Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Romance languages

+ Save concept

The Romance languages (also called Romanic languages or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that began evolving from Vulgar Latin between the sixth and ninth centuries and that form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family. [1]

520 relations: Ablative case, Accusative case, Acute accent, Affix, Affricate consonant, Africa, Africa (Roman province), African French, African Romance, Agglutinative language, Al-Andalus, Albanian language, Alghero, Aljamiado, Allophone, Alphabetical order, Alveolar consonant, Alveolo-palatal consonant, Americas, Analytic language, Ancient Greek, Ancient Rome, Andorra, Angola, Angolar Creole, Antillean Creole, Aosta Valley, Apennine Mountains, Apocope, Appendix Probi, Approximant consonant, Arabic script, Aragon, Aragonese language, Areal feature, Aromanian language, Aromanians, Article (grammar), Aspirated consonant, Astur-Leonese languages, Asturian language, Augmentative, Australia, Autonomous communities of Spain, Balearic Islands, Balkan sprachbund, Balkans, Barbarian, Bari dialect, Basilicata, ..., Basque language, Belize, Bilabial consonant, Bolognese dialect, Branching (linguistics), Brasiguayos, Brazil, Brazilian Portuguese, Brithenig, British Latin, Budjak, Bug River, Bukovina, Bulgarian Empire, Bulgarian language, Campaign history of the Roman military, Campidanese dialect, Cape Verde, Cape Verdean Creole, Cardinal direction, Caribbean, Carolingian minuscule, Castile and León, Catalan language, Catalan personal pronouns, Catalonia, Cedilla, Celtic languages, Central America, Central Italian, Charlemagne, Chavacano, Chivalric romance, Cicero, Circumflex, Clade, Classical Latin, Clitic, Clitic doubling, Close front rounded vowel, Close vowel, Close-mid vowel, Cognate, Colonial empire, Comparison (grammar), Conditional mood, Conservative (language), Consonant cluster, Continental Celtic languages, Continuous and progressive aspects, Contraction (grammar), Copula (linguistics), Corsican language, Council of Tours, Courtly love, Creole language, Cuba, Culture of ancient Rome, Dalmatian language, Dante Alighieri, Dark Ages (historiography), Dative case, Declension, Defenestration, Dekasegi, Demonstrative, Dental consonant, Deponent verb, Determiner, Diacritic, Diaeresis (diacritic), Dialect, Dialect continuum, Digraph (orthography), Diminutive, Diphthong, Disjunctive pronoun, Dniester, Dominican Creole French, Dominican Republic, Doublet (linguistics), Dual (grammatical number), Early Middle Ages, East Timor, Eastern Lombard dialect, Eastern Romance languages, Elision, Elision (French), Emilian dialect, Emilian-Romagnol language, English language, Epenthesis, Equatorial Guinea, Ergative–absolutive language, Eritrea, Esperanto, Ethnologue, Etymology, Europe, European Portuguese, European Union, Extremaduran language, Fall of the Western Roman Empire, Fascism, First language, Flap consonant, Florence, Forro Creole, Franco-Provençal language, Francophonie, Free indirect speech, French colonial empire, French language, French West Indies, French-based creole languages, Frequentative, Fricative consonant, Friulian language, Front rounded vowel, Fusional language, Future perfect, Future tense, Galicia (Spain), Galician language, Galician-Portuguese, Gallo-Italic languages, Gallo-Romance languages, Gallurese dialect, Gascon language, Gaul, Gemination, Genitive case, German language, Germanic languages, Germanic umlaut, Gerundive, Giacomo da Lentini, Giuseppe Peano, Glottal consonant, Gorals, Grammatical aspect, Grammatical case, Grammatical conjugation, Grammatical gender, Grammatical mood, Grammatical number, Grammatical person, Grammatical tense, Grammaticalization, Grave accent, Greater Romania, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea-Bissau Creole, Guttural R, Haiti, Haitian Creole, Hebrew alphabet, Hellenism (neoclassicism), Henri Wittmann, Hiatus (linguistics), Hindi, Hispania, Hispanophone, Homonym, Homophone, Homophony, Huns, Hutsuls, Iberian Romance languages, Icelandic language, Idiom Neutral, Imperfect, Imperfective aspect, Impersonal passive voice, Indefinite pronoun, Indirect speech, Indo-European languages, Infinitive, Inflection, Interdental consonant, Interlingua, International Phonetic Alphabet, Interrogative, Iotation, Irish language, Isogloss, Israel, Istriot language, Istro-Romanian language, Italian language, Italic languages, Italo-Celtic, Italo-Dalmatian languages, Italo-Western languages, Italy, Japanese Brazilians, Japanese language, Jèrriais, Jerome, Jews, Jireček Line, Judaeo-Spanish, Keszthely culture, Kristang language, La Franja, La Spezia–Rimini Line, Labial consonant, Labiodental consonant, Ladin language, Language death, Languages of Europe, Languages of Iberia, Languages of Italy, Languedocien dialect, Langues d'oïl, Lateral consonant, Latin, Latin alphabet, Latin grammar, Latin peoples, Latin Union, Latin-script alphabet, Latinism, Latino sine flexione, Latins, Legacy of the Roman Empire, Lenition, Leonese dialect, Letter case, Lexical similarity, Lexicon, Liaison (French), Libya, Ligurian (Romance language), Lingua franca, Lingua Franca Nova, List of languages by number of native speakers, List of territorial entities where Portuguese is an official language, Lists of languages by number of speakers, Locative adverb, Logudorese dialect, Lombard language, Lombardic language, Louisiana Creole, Lusophone, Macanese Patois, Macau, Madagascar, Maghreb, Magoua dialect, Marche, Mass noun, Mauritian Creole, Mauritius, Medieval Latin, Medieval literature, Mediterranean Sea, Megleno-Romanian language, Merchant, Metaphony, Metre (poetry), Mexico, Middle English, Middle English creole hypothesis, Migration Period, Mirandese language, Mixed language, Moldova, Moldovan language, Monophthong, Morlachs, Morphology (linguistics), Moselle Romance, Mozambique, Mozarabic language, Mutual intelligibility, Nasal consonant, Nasal vowel, National language, Nationalencyklopedin, Neapolitan language, Near-close vowel, New Brunswick, Nominative case, Nominative–accusative language, Nonfinite verb, Norman language, North America, Null-subject language, Oaths of Strasbourg, Object pronoun, Oblique case, Occidental language, Occitan language, Occitano-Romance languages, Oceania, Official language, Old English, Old French, Old Occitan, Old Spanish language, Oltenia, Onomatopoeia, Ontario, Open-mid vowel, Palatal approximant, Palatal consonant, Palatal nasal, Palatalization (sound change), Palenquero, Papiamento, Parable, Penult, Perfect (grammar), Periphrasis, Personal pronoun, Phoneme, Phonology, Picard language, Pidgin, Piedmontese language, Pitch-accent language, Placiti Cassinesi, Pluperfect, Polish language, Portugal, Portuguese Empire, Portuguese language, Portuguese language in Africa, Portuguese language in Asia, Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement of 1990, Portuguese-based creole languages, Possessive, Postalveolar consonant, Preposition and postposition, Present perfect, Present tense, Preterite, Printing press, Pro-drop language, Prosthesis, Proto-Romanian language, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Puerto Rico, Pyrenees, Quebec, Quill, Réunion, Réunion Creole, Red Book of Endangered Languages, Reduced relative clause, Reflexive pronoun, Reichenau Glosses, Relative pronoun, Renaissance, Rhaeto-Romance languages, Rhotic consonant, Romagnol dialect, Roman Britain, Roman Empire, Roman Italy, Romance copula, Romance novel, Romance studies, Romance verbs, Romance-speaking world, Romanche, Romanesco dialect, Romania, Romanian Cyrillic alphabet, Romanian language, Romansh language, Saint Lucian Creole French, Sanskrit, Sardinia, Sardinian language, Sardinian people, Sassarese language, São Tomé and Príncipe, Schwa, Scrambling (linguistics), Semantic change, Semivowel, Sentence (linguistics), Separatism, Sequence of Saint Eulalia, Servigliano, Seychelles, Seychellois Creole, Sibilant, Sicilian language, Silent letter, Slavic languages, Slavs, Sociolect, Soldier, Somalia, Sound change, South America, Southeast Asia, Southeast Europe, Southern Italy, Southern Romance languages, Soviet Union, Spain, Spanish Empire, Spanish language, Spanish language in the Americas, Spanish-based creole languages, Split ergativity, Standard language, Stop consonant, Stratum (linguistics), Stress (linguistics), Subject pronoun, Subject–object–verb, Subject–verb–object, Subjunctive mood, Suffix, Sursilvan dialects (Romansh), Syllable, Syllable weight, Syntactic gemination, Synthetic language, Talossa, T–V distinction, The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, Tilde, Trigraph (orthography), Trill consonant, Turkish language, Tuscan dialect, United Nations, United States of Latin Africa, Uruguayan Portuguese, Uvular consonant, V2 word order, Valencian, Valencian Community, Variety (linguistics), Velar consonant, Venetian language, Verb, Vernacular, Vlachs, Vocative case, Voice (grammar), Voice (phonetics), Voiced bilabial fricative, Voiced palatal fricative, Voiced palatal stop, Voiced postalveolar fricative, Voiced retroflex stop, Voiceless dental fricative, Voiceless pharyngeal fricative, Voiceless postalveolar fricative, Volapük, Vowel, Vowel breaking, Vowel length, Vulgar Latin, Vulgate, Walloon language, Welsh language, Wenedyk, Western Europe, Western Lombard dialect, Western Roman Empire, Western Romance languages, World War II. Expand index (470 more) »

Ablative case

The ablative case (sometimes abbreviated) is a grammatical case for nouns, pronouns and adjectives in the grammar of various languages; it is sometimes used to express motion away from something, among other uses.

New!!: Romance languages and Ablative case · See more »

Accusative case

The accusative case (abbreviated) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.

New!!: Romance languages and Accusative case · See more »

Acute accent

The acute accent (´) is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.

New!!: Romance languages and Acute accent · See more »

Affix

In linguistics, an affix is a morpheme that is attached to a word stem to form a new word or word form.

New!!: Romance languages and Affix · See more »

Affricate consonant

An affricate is a consonant that begins as a stop and releases as a fricative, generally with the same place of articulation (most often coronal).

New!!: Romance languages and Affricate consonant · See more »

Africa

Africa is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (behind Asia in both categories).

New!!: Romance languages and Africa · See more »

Africa (Roman province)

Africa Proconsularis was a Roman province on the north African coast that was established in 146 BC following the defeat of Carthage in the Third Punic War.

New!!: Romance languages and Africa (Roman province) · See more »

African French

African French (français africain) is the generic name of the varieties of a French language spoken by an estimated 120 million people in Africa spread across 24 francophone countries.

New!!: Romance languages and African French · See more »

African Romance

African Romance or African Latin is an extinct Romance language that is assumed to have been spoken in the Roman province of Africa by the Roman Africans during the later Roman and early Byzantine Empires and several centuries after the annexation of the region by the Umayyad Caliphate in 696.

New!!: Romance languages and African Romance · See more »

Agglutinative language

An agglutinative language is a type of synthetic language with morphology that primarily uses agglutination.

New!!: Romance languages and Agglutinative language · See more »

Al-Andalus

Al-Andalus (الأنْدَلُس, trans.; al-Ándalus; al-Ândalus; al-Àndalus; Berber: Andalus), also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain occupying at its peak most of what are today Spain and Portugal.

New!!: Romance languages and Al-Andalus · See more »

Albanian language

Albanian (shqip, or gjuha shqipe) is a language of the Indo-European family, in which it occupies an independent branch.

New!!: Romance languages and Albanian language · See more »

Alghero

Alghero (L'Alguer,,; S'Alighèra; La Liéra), is a town of about 44,000 inhabitants in the Italian insular province of Sassari in northwestern Sardinia, next to the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Romance languages and Alghero · See more »

Aljamiado

Aljamiado (عَجَمِيَة trans. ''ʿajamiyah'') or Aljamía texts are manuscripts that use the Arabic script for transcribing European languages, especially Romance languages such as Mozarabic, Portuguese, Spanish or Ladino, and Bosnian with its Arebica script.

New!!: Romance languages and Aljamiado · See more »

Allophone

In phonology, an allophone (from the ἄλλος, állos, "other" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice, sound") is one of a set of multiple possible spoken sounds, or phones, or signs used to pronounce a single phoneme in a particular language.

New!!: Romance languages and Allophone · See more »

Alphabetical order

Alphabetical order is a system whereby strings of characters are placed in order based on the position of the characters in the conventional ordering of an alphabet.

New!!: Romance languages and Alphabetical order · See more »

Alveolar consonant

Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.

New!!: Romance languages and Alveolar consonant · See more »

Alveolo-palatal consonant

In phonetics, alveolo-palatal (or alveopalatal) consonants, sometimes synonymous with pre-palatal consonants, are intermediate in articulation between the coronal and dorsal consonants, or which have simultaneous alveolar and palatal articulation.

New!!: Romance languages and Alveolo-palatal consonant · See more »

Americas

The Americas (also collectively called America)"America." The Oxford Companion to the English Language.

New!!: Romance languages and Americas · See more »

Analytic language

In linguistic typology, an analytic language is a language that primarily conveys relationships between words in sentences by way of helper words (particles, prepositions, etc.) and word order, as opposed to utilizing inflections (changing the form of a word to convey its role in the sentence).

New!!: Romance languages and Analytic language · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Romance languages and Ancient Greek · See more »

Ancient Rome

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire.

New!!: Romance languages and Ancient Rome · See more »

Andorra

Andorra, officially the Principality of Andorra (Principat d'Andorra), also called the Principality of the Valleys of Andorra (Principat de les Valls d'Andorra), is a sovereign landlocked microstate on the Iberian Peninsula, in the eastern Pyrenees, bordered by France in the north and Spain in the south.

New!!: Romance languages and Andorra · See more »

Angola

Angola, officially the Republic of Angola (República de Angola; Kikongo, Kimbundu and Repubilika ya Ngola), is a country in Southern Africa.

New!!: Romance languages and Angola · See more »

Angolar Creole

Angolar Creole, also Ngola (Lungua N'golá), is a minority language of São Tomé and Príncipe, spoken in the southernmost towns of São Tomé Island and sparsely along the coast.

New!!: Romance languages and Angolar Creole · See more »

Antillean Creole

Antillean Creole is a French-based creole, which is primarily spoken in the Lesser Antilles.

New!!: Romance languages and Antillean Creole · See more »

Aosta Valley

The Aosta Valley (Valle d'Aosta (official) or Val d'Aosta (usual); Vallée d'Aoste (official) or Val d'Aoste (usual); Val d'Outa (usual); Augschtalann or Ougstalland; Val d'Osta) is a mountainous autonomous region in northwestern Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Aosta Valley · See more »

Apennine Mountains

The Apennines or Apennine Mountains (Ἀπέννινα ὄρη; Appenninus or Apenninus Mons—a singular used in the plural;Apenninus has the form of an adjective, which would be segmented Apenn-inus, often used with nouns such as mons (mountain) or Greek ὄρος oros, but just as often used alone as a noun. The ancient Greeks and Romans typically but not always used "mountain" in the singular to mean one or a range; thus, "the Apennine mountain" refers to the entire chain and is translated "the Apennine mountains". The ending can vary also by gender depending on the noun modified. The Italian singular refers to one of the constituent chains rather than to a single mountain and the Italian plural refers to multiple chains rather than to multiple mountains. Appennini) are a mountain range consisting of parallel smaller chains extending along the length of peninsular Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Apennine Mountains · See more »

Apocope

In phonology, apocope is the loss (elision) of one or more sounds from the end of a word, especially the loss of an unstressed vowel.

New!!: Romance languages and Apocope · See more »

Appendix Probi

The Appendix Probi ("Probus' Appendix") is a palimpsest appended to the Instituta Artium, a work written in the third or fourth century AD.

New!!: Romance languages and Appendix Probi · See more »

Approximant consonant

Approximants are speech sounds that involve the articulators approaching each other but not narrowly enough nor with enough articulatory precision to create turbulent airflow.

New!!: Romance languages and Approximant consonant · See more »

Arabic script

The Arabic script is the writing system used for writing Arabic and several other languages of Asia and Africa, such as Azerbaijani, Pashto, Persian, Kurdish, Lurish, Urdu, Mandinka, and others.

New!!: Romance languages and Arabic script · See more »

Aragon

Aragon (or, Spanish and Aragón, Aragó or) is an autonomous community in Spain, coextensive with the medieval Kingdom of Aragon.

New!!: Romance languages and Aragon · See more »

Aragonese language

Aragonese (aragonés in Aragonese) is a Romance language spoken in several dialects by 10,000 to 30,000 people in the Pyrenees valleys of Aragon, Spain, primarily in the comarcas of Somontano de Barbastro, Jacetania, Alto Gállego, Sobrarbe, and Ribagorza/Ribagorça.

New!!: Romance languages and Aragonese language · See more »

Areal feature

In linguistics, areal features are elements shared by languages or dialects in a geographic area, particularly when the languages are not descended from a common ancestor language.

New!!: Romance languages and Areal feature · See more »

Aromanian language

Aromanian (rrãmãneshti, armãneashti, armãneshce., "Aromanian", or limba rrãmãniascã/ armãneascã/ armãneshce, "Aromanian language"), also known as Macedo-Romanian or Vlach, is an Eastern Romance language, similar to Meglenoromanian, or a dialect of the Romanian language.

New!!: Romance languages and Aromanian language · See more »

Aromanians

The Aromanians (Rrãmãnj, Armãnj; Aromâni) are a Latin European ethnic group native to the Balkans, traditionally living in northern and central Greece, central and southern Albania, the Republic of Macedonia, Kosovo and south-western Bulgaria.

New!!: Romance languages and Aromanians · See more »

Article (grammar)

An article (with the linguistic glossing abbreviation) is a word that is used with a noun (as a standalone word or a prefix or suffix) to specify grammatical definiteness of the noun, and in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope.

New!!: Romance languages and Article (grammar) · See more »

Aspirated consonant

In phonetics, aspiration is the strong burst of breath that accompanies either the release or, in the case of preaspiration, the closure of some obstruents.

New!!: Romance languages and Aspirated consonant · See more »

Astur-Leonese languages

Astur-Leonese is a group of closely related Romance languages of the West Iberian branch, including.

New!!: Romance languages and Astur-Leonese languages · See more »

Asturian language

Asturian (asturianu,Art. 1 de la formerly also known as bable) is a West Iberian Romance language spoken in Principality of Asturias, Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and Asturian language · See more »

Augmentative

An augmentative (abbreviated) is a morphological form of a word which expresses greater intensity, often in size but also in other attributes.

New!!: Romance languages and Augmentative · See more »

Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands.

New!!: Romance languages and Australia · See more »

Autonomous communities of Spain

In Spain, an autonomous community (comunidad autónoma, autonomia erkidegoa, comunitat autònoma, comunidade autónoma, comunautat autonòma) is a first-level political and administrative division, created in accordance with the Spanish constitution of 1978, with the aim of guaranteeing limited autonomy of the nationalities and regions that make up Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and Autonomous communities of Spain · See more »

Balearic Islands

The Balearic Islands (Illes Balears,; Islas Baleares) are an archipelago of Spain in the western Mediterranean Sea, near the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

New!!: Romance languages and Balearic Islands · See more »

Balkan sprachbund

The Balkan sprachbund or Balkan language area is the ensemble of areal features—similarities in grammar, syntax, vocabulary and phonology—among the languages of the Balkans.

New!!: Romance languages and Balkan sprachbund · See more »

Balkans

The Balkans, or the Balkan Peninsula, is a geographic area in southeastern Europe with various and disputed definitions.

New!!: Romance languages and Balkans · See more »

Barbarian

A barbarian is a human who is perceived to be either uncivilized or primitive.

New!!: Romance languages and Barbarian · See more »

Bari dialect

Bari dialect (dialetto barese) is a dialect of Neapolitan spoken in the Apulia and Basilicata regions of Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Bari dialect · See more »

Basilicata

Basilicata, also known with its ancient name Lucania, is a region in Southern Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Apulia (Puglia) to the north and east, and Calabria to the south.

New!!: Romance languages and Basilicata · See more »

Basque language

Basque (euskara) is a language spoken in the Basque country and Navarre. Linguistically, Basque is unrelated to the other languages of Europe and, as a language isolate, to any other known living language. The Basques are indigenous to, and primarily inhabit, the Basque Country, a region that straddles the westernmost Pyrenees in adjacent parts of northern Spain and southwestern France. The Basque language is spoken by 28.4% of Basques in all territories (751,500). Of these, 93.2% (700,300) are in the Spanish area of the Basque Country and the remaining 6.8% (51,200) are in the French portion. Native speakers live in a contiguous area that includes parts of four Spanish provinces and the three "ancient provinces" in France. Gipuzkoa, most of Biscay, a few municipalities of Álava, and the northern area of Navarre formed the core of the remaining Basque-speaking area before measures were introduced in the 1980s to strengthen the language. By contrast, most of Álava, the western part of Biscay and central and southern areas of Navarre are predominantly populated by native speakers of Spanish, either because Basque was replaced by Spanish over the centuries, in some areas (most of Álava and central Navarre), or because it was possibly never spoken there, in other areas (Enkarterri and southeastern Navarre). Under Restorationist and Francoist Spain, public use of Basque was frowned upon, often regarded as a sign of separatism; this applied especially to those regions that did not support Franco's uprising (such as Biscay or Gipuzkoa). However, in those Basque-speaking regions that supported the uprising (such as Navarre or Álava) the Basque language was more than merely tolerated. Overall, in the 1960s and later, the trend reversed and education and publishing in Basque began to flourish. As a part of this process, a standardised form of the Basque language, called Euskara Batua, was developed by the Euskaltzaindia in the late 1960s. Besides its standardised version, the five historic Basque dialects are Biscayan, Gipuzkoan, and Upper Navarrese in Spain, and Navarrese–Lapurdian and Souletin in France. They take their names from the historic Basque provinces, but the dialect boundaries are not congruent with province boundaries. Euskara Batua was created so that Basque language could be used—and easily understood by all Basque speakers—in formal situations (education, mass media, literature), and this is its main use today. In both Spain and France, the use of Basque for education varies from region to region and from school to school. A language isolate, Basque is believed to be one of the few surviving pre-Indo-European languages in Europe, and the only one in Western Europe. The origin of the Basques and of their languages is not conclusively known, though the most accepted current theory is that early forms of Basque developed prior to the arrival of Indo-European languages in the area, including the Romance languages that geographically surround the Basque-speaking region. Basque has adopted a good deal of its vocabulary from the Romance languages, and Basque speakers have in turn lent their own words to Romance speakers. The Basque alphabet uses the Latin script.

New!!: Romance languages and Basque language · See more »

Belize

Belize, formerly British Honduras, is an independent Commonwealth realm on the eastern coast of Central America.

New!!: Romance languages and Belize · See more »

Bilabial consonant

In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips.

New!!: Romance languages and Bilabial consonant · See more »

Bolognese dialect

Bolognese (in Bolognese: bulgnaiś) is a dialect of the Emiliano language, spoken in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and along the border of Tuscany to the south.

New!!: Romance languages and Bolognese dialect · See more »

Branching (linguistics)

In linguistics, branching refers to the shape of the parse trees that represent the structure of sentences.

New!!: Romance languages and Branching (linguistics) · See more »

Brasiguayos

Brasiguaio (Portuguese) or brasiguayo (Spanish) is a term referring to Brazilian migrants in Paraguay and their descendants.

New!!: Romance languages and Brasiguayos · See more »

Brazil

Brazil (Brasil), officially the Federative Republic of Brazil (República Federativa do Brasil), is the largest country in both South America and Latin America.

New!!: Romance languages and Brazil · See more »

Brazilian Portuguese

Brazilian Portuguese (português do Brasil or português brasileiro) is a set of dialects of the Portuguese language used mostly in Brazil.

New!!: Romance languages and Brazilian Portuguese · See more »

Brithenig

Brithenig is an invented language, or constructed language ("conlang").

New!!: Romance languages and Brithenig · See more »

British Latin

British Latin or British Vulgar Latin was the Vulgar Latin spoken in Great Britain in the Roman and sub-Roman periods.

New!!: Romance languages and British Latin · See more »

Budjak

Budjak or Budzhak (Russian, Ukrainian, and Bulgarian: Буджак; Bugeac; Bucak, historical Cyrillic: Буӂак; Bucak) is a historical region in Ukraine.

New!!: Romance languages and Budjak · See more »

Bug River

The Bug River (Bug or Western Bug; Західний Буг, Zakhidnyy Buh, Захо́дні Буг, Zakhodni Buh; Западный Буг, Zapadnyy Bug) is a major European river which flows through three countries with a total length of.

New!!: Romance languages and Bug River · See more »

Bukovina

Bukovina (Bucovina; Bukowina/Buchenland; Bukowina; Bukovina, Буковина Bukovyna; see also other languages) is a historical region in Central Europe,Klaus Peter Berger,, Kluwer Law International, 2010, p. 132 divided between Romania and Ukraine, located on the northern slopes of the central Eastern Carpathians and the adjoining plains.

New!!: Romance languages and Bukovina · See more »

Bulgarian Empire

In the medieval history of Europe, Bulgaria's status as the Bulgarian Empire (Българско царство, Balgarsko tsarstvo), wherein it acted as a key regional power (particularly rivaling Byzantium in Southeastern Europe) occurred in two distinct periods: between the seventh and eleventh centuries, and again between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries.

New!!: Romance languages and Bulgarian Empire · See more »

Bulgarian language

No description.

New!!: Romance languages and Bulgarian language · See more »

Campaign history of the Roman military

From its origin as a city-state on the peninsula of Italy in the 8th century BC, to its rise as an empire covering much of Southern Europe, Western Europe, Near East and North Africa to its fall in the 5th century AD, the political history of Ancient Rome was closely entwined with its military history.

New!!: Romance languages and Campaign history of the Roman military · See more »

Campidanese dialect

Campidanese Sardinian (Sardu Campidanesu, Sardo Campidanese) is a standardised variety of the Sardinian language primarily spoken in the Province of Cagliari, Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Campidanese dialect · See more »

Cape Verde

Cape Verde or Cabo Verde (Cabo Verde), officially the Republic of Cabo Verde, is an island country spanning an archipelago of 10 volcanic islands in the central Atlantic Ocean.

New!!: Romance languages and Cape Verde · See more »

Cape Verdean Creole

Cape Verdean Creole (also known as Kabuverdianu) is a Portuguese-based creole language spoken on the islands of Cape Verde.

New!!: Romance languages and Cape Verdean Creole · See more »

Cardinal direction

The four cardinal directions or cardinal points are the directions north, east, south, and west, commonly denoted by their initials N, E, S, and W. East and west are at right angles to north and south, with east being in the clockwise direction of rotation from north and west being directly opposite east.

New!!: Romance languages and Cardinal direction · See more »

Caribbean

The Caribbean is a region that consists of the Caribbean Sea, its islands (some surrounded by the Caribbean Sea and some bordering both the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean) and the surrounding coasts.

New!!: Romance languages and Caribbean · See more »

Carolingian minuscule

Carolingian minuscule or Caroline minuscule is a script which developed as a calligraphic standard in Europe so that the Latin alphabet could be easily recognized by the literate class from one region to another.

New!!: Romance languages and Carolingian minuscule · See more »

Castile and León

Castile and León (Castilla y León; Leonese: Castiella y Llión; Castela e León) is an autonomous community in north-western Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and Castile and León · See more »

Catalan language

Catalan (autonym: català) is a Western Romance language derived from Vulgar Latin and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and Catalan language · See more »

Catalan personal pronouns

This article discusses the forms and functions of the personal pronouns in Catalan grammar.

New!!: Romance languages and Catalan personal pronouns · See more »

Catalonia

Catalonia (Catalunya, Catalonha, Cataluña) is an autonomous community in Spain on the northeastern extremity of the Iberian Peninsula, designated as a nationality by its Statute of Autonomy.

New!!: Romance languages and Catalonia · See more »

Cedilla

A cedilla (from Spanish), also known as cedilha (from Portuguese) or cédille (from French), is a hook or tail (¸) added under certain letters as a diacritical mark to modify their pronunciation.

New!!: Romance languages and Cedilla · See more »

Celtic languages

The Celtic languages are a group of related languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or "Common Celtic"; a branch of the greater Indo-European language family.

New!!: Romance languages and Celtic languages · See more »

Central America

Central America (América Central, Centroamérica) is the southernmost, isthmian portion of the North American continent, which connects with the South American continent on the southeast.

New!!: Romance languages and Central America · See more »

Central Italian

Central Italian (italiano centrale or mediano) is a group of Italo-Dalmatian Romance lects spoken in central Italy in Lazio, Umbria, central Marche, the far south of Tuscany, and a small part of Abruzzo.

New!!: Romance languages and Central Italian · See more »

Charlemagne

Charlemagne or Charles the Great (Karl der Große, Carlo Magno; 2 April 742 – 28 January 814), numbered Charles I, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and Holy Roman Emperor from 800.

New!!: Romance languages and Charlemagne · See more »

Chavacano

Chavacano or Chabacano refers to a number of Spanish-based creole language varieties spoken in the Philippines.

New!!: Romance languages and Chavacano · See more »

Chivalric romance

As a literary genre of high culture, romance or chivalric romance is a type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the aristocratic circles of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Chivalric romance · See more »

Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

New!!: Romance languages and Cicero · See more »

Circumflex

The circumflex is a diacritic in the Latin, Greek and Cyrillic scripts that is used in the written forms of many languages and in various romanization and transcription schemes.

New!!: Romance languages and Circumflex · See more »

Clade

A clade (from κλάδος, klados, "branch"), also known as monophyletic group, is a group of organisms that consists of a common ancestor and all its lineal descendants, and represents a single "branch" on the "tree of life".

New!!: Romance languages and Clade · See more »

Classical Latin

Classical Latin is the modern term used to describe the form of the Latin language recognized as standard by writers of the late Roman Republic and the Roman Empire.

New!!: Romance languages and Classical Latin · See more »

Clitic

A clitic (from Greek κλιτικός klitikos, "inflexional") is a morpheme in morphology and syntax that has syntactic characteristics of a word, but depends phonologically on another word or phrase.

New!!: Romance languages and Clitic · See more »

Clitic doubling

In linguistics, clitic doubling, or pronominal reduplication is a phenomenon by which clitic pronouns appear in verb phrases together with the full noun phrases that they refer to (as opposed to the cases where such pronouns and full noun phrases are in complementary distribution).

New!!: Romance languages and Clitic doubling · See more »

Close front rounded vowel

The close front rounded vowel, or high front rounded vowel, is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Close front rounded vowel · See more »

Close vowel

A close vowel, also known as a high vowel (in American terminology), is any in a class of vowel sound used in many spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Close vowel · See more »

Close-mid vowel

A close-mid vowel (also mid-close vowel, high-mid vowel, mid-high vowel or half-close vowel) is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Close-mid vowel · See more »

Cognate

In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin.

New!!: Romance languages and Cognate · See more »

Colonial empire

A colonial empire is a collective of territories (often called colonies), mostly overseas, settled by the population of a certain state and governed by that state.

New!!: Romance languages and Colonial empire · See more »

Comparison (grammar)

Comparison is a feature in the morphology or syntax of some languages, whereby adjectives and adverbs are inflected or modified to indicate the relative degree of the property defined by the adjective or adverb.

New!!: Romance languages and Comparison (grammar) · See more »

Conditional mood

The conditional mood (abbreviated) is a grammatical mood used to express a proposition whose validity is dependent on some condition, possibly counterfactual.

New!!: Romance languages and Conditional mood · See more »

Conservative (language)

In linguistics, a conservative form, variety, or modality is one that has changed relatively little over its history, or which is relatively resistant to change.

New!!: Romance languages and Conservative (language) · See more »

Consonant cluster

In linguistics, a consonant cluster, consonant sequence or consonant compound is a group of consonants which have no intervening vowel.

New!!: Romance languages and Consonant cluster · See more »

Continental Celtic languages

The Continental Celtic languages are the Celtic languages, now extinct, that were spoken on the continent of Europe, as distinguished from the Insular Celtic languages of the British Isles and Brittany.

New!!: Romance languages and Continental Celtic languages · See more »

Continuous and progressive aspects

The continuous and progressive aspects (abbreviated and) are grammatical aspects that express incomplete action ("to do") or state ("to be") in progress at a specific time: they are non-habitual, imperfective aspects.

New!!: Romance languages and Continuous and progressive aspects · See more »

Contraction (grammar)

A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters and sounds.

New!!: Romance languages and Contraction (grammar) · See more »

Copula (linguistics)

In linguistics, a copula (plural: copulas or copulae; abbreviated) is a word used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate (a subject complement), such as the word is in the sentence "The sky is blue." The word copula derives from the Latin noun for a "link" or "tie" that connects two different things.

New!!: Romance languages and Copula (linguistics) · See more »

Corsican language

Corsican (corsu or lingua corsa) is a Romance language within the Italo-Dalmatian subfamily.

New!!: Romance languages and Corsican language · See more »

Council of Tours

In the medieval Roman Catholic church there were several Councils of Tours, that city being an old seat of Christianity, and considered fairly centrally located in France.

New!!: Romance languages and Council of Tours · See more »

Courtly love

Courtly love (or fin'amor in Occitan) was a medieval European literary conception of love that emphasized nobility and chivalry.

New!!: Romance languages and Courtly love · See more »

Creole language

A creole language, or simply creole, is a stable natural language developed from a mixture of different languages at a fairly sudden point in time: often, a pidgin transitioned into a full, native language.

New!!: Romance languages and Creole language · See more »

Cuba

Cuba, officially the Republic of Cuba, is a country comprising the island of Cuba as well as Isla de la Juventud and several minor archipelagos.

New!!: Romance languages and Cuba · See more »

Culture of ancient Rome

The culture of ancient Rome existed throughout almost 1200-year history of the civilization of Ancient Rome.

New!!: Romance languages and Culture of ancient Rome · See more »

Dalmatian language

Dalmatian or Dalmatic was a Romance language spoken in the Dalmatia region of present-day Croatia, and as far south as Kotor in Montenegro.

New!!: Romance languages and Dalmatian language · See more »

Dante Alighieri

Durante degli Alighieri, commonly known as Dante Alighieri or simply Dante (c. 1265 – 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages.

New!!: Romance languages and Dante Alighieri · See more »

Dark Ages (historiography)

The "Dark Ages" is a historical periodization traditionally referring to the Middle Ages, that asserts that a demographic, cultural, and economic deterioration occurred in Western Europe following the decline of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Romance languages and Dark Ages (historiography) · See more »

Dative case

The dative case (abbreviated, or sometimes when it is a core argument) is a grammatical case used in some languages to indicate, among other uses, the noun to which something is given, as in "Maria Jacobī potum dedit", Latin for "Maria gave Jacob a drink".

New!!: Romance languages and Dative case · See more »

Declension

In linguistics, declension is the changing of the form of a word to express it with a non-standard meaning, by way of some inflection, that is by marking the word with some change in pronunciation or by other information.

New!!: Romance languages and Declension · See more »

Defenestration

Defenestration is the act of throwing someone or something out of a window.

New!!: Romance languages and Defenestration · See more »

Dekasegi

Dekasegi (decassegui, decasségui) is a term used in Brazil to refer to people, primarily Japanese Brazilians, who have migrated to Japan, having taken advantage of Japanese citizenship or nisei visa and immigration laws to escape economic instability in Brazil.

New!!: Romance languages and Dekasegi · See more »

Demonstrative

Demonstratives (abbreviated) are words, such as this and that, used to indicate which entities are being referred to and to distinguish those entities from others.

New!!: Romance languages and Demonstrative · See more »

Dental consonant

A dental consonant is a consonant articulated with the tongue against the upper teeth, such as,,, and in some languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Dental consonant · See more »

Deponent verb

In linguistics, a deponent verb is a verb that is active in meaning but takes its form from a different voice, most commonly the middle or passive.

New!!: Romance languages and Deponent verb · See more »

Determiner

A determiner, also called determinative (abbreviated), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.

New!!: Romance languages and Determiner · See more »

Diacritic

A diacritic – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, diacritical sign, or an accent – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph.

New!!: Romance languages and Diacritic · See more »

Diaeresis (diacritic)

The diaeresis (plural: diaereses), also spelled diæresis or dieresis and also known as the tréma (also: trema) or the umlaut, is a diacritical mark that consists of two dots placed over a letter, usually a vowel.

New!!: Romance languages and Diaeresis (diacritic) · See more »

Dialect

The term dialect (from Latin,, from the Ancient Greek word,, "discourse", from,, "through" and,, "I speak") is used in two distinct ways to refer to two different types of linguistic phenomena.

New!!: Romance languages and Dialect · See more »

Dialect continuum

A dialect continuum or dialect chain is a spread of language varieties spoken across some geographical area such that neighbouring varieties differ only slightly, but the differences accumulate over distance so that widely separated varieties are not mutually intelligible.

New!!: Romance languages and Dialect continuum · See more »

Digraph (orthography)

A digraph or digram (from the δίς dís, "double" and γράφω gráphō, "to write") is a pair of characters used in the orthography of a language to write either a single phoneme (distinct sound), or a sequence of phonemes that does not correspond to the normal values of the two characters combined.

New!!: Romance languages and Digraph (orthography) · See more »

Diminutive

A diminutive is a word that has been modified to convey a slighter degree of its root meaning, to convey the smallness of the object or quality named, or to convey a sense of intimacy or endearment.

New!!: Romance languages and Diminutive · See more »

Diphthong

A diphthong (or; from Greek: δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally "two sounds" or "two tones"), also known as a gliding vowel, is a combination of two adjacent vowel sounds within the same syllable.

New!!: Romance languages and Diphthong · See more »

Disjunctive pronoun

A disjunctive pronoun is a stressed form of a personal pronoun reserved for use in isolation or in certain syntactic contexts.

New!!: Romance languages and Disjunctive pronoun · See more »

Dniester

The Dniester or Dnister River is a river in Eastern Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Dniester · See more »

Dominican Creole French

Dominican Creole French is a French-based creole, which is the generally spoken language in Dominica.

New!!: Romance languages and Dominican Creole French · See more »

Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic (República Dominicana) is a sovereign state located in the island of Hispaniola, in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean region.

New!!: Romance languages and Dominican Republic · See more »

Doublet (linguistics)

In etymology, two or more words in the same language are called doublets or etymological twins (or possibly triplets, etc.) when they have different phonological forms but the same etymological root.

New!!: Romance languages and Doublet (linguistics) · See more »

Dual (grammatical number)

Dual (abbreviated) is a grammatical number that some languages use in addition to singular and plural.

New!!: Romance languages and Dual (grammatical number) · See more »

Early Middle Ages

The Early Middle Ages or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 5th or 6th century to the 10th century CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages of European history.

New!!: Romance languages and Early Middle Ages · See more »

East Timor

East Timor or Timor-Leste (Tetum: Timór Lorosa'e), officially the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste (República Democrática de Timor-Leste, Repúblika Demokrátika Timór-Leste), is a sovereign state in Maritime Southeast Asia.

New!!: Romance languages and East Timor · See more »

Eastern Lombard dialect

Eastern Lombard is a group of closely related dialects of Lombard, a Gallo-Italic language spoken in Lombardy, mainly in the provinces of Bergamo, Brescia and Mantua, in the area around Crema and in parts of Trentino.

New!!: Romance languages and Eastern Lombard dialect · See more »

Eastern Romance languages

The Eastern Romance languages are a group of Romance languages that developed in Eastern Europe (specifically in the Balkans) from the local variant of Vulgar Latin.

New!!: Romance languages and Eastern Romance languages · See more »

Elision

In linguistics, an elision or deletion is the omission of one or more sounds (such as a vowel, a consonant, or a whole syllable) in a word or phrase.

New!!: Romance languages and Elision · See more »

Elision (French)

In French, elision refers to the suppression of a final unstressed vowel (usually) immediately before another word beginning with a vowel.

New!!: Romance languages and Elision (French) · See more »

Emilian dialect

Emilian is a group of dialects of the Emilian-Romagnol language spoken in the area historically called Emilia, the western portion of today's Emilia-Romagna region in Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Emilian dialect · See more »

Emilian-Romagnol language

Emilian-Romagnol (emiliân-rumagnōl or langua emiglièna-rumagnôla), also known as Emiliano-Romagnolo, is a Gallo-Italic language.

New!!: Romance languages and Emilian-Romagnol language · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Romance languages and English language · See more »

Epenthesis

In phonology, epenthesis (Greek) means the addition of one or more sounds to a word, especially to the interior of a word (at the beginning prothesis and at the end paragoge are commonly used).

New!!: Romance languages and Epenthesis · See more »

Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea (Guinea Ecuatorial, Guinée équatoriale, Guiné Equatorial), officially the Republic of Equatorial Guinea (República de Guinea Ecuatorial, République de Guinée équatoriale, República da Guiné Equatorial), is a country located in Central Africa, with an area of.

New!!: Romance languages and Equatorial Guinea · See more »

Ergative–absolutive language

Ergative–absolutive languages, or ergative languages are languages that share a certain distinctive pattern relating to the subjects (technically, arguments) of verbs.

New!!: Romance languages and Ergative–absolutive language · See more »

Eritrea

Eritrea (ኤርትራ), officially the State of Eritrea, is a country in the Horn of Africa, with its capital at Asmara.

New!!: Romance languages and Eritrea · See more »

Esperanto

Esperanto (or; Esperanto) is a constructed international auxiliary language.

New!!: Romance languages and Esperanto · See more »

Ethnologue

Ethnologue: Languages of the World is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world.

New!!: Romance languages and Ethnologue · See more »

Etymology

EtymologyThe New Oxford Dictionary of English (1998) – p. 633 "Etymology /ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/ the study of the class in words and the way their meanings have changed throughout time".

New!!: Romance languages and Etymology · See more »

Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New!!: Romance languages and Europe · See more »

European Portuguese

European Portuguese (português europeu), also known as Lusitanian Portuguese (português lusitano) and Portuguese of Portugal (português de Portugal) in Brazil, or even “Portuguese Portuguese” refers to the Portuguese language spoken in Portugal.

New!!: Romance languages and European Portuguese · See more »

European Union

The European Union (EU) is a political and economic union of EUnum member states that are located primarily in Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and European Union · See more »

Extremaduran language

Extremaduran (autonym: estremeñu, represents a variable vowel -->) is a Romance linguistic variety, spoken by several hundred thousand people in Spain, in an area covering the north-western part of the autonomous community of Extremadura and adjoining areas in the province of Salamanca.

New!!: Romance languages and Extremaduran language · See more »

Fall of the Western Roman Empire

The Fall of the Western Roman Empire (also called Fall of the Roman Empire or Fall of Rome) was the process of decline in the Western Roman Empire in which it failed to enforce its rule, and its vast territory was divided into several successor polities.

New!!: Romance languages and Fall of the Western Roman Empire · See more »

Fascism

Fascism is a form of radical authoritarian ultranationalism, characterized by dictatorial power, forcible suppression of opposition and control of industry and commerce, which came to prominence in early 20th-century Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Fascism · See more »

First language

A first language, native language or mother/father/parent tongue (also known as arterial language or L1) is a language that a person has been exposed to from birth or within the critical period.

New!!: Romance languages and First language · See more »

Flap consonant

In phonetics, a flap or tap is a type of consonantal sound, which is produced with a single contraction of the muscles so that one articulator (such as the tongue) is thrown against another.

New!!: Romance languages and Flap consonant · See more »

Florence

Florence (Firenze) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany.

New!!: Romance languages and Florence · See more »

Forro Creole

Forro Creole, Sãotomense or Santomense, is a Portuguese-based creole language spoken in São Tomé and Príncipe.

New!!: Romance languages and Forro Creole · See more »

Franco-Provençal language

No description.

New!!: Romance languages and Franco-Provençal language · See more »

Francophonie

Francophonie, sometimes also spelt Francophonia in English, is the quality of speaking French.

New!!: Romance languages and Francophonie · See more »

Free indirect speech

Free indirect speech is a style of third-person narration which uses some of the characteristics of third-person along with the essence of first-person direct speech; it is also referred to as free indirect discourse, free indirect style, or, in French, discours indirect libre.

New!!: Romance languages and Free indirect speech · See more »

French colonial empire

The French colonial empire constituted the overseas colonies, protectorates and mandate territories that came under French rule from the 16th century onward.

New!!: Romance languages and French colonial empire · See more »

French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

New!!: Romance languages and French language · See more »

French West Indies

The term French West Indies or French Antilles (Antilles françaises) refers to the seven territories currently under French sovereignty in the Antilles islands of the Caribbean.

New!!: Romance languages and French West Indies · See more »

French-based creole languages

A French creole, or French-based creole language, is a creole language (contact language with native speakers) for which French is the lexifier.

New!!: Romance languages and French-based creole languages · See more »

Frequentative

In grammar, a frequentative form (abbreviated or) of a word is one that indicates repeated action, but is not to be confused with iterative aspect.

New!!: Romance languages and Frequentative · See more »

Fricative consonant

Fricatives are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.

New!!: Romance languages and Fricative consonant · See more »

Friulian language

Friulian or Friulan (or, affectionately, marilenghe in Friulian, friulano in Italian, Furlanisch in German, furlanščina in Slovene; also Friulian) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaeto-Romance family, spoken in the Friuli region of northeastern Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Friulian language · See more »

Front rounded vowel

A front rounded vowel is a particular type of vowel that is both front and rounded.

New!!: Romance languages and Front rounded vowel · See more »

Fusional language

Fusional languages or inflected languages are a type of synthetic languages, distinguished from agglutinative languages by their tendency to use a single inflectional morpheme to denote multiple grammatical, syntactic, or semantic features.

New!!: Romance languages and Fusional language · See more »

Future perfect

The future perfect is a verb form or construction used to describe an event that is expected or planned to happen before a time of reference in the future, such as will have finished in the English sentence "I will have finished by tomorrow." It is a grammatical combination of the future tense, or other marking of future time, and the perfect, a grammatical aspect that views an event as prior and completed.

New!!: Romance languages and Future perfect · See more »

Future tense

In grammar, a future tense (abbreviated) is a verb form that generally marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet, but expected to happen in the future.

New!!: Romance languages and Future tense · See more »

Galicia (Spain)

Galicia (Galician: Galicia, Galiza; Galicia; Galiza) is an autonomous community of Spain and historic nationality under Spanish law.

New!!: Romance languages and Galicia (Spain) · See more »

Galician language

Galician (galego) is an Indo-European language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch.

New!!: Romance languages and Galician language · See more »

Galician-Portuguese

Galician-Portuguese (galego-portugués or galaico-portugués, galego-português or galaico-português), also known as Old Portuguese or Medieval Galician, was a West Iberian Romance language spoken in the Middle Ages, in the northwest area of the Iberian Peninsula.

New!!: Romance languages and Galician-Portuguese · See more »

Gallo-Italic languages

The Gallo-Italian, Gallo-Italic, Gallo-Cisalpine or simply Cisalpine languages constitute the majority of the Romance languages of northern Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Gallo-Italic languages · See more »

Gallo-Romance languages

The Gallo-Romance branch of the Romance languages includes sensu stricto the French language, the Occitan language, and the Franco-Provençal language (Arpitan).

New!!: Romance languages and Gallo-Romance languages · See more »

Gallurese dialect

Gallurese (gadduresu) is an Italo-Dalmatian Romance lect spoken in the region of Gallura, in the northeastern part of Sardinia.

New!!: Romance languages and Gallurese dialect · See more »

Gascon language

Gascon is a dialect of Occitan.

New!!: Romance languages and Gascon language · See more »

Gaul

Gaul (Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine.

New!!: Romance languages and Gaul · See more »

Gemination

Gemination, or consonant elongation, is the pronouncing in phonetics of a spoken consonant for an audibly longer period of time than that of a short consonant.

New!!: Romance languages and Gemination · See more »

Genitive case

In grammar, the genitive (abbreviated); also called the second case, is the grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun.

New!!: Romance languages and Genitive case · See more »

German language

German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and German language · See more »

Germanic languages

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken natively by a population of about 515 million people mainly in Europe, North America, Oceania, and Southern Africa.

New!!: Romance languages and Germanic languages · See more »

Germanic umlaut

The Germanic umlaut (sometimes called i-umlaut or i-mutation) is a type of linguistic umlaut in which a back vowel changes to the associated front vowel (fronting) or a front vowel becomes closer to (raising) when the following syllable contains,, or.

New!!: Romance languages and Germanic umlaut · See more »

Gerundive

In Latin grammar, a gerundive is a verb form that functions as a verbal adjective.

New!!: Romance languages and Gerundive · See more »

Giacomo da Lentini

Giacomo da Lentini, also known as Jacopo (il) Notaro, was an Italian poet of the 13th century.

New!!: Romance languages and Giacomo da Lentini · See more »

Giuseppe Peano

Giuseppe Peano (27 August 1858 – 20 April 1932) was an Italian mathematician and glottologist.

New!!: Romance languages and Giuseppe Peano · See more »

Glottal consonant

Glottal consonants are consonants using the glottis as their primary articulation.

New!!: Romance languages and Glottal consonant · See more »

Gorals

The Gorals (Górale; Gorali; Cieszyn Silesian: Gorole; literally "highlanders") are an ethnographic (or ethnic) group primarily found in their traditional area of southern Poland, northern Slovakia, and in the region of Cieszyn Silesia in the Czech Republic (Silesian Gorals).

New!!: Romance languages and Gorals · See more »

Grammatical aspect

Aspect is a grammatical category that expresses how an action, event, or state, denoted by a verb, extends over time.

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical aspect · See more »

Grammatical case

Case is a special grammatical category of a noun, pronoun, adjective, participle or numeral whose value reflects the grammatical function performed by that word in a phrase, clause or sentence.

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical case · See more »

Grammatical conjugation

In linguistics, conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (alteration of form according to rules of grammar).

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical conjugation · See more »

Grammatical gender

In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs.

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical gender · See more »

Grammatical mood

In linguistics, grammatical mood (also mode) is a grammatical feature of verbs, used for signaling modality.

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical mood · See more »

Grammatical number

In linguistics, grammatical number is a grammatical category of nouns, pronouns, and adjective and verb agreement that expresses count distinctions (such as "one", "two", or "three or more").

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical number · See more »

Grammatical person

Grammatical person, in linguistics, is the grammatical distinction between deictic references to participant(s) in an event; typically the distinction is between the speaker (first person), the addressee (second person), and others (third person).

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical person · See more »

Grammatical tense

In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.

New!!: Romance languages and Grammatical tense · See more »

Grammaticalization

In historical linguistics and language change, grammaticalization (also known as grammatization or grammaticization) is a process of language change by which words representing objects and actions (i.e. nouns and verbs) become grammatical markers (affixes, prepositions, etc.). Thus it creates new function words by a process other than deriving them from existing bound, inflectional constructions, instead deriving them from content words.

New!!: Romance languages and Grammaticalization · See more »

Grave accent

The grave accent (`) is a diacritical mark in many written languages, including Breton, Catalan, Corsican, Dutch, Emilian-Romagnol, French, West Frisian, Greek (until 1982; see polytonic orthography), Haitian Creole, Italian, Mohawk, Occitan, Portuguese, Ligurian, Scottish Gaelic, Vietnamese, Welsh, Romansh, and Yoruba.

New!!: Romance languages and Grave accent · See more »

Greater Romania

The term Greater Romania (România Mare) usually refers to the borders of the Kingdom of Romania in the interwar period.

New!!: Romance languages and Greater Romania · See more »

Guinea-Bissau

Guinea-Bissau, officially the Republic of Guinea-Bissau (República da Guiné-Bissau), is a sovereign state in West Africa.

New!!: Romance languages and Guinea-Bissau · See more »

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Guinea-Bissau Creole (native name kriol, kiriol, kriolu and Portuguis varying with dialects; crioulo da Guiné in Portuguese) is the lingua franca of Guinea Bissau.

New!!: Romance languages and Guinea-Bissau Creole · See more »

Guttural R

In common parlance, "guttural R" is the phenomenon whereby a rhotic consonant (an "R-like" sound) is produced in the back of the vocal tract (usually with the uvula) rather than in the front portion thereof and thus as a guttural consonant.

New!!: Romance languages and Guttural R · See more »

Haiti

Haiti (Haïti; Ayiti), officially the Republic of Haiti and formerly called Hayti, is a sovereign state located on the island of Hispaniola in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean Sea.

New!!: Romance languages and Haiti · See more »

Haitian Creole

Haitian Creole (kreyòl ayisyen,; créole haïtien) is a French-based creole language spoken by 9.6–12million people worldwide, and the only language of most Haitians.

New!!: Romance languages and Haitian Creole · See more »

Hebrew alphabet

The Hebrew alphabet (אָלֶף־בֵּית עִבְרִי), known variously by scholars as the Jewish script, square script and block script, is an abjad script used in the writing of the Hebrew language, also adapted as an alphabet script in the writing of other Jewish languages, most notably in Yiddish (lit. "Jewish" for Judeo-German), Djudío (lit. "Jewish" for Judeo-Spanish), and Judeo-Arabic.

New!!: Romance languages and Hebrew alphabet · See more »

Hellenism (neoclassicism)

Neoclassical Hellenism is a term introduced primarily during the European Romantic era by Johann Joachim Winckelmann.

New!!: Romance languages and Hellenism (neoclassicism) · See more »

Henri Wittmann

Henri Wittmann (born 1937) is a Canadian linguist from Quebec.

New!!: Romance languages and Henri Wittmann · See more »

Hiatus (linguistics)

In phonology, hiatus or diaeresis refers to two vowel sounds occurring in adjacent syllables, with no intervening consonant.

New!!: Romance languages and Hiatus (linguistics) · See more »

Hindi

Hindi (Devanagari: हिन्दी, IAST: Hindī), or Modern Standard Hindi (Devanagari: मानक हिन्दी, IAST: Mānak Hindī) is a standardised and Sanskritised register of the Hindustani language.

New!!: Romance languages and Hindi · See more »

Hispania

Hispania was the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula.

New!!: Romance languages and Hispania · See more »

Hispanophone

Hispanophone and Hispanosphere are terms used to refer to Spanish-language speakers and the Spanish-speaking world, respectively.

New!!: Romance languages and Hispanophone · See more »

Homonym

In linguistics, homonyms, broadly defined, are words which sound alike or are spelled alike, but have different meanings.

New!!: Romance languages and Homonym · See more »

Homophone

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same (to varying extent) as another word but differs in meaning.

New!!: Romance languages and Homophone · See more »

Homophony

In music, homophony (Greek: ὁμόφωνος, homóphōnos, from ὁμός, homós, "same" and φωνή, phōnē, "sound, tone") is a texture in which a primary part is supported by one or more additional strands that flesh out the harmony and often provide rhythmic contrast.

New!!: Romance languages and Homophony · See more »

Huns

The Huns were a nomadic people who lived in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Eastern Europe, between the 4th and 6th century AD.

New!!: Romance languages and Huns · See more »

Hutsuls

Hutsuls (гуцули, hutsuly; Hucuł, plural Huculi, Hucułowie; huțul, plural huțuli) is an ethno-cultural group of Ukrainians,Encyclopedia of Ukraine: Richard T.Schaefer (ed.), 2008, Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society, Volume 1, SAGE Publications, p. 1341.

New!!: Romance languages and Hutsuls · See more »

Iberian Romance languages

The Iberian Romance, Ibero-Romance or simply Iberian languages is an areal grouping of Romance languages that developed on the Iberian Peninsula, an area consisting primarily of Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra, and in southern France which are today more commonly separated into West Iberian and Occitano-Romance language groups.

New!!: Romance languages and Iberian Romance languages · See more »

Icelandic language

Icelandic (íslenska) is a North Germanic language, and the language of Iceland.

New!!: Romance languages and Icelandic language · See more »

Idiom Neutral

Idiom Neutral is an international auxiliary language, published in 1902 by the International Academy of the Universal Language (Akademi Internasional de Lingu Universal) under the leadership of Waldemar Rosenberger, a St. Petersburg engineer.

New!!: Romance languages and Idiom Neutral · See more »

Imperfect

The imperfect (abbreviated) is a verb form, found in various languages, which combines past tense (reference to a past time) and imperfective aspect (reference to a continuing or repeated event or state).

New!!: Romance languages and Imperfect · See more »

Imperfective aspect

The imperfective (abbreviated or more ambiguously) is a grammatical aspect used to describe a situation viewed with interior composition.

New!!: Romance languages and Imperfective aspect · See more »

Impersonal passive voice

The impersonal voice, sometimes called pseudo-passive voice, is a verb voice that decreases the valency of an intransitive verb (which has valency one) to zero.

New!!: Romance languages and Impersonal passive voice · See more »

Indefinite pronoun

An indefinite pronoun is a pronoun that refers to non-specific beings, objects, or places.

New!!: Romance languages and Indefinite pronoun · See more »

Indirect speech

Indirect speech is a means of expressing the content of statements, questions or other utterances, without quoting them explicitly as is done in direct speech.

New!!: Romance languages and Indirect speech · See more »

Indo-European languages

The Indo-European languages are a language family of several hundred related languages and dialects.

New!!: Romance languages and Indo-European languages · See more »

Infinitive

Infinitive (abbreviated) is a grammatical term referring to certain verb forms existing in many languages, most often used as non-finite verbs.

New!!: Romance languages and Infinitive · See more »

Inflection

In grammar, inflection or inflexion – sometimes called accidence – is the modification of a word to express different grammatical categories such as tense, case, voice, aspect, person, number, gender, and mood.

New!!: Romance languages and Inflection · See more »

Interdental consonant

Interdental consonants are produced by placing the tip of the tongue between the upper and lower front teeth.

New!!: Romance languages and Interdental consonant · See more »

Interlingua

Interlingua (ISO 639 language codes ia, ina) is an Italic international auxiliary language (IAL), developed between 1937 and 1951 by the International Auxiliary Language Association (IALA).

New!!: Romance languages and Interlingua · See more »

International Phonetic Alphabet

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Romance languages and International Phonetic Alphabet · See more »

Interrogative

Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions.

New!!: Romance languages and Interrogative · See more »

Iotation

In Slavic languages, iotation is a form of palatalization that occurs when a consonant comes into contact with a palatal approximant from the succeeding morpheme.

New!!: Romance languages and Iotation · See more »

Irish language

The Irish language (Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language, is a Goidelic language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland and historically spoken by the Irish people.

New!!: Romance languages and Irish language · See more »

Isogloss

An isogloss, also called a heterogloss (see Etymology below), is the geographic boundary of a certain linguistic feature, such as the pronunciation of a vowel, the meaning of a word, or the use of some morphological or syntactic feature.

New!!: Romance languages and Isogloss · See more »

Israel

Israel, officially the State of Israel, is a country in the Middle East, on the southeastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea and the northern shore of the Red Sea.

New!!: Romance languages and Israel · See more »

Istriot language

Istriot is a Romance language spoken by about 400 people in the southwestern part of the Istrian Peninsula in Croatia, particularly in Rovinj and Vodnjan.

New!!: Romance languages and Istriot language · See more »

Istro-Romanian language

The Istro-Romanian language (Istro-Romanian: Rumârește) is an Eastern Romance language, spoken in a few villages and hamlets in the peninsula of Istria in Croatia, as well as in diaspora, most notably in Italy, Sweden, Germany, Northern and Southern America, and Australia.

New!!: Romance languages and Istro-Romanian language · See more »

Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language.

New!!: Romance languages and Italian language · See more »

Italic languages

The Italic languages are a subfamily of the Indo-European language family, originally spoken by Italic peoples.

New!!: Romance languages and Italic languages · See more »

Italo-Celtic

In historical linguistics, Italo-Celtic is a grouping of the Italic and Celtic branches of the Indo-European language family on the basis of features shared by these two branches and no others.

New!!: Romance languages and Italo-Celtic · See more »

Italo-Dalmatian languages

The Italo-Dalmatian languages, or Central Romance languages, are a group of Romance languages spoken in Italy, Corsica (France) and formerly in Dalmatia (Croatia).

New!!: Romance languages and Italo-Dalmatian languages · See more »

Italo-Western languages

Italo-Western is, in some classifications, the largest branch of the Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Italo-Western languages · See more »

Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Italy · See more »

Japanese Brazilians

are Brazilian citizens who are nationals or naturals of Japanese ancestry, or Japanese immigrants living in Brazil.

New!!: Romance languages and Japanese Brazilians · See more »

Japanese language

is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language.

New!!: Romance languages and Japanese language · See more »

Jèrriais

Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, one of the Channel Islands off the coast of France.

New!!: Romance languages and Jèrriais · See more »

Jerome

Jerome (Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus; Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian.

New!!: Romance languages and Jerome · See more »

Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

New!!: Romance languages and Jews · See more »

Jireček Line

The Jireček Line is a conceptual boundary through the ancient Balkans that divides the influence of the Latin (in the north) and Greek (in the south) languages in the Roman Empire from Antiquity until the 4th century.

New!!: Romance languages and Jireček Line · See more »

Judaeo-Spanish

Judaeo-Spanish or Judeo-Spanish (judeo-español, Hebrew script: גֿודֿיאו-איספאנייול, Cyrillic: Ђудео-Еспањол), commonly referred to as Ladino, is a Romance language derived from Old Spanish.

New!!: Romance languages and Judaeo-Spanish · See more »

Keszthely culture

Keszthely culture was created ca.

New!!: Romance languages and Keszthely culture · See more »

Kristang language

Papia Kristang ("speak kristang"), or just Kristang, is a creole language.

New!!: Romance languages and Kristang language · See more »

La Franja

La Franja ("The Strip") is the area of Catalan-speaking territories of Aragon bordering Catalonia, in Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and La Franja · See more »

La Spezia–Rimini Line

The La Spezia–Rimini Line (also known as the Massa–Senigallia Line), in the linguistics of the Romance languages, is a line that demarcates a number of important isoglosses that distinguish Romance languages south and east of the line from Romance languages north and west of it.

New!!: Romance languages and La Spezia–Rimini Line · See more »

Labial consonant

Labial consonants are consonants in which one or both lips are the active articulator.

New!!: Romance languages and Labial consonant · See more »

Labiodental consonant

In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lip and the upper teeth.

New!!: Romance languages and Labiodental consonant · See more »

Ladin language

Ladin (or; Ladin: Ladin, Ladino, Ladinisch) is a Romance language consisting of a group of dialects that some consider part of a unitary Rhaeto-Romance language, mainly spoken in the Dolomite Mountains in Northern Italy in the provinces of South Tyrol, the Trentino, and the Belluno, by the Ladin people.

New!!: Romance languages and Ladin language · See more »

Language death

In linguistics, language death occurs when a language loses its last native speaker.

New!!: Romance languages and Language death · See more »

Languages of Europe

Most languages of Europe belong to the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Romance languages and Languages of Europe · See more »

Languages of Iberia

Iberian languages is a generic term for the languages currently or formerly spoken in the Iberian Peninsula.

New!!: Romance languages and Languages of Iberia · See more »

Languages of Italy

There are approximately thirty-four living spoken languages and related dialects in Italy; most of which are indigenous evolutions of Vulgar Latin, and are therefore classified as Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Languages of Italy · See more »

Languedocien dialect

Languedocien (French name) or Lengadocian (native name) is an Occitan dialect spoken in rural parts of southern France such as Languedoc, Rouergue, Quercy, Agenais and Southern Périgord.

New!!: Romance languages and Languedocien dialect · See more »

Langues d'oïl

The langues d'oïl (French) or oïl languages (also in langues d'oui) are a dialect continuum that includes standard French and its closest autochthonous relatives historically spoken in the northern half of France, southern Belgium, and the Channel Islands.

New!!: Romance languages and Langues d'oïl · See more »

Lateral consonant

A lateral is an l-like consonant in which the airstream proceeds along the sides of the tongue, but it is blocked by the tongue from going through the middle of the mouth.

New!!: Romance languages and Lateral consonant · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Latin · See more »

Latin alphabet

The Latin alphabet or the Roman alphabet is a writing system originally used by the ancient Romans to write the Latin language.

New!!: Romance languages and Latin alphabet · See more »

Latin grammar

Latin is a heavily inflected language with largely free word order.

New!!: Romance languages and Latin grammar · See more »

Latin peoples

Latin peoples, also called Romance peoples, is a term used broadly to refer to those societies heavily influenced by Roman culture that, after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, started to diverge from the spoken Vulgar Latin language, creating localized versions which nowadays make up the Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Latin peoples · See more »

Latin Union

The Latin Union was an international organization of nations that used Romance languages that existed as a functional institution from 1983 to 2012.

New!!: Romance languages and Latin Union · See more »

Latin-script alphabet

A Latin-script alphabet (Latin alphabet or Roman alphabet) is an alphabet that uses letters of the Latin script.

New!!: Romance languages and Latin-script alphabet · See more »

Latinism

A Latinism (rarely also known as a Latinity) is an word, idiom, or structure a language other than Latin that is derived from, or suggestive of, the Latin language.

New!!: Romance languages and Latinism · See more »

Latino sine flexione

Latino sine flexione ("Latin without inflections"), Interlingua de Academia pro Interlingua (IL de ApI) or Peano’s Interlingua (abbreviated as IL), is an international auxiliary language compiled by the Academia pro Interlingua under chairmanship of the Italian mathematician Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932) in 1887-1914.

New!!: Romance languages and Latino sine flexione · See more »

Latins

The Latins were originally an Italic tribe in ancient central Italy from Latium.

New!!: Romance languages and Latins · See more »

Legacy of the Roman Empire

The legacy of the Roman Empire includes the set of cultural values, religious beliefs, technological advancements, engineering and language.

New!!: Romance languages and Legacy of the Roman Empire · See more »

Lenition

In linguistics, lenition is a kind of sound change that alters consonants, making them more sonorous.

New!!: Romance languages and Lenition · See more »

Leonese dialect

Leonese is a set of vernacular Romance dialects spoken in the northern and western portions of the historical region of León in Spain (the modern provinces of León, Zamora, and Salamanca) and a few adjoining areas in Portugal.

New!!: Romance languages and Leonese dialect · See more »

Letter case

Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also uppercase, capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule) and smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Letter case · See more »

Lexical similarity

In linguistics, lexical similarity is a measure of the degree to which the word sets of two given languages are similar.

New!!: Romance languages and Lexical similarity · See more »

Lexicon

A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).

New!!: Romance languages and Lexicon · See more »

Liaison (French)

Liaison is the pronunciation of a latent word-final consonant immediately before a following vowel sound.

New!!: Romance languages and Liaison (French) · See more »

Libya

Libya (ليبيا), officially the State of Libya (دولة ليبيا), is a sovereign state in the Maghreb region of North Africa, bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, Egypt to the east, Sudan to the southeast, Chad and Niger to the south and Algeria and Tunisia to the west.

New!!: Romance languages and Libya · See more »

Ligurian (Romance language)

Ligurian (ligure or lengua ligure) is a Gallo-Italic language spoken in Liguria in Northern Italy, parts of the Mediterranean coastal zone of France, Monaco and in the villages of Carloforte and Calasetta in Sardinia.

New!!: Romance languages and Ligurian (Romance language) · See more »

Lingua franca

A lingua franca, also known as a bridge language, common language, trade language, auxiliary language, vernacular language, or link language is a language or dialect systematically used to make communication possible between people who do not share a native language or dialect, particularly when it is a third language that is distinct from both native languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Lingua franca · See more »

Lingua Franca Nova

Lingua Franca Nova (abbreviated as LFN or Elefen) is an auxiliary constructed language originally created by C. George Boeree of Shippensburg University, Pennsylvania.

New!!: Romance languages and Lingua Franca Nova · See more »

List of languages by number of native speakers

This article ranks human languages by their number of native speakers.

New!!: Romance languages and List of languages by number of native speakers · See more »

List of territorial entities where Portuguese is an official language

The following is a list of sovereign states and territories where Portuguese is an official or de facto language.

New!!: Romance languages and List of territorial entities where Portuguese is an official language · See more »

Lists of languages by number of speakers

There are two lists of languages which are sorted by number of speakers.

New!!: Romance languages and Lists of languages by number of speakers · See more »

Locative adverb

A locative adverb is a type of adverb that refers to a location or to a combination of a location and a relation to that location.

New!!: Romance languages and Locative adverb · See more »

Logudorese dialect

Logudorese Sardinian (Sardu Logudoresu, Sardo Logudorese) is a standardised variety of Sardinian, often considered the most conservative of all Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Logudorese dialect · See more »

Lombard language

Lombard (native name lumbàart, lumbard or lombard, depending on the orthography) is a language belonging to the Cisalpine or Gallo-Italic group, within the Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Lombard language · See more »

Lombardic language

Lombardic or Langobardic is an extinct West Germanic language that was spoken by the Lombards (Langobardi), the Germanic people who settled in Italy in the 6th century.

New!!: Romance languages and Lombardic language · See more »

Louisiana Creole

Louisiana Creole (kréyol la lwizyàn; créole louisianais) is a French-based creole language spoken by far fewer than 10,000 people, mostly in the state of Louisiana.

New!!: Romance languages and Louisiana Creole · See more »

Lusophone

Lusophones (lusófonos) are people who speak the Portuguese language, either as native speakers or as learners.

New!!: Romance languages and Lusophone · See more »

Macanese Patois

Macanese Patois (known as Patuá to its speakers) is a Portuguese-based creole language with a substrate from Malay, Cantonese and Sinhalese, which was originally spoken by the Macanese community of the Portuguese colony of Macau.

New!!: Romance languages and Macanese Patois · See more »

Macau

Macau, officially the Macao Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory on the western side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia.

New!!: Romance languages and Macau · See more »

Madagascar

Madagascar (Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar (Repoblikan'i Madagasikara; République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of East Africa.

New!!: Romance languages and Madagascar · See more »

Maghreb

The Maghreb (al-Maɣréb lit.), also known as the Berber world, Barbary, Berbery, and Northwest Africa, is a major region of North Africa that consists primarily of the countries Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania.

New!!: Romance languages and Maghreb · See more »

Magoua dialect

Magoua, which may derive from a word in an Algonquian language (Makwa; Algonquin: Magwish; Mi'kmaq: Gwimu; huard) which means loon, is a particular dialect of basilectal Quebec French spoken in the Trois-Rivières area, between Trois-Rivières and Maskinongé.

New!!: Romance languages and Magoua dialect · See more »

Marche

Marche, or the Marches, is one of the twenty regions of Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Marche · See more »

Mass noun

In linguistics, a mass noun, uncountable noun, or non-count noun is a noun with the syntactic property that any quantity of it is treated as an undifferentiated unit, rather than as something with discrete subsets.

New!!: Romance languages and Mass noun · See more »

Mauritian Creole

Mauritian Creole or Morisien (Mauritian Creole: kreol morisien, pronunciation: /kʁeol moʁisjɛ̃, -iʃɛ̃/) is a French-based creole language spoken in Mauritius.

New!!: Romance languages and Mauritian Creole · See more »

Mauritius

Mauritius (or; Maurice), officially the Republic of Mauritius (République de Maurice), is an island nation in the Indian Ocean about off the southeast coast of the African continent.

New!!: Romance languages and Mauritius · See more »

Medieval Latin

Medieval Latin was the form of Latin used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange, as the liturgical language of Chalcedonian Christianity and the Roman Catholic Church, and as a language of science, literature, law, and administration.

New!!: Romance languages and Medieval Latin · See more »

Medieval literature

Medieval literature is a broad subject, encompassing essentially all written works available in Europe and beyond during the Middle Ages (that is, the one thousand years from the fall of the Western Roman Empire ca. AD 500 to the beginning of the Florentine Renaissance in the late 15th century).

New!!: Romance languages and Medieval literature · See more »

Mediterranean Sea

The Mediterranean Sea is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa and on the east by the Levant.

New!!: Romance languages and Mediterranean Sea · See more »

Megleno-Romanian language

The Megleno-Romanian language (Megleno-Romanian: Vlăheshte), also known as Meglenitic or Moglenitic, is an Eastern Romance language.

New!!: Romance languages and Megleno-Romanian language · See more »

Merchant

A merchant is a person who trades in commodities produced by other people.

New!!: Romance languages and Merchant · See more »

Metaphony

In historical linguistics, metaphony is a class of sound change in which one vowel in a word is influenced by another in a process of assimilation.

New!!: Romance languages and Metaphony · See more »

Metre (poetry)

In poetry, metre is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse.

New!!: Romance languages and Metre (poetry) · See more »

Mexico

Mexico (México; Mēxihco), officially called the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos) is a federal republic in the southern portion of North America.

New!!: Romance languages and Mexico · See more »

Middle English

Middle English (ME) is collectively the varieties of the English language spoken after the Norman Conquest (1066) until the late 15th century; scholarly opinion varies but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period of 1150 to 1500.

New!!: Romance languages and Middle English · See more »

Middle English creole hypothesis

The Middle English creole hypothesis is the concept that the English language is a creole, i.e. a language that developed from a pidgin.

New!!: Romance languages and Middle English creole hypothesis · See more »

Migration Period

The Migration Period was a period during the decline of the Roman Empire around the 4th to 6th centuries AD in which there were widespread migrations of peoples within or into Europe, mostly into Roman territory, notably the Germanic tribes and the Huns.

New!!: Romance languages and Migration Period · See more »

Mirandese language

The Mirandese language (autonym: mirandés or lhéngua mirandesa; mirandês or língua mirandesa) is an Astur-Leonese language that is sparsely spoken in a small area of northeastern Portugal in the municipalities of Miranda do Douro, Mogadouro and Vimioso.

New!!: Romance languages and Mirandese language · See more »

Mixed language

Although every language is mixed to some extent, by virtue of containing loanwords, it is a matter of controversy whether a term mixed language can meaningfully distinguish the contact phenomena of certain languages (such as those listed below) from the type of contact and borrowing seen in all languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Mixed language · See more »

Moldova

Moldova (or sometimes), officially the Republic of Moldova (Republica Moldova), is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, bordered by Romania to the west and Ukraine to the north, east, and south (by way of the disputed territory of Transnistria).

New!!: Romance languages and Moldova · See more »

Moldovan language

Moldovan (also Moldavian; limba moldovenească, or лимба молдовеняскэ in Moldovan Cyrillic) is one of the two names of the Romanian language in the Republic of Moldova, prescribed by the Article 13 of the current constitution; the other name, recognized by the Declaration of Independence of Moldova and the Constitutional Court, is "Romanian".

New!!: Romance languages and Moldovan language · See more »

Monophthong

A monophthong (Greek monóphthongos from mónos "single" and phthóngos "sound") is a pure vowel sound, one whose articulation at both beginning and end is relatively fixed, and which does not glide up or down towards a new position of articulation.

New!!: Romance languages and Monophthong · See more »

Morlachs

Morlachs (Morlaci, Vlaji, Морлаци) has been an exonym used for a rural Christian community in Bosnia and Herzegovina in Lika and the Dalmatian Hinterland.

New!!: Romance languages and Morlachs · See more »

Morphology (linguistics)

In linguistics, morphology is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words in the same language.

New!!: Romance languages and Morphology (linguistics) · See more »

Moselle Romance

Moselle Romance is an extinct Romance language that developed after the fall of the Roman Empire along the Moselle river in modern-day Germany, near the border with France.

New!!: Romance languages and Moselle Romance · See more »

Mozambique

Mozambique, officially the Republic of Mozambique (Moçambique or República de Moçambique) is a country in Southeast Africa bordered by the Indian Ocean to the east, Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Zambia to the northwest, Zimbabwe to the west, and Swaziland and South Africa to the southwest.

New!!: Romance languages and Mozambique · See more »

Mozarabic language

Mozarabic, more accurately Andalusi Romance, was a continuum of closely related Romance dialects spoken in the Muslim-controlled areas of the Iberian Peninsula, known as Al-Andalus.

New!!: Romance languages and Mozarabic language · See more »

Mutual intelligibility

In linguistics, mutual intelligibility is a relationship between languages or dialects in which speakers of different but related varieties can readily understand each other without prior familiarity or special effort.

New!!: Romance languages and Mutual intelligibility · See more »

Nasal consonant

In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive, nasal stop in contrast with a nasal fricative, or nasal continuant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.

New!!: Romance languages and Nasal consonant · See more »

Nasal vowel

A nasal vowel is a vowel that is produced with a lowering of the velum so that air escapes both through the nose as well as the mouth, such as the French vowel.

New!!: Romance languages and Nasal vowel · See more »

National language

A national language is a language (or language variant, e.g. dialect) that has some connection—de facto or de jure—with people and the territory they occupy.

New!!: Romance languages and National language · See more »

Nationalencyklopedin

Nationalencyklopedin, abbreviated NE, is a comprehensive contemporary Swedish-language encyclopedia, initiated by a favourable loan from the Government of Sweden of 17 million Swedish kronor in 1980, which was repaid by December 1990.

New!!: Romance languages and Nationalencyklopedin · See more »

Neapolitan language

Neapolitan (autonym: (’o n)napulitano; napoletano) is a Romance language of the Italo-Dalmatian group spoken across much of southern Italy, except for southern Calabria and Sicily.

New!!: Romance languages and Neapolitan language · See more »

Near-close vowel

A near-close vowel or a near-high vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Near-close vowel · See more »

New Brunswick

New Brunswick (Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation) is one of three Maritime provinces on the east coast of Canada.

New!!: Romance languages and New Brunswick · See more »

Nominative case

The nominative case (abbreviated), subjective case, straight case or upright case is one of the grammatical cases of a noun or other part of speech, which generally marks the subject of a verb or the predicate noun or predicate adjective, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments.

New!!: Romance languages and Nominative case · See more »

Nominative–accusative language

Nominative–accusative languages, or nominative languages have a form of morphosyntactic alignment in which subjects of transitive and intransitive verbs are distinguished from objects of transitive verbs by word order, case-marking, and/or verb agreement.

New!!: Romance languages and Nominative–accusative language · See more »

Nonfinite verb

A nonfinite verb is of any of several verb forms that are not finite verbs; they cannot perform action as the root of an independent clause.

New!!: Romance languages and Nonfinite verb · See more »

Norman language

No description.

New!!: Romance languages and Norman language · See more »

North America

North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.

New!!: Romance languages and North America · See more »

Null-subject language

In linguistic typology, a null-subject language is a language whose grammar permits an independent clause to lack an explicit subject; such a clause is then said to have a null subject.

New!!: Romance languages and Null-subject language · See more »

Oaths of Strasbourg

The Oaths of Strasbourg (Sacramenta Argentariae; Les Serments de Strasbourg; Die Straßburger Eide) were mutual pledges of allegiance between Louis the German (†876), ruler of East Francia, and his half-brother Charles the Bald (†877), ruler of West Francia made on 12 February 842.

New!!: Romance languages and Oaths of Strasbourg · See more »

Object pronoun

In linguistics, an object pronoun is a personal pronoun that is used typically as a grammatical object: the direct or indirect object of a verb, or the object of a preposition.

New!!: Romance languages and Object pronoun · See more »

Oblique case

In grammar, an oblique (abbreviated; from casus obliquus) or objective case (abbr.) is a nominal case that is used when a noun phrase is the object of either a verb or a preposition.

New!!: Romance languages and Oblique case · See more »

Occidental language

The language Occidental, later Interlingue, is a planned international auxiliary language created by the Balto-German naval officer and teacher Edgar de Wahl, and published in 1922.

New!!: Romance languages and Occidental language · See more »

Occitan language

Occitan, also known as lenga d'òc (langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language.

New!!: Romance languages and Occitan language · See more »

Occitano-Romance languages

The Occitano-Romance or Gallo-Narbonnese (llengües occitanoromàniques, lengas occitanoromanicas) is a branch of the Romance language group that encompasses the Occitan language, the Catalan language, and the Aragonese language.

New!!: Romance languages and Occitano-Romance languages · See more »

Oceania

Oceania is a geographic region comprising Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Australasia.

New!!: Romance languages and Oceania · See more »

Official language

An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in a particular country, state, or other jurisdiction.

New!!: Romance languages and Official language · See more »

Old English

Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

New!!: Romance languages and Old English · See more »

Old French

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France from the 8th century to the 14th century.

New!!: Romance languages and Old French · See more »

Old Occitan

Old Occitan (Modern Occitan: occitan ancian, occità antic), also called Old Provençal, was the earliest form of the Occitano-Romance languages, as attested in writings dating from the eighth through the fourteenth centuries.

New!!: Romance languages and Old Occitan · See more »

Old Spanish language

Old Spanish, also known as Old Castilian (castellano antiguo; romance castellano) or Medieval Spanish (español medieval), originally a colloquial Latin spoken in the provinces of the Roman Empire that provided the root for the early form of the Spanish language that was spoken on the Iberian Peninsula from the 10th century until roughly the beginning of the 15th century, before a consonantal readjustment gave rise to the evolution of modern Spanish.

New!!: Romance languages and Old Spanish language · See more »

Oltenia

Oltenia (also called Lesser Wallachia in antiquated versions, with the alternate Latin names Wallachia Minor, Wallachia Alutana, Wallachia Caesarea between 1718 and 1739) is a historical province and geographical region of Romania in western Wallachia.

New!!: Romance languages and Oltenia · See more »

Onomatopoeia

An onomatopoeia (from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία; ὄνομα for "name" and ποιέω for "I make", adjectival form: "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the sound that it describes.

New!!: Romance languages and Onomatopoeia · See more »

Ontario

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada.

New!!: Romance languages and Ontario · See more »

Open-mid vowel

An open-mid vowel (also mid-open vowel, low-mid vowel, mid-low vowel or half-open vowel) is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Open-mid vowel · See more »

Palatal approximant

The voiced palatal approximant is a type of consonant used in many spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Palatal approximant · See more »

Palatal consonant

Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth).

New!!: Romance languages and Palatal consonant · See more »

Palatal nasal

The palatal nasal is a type of consonant, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Palatal nasal · See more »

Palatalization (sound change)

In linguistics, palatalization is a sound change that either results in a palatal or palatalized consonant or a front vowel, or is triggered by one of them.

New!!: Romance languages and Palatalization (sound change) · See more »

Palenquero

Palenquero or palenque (Palenquero: Lengua) is a Spanish-based creole language spoken in Colombia.

New!!: Romance languages and Palenquero · See more »

Papiamento

Papiamento or Papiamentu is a Portuguese-based creole language spoken in the Dutch West Indies.

New!!: Romance languages and Papiamento · See more »

Parable

A parable is a succinct, didactic story, in prose or verse that illustrates one or more instructive lessons or principles.

New!!: Romance languages and Parable · See more »

Penult

Penult is a linguistics term for the second to last syllable of a word.

New!!: Romance languages and Penult · See more »

Perfect (grammar)

The perfect tense or aspect (abbreviated or) is a verb form that indicates that an action or circumstance occurred earlier than the time under consideration, often focusing attention on the resulting state rather than on the occurrence itself.

New!!: Romance languages and Perfect (grammar) · See more »

Periphrasis

In linguistics, periphrasis is the usage of multiple separate words to carry the meaning of prefixes, suffixes or verbs, among other things, where either would be possible.

New!!: Romance languages and Periphrasis · See more »

Personal pronoun

Personal pronouns are pronouns that are associated primarily with a particular grammatical person – first person (as I), second person (as you), or third person (as he, she, it, they).

New!!: Romance languages and Personal pronoun · See more »

Phoneme

A phoneme is one of the units of sound (or gesture in the case of sign languages, see chereme) that distinguish one word from another in a particular language.

New!!: Romance languages and Phoneme · See more »

Phonology

Phonology is a branch of linguistics concerned with the systematic organization of sounds in languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Phonology · See more »

Picard language

Picard is a langues d'oïl dialect spoken in the northernmost part of France and southern Belgium.

New!!: Romance languages and Picard language · See more »

Pidgin

A pidgin, or pidgin language, is a grammatically simplified means of communication that develops between two or more groups that do not have a language in common: typically, its vocabulary and grammar are limited and often drawn from several languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Pidgin · See more »

Piedmontese language

Piedmontese (Piemontèis or Lenga Piemontèisa, in Italian: Piemontese) is a Romance language spoken by some 700,000 people in Piedmont, northwestern region of Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Piedmontese language · See more »

Pitch-accent language

A pitch-accent language is a language that has word-accents—that is, where one syllable in a word or morpheme is more prominent than the others, but the accentuated syllable is indicated by a particular pitch contour (linguistic tones) rather than by stress.

New!!: Romance languages and Pitch-accent language · See more »

Placiti Cassinesi

The Placiti Cassinesi are four official juridical documents written between 960 and 963 in southern Italy, regarding a dispute on several lands among three Benedictine monasteries and a local landowner.

New!!: Romance languages and Placiti Cassinesi · See more »

Pluperfect

The pluperfect is a type of verb form, generally treated as one of the tenses in certain languages, used to refer to an action at a time earlier than a time in the past already referred to.

New!!: Romance languages and Pluperfect · See more »

Polish language

Polish (język polski or simply polski) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland and is the native language of the Poles.

New!!: Romance languages and Polish language · See more »

Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic (República Portuguesa),In recognized minority languages of Portugal: Portugal is the oldest state in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the oldest in Europe, its territory having been continuously settled, invaded and fought over since prehistoric times.

New!!: Romance languages and Portugal · See more »

Portuguese Empire

The Portuguese Empire (Império Português), also known as the Portuguese Overseas (Ultramar Português) or the Portuguese Colonial Empire (Império Colonial Português), was one of the largest and longest-lived empires in world history and the first colonial empire of the Renaissance.

New!!: Romance languages and Portuguese Empire · See more »

Portuguese language

Portuguese (português or, in full, língua portuguesa) is a Western Romance language originating from the regions of Galicia and northern Portugal in the 9th century.

New!!: Romance languages and Portuguese language · See more »

Portuguese language in Africa

Portuguese is spoken in a number of African countries and is the official language in six African states: Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau, Cape Verde, São Tomé and Príncipe and Equatorial Guinea.

New!!: Romance languages and Portuguese language in Africa · See more »

Portuguese language in Asia

The Portuguese language is spoken in Asia by small communities either in regions which formerly served as colonies to Portugal, notably Macau and East Timor where the language is official albeit not widely spoken, or of Lusophone immigrants, notably the Brazilians in Japan.

New!!: Romance languages and Portuguese language in Asia · See more »

Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement of 1990

The Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement of 1990 (Acordo Ortográfico da Língua Portuguesa de 1990) is an international treaty whose purpose is to create a unified orthography for the Portuguese language, to be used by all the countries that have Portuguese as their official language.

New!!: Romance languages and Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement of 1990 · See more »

Portuguese-based creole languages

Portuguese creoles are creole languages which have Portuguese as their substantial lexifier.

New!!: Romance languages and Portuguese-based creole languages · See more »

Possessive

A possessive form (abbreviated) is a word or grammatical construction used to indicate a relationship of possession in a broad sense.

New!!: Romance languages and Possessive · See more »

Postalveolar consonant

Postalveolar consonants (sometimes spelled post-alveolar) are consonants articulated with the tongue near or touching the back of the alveolar ridge, farther back in the mouth than the alveolar consonants, which are at the ridge itself but not as far back as the hard palate, the place of articulation for palatal consonants.

New!!: Romance languages and Postalveolar consonant · See more »

Preposition and postposition

Prepositions and postpositions, together called adpositions (or broadly, in English, simply prepositions), are a class of words used to express spatial or temporal relations (in, under, towards, before) or mark various semantic roles (of, for).

New!!: Romance languages and Preposition and postposition · See more »

Present perfect

The present perfect is a grammatical combination of the present tense and perfect aspect that is used to express a past event that has present consequences.

New!!: Romance languages and Present perfect · See more »

Present tense

The present tense (abbreviated or) is a grammatical tense whose principal function is to locate a situation or event in present time.

New!!: Romance languages and Present tense · See more »

Preterite

The preterite (abbreviated or) is a grammatical tense or verb form serving to denote events that took place or were completed in the past.

New!!: Romance languages and Preterite · See more »

Printing press

A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink.

New!!: Romance languages and Printing press · See more »

Pro-drop language

A pro-drop language (from "pronoun-dropping") is a language in which certain classes of pronouns may be omitted when they are pragmatically or grammatically inferable (the precise conditions vary from language to language, and can be quite intricate).

New!!: Romance languages and Pro-drop language · See more »

Prosthesis

In medicine, a prosthesis (plural: prostheses; from Ancient Greek prosthesis, "addition, application, attachment") is an artificial device that replaces a missing body part, which may be lost through trauma, disease, or congenital conditions.

New!!: Romance languages and Prosthesis · See more »

Proto-Romanian language

Proto-Romanian (also known as "Common Romanian", româna comună or "Ancient Romanian", străromâna, Balkan Latin) is a hypothetical and unattested Romance language evolved from Vulgar Latin and considered to have been spoken by the ancestors of today's Romanians and related Balkan Latin peoples (Vlachs) before 900 (7th–11th century AD).

New!!: Romance languages and Proto-Romanian language · See more »

Publius Clodius Pulcher

Publius Clodius Pulcher (c. December 93 BC – 52 BC, on January 18 of the pre-Julian calendar) was a Roman politician.

New!!: Romance languages and Publius Clodius Pulcher · See more »

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico (Spanish for "Rich Port"), officially the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico, "Free Associated State of Puerto Rico") and briefly called Porto Rico, is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the northeast Caribbean Sea.

New!!: Romance languages and Puerto Rico · See more »

Pyrenees

The Pyrenees (Pirineos, Pyrénées, Pirineus, Pirineus, Pirenèus, Pirinioak) is a range of mountains in southwest Europe that forms a natural border between Spain and France.

New!!: Romance languages and Pyrenees · See more »

Quebec

Quebec (Québec)According to the Canadian government, Québec (with the acute accent) is the official name in French and Quebec (without the accent) is the province's official name in English; the name is.

New!!: Romance languages and Quebec · See more »

Quill

A quill pen is a writing implement made from a moulted flight feather (preferably a primary wing-feather) of a large bird.

New!!: Romance languages and Quill · See more »

Réunion

Réunion (La Réunion,; previously Île Bourbon) is an island and region of France in the Indian Ocean, east of Madagascar and southwest of Mauritius.

New!!: Romance languages and Réunion · See more »

Réunion Creole

Réunion Creole, or Reunionese Creole (kréol rénioné; créole réunionnais), is a French-based creole language spoken on Réunion.

New!!: Romance languages and Réunion Creole · See more »

Red Book of Endangered Languages

The Red Book of Endangered Languages was published by UNESCO and collected a comprehensive list of the world's endangered languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Red Book of Endangered Languages · See more »

Reduced relative clause

A reduced relative clause is a relative clause that is not marked by an explicit relative pronoun or complementizer such as who, which or that.

New!!: Romance languages and Reduced relative clause · See more »

Reflexive pronoun

In language, a reflexive pronoun, sometimes simply called a reflexive, is a pronoun that is preceded or followed by the noun, adjective, adverb or pronoun to which it refers (its antecedent) within the same clause.

New!!: Romance languages and Reflexive pronoun · See more »

Reichenau Glosses

The Reichenau Glosses were compiled in the 8th century in Picardy to help local monks understand archaic terms in the Vulgate, which had been written over three centuries prior.

New!!: Romance languages and Reichenau Glosses · See more »

Relative pronoun

A relative pronoun marks a relative clause; it has the same referent in the main clause of a sentence that the relative modifies.

New!!: Romance languages and Relative pronoun · See more »

Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

New!!: Romance languages and Renaissance · See more »

Rhaeto-Romance languages

Rhaeto-Romance, or Rhaetian, is a traditional subfamily of the Romance languages that is spoken in north and north-eastern Italy and in Switzerland.

New!!: Romance languages and Rhaeto-Romance languages · See more »

Rhotic consonant

In phonetics, rhotic consonants, or "R-like" sounds, are liquid consonants that are traditionally represented orthographically by symbols derived from the Greek letter rho, including r in the Latin script and p in the Cyrillic script.

New!!: Romance languages and Rhotic consonant · See more »

Romagnol dialect

Romagnol (also known as Rumagnol) is a group of closely related dialects of the Emilian-Romagnol language spoken in the historical region of Romagna, which is today in the south-eastern part of Emilia-Romagna.

New!!: Romance languages and Romagnol dialect · See more »

Roman Britain

Roman Britain (Britannia or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.

New!!: Romance languages and Roman Britain · See more »

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

New!!: Romance languages and Roman Empire · See more »

Roman Italy

"Italia" was the name of the Italian Peninsula during the Roman era.

New!!: Romance languages and Roman Italy · See more »

Romance copula

A copula is a word that links the subject of a sentence with a predicate (a subject complement).

New!!: Romance languages and Romance copula · See more »

Romance novel

Although the genre is very old, the romance novel or romantic novel discussed in this article is the mass-market version.

New!!: Romance languages and Romance novel · See more »

Romance studies

Romance studies is an academic discipline that covers the study of the languages, literatures, and cultures of areas that speak a Romance language.

New!!: Romance languages and Romance studies · See more »

Romance verbs

Romance verbs refers to the verbs of the Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Romance verbs · See more »

Romance-speaking world

The Romance-speaking world, romanophone, neolatin world, or Latin-speaking world, is the part of the world where Romance languages (those derived from Latin) are either official, co-official, or significantly used, comprising Latin America, Latin Europe, Romance-speaking Africa and Romance-speaking Asia.

New!!: Romance languages and Romance-speaking world · See more »

Romanche

The Romanche is a long mountain river in southeastern France, right tributary of the Drac (itself a tributary of the Isère).

New!!: Romance languages and Romanche · See more »

Romanesco dialect

Romanesco is a variety of regional Italian spoken in the Metropolitan City of Rome Capital, especially in the core city.

New!!: Romance languages and Romanesco dialect · See more »

Romania

Romania (România) is a sovereign state located at the crossroads of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Romania · See more »

Romanian Cyrillic alphabet

The Romanian Cyrillic alphabet is the Cyrillic alphabet that was used to write the Romanian language before 1860–1862, when it was officially replaced by a Latin-based Romanian alphabet.

New!!: Romance languages and Romanian Cyrillic alphabet · See more »

Romanian language

Romanian (obsolete spellings Rumanian, Roumanian; autonym: limba română, "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is an East Romance language spoken by approximately 24–26 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

New!!: Romance languages and Romanian language · See more »

Romansh language

Romansh (also spelled Romansch, Rumantsch, or Romanche; Romansh:, rumàntsch, or) is a Romance language spoken predominantly in the southeastern Swiss canton of Grisons (Graubünden), where it has official status alongside German and Italian.

New!!: Romance languages and Romansh language · See more »

Saint Lucian Creole French

Saint Lucian Creole French, known locally as Patwá, is a French-based creole, which is the generally spoken language in Saint Lucia.

New!!: Romance languages and Saint Lucian Creole French · See more »

Sanskrit

Sanskrit is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism; a philosophical language of Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism and Jainism; and a former literary language and lingua franca for the educated of ancient and medieval India.

New!!: Romance languages and Sanskrit · See more »

Sardinia

| conventional_long_name.

New!!: Romance languages and Sardinia · See more »

Sardinian language

Sardinian or Sard (sardu, limba sarda or língua sarda) is the primary indigenous Romance language spoken on most of the island of Sardinia (Italy).

New!!: Romance languages and Sardinian language · See more »

Sardinian people

The Sardinians, or also the Sards (Sardos or Sardus; Italian and Sassarese: Sardi; Catalan: Sards or Sardos; Gallurese: Saldi; Ligurian: Sordi), are the native people and ethnic group from which Sardinia, a western Mediterranean island and autonomous region of Italy, derives its name.

New!!: Romance languages and Sardinian people · See more »

Sassarese language

Sassarese (Sassaresu or Turritanu) is an Italo-Dalmatian language and transitional variety between Corsican and Sardinian.

New!!: Romance languages and Sassarese language · See more »

São Tomé and Príncipe

São Tomé and Príncipe, officially the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, is an island nation in the Gulf of Guinea, off the western equatorial coast of Central Africa.

New!!: Romance languages and São Tomé and Príncipe · See more »

Schwa

In linguistics, specifically phonetics and phonology, schwa (rarely or; sometimes spelled shwa) is the mid central vowel sound (rounded or unrounded) in the middle of the vowel chart, denoted by the IPA symbol ə, or another vowel sound close to that position.

New!!: Romance languages and Schwa · See more »

Scrambling (linguistics)

Scrambling is a common term for pragmatic word order.

New!!: Romance languages and Scrambling (linguistics) · See more »

Semantic change

Semantic change (also semantic shift, semantic progression, semantic development, or semantic drift) is the evolution of word usage—usually to the point that the modern meaning is radically different from the original usage.

New!!: Romance languages and Semantic change · See more »

Semivowel

In phonetics and phonology, a semivowel or glide, also known as a non-syllabic vocoid, is a sound that is phonetically similar to a vowel sound but functions as the syllable boundary, rather than as the nucleus of a syllable.

New!!: Romance languages and Semivowel · See more »

Sentence (linguistics)

In non-functional linguistics, a sentence is a textual unit consisting of one or more words that are grammatically linked.

New!!: Romance languages and Sentence (linguistics) · See more »

Separatism

A common definition of separatism is that it is the advocacy of a state of cultural, ethnic, tribal, religious, racial, governmental or gender separation from the larger group.

New!!: Romance languages and Separatism · See more »

Sequence of Saint Eulalia

The Sequence of Saint Eulalia, also known as the Canticle of Saint Eulalia (Séquence/Cantilène de sainte Eulalie) is the earliest surviving piece of French hagiography and one of the earliest extant texts in the vernacular langues d'oïl (Old French).

New!!: Romance languages and Sequence of Saint Eulalia · See more »

Servigliano

Servigliano is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Fermo in the Italian region Marche, located about south of Ancona and about north of Ascoli Piceno.

New!!: Romance languages and Servigliano · See more »

Seychelles

Seychelles (French), officially the Republic of Seychelles (République des Seychelles; Creole: Repiblik Sesel), is an archipelago and sovereign state in the Indian Ocean.

New!!: Romance languages and Seychelles · See more »

Seychellois Creole

Seychellois Creole, also known as kreol or seselwa, is the French-based creole language of the Seychelles.

New!!: Romance languages and Seychellois Creole · See more »

Sibilant

Sibilance is an acoustic characteristic of fricative and affricate consonants of higher amplitude and pitch, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the sharp edge of the teeth, which are held close together; a consonant that uses sibilance may be called a sibilant.

New!!: Romance languages and Sibilant · See more »

Sicilian language

Sicilian (sicilianu; in Italian: Siciliano; also known as Siculo (siculu) or Calabro-Sicilian) is a Romance language spoken on the island of Sicily and its satellite islands.

New!!: Romance languages and Sicilian language · See more »

Silent letter

In an alphabetic writing system, a silent letter is a letter that, in a particular word, does not correspond to any sound in the word's pronunciation.

New!!: Romance languages and Silent letter · See more »

Slavic languages

The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) are the Indo-European languages spoken by the Slavic peoples.

New!!: Romance languages and Slavic languages · See more »

Slavs

Slavs are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group.

New!!: Romance languages and Slavs · See more »

Sociolect

In sociolinguistics, a sociolect or social dialect is a variety of language (a register) used by a socioeconomic class, a profession, an age group or other social group.

New!!: Romance languages and Sociolect · See more »

Soldier

A soldier is one who fights as part of an army.

New!!: Romance languages and Soldier · See more »

Somalia

Somalia (Soomaaliya; aṣ-Ṣūmāl), officially the Federal Republic of SomaliaThe Federal Republic of Somalia is the country's name per Article 1 of the.

New!!: Romance languages and Somalia · See more »

Sound change

Sound change includes any processes of language change that affect pronunciation (phonetic change) or sound system structures (phonological change).

New!!: Romance languages and Sound change · See more »

South America

South America is a continent in the Western Hemisphere, mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the Northern Hemisphere.

New!!: Romance languages and South America · See more »

Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the countries that are geographically south of China, east of India, west of New Guinea and north of Australia.

New!!: Romance languages and Southeast Asia · See more »

Southeast Europe

Southeast Europe or Southeastern Europe is a geographical region of Europe, consisting primarily of the coterminous Balkan peninsula.

New!!: Romance languages and Southeast Europe · See more »

Southern Italy

Southern Italy or Mezzogiorno (literally "midday") is a macroregion of Italy traditionally encompassing the territories of the former Kingdom of the two Sicilies (all the southern section of the Italian Peninsula and Sicily), with the frequent addition of the island of Sardinia.

New!!: Romance languages and Southern Italy · See more »

Southern Romance languages

The Southern Romance languages make up a sub-group of the family of Romance languages suggested by Ethnologue and Glottolog, but with little support among other linguists.

New!!: Romance languages and Southern Romance languages · See more »

Soviet Union

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991.

New!!: Romance languages and Soviet Union · See more »

Spain

Spain (España), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Reino de España), is a sovereign state mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Spain · See more »

Spanish Empire

The Spanish Empire (Imperio Español; Imperium Hispanicum), historically known as the Hispanic Monarchy (Monarquía Hispánica) and as the Catholic Monarchy (Monarquía Católica) was one of the largest empires in history.

New!!: Romance languages and Spanish Empire · See more »

Spanish language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin America and Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and Spanish language · See more »

Spanish language in the Americas

The different varieties of the Spanish language spoken in the Americas are distinct from Peninsular Spanish and Spanish spoken elsewhere, such as in Africa and Asia.

New!!: Romance languages and Spanish language in the Americas · See more »

Spanish-based creole languages

A Spanish creole, or Spanish-based creole language, is a creole language (contact language with native speakers) for which Spanish serves as its substantial lexifier.

New!!: Romance languages and Spanish-based creole languages · See more »

Split ergativity

Split ergativity is a term used by comparative linguists to refer to languages where some constructions use ergative syntax and morphology, but other constructions show another pattern, usually nominative-accusative.

New!!: Romance languages and Split ergativity · See more »

Standard language

A standard language or standard variety may be defined either as a language variety used by a population for public purposes or as a variety that has undergone standardization.

New!!: Romance languages and Standard language · See more »

Stop consonant

In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive or oral occlusive, is a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases.

New!!: Romance languages and Stop consonant · See more »

Stratum (linguistics)

In linguistics, a stratum (Latin for "layer") or strate is a language that influences, or is influenced by another through contact.

New!!: Romance languages and Stratum (linguistics) · See more »

Stress (linguistics)

In linguistics, and particularly phonology, stress or accent is relative emphasis or prominence given to a certain syllable in a word, or to a certain word in a phrase or sentence.

New!!: Romance languages and Stress (linguistics) · See more »

Subject pronoun

In linguistics, a subject pronoun is a personal pronoun that is used as the subject of a verb.

New!!: Romance languages and Subject pronoun · See more »

Subject–object–verb

In linguistic typology, a subject–object–verb (SOV) language is one in which the subject, object, and verb of a sentence always or usually appear in that order.

New!!: Romance languages and Subject–object–verb · See more »

Subject–verb–object

In linguistic typology, subject–verb–object (SVO) is a sentence structure where the subject comes first, the verb second, and the object third.

New!!: Romance languages and Subject–verb–object · See more »

Subjunctive mood

The subjunctive is a grammatical mood (that is, a way of speaking that allows people to express their attitude toward what they are saying) found in many languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Subjunctive mood · See more »

Suffix

In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.

New!!: Romance languages and Suffix · See more »

Sursilvan dialects (Romansh)

Sursilvan (or romontsch sursilvan) is a group of dialects of the Romansh language spoken in the Swiss district of Surselva.

New!!: Romance languages and Sursilvan dialects (Romansh) · See more »

Syllable

A syllable is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds.

New!!: Romance languages and Syllable · See more »

Syllable weight

In linguistics, syllable weight is the concept that syllables pattern together according to the number and/or duration of segments in the rime.

New!!: Romance languages and Syllable weight · See more »

Syntactic gemination

Syntactic gemination, or syntactic doubling, is an external sandhi phenomenon in Italian, Finnish and some Western Romance languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Syntactic gemination · See more »

Synthetic language

In linguistic typology, a synthetic language is a language with a high morpheme-per-word ratio, as opposed to a low morpheme-per-word ratio in what is described as an analytic language.

New!!: Romance languages and Synthetic language · See more »

Talossa

Talossa, officially the Kingdom of Talossa (Regipäts Talossan), is one of the earliest micronations — founded in 1979 by then 14-year-old Robert Ben Madison of Milwaukee and at first confined to his bedroom; he adopted the name after discovering that the word means "inside the house" in Finnish.

New!!: Romance languages and Talossa · See more »

T–V distinction

In sociolinguistics, a T–V distinction (from the Latin pronouns tu and vos) is a contrast, within one language, between various forms of addressing one's conversation partner or partners that are specialized for varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, age or insult toward the addressee.

New!!: Romance languages and T–V distinction · See more »

The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology is an etymological dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press.

New!!: Romance languages and The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology · See more »

Tilde

The tilde (in the American Heritage dictionary or; ˜ or ~) is a grapheme with several uses.

New!!: Romance languages and Tilde · See more »

Trigraph (orthography)

A trigraph (from the τρεῖς, treîs, "three" and γράφω, gráphō, "write") is a group of three characters used to represent a single sound or a combination of sounds that does not correspond to the written letters combined.

New!!: Romance languages and Trigraph (orthography) · See more »

Trill consonant

In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.

New!!: Romance languages and Trill consonant · See more »

Turkish language

Turkish, also referred to as Istanbul Turkish, is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around 10–15 million native speakers in Southeast Europe (mostly in East and Western Thrace) and 60–65 million native speakers in Western Asia (mostly in Anatolia).

New!!: Romance languages and Turkish language · See more »

Tuscan dialect

Tuscan (dialetto toscano) is a set of Italo-Dalmatian varieties mainly spoken in Tuscany, Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Tuscan dialect · See more »

United Nations

The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order.

New!!: Romance languages and United Nations · See more »

United States of Latin Africa

The United States of Latin Africa (French: Les États-Unis de l'Afrique Latine, Portuguese: Estados Unidos da África Latina, Spanish: Estados Unidos de África Latina) was the proposed union of Romance-language-speaking Central African countries envisioned by Barthélémy Boganda.

New!!: Romance languages and United States of Latin Africa · See more »

Uruguayan Portuguese

Uruguayan Portuguese (português uruguaio), also known as fronteiriço and portunhol riverense, is a variety of Portuguese with influences from Spanish.

New!!: Romance languages and Uruguayan Portuguese · See more »

Uvular consonant

Uvulars are consonants articulated with the back of the tongue against or near the uvula, that is, further back in the mouth than velar consonants.

New!!: Romance languages and Uvular consonant · See more »

V2 word order

In syntax, verb-second (V2) word order places the finite verb of a clause or sentence in second position with a single major constituent preceding it, which functions as the clause topic.

New!!: Romance languages and V2 word order · See more »

Valencian

Valencian (or; endonym: valencià, llengua valenciana, or idioma valencià) is a linguistic variety spoken in the Valencian Community, Spain. In the Valencian Community, Valencian is the traditional language and is co-official with Spanish. It is considered different from Catalan by a slight majority of the people of the Valencian Community (including non-speakers), but this is at odds with the broad academic view, which considers it a dialect of Catalan. A standardized form exists, based on the Southern Valencian dialect. Valencian belongs to the Western group of Catalan dialects. Under the Valencian Statute of Autonomy, the Valencian Academy of the Language (Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua, AVL) has been established as its regulator. The AVL considers Catalan and Valencian to be simply two names for the same language. Some of the most important works of Valencian literature experienced a golden age during the Late Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Important works include Joanot Martorell's chivalric romance Tirant lo Blanch, and Ausiàs March's poetry. The first book produced with movable type in the Iberian Peninsula was printed in the Valencian variety. The earliest recorded chess game with modern rules for moves of the queen and bishop was in the Valencian poem Scachs d'amor (1475).

New!!: Romance languages and Valencian · See more »

Valencian Community

The Valencian Community, or the Valencian Country, is an autonomous community of Spain.

New!!: Romance languages and Valencian Community · See more »

Variety (linguistics)

In sociolinguistics a variety, also called a lect, is a specific form of a language or language cluster.

New!!: Romance languages and Variety (linguistics) · See more »

Velar consonant

Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate, the back part of the roof of the mouth (known also as the velum).

New!!: Romance languages and Velar consonant · See more »

Venetian language

Venetian or Venetan (Venetian: vèneto, vènet or łéngua vèneta) is a Romance language spoken as a native language by almost four million people in the northeast of Italy,Ethnologue.

New!!: Romance languages and Venetian language · See more »

Verb

A verb, from the Latin verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand).

New!!: Romance languages and Verb · See more »

Vernacular

A vernacular, or vernacular language, is the language or variety of a language used in everyday life by the common people of a specific population.

New!!: Romance languages and Vernacular · See more »

Vlachs

Vlachs (or, or rarely), also Wallachians (and many other variants), is a historical term from the Middle Ages which designates an exonym (a name given by foreigners) used mostly for the Romanians who lived north and south of the Danube.

New!!: Romance languages and Vlachs · See more »

Vocative case

The vocative case (abbreviated) is the case used for a noun that identifies a person (animal, object etc.) being addressed or occasionally the determiners of that noun.

New!!: Romance languages and Vocative case · See more »

Voice (grammar)

In grammar, the voice of a verb describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified by its arguments (subject, object, etc.). When the subject is the agent or doer of the action, the verb is in the active voice.

New!!: Romance languages and Voice (grammar) · See more »

Voice (phonetics)

Voice is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds (usually consonants).

New!!: Romance languages and Voice (phonetics) · See more »

Voiced bilabial fricative

The voiced bilabial fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiced bilabial fricative · See more »

Voiced palatal fricative

The voiced palatal fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiced palatal fricative · See more »

Voiced palatal stop

The voiced palatal stop, or voiced palatal plosive, is a type of consonantal sound in some vocal languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiced palatal stop · See more »

Voiced postalveolar fricative

Voiced fricatives produced in the postalveolar region include the voiced palato-alveolar fricative, the voiced postalveolar non-sibilant fricative, the voiced retroflex fricative, and the voiced alveolo-palatal fricative.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiced postalveolar fricative · See more »

Voiced retroflex stop

The voiced retroflex stop is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiced retroflex stop · See more »

Voiceless dental fricative

The voiceless dental non-sibilant fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiceless dental fricative · See more »

Voiceless pharyngeal fricative

The voiceless pharyngeal fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiceless pharyngeal fricative · See more »

Voiceless postalveolar fricative

Voiceless fricatives produced in the postalveolar region include the voiceless palato-alveolar fricative, the voiceless postalveolar non-sibilant fricative, the voiceless retroflex fricative, and the voiceless alveolo-palatal fricative.

New!!: Romance languages and Voiceless postalveolar fricative · See more »

Volapük

Volapük (in English; in Volapük) is a constructed language, created in 1879 and 1880 by Johann Martin Schleyer, a Roman Catholic priest in Baden, Germany.

New!!: Romance languages and Volapük · See more »

Vowel

A vowel is one of the two principal classes of speech sound, the other being a consonant.

New!!: Romance languages and Vowel · See more »

Vowel breaking

In historical linguistics, vowel breaking, vowel fracture, or diphthongization is the change of a monophthong into a diphthong or triphthong.

New!!: Romance languages and Vowel breaking · See more »

Vowel length

In linguistics, vowel length is the perceived duration of a vowel sound.

New!!: Romance languages and Vowel length · See more »

Vulgar Latin

Vulgar Latin or Sermo Vulgaris ("common speech") was a nonstandard form of Latin (as opposed to Classical Latin, the standard and literary version of the language) spoken in the Mediterranean region during and after the classical period of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Romance languages and Vulgar Latin · See more »

Vulgate

The Vulgate is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible that became the Catholic Church's officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible during the 16th century.

New!!: Romance languages and Vulgate · See more »

Walloon language

Walloon (Walon in Walloon) is a Romance language that is spoken in much of Wallonia in Belgium, in some villages of Northern France (near Givet) and in the northeast part of WisconsinUniversité du Wisconsin: collection de documents sur l'immigration wallonne au Wisconsin, enregistrements de témoignages oraux en anglais et wallon, 1976 until the mid 20th century and in some parts of Canada.

New!!: Romance languages and Walloon language · See more »

Welsh language

Welsh (Cymraeg or y Gymraeg) is a member of the Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages.

New!!: Romance languages and Welsh language · See more »

Wenedyk

Wenedyk (Venedic) is a naturalistic constructed language, created by the Dutch translator Jan van Steenbergen (who also co-created the international auxiliary language Interslavic).

New!!: Romance languages and Wenedyk · See more »

Western Europe

Western Europe is the region comprising the western part of Europe.

New!!: Romance languages and Western Europe · See more »

Western Lombard dialect

Western Lombard is one of the main varieties of Lombard, a Romance language spoken in Italy.

New!!: Romance languages and Western Lombard dialect · See more »

Western Roman Empire

In historiography, the Western Roman Empire refers to the western provinces of the Roman Empire at any one time during which they were administered by a separate independent Imperial court, coequal with that administering the eastern half, then referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire.

New!!: Romance languages and Western Roman Empire · See more »

Western Romance languages

Western Romance languages are one of the two subdivisions of a proposed subdivision of the Romance languages based on the La Spezia–Rimini line.

New!!: Romance languages and Western Romance languages · See more »

World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

New!!: Romance languages and World War II · See more »

Redirects here:

Continental Romance languages, Eastern and Southern Romance languages, Eastern and Southern languages, ISO 639:roa, Languages derived from Latin, Latin languages, Latin tongues, Latinate language, Latinate languages, Latino Asian, List of Asturo-Leonese languages, List of Castilian languages, List of Eastern Romance languages, List of Gallo-Iberian languages, List of Gallo-Italian languages, List of Gallo-Rhaetian languages, List of Gallo-Romance languages, List of Ibero-Romance languages, List of Italo-Dalmatian languages, List of Italo-Western Romance languages, List of Oc languages, List of Portuguese-Galician languages, List of Pyrenean-Mozarabic languages, List of Rhaetian languages, List of Romance languages, List of Sardinian languages, List of Southern Romance languages, List of West Iberian languages, Neo Latin languages, Neo-Latin languages, Neo-Romance, Neo-Romance languages, Neo-Romanic languages, Neo-romance languages, Neolatin languages, Neolatine language, New Latin languages, Other Romance language, Romance Language, Romance Languages, Romance dialect, Romance language, Romance tongues, Romance-language, Romance-speaking, RomanceLanguages, Romanic, Romanic language, Romanic languages, Romantic Language, Romantic Languages, Romantic languages, Romlang.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »