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Roman naming conventions

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Over the course of some fourteen centuries, the Romans and other peoples of Italy employed a system of nomenclature that differed from that used by other cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean, consisting of a combination of personal and family names. [1]

130 relations: Ab Urbe Condita Libri, Aemilia (gens), Agnomen, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek personal names, Antonia (gens), Aphroditopolis Nome, Assassination of Julius Caesar, Augustus, Aulus Postumius Albus Regillensis, Battle of Lake Regillus, Benet Salway, Caecilia Metella Dalmatica, Caracalla, Children of Ancient Rome, Cicero, Claudia (gens), Cognomen, Constitutio Antoniniana, Corioli, Cornelia (gens), Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum, Demography of the Roman Empire, Diocletian, Domitian, Domitilla the Elder, Etruria, Etruscan civilization, Fabia (gens), Faustulus, Faustus (praenomen), Furia (gens), Gaius Bruttius Praesens (consul AD 139), Gaius Julius Hyginus, Gaius Marcius Coriolanus, Gaius Octavius (proconsul), Gallienus, Gauls, Gens, Given name, Hannibal, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, Harry Thurston Peck, Ides of March, Imperator, Indo-European languages, Italic peoples, James Chidester Egbert Jr., Julio-Claudian dynasty, Julius Caesar, ..., Junia (gens), King of Rome, Kings of Alba Longa, Latinisation of names, Latium, Legislative assemblies of the Roman Republic, Livy, Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus, Lucius Caecilius Metellus Dalmaticus, Lucius Junius Brutus, Magister equitum, Manlia (gens), Marcus (praenomen), Marcus Manlius Capitolinus, Marcus Terentius Varro, Marcus Valerius Corvus, Maria (gens), Mark Antony, Mars (mythology), Middle Ages, Modern language, Naming conventions for women in ancient Rome, Nero Claudius Drusus, Norba, Octavia (gens), Overthrow of the Roman monarchy, Oxford Classical Dictionary, Pagus, Patrician (ancient Rome), Patronage in ancient Rome, Patronymic surname, Plebs, Praenomen, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (priest), Quintus Mucius Scaevola Pontifex, Quintus Pompeius Senecio Sosius Priscus, Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft, Renaissance, Ritual purification, Roman censor, Roman citizenship, Roman dictator, Roman emperor, Roman Empire, Roman law, Roman Republic, Roman Senate, Romulus and Remus, Scipio Aemilianus, Scipio Africanus, Second Punic War, Servius Tullius, Sextus Pompeius Festus, Silvius (mythology), Slavery in ancient Rome, Social class in ancient Rome, Social War (91–88 BC), Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, Surname, Testator, Thurii, Tiberius, Tiberius (praenomen), Titus, Titus (praenomen), Titus Flavius Clemens (consul), Titus Flavius Petro, Titus Flavius Sabinus (consul AD 47), Titus Flavius Sabinus (consul AD 69), Titus Flavius Sabinus (consul AD 82), Titus Flavius Sabinus (father of Vespasian), Titus Manlius Torquatus (consul 347 BC), Toga, Torc, Tribal Assembly, Valeria (gens), Verrius Flaccus, Vespasia Polla, Vespasian, Volubilis. Expand index (80 more) »

Ab Urbe Condita Libri

Livy's History of Rome, sometimes referred to as Ab Urbe Condita, is a monumental history of ancient Rome, written in Latin, between 27 and 9 BC.

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Aemilia (gens)

The gens Aemilia, originally written Aimilia, was one of the greatest patrician families at Rome.

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Agnomen

An agnomen (plural: agnomina), in the Roman naming convention, was a nickname, just as the cognomen was initially.

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Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

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Ancient Greek personal names

The study of ancient Greek personal names is a branch of onomastics, the study of names, and more specifically of anthroponomastics, the study of names of persons.

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Antonia (gens)

The gens Antonia was a Roman family of great antiquity, with both patrician and plebeian branches.

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Aphroditopolis Nome

The Aphroditopolis Nome (also Wadjet) was a nome in Ancient Egypt.

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Assassination of Julius Caesar

The assassination of Julius Caesar was the result of a conspiracy by many Roman senators led by Gaius Cassius Longinus, Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, and Marcus Junius Brutus.

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Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

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Aulus Postumius Albus Regillensis

Aulus Postumius Albus Regillensis was an ancient Roman who, according to Livy, was Roman dictator in 498 or 496 BC, when he conquered the Latins in the great Battle of Lake Regillus and subsequently celebrated a triumph.

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Battle of Lake Regillus

The Battle of Lake Regillus was a legendary Roman victory over the Latin League shortly after the establishment of the Roman Republic and as part of a wider Latin War.

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Benet Salway

Richard William Benet Salway is a senior lecturer in ancient history at University College London.

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Caecilia Metella Dalmatica

Caecilia Metella (died around 80 BC) was the daughter of Lucius Caecilius Metellus Dalmaticus, Pontifex Maximus in 115 BC.

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Caracalla

Caracalla (Latin: Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus; 4 April 188 – 8 April 217), formally known as Antoninus, was Roman emperor from 198 to 217 AD.

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Children of Ancient Rome

This article is about children in ancient Rome.

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Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

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Claudia (gens)

The gens Claudia, sometimes written Clodia, was one of the most prominent patrician houses at Rome.

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Cognomen

A cognomen (Latin plural cognomina; from con- "together with" and (g)nomen "name") was the third name of a citizen of ancient Rome, under Roman naming conventions.

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Constitutio Antoniniana

The Constitutio Antoniniana (Latin for: "Constitution of Antoninus") (also called the Edict of Caracalla or the Antonine Constitution) was an edict issued in 212, by the Roman Emperor Caracalla declaring that all free men in the Roman Empire were to be given theoretical Roman citizenship and that all free women in the Empire were to be given the same rights as Roman women.

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Corioli

Corioli was a town in ancient times in the territory of the Volsci in central Italy, in Latium adiectum.

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Cornelia (gens)

The gens Cornelia was one of the greatest patrician houses at Rome.

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Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum

The Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (CIL) is a comprehensive collection of ancient Latin inscriptions.

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Demography of the Roman Empire

Demographically, the Roman Empire was an ordinary premodern state.

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Diocletian

Diocletian (Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Augustus), born Diocles (22 December 244–3 December 311), was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305.

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Domitian

Domitian (Titus Flavius Caesar Domitianus Augustus; 24 October 51 – 18 September 96 AD) was Roman emperor from 81 to 96.

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Domitilla the Elder

Flavia Domitilla Major (Major, Latin for the elder) Flavia Domitilla the Elder or Domitilla the Elder (died before 69, perhaps c. 65) was the wife of the Roman Emperor Vespasian.

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Etruria

Etruria (usually referred to in Greek and Latin source texts as Tyrrhenia Τυρρηνία) was a region of Central Italy, located in an area that covered part of what are now Tuscany, Lazio, and Umbria.

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Etruscan civilization

The Etruscan civilization is the modern name given to a powerful and wealthy civilization of ancient Italy in the area corresponding roughly to Tuscany, western Umbria and northern Lazio.

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Fabia (gens)

The gens Fabia was one of the most ancient patrician families at Rome.

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Faustulus

In Roman mythology, Faustulus was the shepherd who found the infants Romulus and Remus, who were being suckled by a she-wolf, known as Lupa, on the Palatine Hill.

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Faustus (praenomen)

Faustus (or occasionally) is a Latin praenomen, or personal name.

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Furia (gens)

The gens Furia, originally written Fusia, and sometimes found as Fouria on coins, was one of the most ancient and noble patrician houses at Rome.

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Gaius Bruttius Praesens (consul AD 139)

Gaius Bruttius Praesens Lucius Fulvius Rusticus (68–140 AD) was an important Roman senator of the reigns of the emperors Trajan, Hadrian and Antoninus Pius.

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Gaius Julius Hyginus

Gaius Julius Hyginus (64 BC – AD 17) was a Latin author, a pupil of the famous Cornelius Alexander Polyhistor, and a freedman of Caesar Augustus.

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Gaius Marcius Coriolanus

Gaius Marcius (Caius Martius) Coriolanus was a Roman general who is said to have lived in the 5th century BC.

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Gaius Octavius (proconsul)

Gaius Octavius (about 100 – 59 BC) was a Roman politician.

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Gallienus

Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus Augustus; c. 218 – 268), also known as Gallien, was Roman Emperor with his father Valerian from 253 to 260 and alone from 260 to 268.

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Gauls

The Gauls were Celtic people inhabiting Gaul in the Iron Age and the Roman period (roughly from the 5th century BC to the 5th century AD).

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Gens

In ancient Rome, a gens, plural gentes, was a family consisting of all those individuals who shared the same nomen and claimed descent from a common ancestor.

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Given name

A given name (also known as a first name, forename or Christian name) is a part of a person's personal name.

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Hannibal

Hannibal Barca (𐤇𐤍𐤁𐤏𐤋 𐤁𐤓𐤒 ḥnb‘l brq; 247 – between 183 and 181 BC) was a Carthaginian general, considered one of the greatest military commanders in history.

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Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Harper's Dictionary of Classical Literature and Antiquities is an English-language encyclopedia on subjects of classical antiquity.

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Harry Thurston Peck

Harry Thurston Peck (November 24, 1856 – March 23, 1914) was an American classical scholar, author, editor, and critic.

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Ides of March

The Ides of March (Idus Martiae, Late Latin: Idus Martii) is a day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to 15 March.

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Imperator

The Latin word imperator derives from the stem of the verb imperare, meaning ‘to order, to command’.

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Indo-European languages

The Indo-European languages are a language family of several hundred related languages and dialects.

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Italic peoples

The Italic peoples are an Indo-European ethnolinguistic group identified by speaking Italic languages.

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James Chidester Egbert Jr.

James Chidester Egbert Jr., Ph.

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Julio-Claudian dynasty

The Julio-Claudian dynasty was the first Roman imperial dynasty, consisting of the first five emperors—Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero—or the family to which they belonged.

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Julius Caesar

Gaius Julius Caesar (12 or 13 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC), known by his cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and military general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

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Junia (gens)

The gens Junia was one of the most celebrated families in Rome.

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King of Rome

The King of Rome (Rex Romae) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom.

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Kings of Alba Longa

The kings of Alba Longa, or Alban kings (Latin: reges Albani), were a series of legendary kings of Latium, who ruled from the ancient city of Alba Longa.

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Latinisation of names

Latinisation or Latinization is the practice of rendering a non-Latin name (or word) in a Latin style.

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Latium

Latium is the region of central western Italy in which the city of Rome was founded and grew to be the capital city of the Roman Empire.

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Legislative assemblies of the Roman Republic

The legislative assemblies of the Roman Republic were political institutions in the ancient Roman Republic.

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Livy

Titus Livius Patavinus (64 or 59 BCAD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Titus Livy, or simply Livy, in English language sources – was a Roman historian.

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Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus

Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus (c. 229 BC – 160 BC) was a two-time consul of the Roman Republic and a noted general who conquered Macedon, putting an end to the Antigonid dynasty in the Third Macedonian War.

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Lucius Caecilius Metellus Dalmaticus

Lucius Caecilius Metellus Dalmaticus (b. c. 160 BC) was a son of Lucius Caecilius Metellus Calvus.

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Lucius Junius Brutus

Lucius Junius Brutus was the founder of the Roman Republic and traditionally one of the first consuls in 509 BC.

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Magister equitum

The Magister equitum, in English Master of the Horse or Master of the Cavalry, was a Roman magistrate appointed as lieutenant to a dictator.

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Manlia (gens)

The gens Manlia was one of the oldest and noblest patrician houses at Rome, from the earliest days of the Republic until imperial times.

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Marcus (praenomen)

Marcus is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, which was one of the most common names throughout Roman history.

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Marcus Manlius Capitolinus

Marcus Manlius Capitolinus (died 384 BC) was consul of the Roman Republic in 392 BC.

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Marcus Terentius Varro

Marcus Terentius Varro (116 BC – 27 BC) was an ancient Roman scholar and writer.

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Marcus Valerius Corvus

Marcus Valerius Corvus Calenus (c. 370 – c. 270 BC) was an important military commander and politician from the early-to-middle period of the Roman Republic.

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Maria (gens)

The gens Maria was a plebeian family of Rome.

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Mark Antony

Marcus Antonius (Latin:; 14 January 1 August 30 BC), commonly known in English as Mark Antony or Marc Antony, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the Roman Republic from an oligarchy into the autocratic Roman Empire.

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Mars (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Mars (Mārs) was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian, a combination characteristic of early Rome.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Modern language

A modern language is any human language that is currently in use.

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Naming conventions for women in ancient Rome

Naming conventions for women in ancient Rome differed from nomenclature for men, and practice changed dramatically from the Early Republic to the High Empire and then into Late Antiquity.

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Nero Claudius Drusus

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus (January 14, 38 BC – summer of 9 BC), born Decimus Claudius Drusus, also called Drusus Claudius Nero, Drusus, Drusus I, Nero Drusus, or Drusus the Elder was a Roman politician and military commander.

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Norba

Norba, an ancient town of Latium (Adjectum), Italy.

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Octavia (gens)

The gens Octavia was a plebeian family at Rome, which was raised to patrician status by Caesar during the first century BC.

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Overthrow of the Roman monarchy

The overthrow of the Roman monarchy, a political revolution in ancient Rome, took place around 509 BC and resulted in the expulsion of the last king of Rome, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, and the establishment of the Roman Republic.

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Oxford Classical Dictionary

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (OCD) is generally considered "the best one-volume dictionary on antiquity," an encyclopedic work in English consisting of articles relating to classical antiquity and its civilizations.

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Pagus

In the later Western Roman Empire, following the reorganization of Diocletian, a pagus (compare French pays, Spanish pago, "a region, terroir") became the smallest administrative district of a province.

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Patrician (ancient Rome)

The patricians (from patricius) were originally a group of ruling class families in ancient Rome.

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Patronage in ancient Rome

Patronage (clientela) was the distinctive relationship in ancient Roman society between the patronus (plural patroni, "patron") and their cliens (plural clientes, "client").

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Patronymic surname

A patronymic surname is a surname originated from the given name of the father or a patrilineal ancestor.

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Plebs

The plebs were, in ancient Rome, the general body of free Roman citizens who were not patricians, as determined by the census.

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Praenomen

The praenomen (plural: praenomina) was a personal name chosen by the parents of a Roman child.

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Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (priest)

Publius Cornelius Scipio P.f. P.n. AfricanusWith the Roman acronyms expanded, the full name is Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Publii filius Publii nepos, translated as "Publius Cornelius Scipio son of Publius grandson of Publius." In modern times he is more popularly known as the flamen dialis because the title appears in his inscription of the elogia Scipionum.

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Quintus Mucius Scaevola Pontifex

Quintus Mucius Scaevola Pontifex (died 82 BC) was a politician of the Roman Republic and an important early authority on Roman law.

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Quintus Pompeius Senecio Sosius Priscus

Quintus Pompeius Senecio Sosius Priscus (fl. 2nd century) was a Roman military officer and senator who was appointed consul during the reign of Marcus Aurelius.

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Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft

The Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft, commonly called the Pauly–Wissowa or simply RE, is a German encyclopedia of classical scholarship.

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Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

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Ritual purification

Ritual purification is the purification ritual prescribed by a religion by which a person about to perform some ritual is considered to be free of uncleanliness, especially prior to the worship of a deity, and ritual purity is a state of ritual cleanliness.

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Roman censor

The censor was a magistrate in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government's finances.

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Roman citizenship

Citizenship in ancient Rome was a privileged political and legal status afforded to free individuals with respect to laws, property, and governance.→.

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Roman dictator

A dictator was a magistrate of the Roman Republic, entrusted with the full authority of the state to deal with a military emergency or to undertake a specific duty.

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Roman emperor

The Roman Emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC).

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Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

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Roman law

Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome, including the legal developments spanning over a thousand years of jurisprudence, from the Twelve Tables (c. 449 BC), to the Corpus Juris Civilis (AD 529) ordered by Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I. Roman law forms the basic framework for civil law, the most widely used legal system today, and the terms are sometimes used synonymously.

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Roman Republic

The Roman Republic (Res publica Romana) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire.

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Roman Senate

The Roman Senate (Senatus Romanus; Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome.

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Romulus and Remus

In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus are twin brothers, whose story tells the events that led to the founding of the city of Rome and the Roman Kingdom by Romulus.

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Scipio Aemilianus

Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus Numantinus (185–129 BC), also known as Scipio Aemilianus or Scipio Africanus Minor (Scipio Africanus the Younger), was a politician of the Roman Republic who served as consul twice, in 147 BC and 134 BC.

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Scipio Africanus

Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (236–183 BC), also known as Scipio the African, Scipio Africanus-Major, Scipio Africanus the Elder and Scipio the Great, was a Roman general and later consul who is often regarded as one of the greatest generals and military strategists of all time.

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Second Punic War

The Second Punic War (218 to 201 BC), also referred to as The Hannibalic War and by the Romans the War Against Hannibal, was the second major war between Carthage and the Roman Republic and its allied Italic socii, with the participation of Greek polities and Numidian and Iberian forces on both sides.

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Servius Tullius

Servius Tullius was the legendary sixth king of Rome, and the second of its Etruscan dynasty.

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Sextus Pompeius Festus

Sextus Pompeius Festus, usually known simply as Festus, was a Roman grammarian who probably flourished in the later 2nd century AD, perhaps at Narbo (Narbonne) in Gaul.

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Silvius (mythology)

In Roman mythology, Silvius, or Sylvius, (Latin: Silvǐus; Greek: Σιλούιος; said to have reigned 1139-1110 BC), or Silvius Postumus, was either the son of Aeneas and Lavinia or the son of Ascanius.

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Slavery in ancient Rome

Slavery in ancient Rome played an important role in society and the economy.

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Social class in ancient Rome

Social class in ancient Rome was hierarchical, but there were multiple and overlapping social hierarchies, and an individual's relative position in one might be higher or lower than in another.

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Social War (91–88 BC)

The Social War (from socii ("allies"), thus Bellum Sociale; also called the Italian War, the War of the Allies or the Marsic War) was a war waged from 91 to 88 BC between the Roman Republic and several of the other cities in Italy, which prior to the war had been Roman allies for centuries.

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Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies

The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies (The Roman Society) was founded in 1910 as the sister society to the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies.

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Surname

A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family (or tribe or community, depending on the culture).

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Testator

A testator is a person who has written and executed a last will and testament that is in effect at the time of his/her death.

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Thurii

Thurii (Thoúrioi), called also by some Latin writers Thurium (compare Θούριον in Ptolemy), for a time also Copia and Copiae, was a city of Magna Graecia, situated on the Tarentine gulf, within a short distance of the site of Sybaris, whose place it may be considered as having taken.

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Tiberius

Tiberius (Tiberius Caesar Divi Augusti filius Augustus; 16 November 42 BC – 16 March 37 AD) was Roman emperor from 14 AD to 37 AD, succeeding the first emperor, Augustus.

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Tiberius (praenomen)

Tiberius is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, which was used throughout Roman history.

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Titus

Titus (Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus; 30 December 39 – 13 September 81 AD) was Roman emperor from 79 to 81.

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Titus (praenomen)

Titus is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, and was one of the most common names throughout Roman history.

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Titus Flavius Clemens (consul)

Titus Flavius T. f. T. n. Clemens was a nephew of the Roman Emperor Vespasian.

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Titus Flavius Petro

Titus Flavius Petro (fl 1st century BC) was the paternal grandfather of the Roman Emperor Vespasian.

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Titus Flavius Sabinus (consul AD 47)

Titus Flavius T. f. T. n. Sabinus (d. December 20, AD 69) was a Roman politician and soldier.

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Titus Flavius Sabinus (consul AD 69)

See also Titus Flavius Sabinus (disambiguation) for other men of this name. Titus Flavius Sabinus was a Roman senator who was active in the first century AD.

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Titus Flavius Sabinus (consul AD 82)

See also Titus Flavius Sabinus (disambiguation) for other men of this name. Titus Flavius T. f. T. n. Sabinus was a Roman senator, who was active during the second half of the first century AD.

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Titus Flavius Sabinus (father of Vespasian)

See also Titus Flavius Sabinus (disambiguation) for other men of this name. Titus Flavius T. f. Sabinus was the father of the emperor Vespasian.

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Titus Manlius Torquatus (consul 347 BC)

Titus Manlius Imperiosus Torquatus held three consulships of republican Rome and was also three times Roman Dictator.

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Toga

The toga, a distinctive garment of Ancient Rome, was a roughly semicircular cloth, between in length, draped over the shoulders and around the body.

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Torc

A torc, also spelled torq or torque, is a large rigid or stiff neck ring in metal, made either as a single piece or from strands twisted together.

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Tribal Assembly

The Tribal Assembly or Assembly of the People (comitia populi tributa) of the Roman Republic was an assembly consisting of all Roman citizens convened by the tribes (tributim).

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Valeria (gens)

The Gens Valeria was a patrician family at Rome, prominent from the very beginning of the Republic to the latest period of the Empire.

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Verrius Flaccus

Marcus Verrius Flaccus (c. 55 BC – AD 20) was a Roman grammarian and teacher who flourished under Augustus and Tiberius.

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Vespasia Polla

Vespasia Polla (also known as Vespasia Pollia, born c. 15 BC, fl 1st century AD) was the mother of the Roman emperor Vespasian, and grandmother to the emperors Titus and Domitian.

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Vespasian

Vespasian (Titus Flavius Vespasianus;Classical Latin spelling and reconstructed Classical Latin pronunciation: Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. Although he fulfilled the standard succession of public offices and held the consulship in AD 51, Vespasian's renown came from his military success; he was legate of Legio II ''Augusta'' during the Roman invasion of Britain in 43 and subjugated Judaea during the Jewish rebellion of 66. While Vespasian besieged Jerusalem during the Jewish rebellion, emperor Nero committed suicide and plunged Rome into a year of civil war known as the Year of the Four Emperors. After Galba and Otho perished in quick succession, Vitellius became emperor in April 69. The Roman legions of Roman Egypt and Judaea reacted by declaring Vespasian, their commander, emperor on 1 July 69. In his bid for imperial power, Vespasian joined forces with Mucianus, the governor of Syria, and Primus, a general in Pannonia, leaving his son Titus to command the besieging forces at Jerusalem. Primus and Mucianus led the Flavian forces against Vitellius, while Vespasian took control of Egypt. On 20 December 69, Vitellius was defeated, and the following day Vespasian was declared emperor by the Senate. Vespasian dated his tribunician years from 1 July, substituting the acts of Rome's Senate and people as the legal basis for his appointment with the declaration of his legions, and transforming his legions into an electoral college. Little information survives about the government during Vespasian's ten-year rule. He reformed the financial system of Rome after the campaign against Judaea ended successfully, and initiated several ambitious construction projects, including the building of the Flavian Amphitheatre, better known today as the Roman Colosseum. In reaction to the events of 68–69, Vespasian forced through an improvement in army discipline. Through his general Agricola, Vespasian increased imperial expansion in Britain. After his death in 79, he was succeeded by his eldest son Titus, thus becoming the first Roman emperor to be directly succeeded by his own natural son and establishing the Flavian dynasty.

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Volubilis

Volubilis (Walili, وليلي) is a partly excavated Berber and Roman city in Morocco situated near the city of Meknes, and commonly considered as the ancient capital of the kingdom of Mauretania.

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Gentilicium, Gentilicum, Latin NAmes, Nomen (Roman name), Nomen (surname), Nomen gentile, Nomen gentilicium, Polyonomy, Polyonymy, Roman Naming Convention, Roman Naming Conventions, Roman name, Roman names, Roman naming, Roman naming convention, Roman naming customs, Tria nomina.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_naming_conventions

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