Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Relative clause

Index Relative clause

A relative clause is a kind of subordinate clause that contains the element whose interpretation is provided by an antecedent on which the subordinate clause is grammatically dependent; that is, there is an anaphora relation between the relativized element in the relative clause and antecedent on which it depends. [1]

126 relations: Absolutive case, Academy of the Hebrew Language, Accusative case, Akkadian language, Alexandra Aikhenvald, Ancient Greek, Antecedent (grammar), Antipassive voice, Applicative voice, Arabic, Argument (linguistics), Attributive verb, Austronesian languages, Bambara language, Basque language, Bernard Comrie, Biblical Hebrew, Branching (linguistics), British National Corpus, Celtic languages, Chinese language, Chukchi language, Classical Arabic, Cognate, Comma, Complementizer, Creole language, Debuccalization, Definiteness, Dependency grammar, Dependent clause, Dependent-marking language, Determiner, Discontinuity (linguistics), English language, English relative clauses, Ergative case, Ergative–absolutive language, French language, Genitive case, Genitive construction, Geoffrey K. Pullum, Georgian language, German language, Ghil'ad Zuckermann, Grammatical case, Grammatical gender, Grammatical number, Greek language, Gullah language, ..., Hawaiian language, Hawaiian Pidgin, Head (linguistics), Head-driven phrase structure grammar, Head-marking language, Hebrew language, Hindi, Indigenous languages of the Americas, Indirect speech, Indo-Aryan languages, Infinitive, Insular Celtic languages, Interrogative word, Irish initial mutations, Japanese language, Keres language, Language (journal), Languages of Africa, Latin, Lexical functional grammar, Linguistic Inquiry, Malagasy language, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Hebrew, Modern Standard Arabic, Navajo language, Nominalization, Nominative case, Non-finite clause, Noun, Noun phrase, Object (grammar), Oblique case, Oxford, Oxford University Press, Participle, Passive voice, Persian language, Personal pronoun, Pluricentric language, Possession (linguistics), Pronoun, Proposition, Proto-Greek language, Proto-Indo-European language, Reduced relative clause, Relative clause, Relative pronoun, Relativizer, Restrictiveness, Resumptive pronoun, Robert M. W. Dixon, Rodney Huddleston, Romanian language, Russian language, Sanskrit, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish language, Standard Average European, Standard Tibetan, Subject (grammar), Subject–object–verb, Syncretism (linguistics), Syntactic movement, Tagalog language, Tbilisi, Tempura, Thai language, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, Turkish language, Varieties of Arabic, Vietnamese language, Voice (grammar), Warlpiri language, Yoruba language, Zero (linguistics). Expand index (76 more) »

Absolutive case

The absolutive case (abbreviated) is the unmarked grammatical case of a core argument of a verb (generally other than the nominative) that is used as the citation form of a noun.

New!!: Relative clause and Absolutive case · See more »

Academy of the Hebrew Language

The Academy of the Hebrew Language (הָאָקָדֶמְיָה לַלָּשׁוֹן הָעִבְרִית, Ha-Akademya la-Lashon ha-Ivrit) was established by the Israeli government in 1953 as the "supreme institution for scholarship on the Hebrew language in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem of Givat Ram campus." It is an educational institution with the mission of creating new Hebrew words to ensure that the language does not die out.

New!!: Relative clause and Academy of the Hebrew Language · See more »

Accusative case

The accusative case (abbreviated) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.

New!!: Relative clause and Accusative case · See more »

Akkadian language

Akkadian (akkadû, ak-ka-du-u2; logogram: URIKI)John Huehnergard & Christopher Woods, "Akkadian and Eblaite", The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the World's Ancient Languages.

New!!: Relative clause and Akkadian language · See more »

Alexandra Aikhenvald

Alexandra Yurievna ("Sasha") Aikhenvald (Eichenwald) (born September 1, 1957 in Moscow, Russian SFSR) (at JCU site; accessed 20 December 2009) - A.Y. Aikhenvald's interview with ABC Radio National, 9 February 2008 is a linguist specialising in Linguistic typology and the Arawak language family (including Tariana) of the Brazilian Amazon basin.

New!!: Relative clause and Alexandra Aikhenvald · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Relative clause and Ancient Greek · See more »

Antecedent (grammar)

In grammar, an antecedent is an expression (word, phrase, clause, sentence, etc.) that gives its meaning to a proform (pronoun, pro-verb, pro-adverb, etc.). A proform takes its meaning from its antecedent, e.g. "Ava arrived late because traffic held her up".

New!!: Relative clause and Antecedent (grammar) · See more »

Antipassive voice

The antipassive voice (abbreviated or) is a type of grammatical voice that either does not include the object or includes the object in an oblique case.

New!!: Relative clause and Antipassive voice · See more »

Applicative voice

The applicative voice (abbreviated or) is a grammatical voice that promotes an oblique argument of a verb to the (core) object argument, and indicates the oblique role within the meaning of the verb.

New!!: Relative clause and Applicative voice · See more »

Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

New!!: Relative clause and Arabic · See more »

Argument (linguistics)

In linguistics, an argument is an expression that helps complete the meaning of a predicate, the latter referring in this context to a main verb and its auxiliaries.

New!!: Relative clause and Argument (linguistics) · See more »

Attributive verb

An attributive verb is a verb that modifies (expresses an attribute of) a noun in the manner of an attributive adjective, rather than express an independent idea as a predicate.

New!!: Relative clause and Attributive verb · See more »

Austronesian languages

The Austronesian languages are a language family that is widely dispersed throughout Maritime Southeast Asia, Madagascar and the islands of the Pacific Ocean, with a few members in continental Asia.

New!!: Relative clause and Austronesian languages · See more »

Bambara language

The Bambara (Bamana) language, Bamanankan, is a lingua franca and national language of Mali spoken by perhaps 15 million people, natively by 5 million Bambara people and about 10 million second-language users.

New!!: Relative clause and Bambara language · See more »

Basque language

Basque (euskara) is a language spoken in the Basque country and Navarre. Linguistically, Basque is unrelated to the other languages of Europe and, as a language isolate, to any other known living language. The Basques are indigenous to, and primarily inhabit, the Basque Country, a region that straddles the westernmost Pyrenees in adjacent parts of northern Spain and southwestern France. The Basque language is spoken by 28.4% of Basques in all territories (751,500). Of these, 93.2% (700,300) are in the Spanish area of the Basque Country and the remaining 6.8% (51,200) are in the French portion. Native speakers live in a contiguous area that includes parts of four Spanish provinces and the three "ancient provinces" in France. Gipuzkoa, most of Biscay, a few municipalities of Álava, and the northern area of Navarre formed the core of the remaining Basque-speaking area before measures were introduced in the 1980s to strengthen the language. By contrast, most of Álava, the western part of Biscay and central and southern areas of Navarre are predominantly populated by native speakers of Spanish, either because Basque was replaced by Spanish over the centuries, in some areas (most of Álava and central Navarre), or because it was possibly never spoken there, in other areas (Enkarterri and southeastern Navarre). Under Restorationist and Francoist Spain, public use of Basque was frowned upon, often regarded as a sign of separatism; this applied especially to those regions that did not support Franco's uprising (such as Biscay or Gipuzkoa). However, in those Basque-speaking regions that supported the uprising (such as Navarre or Álava) the Basque language was more than merely tolerated. Overall, in the 1960s and later, the trend reversed and education and publishing in Basque began to flourish. As a part of this process, a standardised form of the Basque language, called Euskara Batua, was developed by the Euskaltzaindia in the late 1960s. Besides its standardised version, the five historic Basque dialects are Biscayan, Gipuzkoan, and Upper Navarrese in Spain, and Navarrese–Lapurdian and Souletin in France. They take their names from the historic Basque provinces, but the dialect boundaries are not congruent with province boundaries. Euskara Batua was created so that Basque language could be used—and easily understood by all Basque speakers—in formal situations (education, mass media, literature), and this is its main use today. In both Spain and France, the use of Basque for education varies from region to region and from school to school. A language isolate, Basque is believed to be one of the few surviving pre-Indo-European languages in Europe, and the only one in Western Europe. The origin of the Basques and of their languages is not conclusively known, though the most accepted current theory is that early forms of Basque developed prior to the arrival of Indo-European languages in the area, including the Romance languages that geographically surround the Basque-speaking region. Basque has adopted a good deal of its vocabulary from the Romance languages, and Basque speakers have in turn lent their own words to Romance speakers. The Basque alphabet uses the Latin script.

New!!: Relative clause and Basque language · See more »

Bernard Comrie

Bernard S. Comrie, (born 23 May 1947) is a British-born linguist.

New!!: Relative clause and Bernard Comrie · See more »

Biblical Hebrew

Biblical Hebrew (rtl Ivrit Miqra'it or rtl Leshon ha-Miqra), also called Classical Hebrew, is an archaic form of Hebrew, a Canaanite Semitic language spoken by the Israelites in the area known as Israel, roughly west of the Jordan River and east of the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Relative clause and Biblical Hebrew · See more »

Branching (linguistics)

In linguistics, branching refers to the shape of the parse trees that represent the structure of sentences.

New!!: Relative clause and Branching (linguistics) · See more »

British National Corpus

The British National Corpus (BNC) is a 100-million-word text corpus of samples of written and spoken English from a wide range of sources.

New!!: Relative clause and British National Corpus · See more »

Celtic languages

The Celtic languages are a group of related languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or "Common Celtic"; a branch of the greater Indo-European language family.

New!!: Relative clause and Celtic languages · See more »

Chinese language

Chinese is a group of related, but in many cases mutually unintelligible, language varieties, forming a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family.

New!!: Relative clause and Chinese language · See more »

Chukchi language

Chukchi is a Chukotko–Kamchatkan language spoken by the Chukchi people in the easternmost extremity of Siberia, mainly in Chukotka Autonomous Okrug.

New!!: Relative clause and Chukchi language · See more »

Classical Arabic

Classical Arabic is the form of the Arabic language used in Umayyad and Abbasid literary texts from the 7th century AD to the 9th century AD.

New!!: Relative clause and Classical Arabic · See more »

Cognate

In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin.

New!!: Relative clause and Cognate · See more »

Comma

The comma is a punctuation mark that appears in several variants in different languages.

New!!: Relative clause and Comma · See more »

Complementizer

In linguistics (especially generative grammar), complementizer or complementiser (glossing abbreviation) is a lexical category (part of speech) that includes those words that can be used to turn a clause into the subject or object of a sentence.

New!!: Relative clause and Complementizer · See more »

Creole language

A creole language, or simply creole, is a stable natural language developed from a mixture of different languages at a fairly sudden point in time: often, a pidgin transitioned into a full, native language.

New!!: Relative clause and Creole language · See more »

Debuccalization

Debuccalization is a sound change in which an oral consonant loses its original place of articulation and moves it to the glottis (usually,, or). The pronunciation of a consonant as is sometimes called aspiration but in phonetics, aspiration is the burst of air accompanying a stop.

New!!: Relative clause and Debuccalization · See more »

Definiteness

In linguistics, definiteness is a semantic feature of noun phrases (NPs), distinguishing between referents/entities that are identifiable in a given context (definite noun phrases) and entities which are not (indefinite noun phrases).

New!!: Relative clause and Definiteness · See more »

Dependency grammar

Dependency grammar (DG) is a class of modern grammatical theories that are all based on the dependency relation (as opposed to the constituency relation) and that can be traced back primarily to the work of Lucien Tesnière.

New!!: Relative clause and Dependency grammar · See more »

Dependent clause

A dependent clause is a clause that provides a sentence element with additional information, but which cannot stand alone as a sentence.

New!!: Relative clause and Dependent clause · See more »

Dependent-marking language

A dependent-marking language has grammatical markers of agreement and case government between the words of phrases that tend to appear more on dependents than on heads.

New!!: Relative clause and Dependent-marking language · See more »

Determiner

A determiner, also called determinative (abbreviated), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.

New!!: Relative clause and Determiner · See more »

Discontinuity (linguistics)

In linguistics, a discontinuity occurs when a given word or phrase is separated from another word or phrase that it modifies in such a manner that a direct connection cannot be established between the two without incurring crossing lines in the tree structure.

New!!: Relative clause and Discontinuity (linguistics) · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Relative clause and English language · See more »

English relative clauses

Relative clauses in the English language are formed principally by means of relative pronouns.

New!!: Relative clause and English relative clauses · See more »

Ergative case

The ergative case (abbreviated) is the grammatical case that identifies the noun as a subject of a transitive verb in ergative–absolutive languages.

New!!: Relative clause and Ergative case · See more »

Ergative–absolutive language

Ergative–absolutive languages, or ergative languages are languages that share a certain distinctive pattern relating to the subjects (technically, arguments) of verbs.

New!!: Relative clause and Ergative–absolutive language · See more »

French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

New!!: Relative clause and French language · See more »

Genitive case

In grammar, the genitive (abbreviated); also called the second case, is the grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun.

New!!: Relative clause and Genitive case · See more »

Genitive construction

In grammar, a genitive construction or genitival construction is a type of grammatical construction used to express a relation between two nouns such as the possession of one by another (e.g. "John's jacket"), or some other type of connection (e.g. "John's father" or "the father of John").

New!!: Relative clause and Genitive construction · See more »

Geoffrey K. Pullum

Geoffrey Keith Pullum (born March 8, 1945) is a British-American linguist specialising in the study of English.

New!!: Relative clause and Geoffrey K. Pullum · See more »

Georgian language

Georgian (ქართული ენა, translit.) is a Kartvelian language spoken by Georgians.

New!!: Relative clause and Georgian language · See more »

German language

German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe.

New!!: Relative clause and German language · See more »

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann (גלעד צוקרמן,, born 1 June 1971) is a linguist and revivalist who works in contact linguistics, lexicology and the study of language, culture and identity.

New!!: Relative clause and Ghil'ad Zuckermann · See more »

Grammatical case

Case is a special grammatical category of a noun, pronoun, adjective, participle or numeral whose value reflects the grammatical function performed by that word in a phrase, clause or sentence.

New!!: Relative clause and Grammatical case · See more »

Grammatical gender

In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs.

New!!: Relative clause and Grammatical gender · See more »

Grammatical number

In linguistics, grammatical number is a grammatical category of nouns, pronouns, and adjective and verb agreement that expresses count distinctions (such as "one", "two", or "three or more").

New!!: Relative clause and Grammatical number · See more »

Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

New!!: Relative clause and Greek language · See more »

Gullah language

Gullah, also called Sea Island Creole English and Geechee, is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called "Geechees" within the community), an African-American population living in coastal regions of the American states of South Carolina, Georgia and northeast Florida (including urban Charleston and Savannah).

New!!: Relative clause and Gullah language · See more »

Hawaiian language

The Hawaiian language (Hawaiian: Ōlelo Hawaii) is a Polynesian language that takes its name from Hawaiokinai, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed.

New!!: Relative clause and Hawaiian language · See more »

Hawaiian Pidgin

Hawaiian Pidgin English (alternately Hawaiian Creole English or HCE, known locally as Pidgin) is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi (L1: 600,000; L2: 400,000).

New!!: Relative clause and Hawaiian Pidgin · See more »

Head (linguistics)

In linguistics, the head or nucleus of a phrase is the word that determines the syntactic category of that phrase.

New!!: Relative clause and Head (linguistics) · See more »

Head-driven phrase structure grammar

Head-driven phrase structure grammar (HPSG) is a highly lexicalized, constraint-based grammar developed by Carl Pollard and Ivan Sag.

New!!: Relative clause and Head-driven phrase structure grammar · See more »

Head-marking language

A language is head-marking if the grammatical marks showing agreement between different words of a phrase tend to be placed on the heads (or nuclei) of phrases, rather than on the modifiers or dependents.

New!!: Relative clause and Head-marking language · See more »

Hebrew language

No description.

New!!: Relative clause and Hebrew language · See more »

Hindi

Hindi (Devanagari: हिन्दी, IAST: Hindī), or Modern Standard Hindi (Devanagari: मानक हिन्दी, IAST: Mānak Hindī) is a standardised and Sanskritised register of the Hindustani language.

New!!: Relative clause and Hindi · See more »

Indigenous languages of the Americas

Indigenous languages of the Americas are spoken by indigenous peoples from Alaska and Greenland to the southern tip of South America, encompassing the land masses that constitute the Americas.

New!!: Relative clause and Indigenous languages of the Americas · See more »

Indirect speech

Indirect speech is a means of expressing the content of statements, questions or other utterances, without quoting them explicitly as is done in direct speech.

New!!: Relative clause and Indirect speech · See more »

Indo-Aryan languages

The Indo-Aryan or Indic languages are the dominant language family of the Indian subcontinent.

New!!: Relative clause and Indo-Aryan languages · See more »

Infinitive

Infinitive (abbreviated) is a grammatical term referring to certain verb forms existing in many languages, most often used as non-finite verbs.

New!!: Relative clause and Infinitive · See more »

Insular Celtic languages

Insular Celtic languages are a group of Celtic languages that originated in Britain and Ireland, in contrast to the Continental Celtic languages of mainland Europe and Anatolia.

New!!: Relative clause and Insular Celtic languages · See more »

Interrogative word

An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, whom, why, and how.

New!!: Relative clause and Interrogative word · See more »

Irish initial mutations

Irish, like all modern Celtic languages, is characterized by its initial consonant mutations.

New!!: Relative clause and Irish initial mutations · See more »

Japanese language

is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language.

New!!: Relative clause and Japanese language · See more »

Keres language

Keresan, also Keres, is a Native American language, spoken by the Keres Pueblo people in New Mexico.

New!!: Relative clause and Keres language · See more »

Language (journal)

Language is a peer-reviewed quarterly academic journal published by the Linguistic Society of America since 1925.

New!!: Relative clause and Language (journal) · See more »

Languages of Africa

The languages of Africa are divided into six major language families.

New!!: Relative clause and Languages of Africa · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Relative clause and Latin · See more »

Lexical functional grammar

Lexical functional grammar (LFG) is a constraint-based grammar framework in theoretical linguistics.

New!!: Relative clause and Lexical functional grammar · See more »

Linguistic Inquiry

Linguistic Inquiry is a peer-reviewed academic journal in generative linguistics published by the MIT Press since 1970.

New!!: Relative clause and Linguistic Inquiry · See more »

Malagasy language

Malagasy is an Austronesian language and the national language of Madagascar.

New!!: Relative clause and Malagasy language · See more »

Mandarin Chinese

Mandarin is a group of related varieties of Chinese spoken across most of northern and southwestern China.

New!!: Relative clause and Mandarin Chinese · See more »

Modern Hebrew

No description.

New!!: Relative clause and Modern Hebrew · See more »

Modern Standard Arabic

Modern Standard Arabic (MSA; اللغة العربية الفصحى 'the most eloquent Arabic language'), Standard Arabic, or Literary Arabic is the standardized and literary variety of Arabic used in writing and in most formal speech throughout the Arab world to facilitate communication.

New!!: Relative clause and Modern Standard Arabic · See more »

Navajo language

Navajo or Navaho (Navajo: Diné bizaad or Naabeehó bizaad) is a Southern Athabaskan language of the Na-Dené family, by which it is related to languages spoken across the western areas of North America.

New!!: Relative clause and Navajo language · See more »

Nominalization

In linguistics, nominalization or nominalisation is the use of a word which is not a noun (e.g., a verb, an adjective or an adverb) as a noun, or as the head of a noun phrase, with or without morphological transformation.

New!!: Relative clause and Nominalization · See more »

Nominative case

The nominative case (abbreviated), subjective case, straight case or upright case is one of the grammatical cases of a noun or other part of speech, which generally marks the subject of a verb or the predicate noun or predicate adjective, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments.

New!!: Relative clause and Nominative case · See more »

Non-finite clause

In linguistics, a non-finite clause is a dependent or embedded clause whose verbal chain is non-finite; for example, using Priscian's categories for Latin verb forms, in many languages we find texts with non-finite clauses containing infinitives, participles and gerunds.

New!!: Relative clause and Non-finite clause · See more »

Noun

A noun (from Latin nōmen, literally meaning "name") is a word that functions as the name of some specific thing or set of things, such as living creatures, objects, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas.

New!!: Relative clause and Noun · See more »

Noun phrase

A noun phrase or nominal phrase (abbreviated NP) is a phrase which has a noun (or indefinite pronoun) as its head, or which performs the same grammatical function as such a phrase.

New!!: Relative clause and Noun phrase · See more »

Object (grammar)

Traditional grammar defines the object in a sentence as the entity that is acted upon by the subject.

New!!: Relative clause and Object (grammar) · See more »

Oblique case

In grammar, an oblique (abbreviated; from casus obliquus) or objective case (abbr.) is a nominal case that is used when a noun phrase is the object of either a verb or a preposition.

New!!: Relative clause and Oblique case · See more »

Oxford

Oxford is a city in the South East region of England and the county town of Oxfordshire.

New!!: Relative clause and Oxford · See more »

Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Relative clause and Oxford University Press · See more »

Participle

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb, or verb phrase, and plays a role similar to an adjective or adverb.

New!!: Relative clause and Participle · See more »

Passive voice

Passive voice is a grammatical voice common in many languages.

New!!: Relative clause and Passive voice · See more »

Persian language

Persian, also known by its endonym Farsi (فارسی), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Relative clause and Persian language · See more »

Personal pronoun

Personal pronouns are pronouns that are associated primarily with a particular grammatical person – first person (as I), second person (as you), or third person (as he, she, it, they).

New!!: Relative clause and Personal pronoun · See more »

Pluricentric language

A pluricentric language or polycentric language is a language with several interacting codified standard versions, often corresponding to different countries.

New!!: Relative clause and Pluricentric language · See more »

Possession (linguistics)

Possession, in the context of linguistics, is an asymmetric relationship between two constituents, the referent of one of which (the possessor) in some sense possesses (owns, has as a part, rules over, etc.) the referent of the other (the possessed).

New!!: Relative clause and Possession (linguistics) · See more »

Pronoun

In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun (abbreviated) is a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase.

New!!: Relative clause and Pronoun · See more »

Proposition

The term proposition has a broad use in contemporary analytic philosophy.

New!!: Relative clause and Proposition · See more »

Proto-Greek language

The Proto-Greek language (also known as Proto-Hellenic) is the assumed last common ancestor of all known varieties of Greek, including Mycenaean Greek, the subsequent ancient Greek dialects (i.e., Attic, Ionic, Aeolic, Doric, Ancient Macedonian and Arcadocypriot) and, ultimately, Koine, Byzantine and Modern Greek.

New!!: Relative clause and Proto-Greek language · See more »

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-European (PIE) is the linguistic reconstruction of the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, the most widely spoken language family in the world.

New!!: Relative clause and Proto-Indo-European language · See more »

Reduced relative clause

A reduced relative clause is a relative clause that is not marked by an explicit relative pronoun or complementizer such as who, which or that.

New!!: Relative clause and Reduced relative clause · See more »

Relative clause

A relative clause is a kind of subordinate clause that contains the element whose interpretation is provided by an antecedent on which the subordinate clause is grammatically dependent; that is, there is an anaphora relation between the relativized element in the relative clause and antecedent on which it depends.

New!!: Relative clause and Relative clause · See more »

Relative pronoun

A relative pronoun marks a relative clause; it has the same referent in the main clause of a sentence that the relative modifies.

New!!: Relative clause and Relative pronoun · See more »

Relativizer

In linguistics, a relativizer (abbreviated) is a type of conjunction that introduces a relative clause.

New!!: Relative clause and Relativizer · See more »

Restrictiveness

In semantics, a modifier is said to be restrictive (or defining) if it restricts the reference of its head.

New!!: Relative clause and Restrictiveness · See more »

Resumptive pronoun

A resumptive pronoun is a personal pronoun appearing in a relative clause, which restates the antecedent after a pause or interruption (such as an embedded clause, series of adjectives, or a wh-island).

New!!: Relative clause and Resumptive pronoun · See more »

Robert M. W. Dixon

Robert Malcolm Ward Dixon (Gloucester, England, 25 January 1939) is a Professor of Linguistics in the College of Arts, Society, and Education and The Cairns Institute, James Cook University, Queensland.

New!!: Relative clause and Robert M. W. Dixon · See more »

Rodney Huddleston

Rodney D. Huddleston (born 4 April 1937) is a British linguist and grammarian specializing in the study and description of English.

New!!: Relative clause and Rodney Huddleston · See more »

Romanian language

Romanian (obsolete spellings Rumanian, Roumanian; autonym: limba română, "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is an East Romance language spoken by approximately 24–26 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

New!!: Relative clause and Romanian language · See more »

Russian language

Russian (rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language, which is official in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely spoken throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia.

New!!: Relative clause and Russian language · See more »

Sanskrit

Sanskrit is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism; a philosophical language of Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism and Jainism; and a former literary language and lingua franca for the educated of ancient and medieval India.

New!!: Relative clause and Sanskrit · See more »

Serbo-Croatian

Serbo-Croatian, also called Serbo-Croat, Serbo-Croat-Bosnian (SCB), Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS), or Bosnian-Croatian-Montenegrin-Serbian (BCMS), is a South Slavic language and the primary language of Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Montenegro.

New!!: Relative clause and Serbo-Croatian · See more »

Spanish language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin America and Spain.

New!!: Relative clause and Spanish language · See more »

Standard Average European

Standard Average European (SAE) is a concept introduced in 1939 by Benjamin Whorf to group the modern Indo-European languages of Europe.

New!!: Relative clause and Standard Average European · See more »

Standard Tibetan

Standard Tibetan is the most widely spoken form of the Tibetic languages.

New!!: Relative clause and Standard Tibetan · See more »

Subject (grammar)

The subject in a simple English sentence such as John runs, John is a teacher, or John was hit by a car is the person or thing about whom the statement is made, in this case 'John'.

New!!: Relative clause and Subject (grammar) · See more »

Subject–object–verb

In linguistic typology, a subject–object–verb (SOV) language is one in which the subject, object, and verb of a sentence always or usually appear in that order.

New!!: Relative clause and Subject–object–verb · See more »

Syncretism (linguistics)

In linguistics, syncretism exists when functionally distinct occurrences of a single lexeme are identical in form.

New!!: Relative clause and Syncretism (linguistics) · See more »

Syntactic movement

Syntactic movement is the means by which some theories of syntax address discontinuities.

New!!: Relative clause and Syntactic movement · See more »

Tagalog language

Tagalog is an Austronesian language spoken as a first language by a quarter of the population of the Philippines and as a second language by the majority.

New!!: Relative clause and Tagalog language · See more »

Tbilisi

Tbilisi (თბილისი), in some countries also still named by its pre-1936 international designation Tiflis, is the capital and the largest city of Georgia, lying on the banks of the Kura River with a population of approximately 1.5 million people.

New!!: Relative clause and Tbilisi · See more »

Tempura

is Japanese dish usually consisting of seafood or vegetables that have been battered and deep fried.

New!!: Relative clause and Tempura · See more »

Thai language

Thai, Central Thai, or Siamese, is the national and official language of Thailand and the first language of the Central Thai people and vast majority Thai of Chinese origin.

New!!: Relative clause and Thai language · See more »

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, often abbreviated CGEL by its adherents, is a comprehensive reference book on English language grammar.

New!!: Relative clause and The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language · See more »

Turkish language

Turkish, also referred to as Istanbul Turkish, is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around 10–15 million native speakers in Southeast Europe (mostly in East and Western Thrace) and 60–65 million native speakers in Western Asia (mostly in Anatolia).

New!!: Relative clause and Turkish language · See more »

Varieties of Arabic

There are many varieties of Arabic (dialects or otherwise) in existence.

New!!: Relative clause and Varieties of Arabic · See more »

Vietnamese language

Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) is an Austroasiatic language that originated in Vietnam, where it is the national and official language.

New!!: Relative clause and Vietnamese language · See more »

Voice (grammar)

In grammar, the voice of a verb describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified by its arguments (subject, object, etc.). When the subject is the agent or doer of the action, the verb is in the active voice.

New!!: Relative clause and Voice (grammar) · See more »

Warlpiri language

The Warlpiri language is spoken by about 3,000 of the Warlpiri people in Australia's Northern Territory.

New!!: Relative clause and Warlpiri language · See more »

Yoruba language

Yoruba (Yor. èdè Yorùbá) is a language spoken in West Africa.

New!!: Relative clause and Yoruba language · See more »

Zero (linguistics)

In linguistics, a zero or null is a segment which is not pronounced or written.

New!!: Relative clause and Zero (linguistics) · See more »

Redirects here:

Accessibility Hierarchy, Accessibility hierarchy, Defining relative clause, Free relative clause, Gapped relative clause, Non-defining relative clause, Non-restrictive relative clause, Relative clauses, Restrictive relative clause.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_clause

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »