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Restoration (England)

Index Restoration (England)

The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period. [1]

123 relations: Act of Uniformity 1662, Adrian Scrope, Anne, Queen of Great Britain, Attainder, Baron, Baron Langdale, Baronet, Bill of attainder, Bill of Rights 1689, Bulstrode Whitelocke, Cashiering, Cavalier, Cavalier Parliament, Charing Cross, Charles Fleetwood, Charles Harding Firth, Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle, Charles I of England, Charles II of England, Church of England, Commonwealth of England, Convention Parliament (1660), Convention Parliament (1689), Daniel Axtell, Declaration of Breda, Declaration of Indulgence, Dover, Dutch Gift, Earl of Carlisle, Early modern Britain, Edmund Dunch (Roundhead), Edmund Dunch (Whig), Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, English Committee of Safety, English Council of State, Episcopal polity, Fifth Monarchists, Francis Hacker, George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer, George Goring, 1st Earl of Norwich, George I of Great Britain, George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle, Georgian era, Glorious Revolution, Good Old Cause, Gregory Clement, Guernsey, Hanged, drawn and quartered, Henry Ireton, Henry Vane the Younger, ..., House of Hanover, Hugh Peter, Indemnity and Oblivion Act, Instrument of Government, Interregnum (1649–1660), Interregnum (England), James II of England, John Barkstead, John Bradshaw (judge), John Carew (regicide), John Cook (regicide), John Jones Maesygarnedd, John Lambert (general), John Okey, Knight, List of regicides of Charles I, List of Scottish monarchs, Long Parliament, Lord Protector, Louis XIV of France, Marmaduke Langdale, 1st Baron Langdale of Holme, Mary II of England, Maypole, Miles Corbet, Monarchy of Ireland, Monarchy of the United Kingdom, New Haven, Connecticut, Oak Apple Day, Oliver Cromwell, Order of the Garter, Peter Lely, Pride's Purge, Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Privy council, Puritans, Regicide, Restoration (1995 film), Restoration (Tremain novel), Restoration comedy, Restoration literature, Restoration spectacular, Restoration style, Richard Cromwell, Richard Ingoldsby, Rose Tremain, Rota Club, Royal Society, Rump Parliament, Samuel Pepys, Scotland, Seven Bishops, Solemn League and Covenant, Speaker of the House of Commons (United Kingdom), Stuart period, Test Act, The Hague, The Protectorate, Thomas Harrison (soldier), Thomas Parker, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, Thomas Pride, Thomas Scot, Thomas Venner, Tower Hill, Tower of London, Treason, Tyburn, Viscount, Wallingford House party, Wars of the Three Kingdoms, William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle, William Ellis (solicitor-general), William III of England, Williams-Bulkeley baronets. Expand index (73 more) »

Act of Uniformity 1662

The Act of Uniformity 1662 (14 Car 2 c 4) is an Act of the Parliament of England.

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Adrian Scrope

Colonel Adrian Scrope (c. 1601 – 17 October 1660) was the twenty-seventh of the fifty-nine Commissioners who signed the Death Warrant of King Charles I. He was hanged, drawn and quartered at Charing Cross after the restoration of Charles II.

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Anne, Queen of Great Britain

Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) was the Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland between 8 March 1702 and 1 May 1707.

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Attainder

In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital crime (felony or treason).

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Baron

Baron is a rank of nobility or title of honour, often hereditary.

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Baron Langdale

Baron Langdale was a title that was created twice in British history.

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Baronet

A baronet (or; abbreviated Bart or Bt) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (or; abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a baronetcy, an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown.

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Bill of attainder

A bill of attainder (also known as an act of attainder or writ of attainder or bill of pains and penalties) is an act of a legislature declaring a person or group of persons guilty of some crime and punishing them, often without a trial.

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Bill of Rights 1689

The Bill of Rights, also known as the English Bill of Rights, is an Act of the Parliament of England that deals with constitutional matters and sets out certain basic civil rights.

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Bulstrode Whitelocke

Sir Bulstrode Whitelocke (6 August 1605 – 28 July 1675) was an English lawyer, writer, parliamentarian and Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England.

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Cashiering

Cashiering (or degradation ceremony), generally within military forces, is a ritual dismissal of an individual from some position of responsibility for a breach of discipline.

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Cavalier

The term Cavalier was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679).

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Cavalier Parliament

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679.

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Charing Cross

Charing Cross is a junction in London, England, where six routes meet.

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Charles Fleetwood

Charles Fleetwood (c. 1618 – 4 October 1692) was an English Parliamentarian soldier and politician, Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1652–1655, where he enforced the Cromwellian Settlement.

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Charles Harding Firth

Sir Charles Harding Firth, FBA (16 March 1857 – 19 February 1936) was a British historian.

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Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle

Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle (1629 – 24 February 1685) was an English military leader and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1653 and 1660 and was created Earl of Carlisle in 1661.

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Charles I of England

Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

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Charles II of England

Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was king of England, Scotland and Ireland.

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Church of England

The Church of England (C of E) is the state church of England.

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Commonwealth of England

The Commonwealth was the period from 1649 to 1660 when England and Wales, later along with Ireland and Scotland, was ruled as a republic following the end of the Second English Civil War and the trial and execution of Charles I. The republic's existence was declared through "An Act declaring England to be a Commonwealth", adopted by the Rump Parliament on 19 May 1649.

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Convention Parliament (1660)

The Convention Parliament (25 April 1660 – 29 December 1660) followed the Long Parliament that had finally voted for its own dissolution on 16 March that year.

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Convention Parliament (1689)

The English Convention (1689) was an assembly of the Parliament of England which transferred the crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland from James II to William III and Mary II as co-regents.

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Daniel Axtell

Colonel Daniel Axtell (1622 – 19 October 1660) was captain of the Parliamentary Guard at the trial of King Charles I at Westminster Hall in 1649.

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Declaration of Breda

The Declaration of Breda (dated 4 April 1660) was a proclamation by Charles II of England in which he promised a general pardon for crimes committed during the English Civil War and the Interregnum for all those who recognised Charles as the lawful king; the retention by the current owners of property purchased during the same period; religious toleration; and the payment of pay arrears to members of the army, and that the army would be recommissioned into service under the crown.

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Declaration of Indulgence

The Declaration of Indulgence or Declaration for Liberty of Conscience was a pair of proclamations made by James II of England and VII of Scotland in 1687.

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Dover

Dover is a town and major ferry port in the home county of Kent, in South East England.

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Dutch Gift

The Dutch Gift of 1660 was a collection of 28 mostly Italian Renaissance paintings and 12 classical sculptures, along with a yacht, the ''Mary'', and furniture, which was presented to King Charles II of England by the States-General of the Netherlands in 1660.

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Earl of Carlisle

Earl of Carlisle is a title that has been created three times in the Peerage of England.

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Early modern Britain

Early modern Britain is the history of the island of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.

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Edmund Dunch (Roundhead)

Edmund Dunch (1602–1678) was an English Member of Parliament who supported the Parliamentary cause before and during the English Civil War.

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Edmund Dunch (Whig)

Edmund Dunch (or Dunche) (14 December 1657 Westminster – 31 May 1719 Little Wittenham) was Master of the Royal Household to Queen Anne and a British Member of Parliament (MP).

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Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon

Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (18 February 16099 December 1674) was an English statesman who served as Lord Chancellor to King Charles II from 1658, two years before the Restoration of the Monarchy, until 1667.

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English Committee of Safety

The Committee of Safety, established by the Parliamentarians in July 1642, was the first of a number of successive committees set up to oversee the English Civil War against King Charles I, and the Interregnum.

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English Council of State

The English Council of State, later also known as the Protector's Privy Council, was first appointed by the Rump Parliament on 14 February 1649 after the execution of King Charles I. Charles's execution on 30 January was delayed for several hours so that the House of Commons could pass an emergency bill to declare the representatives of the people, the House of Commons, as the source of all just power and to make it an offence to proclaim a new King.

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Episcopal polity

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which the chief local authorities are called bishops.

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Fifth Monarchists

The Fifth Monarchists or Fifth Monarchy Men were an extreme Puritan sect active from 1649 to 1660 during the Interregnum, following the English Civil Wars of the 17th century.

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Francis Hacker

Colonel Francis Hacker (died 19 October 1660) was an English soldier who fought for Parliament during the English Civil War and one of the Regicides of King Charles I of England.

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George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer

George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer (August 16228 August 1684), styled Sir George Booth, 2nd Bt, from 1652 to 1661, until his elevation to the House of Lords as an English peer.

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George Goring, 1st Earl of Norwich

George Goring, 1st Earl of Norwich (28 April 1585 – 6 January 1663) was an English soldier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1628 when he was raised to the peerage.

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George I of Great Britain

George I (George Louis; Georg Ludwig; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714 and ruler of the Duchy and Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) in the Holy Roman Empire from 1698 until his death.

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George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle

George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle, KG (6 December 1608 – 3 January 1670) was an English soldier and politician, and a key figure in the Restoration of the monarchy to King Charles II in 1660.

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Georgian era

The Georgian era is a period in British history from 1714 to, named eponymously after kings George I, George II, George III and George IV.

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Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

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Good Old Cause

The Good Old Cause was the name given, retrospectively, by the soldiers of the New Model Army, to the complex of reasons that motivated their fight on behalf of the Parliament of England.

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Gregory Clement

Gregory Clement (1594–1660) was an English Member of Parliament (MP) and one of the regicides of King Charles I. Clement was the son of John Clement, a merchant and one time Mayor of Plymouth.

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Guernsey

Guernsey is an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy.

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Hanged, drawn and quartered

To be hanged, drawn and quartered was from 1352 a statutory penalty in England for men convicted of high treason, although the ritual was first recorded during the reign of King Henry III (1216–1272).

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Henry Ireton

Henry Ireton (1611 – 26 November 1651) was an English general in the Parliamentary army during the English Civil War, the son-in-law of Oliver Cromwell.

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Henry Vane the Younger

Sir Henry Vane (baptised 26 March 161314 June 1662) (often referred to as Harry Vane to distinguish him from his father), son of Henry Vane the Elder, was an English politician, statesman, and colonial governor.

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House of Hanover

The House of Hanover (or the Hanoverians; Haus Hannover) is a German royal dynasty that ruled the Electorate and then the Kingdom of Hanover, and also provided monarchs of Great Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1800 and ruled the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from its creation in 1801 until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901.

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Hugh Peter

Hugh Peter (or Peters) (baptized 29 June 1598 – 16 October 1660) was an English preacher, political advisor and soldier who supported the Parliamentary cause during the English Civil War, and became highly influential.

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Indemnity and Oblivion Act

The Indemnity and Oblivion Act 1660 is an Act of the Parliament of England (12 Cha. II c. 11), the long title of which is "An Act of Free and General Pardon, Indemnity, and Oblivion".

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Instrument of Government

The Instrument of Government was a constitution of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland.

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Interregnum (1649–1660)

The "interregnum" in England, Scotland, and Ireland started with the execution of Charles I in January 1649 (September 1651 in Scotland) and ended in May 1660 when his son Charles II was restored to the thrones of the three realms, although he had been already acclaimed king in Scotland since 1650.

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Interregnum (England)

The Interregnum was the period between the execution of Charles I on 30 January 1649 and the arrival of his son Charles II in London on 29 May 1660 which marked the start of the Restoration.

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James II of England

James II and VII (14 October 1633O.S. – 16 September 1701An assertion found in many sources that James II died 6 September 1701 (17 September 1701 New Style) may result from a miscalculation done by an author of anonymous "An Exact Account of the Sickness and Death of the Late King James II, as also of the Proceedings at St. Germains thereupon, 1701, in a letter from an English gentleman in France to his friend in London" (Somers Tracts, ed. 1809–1815, XI, pp. 339–342). The account reads: "And on Friday the 17th instant, about three in the afternoon, the king died, the day he always fasted in memory of our blessed Saviour's passion, the day he ever desired to die on, and the ninth hour, according to the Jewish account, when our Saviour was crucified." As 17 September 1701 New Style falls on a Saturday and the author insists that James died on Friday, "the day he ever desired to die on", an inevitable conclusion is that the author miscalculated the date, which later made it to various reference works. See "English Historical Documents 1660–1714", ed. by Andrew Browning (London and New York: Routledge, 2001), 136–138.) was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

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John Barkstead

John Barkstead (died 1662) was an English Major-General and Regicide.

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John Bradshaw (judge)

John Bradshaw (15 July 1602 – 31 October 1659) was an English judge.

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John Carew (regicide)

John Carew (1622–1660), from Antony, Cornwall, was one of the regicides of King Charles I.

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John Cook (regicide)

John Cook (1608 – 16 October 1660) was the first Solicitor General of the English Commonwealth and led the prosecution of Charles I. Following the English Restoration, Cook was convicted of regicide and hanged, drawn and quartered on 16 October 1660.

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John Jones Maesygarnedd

John Jones Maesygarnedd (c. 1597 – 17 October 1660) was a Welsh military leader and politician, known as one of the regicides of King Charles I following the English Civil War.

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John Lambert (general)

John Lambert (Autumn 1619 – March 1684) was an English Parliamentary general and politician.

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John Okey

John Okey (1606–1662) was an English soldier and member of Parliament, and one of the regicides of King Charles I.

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Knight

A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch, bishop or other political leader for service to the monarch or a Christian Church, especially in a military capacity.

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List of regicides of Charles I

Following the trial of Charles I in January 1649, 59 commissioners (judges) signed his death warrant.

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List of Scottish monarchs

The monarch of Scotland was the head of state of the Kingdom of Scotland.

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Long Parliament

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660.

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Lord Protector

Lord Protector (pl. Lords Protectors) is a title that has been used in British constitutional law for the head of state.

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Louis XIV of France

Louis XIV (Louis Dieudonné; 5 September 16381 September 1715), known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who reigned as King of France from 1643 until his death in 1715.

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Marmaduke Langdale, 1st Baron Langdale of Holme

Sir Marmaduke Langdale (1598 at Pighall – 5 August 1661 at Holme-on-Spalding-Moor) was a Royalist commander in the English Civil War.

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Mary II of England

Mary II (30 April 1662 – 28 December 1694) was Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland, co-reigning with her husband and first cousin, King William III and II, from 1689 until her death; popular histories usually refer to their joint reign as that of William and Mary.

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Maypole

A maypole is a tall wooden pole erected as a part of various European folk festivals, around which a maypole dance often takes place.

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Miles Corbet

Miles Corbet (1595–1662) was an English politician, recorder of Yarmouth and Regicide.

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Monarchy of Ireland

A monarchical system of government existed in Ireland from ancient times until, for what became the Republic of Ireland, the mid-twentieth century.

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Monarchy of the United Kingdom

The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies and its overseas territories.

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New Haven, Connecticut

New Haven is a coastal city in the U.S. state of Connecticut.

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Oak Apple Day

Restoration Day, more commonly known as Oak Apple Day or Royal Oak Day, was an English public holiday, observed annually on 29 May, to commemorate the restoration of the English monarchy in May 1660.

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Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 15993 September 1658) was an English military and political leader.

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Order of the Garter

The Order of the Garter (formally the Most Noble Order of the Garter) is an order of chivalry founded by Edward III in 1348 and regarded as the most prestigious British order of chivalry (though in precedence inferior to the military Victoria Cross and George Cross) in England and the United Kingdom.

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Peter Lely

Sir Peter Lely (14 September 1618 – 30 November 1680) was a painter of Dutch origin whose career was nearly all spent in England, where he became the dominant portrait painter to the court.

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Pride's Purge

Pride's Purge was an event that took place in December 1648, during the Second English Civil War, when troops of the New Model Army under the command of Colonel Thomas Pride forcibly removed from the Long Parliament all those who were not supporters of the Grandees in the New Model Army and the Independents.

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Prince Rupert of the Rhine

Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Duke of Cumberland (17 December 1619 – 29 November 1682) was a noted German soldier, admiral, scientist, sportsman, colonial governor and amateur artist during the 17th century.

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Privy council

A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically, but not always, in the context of a monarchic government.

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Puritans

The Puritans were English Reformed Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to "purify" the Church of England from its "Catholic" practices, maintaining that the Church of England was only partially reformed.

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Regicide

The broad definition of regicide (regis "of king" + cida "killer" or cidium "killing") is the deliberate killing of a monarch, or the person responsible for the killing of a person of royalty.

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Restoration (1995 film)

Restoration is a 1995 American historical drama film directed by Michael Hoffman.

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Restoration (Tremain novel)

Restoration is a novel by Rose Tremain, published in 1989.

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Restoration comedy

The term "Restoration comedy" refers to English comedies written and performed in the Restoration period from 1660 to 1710.

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Restoration literature

Restoration literature is the English literature written during the historical period commonly referred to as the English Restoration (1660–1689), which corresponds to the last years of the direct Stuart reign in England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland.

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Restoration spectacular

The Restoration spectacular, or elaborately staged machine play, hit the London public stage in the late 17th-century Restoration period, enthralling audiences with action, music, dance, moveable scenery, baroque illusionistic painting, gorgeous costumes, and special effects such as trapdoor tricks, "flying" actors, and fireworks.

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Restoration style

Restoration style, also known as Carolean style (from the Latin Carolus (Charles), refers to the decorative arts popular in England from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 to the late 1680s after Charles II (reigned 1660–1685). The return of the king and his court from exile on the Continent led to the replacement of the Puritan severity of the Cromwellian style with a taste for magnificence and opulence and to the introduction of Dutch and French artistic influences. These are evident in furniture in the use of floral marquetry, walnut instead of oak, twisted turned supports and legs, exotic veneers, cane seats and backs on chairs, sumptuous tapestry and velvet upholstery and ornate carved and gilded scrolling bases for cabinets. Restoration silver is characterized by embossed motifs for tulips and naturalistic fruit and leaves. New types of furniture introduced in this period include cabinets on stands, chests of drawers, armchairs and wing chairs and day beds. The growing power of English East India Company resulted in increased imports of exotic commodities from China and Japan, including tea, porcelain and lacquer, and chintzes from India. This led to a craze for chinoiserie, reflected on the development of imitation lacquer (Japanning), blue and white decoration on ceramics, flat-chased scenes of Chinese-style figures and landscapes on silver and new forms of silver as teapots, as well as colourful Indian-style crewelwork bed-hangings and curtains. Other developments in the Restoration period were the emergence of the English glass industry, following the invention of lead glass by George Ravenscroft around 1676, and the manufacture of slipware by Thomas Toft. After the accession of William III and Mary II in 1689, Restoration style was superseded by William and Mary style.

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Richard Cromwell

Richard Cromwell (4 October 162612 July 1712) became the second Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland, and was one of only two commoners to become the English head of state, the other being his father, Oliver Cromwell, from whom he inherited the post.

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Richard Ingoldsby

Colonel Sir Richard Ingoldsby (10 August 1617 – 9 September 1685) was an English officer in the New Model Army during the English Civil War and a politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1647 and 1685.

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Rose Tremain

Rose Tremain CBE FRSL (born 2 August 1943) is an English novelist, short story writer, and former Chancellor of the University of East Anglia.

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Rota Club

The Rota Club refers to a debate society, composed of learned gentlemen, who debated republican ideology in London between November 1659 and February 1660.

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Royal Society

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society.

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Rump Parliament

The Rump Parliament was the English Parliament after Colonel Thomas Pride purged the Long Parliament, on 6 December 1648, of those members hostile to the Grandees' intention to try King Charles I for high treason.

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Samuel Pepys

Samuel Pepys (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an administrator of the navy of England and Member of Parliament who is most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man.

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Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

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Seven Bishops

The Seven Bishops of the Church of England were those imprisoned and tried for seditious libel related to their opposition to the second Declaration of Indulgence, issued by James II in 1688.

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Solemn League and Covenant

The Solemn League and Covenant was an agreement between the Scottish Covenanters and the leaders of the English Parliamentarians in 1643 during the First English Civil War.

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Speaker of the House of Commons (United Kingdom)

The Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, the United Kingdom's lower chamber of Parliament.

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Stuart period

The Stuart period of British history lasted from 1603 to 1714 during the dynasty of the House of Stuart.

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Test Act

The Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that served as a religious test for public office and imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics and nonconformists.

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The Hague

The Hague (Den Haag,, short for 's-Gravenhage) is a city on the western coast of the Netherlands and the capital of the province of South Holland.

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The Protectorate

The Protectorate was the period during the Commonwealth (or, to monarchists, the Interregnum) when England and Wales, Ireland and Scotland were governed by a Lord Protector as a republic.

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Thomas Harrison (soldier)

Major-General Thomas Harrison (1606 – 13 October 1660) sided with Parliament in the English Civil War.

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Thomas Parker, 1st Earl of Macclesfield

Thomas Parker, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, (23 July 1666 – 28 April 1732) was an English Whig politician.

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Thomas Pride

General Sir Thomas Pride (died 23 October 1658) was a parliamentarian commander in the Civil War, best known as one of the Regicides of King Charles I and as the instigator of "Pride's Purge".

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Thomas Scot

Thomas Scot (or Scott; died 17 October 1660) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1645 and 1660.

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Thomas Venner

Thomas Venner (died 19 January 1661) was a cooper and rebel who became the last leader of the Fifth Monarchy Men, who tried unsuccessfully to overthrow Oliver Cromwell in 1657, and subsequently led a coup in London against the newly restored government of Charles II.

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Tower Hill

Tower Hill is a complex city or garden square northwest of the Tower of London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets just outside the City of London boundary yet inside what remains of the London Wall — a large fragment of which survives toward its east.

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Tower of London

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London.

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Treason

In law, treason is the crime that covers some of the more extreme acts against one's nation or sovereign.

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Tyburn

Tyburn was a village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch and the southern end of Edgware Road in present-day London.

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Viscount

A viscount (for male) or viscountess (for female) is a title used in certain European countries for a noble of varying status.

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Wallingford House party

The Wallingford House party was a group of senior officers (Grandees) of the New Model Army who met at Wallingford House, the London home of Charles Fleetwood.

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Wars of the Three Kingdoms

The Wars of the Three Kingdoms, sometimes known as the British Civil Wars, formed an intertwined series of conflicts that took place in the kingdoms of England, Ireland and Scotland between 1639 and 1651.

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William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle

William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle upon Tyne KG KB PC (6 December 1592 – 25 December 1676) was an English polymath and aristocrat, having been a poet, equestrian, playwright, swordsman, politician, architect, diplomat and soldier.

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William Ellis (solicitor-general)

Sir William Ellis (1609–1680) was an English lawyer, judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1679, and supported the Parliamentary cause in the English Civil War.

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William III of England

William III (Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702.

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Williams-Bulkeley baronets

The Williams, later Williams-Bulkeley Baronetcy, of Penrhyn in the County of Caernarvon, is a title in the Baronetage of England.

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1660 Restoration, English Restoration, English restoration, Restoration (English history), Restoration England, Restoration Settlement, Restoration era, Restoration of 1660, Restoration of Charles II, Restoration of the English monarchy, Restoration of the monarchy, Restoration period, Restoration tragedy, Stuart Restoration, The English Restoration, The Restoration, The Restoration (England), The Restoration in fiction.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(England)

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