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Reform Act 1832

Index Reform Act 1832

The Representation of the People Act 1832 (known informally as the 1832 Reform Act, Great Reform Act or First Reform Act to distinguish it from subsequent Reform Acts) was an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom (indexed as 2 & 3 Will. IV c. 45) that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of England and Wales. [1]

157 relations: Abingdon (UK Parliament constituency), Act of Parliament, Acts of Union 1800, Anglesey, Anna Wheeler (author), Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, Banbury (UK Parliament constituency), Bank run, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Berwickshire, Bewdley (UK Parliament constituency), Birmingham Political Union, Bishop of Bristol, Borough, Bristol, Bruce Mazlish, Burgage, Camelford (UK Parliament constituency), Catholic emancipation, Cavalier, Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, Charles Howard, 11th Duke of Norfolk, Charles I of England, Chartism, City of London, Constitution of the United Kingdom, Copyhold, Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844, Court, Days of May, Derby, Dorset, Duns, Dunwich (UK Parliament constituency), Electoral system, Emancipation of the Jews in the United Kingdom, England and Wales, English Civil War, Erskine May, Fee simple, Forty-shilling freeholders, Francis Burdett, French Revolution, G. M. Trevelyan, Gaming the system, Gatton (UK Parliament constituency), George III of the United Kingdom, George IV of the United Kingdom, Grampound (UK Parliament constituency), Hampden Clubs, ..., Henry Ireton, Henry VI of England, Higham Ferrers, Higham Ferrers (UK Parliament constituency), House of Commons of the United Kingdom, House of Lords, Industrial Revolution, Interpretation Act 1850, Interpretation Act 1978, Irish Reform Act 1832, Isaac Gascoyne, Jacksonian democracy, James Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale, James Maitland, 8th Earl of Lauderdale, James Mill, Jeremy Bentham, John Hampden, John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, Knights of the Shire, Leasehold estate, Leeds, List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1820–1839, List of constituencies enfranchised and disfranchised by the Reform Act 1832, List of mayors of Bristol, Local Government Act 1972, London Corresponding Society, Lords Spiritual, Loss of supply, Manchester, Member of parliament, Michael Brock, Militia, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Motion of no confidence, Municipal Corporations Act 1835, Nabob, National Political Union (England), New Shoreham (UK Parliament constituency), Newark (UK Parliament constituency), Norman Gash, Nottingham, Nottingham Castle, Old Sarum (UK Parliament constituency), Oliver Cromwell, Overseer of the poor, Parliament Act 1911, Parliament of the United Kingdom, Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832, Patronage, Penryn, Cornwall, People's History Museum, Peterloo Massacre, Plural voting, Potwalloper, Princeton University Press, Putney Debates, Radicalism (historical), Reading (legislature), Reform Act, Reform Act 1867, Retford, Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, Riding (country subdivision), Robert Peel, Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829, Rotten and pocket boroughs, Roundhead, Royal assent, Rutland, Scot and lot, Scottish Reform Act 1832, Secret ballot, Seditious Meetings Act 1817, Short and long titles, Sir Charles Wolseley, 7th Baronet, Six Acts, Society of the Friends of the People, Somerset, Suffrage, Sydney Smith, Thomas Attwood (economist), Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, Thomas Oldfield, Thomas Rainsborough, Totnes, Ultra-Tories, United Kingdom general election, 1830, United Kingdom general election, 1831, United Kingdom general election, 1832–33, United Kingdom general election, 1835, United Kingdom general election, 1837, United Kingdom general election, 1841, Universal suffrage, Voter registration, West Indies, Westminster (UK Parliament constituency), Weymouth and Melcombe Regis (UK Parliament constituency), Whigs (British political party), William Blackstone, William IV of the United Kingdom, William Pitt the Younger, William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, William Thompson (philosopher), Winchelsea (UK Parliament constituency), Wollaton Hall, Yorkshire. Expand index (107 more) »

Abingdon (UK Parliament constituency)

Abingdon was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (and its predecessor institutions for England and Great Britain), electing one Member of Parliament (MP) from 1558 until 1983.

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Act of Parliament

Acts of Parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature).

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Acts of Union 1800

The Acts of Union 1800 (sometimes erroneously referred to as a single Act of Union 1801) were parallel acts of the Parliament of Great Britain and the Parliament of Ireland which united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland (previously in personal union) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

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Anglesey

Anglesey (Ynys Môn) is an island situated on the north coast of Wales with an area of.

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Anna Wheeler (author)

Anna Wheeler (c. 1780–1848), also known by her maiden name of Anna Doyle, was an Irish born British writer and advocate of political rights for women and the benefits of contraception.

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Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister.

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Banbury (UK Parliament constituency)

Banbury is a constituency in Oxfordshire created in 1553 and represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Victoria Prentis of the Conservative Party.

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Bank run

A bank run (also known as a run on the bank) occurs when a large number of people withdraw their money from a bank, because they believe the bank may cease to function in the near future.

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Berwick-upon-Tweed

Berwick-upon-Tweed (Sooth Berwick, Bearaig a Deas) is a town in the county of Northumberland.

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Berwickshire

Berwickshire is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the Scottish Borders.

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Bewdley (UK Parliament constituency)

Bewdley was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1605 until 1950.

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Birmingham Political Union

The Birmingham Political Union (General Political Union) was a grass roots pressure group in Great Britain during the 1830s.

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Bishop of Bristol

The Bishop of Bristol heads the Church of England Diocese of Bristol in the Province of Canterbury, in England.

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Borough

A borough is an administrative division in various English-speaking countries.

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Bristol

Bristol is a city and county in South West England with a population of 456,000.

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Bruce Mazlish

Bruce Mazlish (September 15, 1923 – November 27, 2016) was an American historian who was a professor in the Department of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Burgage

Burgage is a medieval land term used in Great Britain and Ireland, well established by the 13th century.

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Camelford (UK Parliament constituency)

Camelford was a rotten borough in Cornwall which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons in the English and later British Parliament from 1552 to 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

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Catholic emancipation

Catholic emancipation or Catholic relief was a process in the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century that involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the penal laws.

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Cavalier

The term Cavalier was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679).

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Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey

Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (13 March 1764 – 17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from November 1830 to July 1834.

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Charles Howard, 11th Duke of Norfolk

Charles Howard, 11th Duke of Norfolk (15 March 1746 – 16 December 1815), styled Earl of Surrey from 1777 to 1786, was a British nobleman, peer, and politician.

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Charles I of England

Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

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Chartism

Chartism was a working-class movement for political reform in Britain that existed from 1838 to 1857.

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City of London

The City of London is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London.

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Constitution of the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom does not have one specific constitutional document named as such.

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Copyhold

Copyhold tenure was a form of customary tenure of land common in England from the Middle Ages.

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Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844

The Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844 (7 & 8 Vict. c. 61), which came into effect on 20 October 1844, was an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom which eliminated many outliers or exclaves of counties in England and Wales for civil purposes.

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Court

A court is a tribunal, often as a government institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters in accordance with the rule of law.

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Days of May

The Days of May was a period of social unrest and political tension in the United Kingdom in May 1832, after Tories in the House of Lords blocked the Third Reform Bill, which aimed to extend parliamentary representation to the middle class and to the newly industrialised cities of the English Midlands and the North of England.

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Derby

Derby is a city and unitary authority area in Derbyshire, England.

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Dorset

Dorset (archaically: Dorsetshire) is a county in South West England on the English Channel coast.

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Duns

Duns (historically Dunse) is a town in the Scottish Borders, Scotland.

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Dunwich (UK Parliament constituency)

Dunwich was a parliamentary borough in Suffolk, one of the most notorious of all the rotten boroughs.

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Electoral system

An electoral system is a set of rules that determines how elections and referendums are conducted and how their results are determined.

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Emancipation of the Jews in the United Kingdom

The Emancipation of the Jews in the United Kingdom was the culmination in the 19th century of efforts over several hundred years to loosen the legal restrictions set in place on England's Jewish population.

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England and Wales

England and Wales is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom.

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English Civil War

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.

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Erskine May

Thomas Erskine May, 1st Baron Farnborough, (8 February 1815 – 17 May 1886) was a British constitutional theorist.

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Fee simple

In English law, a fee simple or fee simple absolute is an estate in land, a form of freehold ownership.

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Forty-shilling freeholders

Forty-shilling freeholders were a group of people who had the parliamentary franchise to vote by possessing freehold property, or lands held directly of the king, of an annual rent of at least forty shillings (i.e. £2 or 3 marks), clear of all charges.

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Francis Burdett

Sir Francis Burdett, 5th Baronet (25 January 1770 – 23 January 1844) was an English reformist politician, the son of Francis Burdett and his wife Eleanor, daughter of William Jones of Ramsbury manor, Wiltshire, and grandson of Sir Robert Burdett, Bart.

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French Revolution

The French Revolution (Révolution française) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799.

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G. M. Trevelyan

George Macaulay Trevelyan, (16 February 1876 – 21 July 1962), was a British historian and academic.

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Gaming the system

Gaming the system (also gaming the rules, bending the rules, abusing the system, cheating the system, milking the system, playing the system, or working the system) can be defined as using the rules and procedures meant to protect a system in order, instead, to manipulate the system for a desired outcome.

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Gatton (UK Parliament constituency)

Gatton was a parliamentary borough in Surrey, one of the most notorious of all the rotten boroughs.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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George IV of the United Kingdom

George IV (George Augustus Frederick; 12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover following the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820, until his own death ten years later.

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Grampound (UK Parliament constituency)

Grampound in Cornwall, was a borough constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1821.

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Hampden Clubs

The Hampden Clubs were political campaigning and debating societies formed in England in the early 19th century as part of the Radical Movement.

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Henry Ireton

Henry Ireton (1611 – 26 November 1651) was an English general in the Parliamentary army during the English Civil War, the son-in-law of Oliver Cromwell.

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Henry VI of England

Henry VI (6 December 1421 – 21 May 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453.

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Higham Ferrers

Higham Ferrers is a market town in the Nene Valley in East Northamptonshire, England, close to the Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire borders.

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Higham Ferrers (UK Parliament constituency)

Higham Ferrers was a parliamentary borough in Northamptonshire, which was represented in the House of Commons from 1558 until 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

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House of Commons of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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House of Lords

The House of Lords of the United Kingdom, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

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Interpretation Act 1850

The Interpretation Act 1850 (13 & 14 Vict. c. 21) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed in 1850 that simplified the language that was used in statutes.

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Interpretation Act 1978

The Interpretation Act 1978 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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Irish Reform Act 1832

The Representation of the People (Ireland) Act, 1832, commonly called the Irish Reform Act 1832, was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the election laws of Ireland.

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Isaac Gascoyne

Isaac Gascoyne (21 August 1763 – 26 August 1841) was a British Army officer and Tory politician.

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Jacksonian democracy

Jacksonian democracy is a 19th-century political philosophy in the United States that espoused greater democracy for the common man as that term was then defined.

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James Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale

James Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale (5 August 1736 – 24 May 1802) was an English country landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons for 27 years from 1757 to 1784, when he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Earl of Lonsdale.

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James Maitland, 8th Earl of Lauderdale

James Maitland, 8th Earl of Lauderdale (26 January 1759 – 10 September 1839) was Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland and a representative peer for Scotland in the House of Lords.

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James Mill

James Mill (born James Milne, 6 April 1773 – 23 June 1836) was a Scottish historian, economist, political theorist, and philosopher.

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Jeremy Bentham

Jeremy Bentham (15 February 1748 – 6 June 1832) was an English philosopher, jurist, and social reformer regarded as the founder of modern utilitarianism.

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John Hampden

John Hampden (ca. 1595 – 1643) was an English politician who was one of the leading parliamentarians involved in challenging the authority of Charles I of England in the run-up to the English Civil War.

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John Russell, 1st Earl Russell

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, (18 August 1792 – 28 May 1878), known by his courtesy title Lord John Russell before 1861, was a leading Whig and Liberal politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on two occasions during the early Victorian era.

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Knights of the Shire

Knights of the shire (milites comitatus) was the formal title for members of parliament (MPs) representing a county constituency in the British House of Commons, from its origins in the medieval Parliament of England until the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 ended the practice of each county (or shire) forming a single constituency.

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Leasehold estate

A leasehold estate is an ownership of a temporary right to hold land or property in which a lessee or a tenant holds rights of real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord.

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Leeds

Leeds is a city in the metropolitan borough of Leeds, in the county of West Yorkshire, England.

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List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1820–1839

This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1820–1839.

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List of constituencies enfranchised and disfranchised by the Reform Act 1832

This is a list of changes made to constituencies of England and Wales by the Reform Act 1832.

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List of mayors of Bristol

*This is a chronological list of the Lord Mayors of Bristol.

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Local Government Act 1972

The Local Government Act 1972 is an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales on 1 April 1974.

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London Corresponding Society

The London Corresponding Society (LCS) was a British Radical organisation, with a membership consisting primarily of artisans, tradesmen, and shopkeepers.

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Lords Spiritual

The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom are the 26 bishops of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords along with the Lords Temporal.

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Loss of supply

Loss of supply occurs where a government in a parliamentary democracy using the Westminster System or a system derived from it is denied a supply of treasury or exchequer funds, by whichever house or houses of parliament or head of state is constitutionally entitled to grant and deny supply.

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Manchester

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 530,300.

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Member of parliament

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament.

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Michael Brock

Michael George Brock CBE FRHistS FRSL (9 March 1920 – 30 April 2014) was a British historian who was associated with several Oxford colleges during his academic career.

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Militia

A militia is generally an army or some other fighting organization of non-professional soldiers, citizens of a nation, or subjects of a state, who can be called upon for military service during a time of need, as opposed to a professional force of regular, full-time military personnel, or historically, members of a warrior nobility class (e.g., knights or samurai).

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Monmouth

Monmouth (Trefynwy meaning "town on the Monnow") is the historic county town of Monmouthshire, Wales.

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Monmouthshire

Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy) is a county in south east Wales.

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Motion of no confidence

A motion of no confidence (alternatively vote of no confidence, no-confidence motion, or (unsuccessful) confidence motion) is a statement or vote which states that a person(s) in a position of responsibility (government, managerial, etc.) is no longer deemed fit to hold that position, perhaps because they are inadequate in some respect, are failing to carry out obligations, or are making decisions that other members feel are detrimental.

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Municipal Corporations Act 1835

The Municipal Corporations Act 1835 (5 & 6 Wm. IV., c.76), sometimes known as the Municipal Reform Act, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in the incorporated boroughs of England and Wales.

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Nabob

A nabob is a conspicuously wealthy man deriving his fortune in the Orient, especially in India during the 18th century with the privately held East India Company.

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National Political Union (England)

The National Political Union was an organisation set up in October 1831, after the rejection of the Reform Bill by the House of Lords, to serve as a pressure group for parliamentary reform: “to support the King and his ministers against a small faction in accomplishing their great measure of Parliamentary Reform”.

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New Shoreham (UK Parliament constituency)

New Shoreham, sometimes simply called Shoreham, was a parliamentary borough centred on the town of Shoreham-by-Sea in what is now West Sussex.

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Newark (UK Parliament constituency)

Newark is a constituency in Nottinghamshire, England.

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Norman Gash

Norman Gash CBE, FBA, FRSL, FRSE, FRHistS (16 January 1912 in Meerut, British Raj – 1 May 2009 in Somerset) was a British historian, notable for a two-volume biography of British Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel.

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Nottingham

Nottingham is a city and unitary authority area in Nottinghamshire, England, north of London, in the East Midlands.

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Nottingham Castle

Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England.

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Old Sarum (UK Parliament constituency)

Old Sarum was from 1295 to 1832 a parliamentary constituency of England (until 1707), of Great Britain (until 1800), and finally of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

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Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 15993 September 1658) was an English military and political leader.

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Overseer of the poor

An overseer of the poor was an official who administered poor relief such as money, food, and clothing in England and various other countries which derived their law from England.

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Parliament Act 1911

The Parliament Act 1911 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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Parliament of the United Kingdom

The Parliament of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the UK Parliament or British Parliament, is the supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom, the Crown dependencies and overseas territories.

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Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832

The Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which defined the parliamentary divisions (constituencies) in England and Wales required by the Reform Act 1832.

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Patronage

Patronage is the support, encouragement, privilege, or financial aid that an organization or individual bestows to another.

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Penryn, Cornwall

Penryn (Pennrynn, meaning 'promontory') is a civil parish and town in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.

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People's History Museum

The People's History Museum (the National Museum of Labour History until 2001) in Manchester, England, is the United Kingdom's national centre for the collection, conservation, interpretation and study of material relating to the history of working people in the UK.

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Peterloo Massacre

The Peterloo Massacre occurred at St Peter's Field, Manchester, England, on 16 August 1819, when cavalry charged into a crowd of 60,000–80,000 who had gathered to demand the reform of parliamentary representation.

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Plural voting

Plural voting is the practice whereby one person might be able to vote multiple times in an election.

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Potwalloper

A potwalloper (sometimes potwalloner or potwaller) or householder borough was a parliamentary borough in which the franchise was extended to the male head of any household with a hearth large enough to boil a cauldron (or "wallop a pot").

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Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University.

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Putney Debates

The Putney Debates were a series of discussions between members of the New Model Army – a number of the participants being Levellers – concerning the makeup of a new constitution for Britain.

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Radicalism (historical)

The term "Radical" (from the Latin radix meaning root) during the late 18th-century and early 19th-century identified proponents of democratic reform, in what subsequently became the parliamentary Radical Movement.

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Reading (legislature)

A reading of a bill is a debate on the bill held before the general body of a legislature, as opposed to before a committee or an other group.

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Reform Act

In the United Kingdom, Reform Act is a generic term used for legislation concerning electoral matters.

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Reform Act 1867

The Representation of the People Act 1867, 30 & 31 Vict.

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Retford

Retford (pronounced rɛt-fʌd, RET-fud) is a market town in Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands of England, from Nottingham, and west of Lincoln.

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Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos

Richard Plantagenet Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, (11 February 1797 – 29 July 1861), styled Viscount Cobham from birth until 1813, Earl Temple between 1813 and 1822 and Marquess of Chandos between 1822 and 1839, was a British Tory politician.

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Riding (country subdivision)

A riding is an administrative jurisdiction or electoral district, particularly in several current or former Commonwealth countries.

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Robert Peel

Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, (5 February 17882 July 1850) was a British statesman of the Conservative Party who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1834–35 and 1841–46) and twice as Home Secretary (1822–27 and 1828–30).

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Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829

The Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829, passed by Parliament in 1829, was the culmination of the process of Catholic Emancipation throughout the UK.

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Rotten and pocket boroughs

A rotten or pocket borough, more formally known as a nomination borough or proprietorial borough, was a parliamentary borough or constituency in England, Great Britain, or the United Kingdom before the Reform Act 1832, which had a very small electorate and could be used by a patron to gain unrepresentative influence within the unreformed House of Commons.

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Roundhead

Roundheads were supporters of the Parliament of England during the English Civil War.

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Royal assent

Royal assent or sanction is the method by which a country's monarch (possibly through a delegated official) formally approves an act of that nation's parliament.

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Rutland

Rutland is a landlocked county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire.

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Scot and lot

Scot and lot is a phrase common in the records of English medieval boroughs, referring to local rights and obligations.

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Scottish Reform Act 1832

The Scottish Reform Act 1832 was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the election laws of Scotland.

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Secret ballot

The secret ballot is a voting method in which a voter's choices in an election or a referendum is anonymous, forestalling attempts to influence the voter by intimidation, blackmailing, and potential vote buying.

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Seditious Meetings Act 1817

The Seditious Meetings Act 1817 (57 Geo. III c. 19) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland which made it illegal to hold a meeting of more than 50 people.

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Short and long titles

The short title is the formal name by which a piece of primary legislation may by law be cited in the United Kingdom and other Westminster-influenced jurisdictions (such as Canada or Australia), as well as the United States and the Philippines.

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Sir Charles Wolseley, 7th Baronet

Sir Charles Wolseley, 7th Baronet (20 July 1769 - 3 October 1846) was one of the Wolseley baronets of Staffordshire.

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Six Acts

In Britain, following the Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819, the British government acted to prevent any future disturbances by the introduction of new legislation, the so-called Six Acts aimed at suppressing any meetings for the purpose of radical reform.

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Society of the Friends of the People

The Society of the Friends of the People was an organization in Great Britain that was focused on advocating for Parliamentary Reform.

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Somerset

Somerset (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west.

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Suffrage

Suffrage, political franchise, or simply franchise is the right to vote in public, political elections (although the term is sometimes used for any right to vote).

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Sydney Smith

Sydney Smith (3 June 1771 – 22 February 1845) was an English wit, writer and Anglican cleric.

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Thomas Attwood (economist)

Thomas Attwood (6 October 1783 – 6 March 1856) was a British banker, economist, political campaigner and Member of Parliament.

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Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald

Admiral Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, Marquess of Maranhão, GCB, ODM, OSC (14 December 1775 – 31 October 1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831, was a British naval flag officer of the Royal Navy, mercenary and radical politician.

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Thomas Oldfield

Thomas Hinton Burley Oldfield (1755–1822) was an English political reformer, parliamentary historian and antiquary.

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Thomas Rainsborough

Vice-Admiral Thomas Rainsborough (6 July 1610 – 29 October 1648), or Rainborowe, was a prominent figure in the English Civil War and the leading spokesman for the Levellers in the Putney Debates.

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Totnes

Totnes is a market town and civil parish at the head of the estuary of the River Dart in Devon, England within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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Ultra-Tories

The Ultra-Tories were an Anglican faction of British and Irish politics that appeared in the 1820s in opposition to Catholic emancipation.

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United Kingdom general election, 1830

The 1830 United Kingdom general election was triggered by the death of King George IV and produced the first parliament of the reign of his successor, William IV.

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United Kingdom general election, 1831

The 1831 United Kingdom general election saw a landslide win by supporters of electoral reform, which was the major election issue.

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United Kingdom general election, 1832–33

The United Kingdom general election, the first after the Reform Act, saw the Whigs win a large majority, with the Tories winning less than 30% of the vote.

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United Kingdom general election, 1835

The 1835 United Kingdom general election was called when Parliament was dissolved on 29 December 1834.

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United Kingdom general election, 1837

The 1837 United Kingdom general election was triggered by the death of King William IV and produced the first Parliament of the reign of his successor, Victoria.

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United Kingdom general election, 1841

In the 1841 United Kingdom general election, there was a big swing as Sir Robert Peel's Conservatives took control of the House of Commons.

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Universal suffrage

The concept of universal suffrage, also known as general suffrage or common suffrage, consists of the right to vote of all adult citizens, regardless of property ownership, income, race, or ethnicity, subject only to minor exceptions.

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Voter registration

Voter registration (or enrollment) is the requirement that a person otherwise eligible to vote register (or enroll) on an electoral roll before they will be entitled or permitted to vote.

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West Indies

The West Indies or the Caribbean Basin is a region of the North Atlantic Ocean in the Caribbean that includes the island countries and surrounding waters of three major archipelagoes: the Greater Antilles, the Lesser Antilles and the Lucayan Archipelago.

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Westminster (UK Parliament constituency)

Westminster was a parliamentary constituency in the Parliament of England to 1707, the Parliament of Great Britain 1707–1800 and the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801.

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Weymouth and Melcombe Regis (UK Parliament constituency)

Weymouth and Melcombe Regis was a parliamentary borough in Dorset represented in the English House of Commons, later in that of Great Britain, and finally in the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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Whigs (British political party)

The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

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William Blackstone

Sir William Blackstone (10 July 1723 – 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century.

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William IV of the United Kingdom

William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death in 1837.

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William Pitt the Younger

William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a prominent British Tory statesman of the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

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William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778) was a British statesman of the Whig group who led the government of Great Britain twice in the middle of the 18th century.

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William Thompson (philosopher)

William Thompson (1775 – 28 March 1833) was an Irish political and philosophical writer and social reformer, developing from utilitarianism into an early critic of capitalist exploitation whose ideas influenced the Cooperative, Trade Union and Chartist movements as well as Karl Marx.

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Winchelsea (UK Parliament constituency)

Winchelsea was a parliamentary constituency in Sussex, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1366 until 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

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Wollaton Hall

Wollaton Hall is an Elizabethan country house of the 1580s standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton Park, Nottingham, England.

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Yorkshire

Yorkshire (abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom.

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Redirects here:

1832 Parliamentary Reform Act, 1832 Reform Act, 1832 Reform Bill, Corporate Property (Elections) Act 1832, First Reform Act, First Reform Bill, Great Reform Act, Great Reform Act 1832, Great Reform Act of 1832, Great Reform Act, 1832, Great Reform Bill, Parliamentary Reform Act 1832, Reform (Scotland) Act 1832, Reform Act 1831, Reform Act of 1832, Reform Act, 1832, Reform Bill of 1832, Reform Crisis, Reform bill of 1832, Representation of the People Act 1832, Representation of the People Act, 1832, The Parliamentary Reform Act 1832.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reform_Act_1832

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