Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Rifled musket

Index Rifled musket

A rifled musket or rifle musket is a type of firearm made in the mid-19th century. [1]

57 relations: ABC-CLIO, American Civil War, American Revolutionary War, Austrian Empire, Bayonet, Bloomington, Indiana, Breech-loading weapon, Buck and ball, Cap gun, Caplock mechanism, Cartridge (firearms), Claude-Étienne Minié, Crimean War, Da Capo Press, Dover Publications, Flintlock, Fouling, Gun barrel, Gunpowder, Henry rifle, Indiana University Press, Infantry square, Line (formation), Lorenz rifle, Maynard tape primer, Minié ball, Minié rifle, Mounted infantry, Musket, Muzzle-loading rifle, Muzzleloader, Napoleonic Wars, New York University Press, Paper cartridge, Pattern 1853 Enfield, Percussion cap, Pike (weapon), Ramrod, Rank (formation), Rifle, Rifleman, Rifling, Russian Empire, Saint Paul, Minnesota, Santa Barbara, California, Second French Empire, Second Italian War of Independence, Sharpshooter, Skirmisher, Smoothbore, ..., Springfield Model 1855, Springfield Model 1861, Springfield Model 1868, Springfield rifle, Terminal ballistics, The Quarto Group, Volley fire. Expand index (7 more) »

ABC-CLIO

ABC-CLIO, LLC is a publishing company for academic reference works and periodicals primarily on topics such as history and social sciences for educational and public library settings.

New!!: Rifled musket and ABC-CLIO · See more »

American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

New!!: Rifled musket and American Civil War · See more »

American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

New!!: Rifled musket and American Revolutionary War · See more »

Austrian Empire

The Austrian Empire (Kaiserthum Oesterreich, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1919, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs.

New!!: Rifled musket and Austrian Empire · See more »

Bayonet

A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife, sword, or spike-shaped weapon designed to fit on the end of a rifles muzzle, allowing it to be used as a pike.

New!!: Rifled musket and Bayonet · See more »

Bloomington, Indiana

Bloomington is a city in and the county seat of Monroe County in the southern region of the U.S. state of Indiana.

New!!: Rifled musket and Bloomington, Indiana · See more »

Breech-loading weapon

A breech-loading gun is a firearm in which the cartridge or shell is inserted or loaded into a chamber integral to the rear portion of a barrel.

New!!: Rifled musket and Breech-loading weapon · See more »

Buck and ball

Buck and ball was a common load for muzzle-loading muskets, and was frequently used in the American Revolutionary War and into the early days of the American Civil War.

New!!: Rifled musket and Buck and ball · See more »

Cap gun

A cap gun, cap pistol, or cap rifle is a toy gun that creates a loud sound simulating a gunshot and a puff of smoke when a small percussion cap is exploded.

New!!: Rifled musket and Cap gun · See more »

Caplock mechanism

The caplock mechanism or percussion lock was the successor of the flintlock mechanism in firearm technology, and used a percussion cap struck by the hammer to set off the main charge, rather than using a piece of flint to strike a steel frizzen.The caplock mechanism consists of a hammer, similar to the hammer used in a flintlock, and a nipple (sometimes referred to as a "cone"), which holds a small percussion cap.

New!!: Rifled musket and Caplock mechanism · See more »

Cartridge (firearms)

A cartridge is a type of firearm ammunition packaging a projectile (bullet, shots or slug), a propellant substance (usually either smokeless powder or black powder) and an ignition device (primer) within a metallic, paper or plastic case that is precisely made to fit within the barrel chamber of a breechloading gun, for the practical purpose of convenient transportation and handling during shooting.

New!!: Rifled musket and Cartridge (firearms) · See more »

Claude-Étienne Minié

Claude-Etienne Minié (13 February 1804 – 14 December 1879) was a French Army officer famous for solving the problem of designing a reliable muzzle-loading rifle by inventing the Minié ball in 1846, and the Minié rifle in 1849.

New!!: Rifled musket and Claude-Étienne Minié · See more »

Crimean War

The Crimean War (or translation) was a military conflict fought from October 1853 to February 1856 in which the Russian Empire lost to an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, France, Britain and Sardinia.

New!!: Rifled musket and Crimean War · See more »

Da Capo Press

Da Capo Press is an American publishing company with headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts.

New!!: Rifled musket and Da Capo Press · See more »

Dover Publications

Dover Publications, also known as Dover Books, is an American book publisher founded in 1941 by Hayward Cirker and his wife, Blanche.

New!!: Rifled musket and Dover Publications · See more »

Flintlock

Flintlock is a general term for any firearm that uses a flint striking ignition mechanism.

New!!: Rifled musket and Flintlock · See more »

Fouling

Fouling is the accumulation of unwanted material on solid surfaces to the detriment of function.

New!!: Rifled musket and Fouling · See more »

Gun barrel

A gun barrel is a crucial part of gun-type ranged weapons such as small firearms, artillery pieces and air guns.

New!!: Rifled musket and Gun barrel · See more »

Gunpowder

Gunpowder, also known as black powder to distinguish it from modern smokeless powder, is the earliest known chemical explosive.

New!!: Rifled musket and Gunpowder · See more »

Henry rifle

The Henry repeating rifle is a lever-action, breech-loading, tubular magazine rifle famed both for its use at the Battle of the Little Bighorn and being the basis for the iconic Winchester rifle of the American Wild West.

New!!: Rifled musket and Henry rifle · See more »

Indiana University Press

Indiana University Press, also known as IU Press, is an academic publisher founded in 1950 at Indiana University that specializes in the humanities and social sciences.

New!!: Rifled musket and Indiana University Press · See more »

Infantry square

Historically an infantry square, also known as a hollow square, is a combat formation an infantry unit forms in close order usually when threatened with cavalry attack.

New!!: Rifled musket and Infantry square · See more »

Line (formation)

The line formation is a standard tactical formation which was used in early modern warfare.

New!!: Rifled musket and Line (formation) · See more »

Lorenz rifle

The Lorenz rifle was an Austrian rifle used in the mid 19th century.

New!!: Rifled musket and Lorenz rifle · See more »

Maynard tape primer

The Maynard tape primer was a system designed by Edward Maynard to allow for more rapid reloading of muskets.

New!!: Rifled musket and Maynard tape primer · See more »

Minié ball

The Minié ball, or Minni ball, is a type of muzzle-loading spin-stabilized rifle bullet named after its co-developer, Claude-Étienne Minié, inventor of the Minié rifle.

New!!: Rifled musket and Minié ball · See more »

Minié rifle

The Minié rifle was an important infantry rifle of the mid-19th century.

New!!: Rifled musket and Minié rifle · See more »

Mounted infantry

Mounted infantry were infantry who rode horses instead of marching.

New!!: Rifled musket and Mounted infantry · See more »

Musket

A musket is a muzzle-loaded, smoothbore long gun that appeared in early 16th century Europe, at first as a heavier variant of the arquebus, capable of penetrating heavy armor.

New!!: Rifled musket and Musket · See more »

Muzzle-loading rifle

A muzzle-loading rifle is a muzzle-loaded small arm or artillery piece that has a rifled barrel rather than a smoothbore.

New!!: Rifled musket and Muzzle-loading rifle · See more »

Muzzleloader

A muzzleloader is any firearm into which the projectile and usually the propellant charge is loaded from the muzzle of the gun (i.e., from the forward, open end of the gun's barrel).

New!!: Rifled musket and Muzzleloader · See more »

Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom.

New!!: Rifled musket and Napoleonic Wars · See more »

New York University Press

New York University Press (or NYU Press) is a university press that is part of New York University.

New!!: Rifled musket and New York University Press · See more »

Paper cartridge

This article addresses older paper small-arms cartridges, for modern metallic small arms cartridges see Cartridge (firearms).

New!!: Rifled musket and Paper cartridge · See more »

Pattern 1853 Enfield

The Enfield Pattern 1853 rifle-musket (also known as the Pattern 1853 Enfield, P53 Enfield, and Enfield rifle-musket) was a.577 calibre Minié-type muzzle-loading rifled musket, used by the British Empire from 1853 to 1867, after which many Enfield 1853 rifle-muskets were converted to (and replaced in service by) the cartridge-loaded Snider–Enfield rifle.

New!!: Rifled musket and Pattern 1853 Enfield · See more »

Percussion cap

The percussion cap, introduced circa 1820, is a type of single-use ignition device used on muzzleloading firearms that enabled them to fire reliably in any weather conditions.

New!!: Rifled musket and Percussion cap · See more »

Pike (weapon)

A pike is a pole weapon, a very long thrusting spear formerly used extensively by infantry.

New!!: Rifled musket and Pike (weapon) · See more »

Ramrod

A ramrod is a metal or wooden device used with early firearms to push the projectile up against the propellant (mainly gunpowder).

New!!: Rifled musket and Ramrod · See more »

Rank (formation)

A rank is a line of military personnel, drawn up in line abreast (i.e. standing side by side).

New!!: Rifled musket and Rank (formation) · See more »

Rifle

A rifle is a portable long-barrelled firearm designed for precision shooting, to be held with both hands and braced against the shoulder for stability during firing, and with a barrel that has a helical pattern of grooves ("rifling") cut into the bore walls.

New!!: Rifled musket and Rifle · See more »

Rifleman

A rifleman is an infantry soldier armed with a rifled long gun.

New!!: Rifled musket and Rifleman · See more »

Rifling

In firearms, rifling is the helical groove pattern that is machined into the internal (bore) surface of a gun's barrel, for the purpose of exerting torque and thus imparting a spin to a projectile around its longitudinal axis during shooting.

New!!: Rifled musket and Rifling · See more »

Russian Empire

The Russian Empire (Российская Империя) or Russia was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

New!!: Rifled musket and Russian Empire · See more »

Saint Paul, Minnesota

Saint Paul (abbreviated St. Paul) is the capital and second-most populous city of the U.S. state of Minnesota.

New!!: Rifled musket and Saint Paul, Minnesota · See more »

Santa Barbara, California

Santa Barbara (Spanish for "Saint Barbara") is the county seat of Santa Barbara County in the U.S. state of California.

New!!: Rifled musket and Santa Barbara, California · See more »

Second French Empire

The French Second Empire (Second Empire) was the Imperial Bonapartist regime of Napoleon III from 1852 to 1870, between the Second Republic and the Third Republic, in France.

New!!: Rifled musket and Second French Empire · See more »

Second Italian War of Independence

The Second Italian War of Independence, also called the Franco-Austrian War, Austro-Sardinian War or Italian War of 1859 (Campagne d'Italie), was fought by the French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia against the Austrian Empire in 1859 and played a crucial part in the process of Italian unification.

New!!: Rifled musket and Second Italian War of Independence · See more »

Sharpshooter

A sharpshooter is one who is highly proficient at firing firearms or other projectile weapons accurately.

New!!: Rifled musket and Sharpshooter · See more »

Skirmisher

Skirmishers are light infantry or cavalry soldiers in the role of skirmishing—stationed to act as a vanguard, flank guard, or rearguard, screening a tactical position or a larger body of friendly troops from enemy advances.

New!!: Rifled musket and Skirmisher · See more »

Smoothbore

A smoothbore weapon is one that has a barrel without rifling.

New!!: Rifled musket and Smoothbore · See more »

Springfield Model 1855

The Springfield Model 1855 was a rifled musket widely used in the American Civil War.

New!!: Rifled musket and Springfield Model 1855 · See more »

Springfield Model 1861

The Springfield Model 1861 was a Minié-type rifled musket shoulder-arm used by the United States Army and Marine Corps during the American Civil War.

New!!: Rifled musket and Springfield Model 1861 · See more »

Springfield Model 1868

The Springfield Model 1868 was one of several model "trapdoor Springfields", which used the trapdoor breechblock design developed by Erskine S. Allin.

New!!: Rifled musket and Springfield Model 1868 · See more »

Springfield rifle

The term Springfield rifle may refer to any one of several types of small arms produced by the Springfield Armory in Springfield, Massachusetts, for the United States armed forces.

New!!: Rifled musket and Springfield rifle · See more »

Terminal ballistics

Terminal ballistics (also known as wound ballistics), a sub-field of ballistics, is the study of the behavior and effects of a projectile when it hits and transfers its energy to a target.

New!!: Rifled musket and Terminal ballistics · See more »

The Quarto Group

The Quarto Group is a global illustrated book publishing group founded in 1976.

New!!: Rifled musket and The Quarto Group · See more »

Volley fire

Volley fire, as a military tactic, is in its simplest form the concept of having soldiers shoot in turns.

New!!: Rifled musket and Volley fire · See more »

Redirects here:

Rifle musket, Rifle-musket, Rifled Musket, Rifled Muskets.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifled_musket

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »