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Rules of chess

Index Rules of chess

The rules of chess (also known as the laws of chess) are rules governing the play of the game of chess. [1]

88 relations: A History of Chess, Adjournment (games), Adolf Anderssen, Alexander McDonnell, Alfil (chess), Algebraic notation (chess), Bare king, Bishop (chess), Board game, Buff (colour), Castling, Cheating in chess, Check (chess), Checkmate, Chess, Chess clock, Chess endgame, Chess engine, Chess notation, Chess piece, Chess tournament, Chess960, Chessboard, Clock, Correspondence chess, Daniel Harrwitz, Descriptive notation, Draughts, Draw (chess), Draw by agreement, Elijah Williams (chess player), Elo rating system, En passant, Eric Schiller, Fast chess, Ferz, FIDE, Fifty-move rule, François-André Danican Philidor, Glossary of chess, Handbuch des Schachspiels, Harry Golombek, History of chess, Howard Staunton, ICCF numeric notation, Ignatz Kolisch, International Arbiter, Internet chess server, Italy, Jacob Sarratt, ..., Johann Berger, Johann Löwenthal, Kenneth Harkness, King (chess), Knight (chess), Libro de la invencion liberal y arte del juego del axedrez, London 1851 chess tournament, Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais, Luis Ramírez de Lucena, Mikhail Tal, Mobile phone, New In Chess, Paul Rudolf von Bilguer, Pawn (chess), Perpetual check, Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant, Pin (chess), Promotion (chess), Queen (chess), Random House, Rook (chess), Round-robin tournament, Ruy López de Segura, Stalemate, Staunton chess set, Swiss-system tournament, Tassilo von Heydebrand und der Lasa, The Daily Telegraph, The Oxford Companion to Chess, The Scotsman, Threefold repetition, Tim Krabbé, Time control, Touch-move rule, United States Chess Federation, White and Black in chess, Women's World Chess Championship 2008, Zugzwang. Expand index (38 more) »

A History of Chess

The book A History of Chess was written by H. J. R. Murray (1868–1955) and published in 1913.

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Adjournment (games)

Some board games, such as chess and Go, use an adjournment mechanism to suspend the game in progress so it can be continued at another time, typically the following day.

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Adolf Anderssen

Karl Ernst Adolf Anderssen (July 6, 1818 – March 13, 1879)"Anderssen, Adolf" in The New Encyclopædia Britannica.

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Alexander McDonnell

Alexander McDonnell (1798–1835) was an Irish chess master, who contested a series of six matches with the world's leading player Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais in the summer of 1834.

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Alfil (chess)

An alfil (or elephant) is a xiangqi piece and fairy chess piece that jumps two squares diagonally.

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Algebraic notation (chess)

Algebraic notation (or AN) is a method for recording and describing the moves in a game of chess.

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Bare king

In chess and chess variants, a bare king (or lone king) is a game position where one player has only the king remaining (i.e. all the player's other pieces have been).

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Bishop (chess)

A bishop (♗,♝) is a piece in the board game of chess.

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Board game

A board game is a tabletop game that involves counters or moved or placed on a pre-marked surface or "board", according to a set of rules.

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Buff (colour)

Buff is the pale yellow-brown colour of the undyed leather of several animals.

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Castling

Castling is a move in the game of chess involving a player's king and either of the player's original rooks.

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Cheating in chess

Cheating in chess refers to a deliberate violation of the rules of chess or other unethical behaviour that is intended to give an unfair advantage to a player or team.

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Check (chess)

A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.

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Checkmate

Checkmate (often shortened to mate) is a game position in chess and other chess-like games in which a player's king is in check (threatened with) and there is no way to remove the threat.

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Chess

Chess is a two-player strategy board game played on a chessboard, a checkered gameboard with 64 squares arranged in an 8×8 grid.

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Chess clock

A chess clock consists of two adjacent clocks with buttons to stop one clock while starting the other, so that the two clocks never run simultaneously.

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Chess endgame

In chess and chess-like games, the endgame (or end game or ending) is the stage of the game when few pieces are left on the board.

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Chess engine

In computer chess, a chess engine is a computer program that analyses chess or chess variant positions and makes decisions on the best chess moves.

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Chess notation

Chess notations are various systems that have developed to record either the moves made in a game of chess or the position of pieces on a chessboard.

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Chess piece

A chess piece, or chessman, is any of the six different movable objects used on a chessboard to play the game of chess.

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Chess tournament

A chess tournament is a series of chess games played competitively to determine a winning individual or team.

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Chess960

Chess960, also called Fischer Random Chess (originally Fischerandom), is a variant of chess invented and advocated by former world chess champion Bobby Fischer, announced publicly on June 19, 1996, in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Chessboard

A chessboard is the type of checkerboard used in the board game chess, consisting of 64 squares (eight rows and eight columns).

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Clock

A clock is an instrument to measure, keep, and indicate time.

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Correspondence chess

Correspondence chess is chess or variant chess played by various forms of long-distance correspondence, often through a correspondence chess server, a public internet chess forum, email, or the postal system.

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Daniel Harrwitz

Daniel Harrwitz (29 April 1823 – 9 January 1884) was a Jewish German chess master.

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Descriptive notation

Descriptive notation is a notation for recording chess games, and at one time was the most popular notation in English- and Spanish-speaking countries.

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Draughts

Draughts (British English) or checkers (American English) is a group of strategy board games for two players which involve diagonal moves of uniform game pieces and mandatory captures by jumping over opponent pieces.

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Draw (chess)

In chess, a draw is the result of a game ending in a tie.

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Draw by agreement

In chess, a draw by (mutual) agreement is the outcome of a game due to the agreement of both players to a draw.

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Elijah Williams (chess player)

Elijah Williams (7 October 1809 – 8 September 1854) was an eminent British chess player of the mid-19th century.

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Elo rating system

The Elo rating system is a method for calculating the relative skill levels of players in zero-sum games such as chess.

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En passant

En passant (in passing) is a move in chess.

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Eric Schiller

Eric Schiller (born March 20, 1955 in New York City) is an American chess player, trainer, arbiter and one of the most prolific authors of books on chess in the 20th century.

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Fast chess

Fast chess (also known as speed chess) is a variation of chess in which each side is given less time to make their moves than under normal tournament time controls.

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Ferz

A ferz (or fers) is a fairy chess piece that moves like a bishop, but can only go one square.

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FIDE

The Fédération Internationale des Échecs or World Chess Federation is an international organization that connects the various national chess federations around the world and acts as the governing body of international chess competition.

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Fifty-move rule

The fifty-move rule in chess states that a player can claim a draw if no has been made and no pawn has been moved in the last fifty moves (for this purpose a "move" consists of a player completing their turn followed by the opponent completing their turn).

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François-André Danican Philidor

François-André Danican Philidor (September 7, 1726 – August 31, 1795), often referred to as André Danican Philidor during his lifetime, was a French composer and chess player.

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Glossary of chess

This page explains commonly used terms in chess in alphabetical order.

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Handbuch des Schachspiels

Handbuch des Schachspiels (Handbook of Chess, often simply called the Handbuch) is a chess book, first published in 1843 by Tassilo von Heydebrand und der Lasa.

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Harry Golombek

Harry Golombek OBE (1 March 1911 – 7 January 1995), was a British chess grandmaster, chess arbiter, chess author, and wartime codebreaker.

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History of chess

The history of chess can be traced back nearly 1500 years, although the earliest origins are uncertain.

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Howard Staunton

Howard Staunton (1810 – 22 June 1874) was an English chess master who is generally regarded as having been the world's strongest player from 1843 to 1851, largely as a result of his 1843 victory over Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant.

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ICCF numeric notation

ICCF numeric notation is the official chess game notation for all International Correspondence Chess Federation games.

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Ignatz Kolisch

Baron Ignatz von Kolisch (6 April 1837 – 30 April 1889), also Baron Ignaz von Kolisch (German) or báró Kolisch Ignác (Hungarian), was a merchant, journalist and chess master with Jewish roots. Kolisch was born into a Jewish family in Pressburg. Both in business and as a chess player he was eminently successful. In his early years he moved to Vienna, then spent a year in Italy. In 1859 he arrived in Paris and in 1860-62 mostly sojourned in London. In summer 1862 he accompanied the Russian Count Kushelev-Bezborodko to St. Petersburg, where he won a match against Shumov. Later he moved to Paris and in 1869 to Vienna. He became involved in banking and became a millionaire and chess patron, organizing and sponsoring important chess tournaments in the 1870s and 1880s. He founded the Wiener Börse-Syndikatskasse in 1869, and in 1873 established a commission house in Paris; and by prudent management he acquired considerable wealth. In 1881 he received the title of baron from Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. As a chess player, Kolisch soon became known for his brilliant and aggressive style, but he was not a frequent participant in tournaments. In 1860 he won the first prize at the international tournament held at Cambridge, England. In 1861 he lost a match to Adolf Anderssen, the strongest player of the day, by a score of 5–4. The same year, he drew a match with Louis Paulsen. In 1867 at the Paris tournament he secured first place, defeating both Szymon Winawer and Wilhelm Steinitz. Kolisch was the founder and editor-in-chief of the Wiener Allgemeine Zeitung, to which, under the pseudonym "Ideka", he contributed many feuilletons. The protagonist in the short story "The chessbaron" (A sakkbáró) by Ferenc Móra is based on him. He died of kidney failure in 1889.

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International Arbiter

In chess, International Arbiter is a title awarded by FIDE to individuals deemed capable of acting as arbiter in important chess matches.

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Internet chess server

An Internet chess server (ICS) is an external server that provides the facility to play, discuss, and view the board game of chess over the Internet.

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Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

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Jacob Sarratt

Jacob Henry Sarratt (1772 – 6 November 1819) was one of the top English chess players of the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

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Johann Berger

Johann Nepomuk Berger (11 April 1845, Graz – 17 October 1933) was an Austrian chess master, theorist, endgame study composer, author and editor.

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Johann Löwenthal

Johann Jacob Löwenthal (Löwenthal János Jakab; 15 July 1810 – 24 July 1876) was a professional chess master.

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Kenneth Harkness

Kenneth Harkness (byname of Stanley Edgar; November 12, 1896 – October 4, 1972) was a chess organizer.

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King (chess)

In chess, the king (♔,♚) is the most important piece.

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Knight (chess)

The knight (♘ ♞) is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).

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Libro de la invencion liberal y arte del juego del axedrez

Libro de la invencion liberal y arte del juego del axedrez (translation: Book of the liberal invention and art of the game of chess) is one of the first books published about modern chess in Europe, after Pedro Damiano's 1512 book.

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London 1851 chess tournament

London 1851 was the first international chess tournament.

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Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais

Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais (1795– December 1840) was a French chess master, possibly the strongest player in the early 19th century.

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Luis Ramírez de Lucena

Luis Ramírez de Lucena (c. 1465 – c. 1530) was a Spanish chess player who published the first still-existing chess book.

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Mikhail Tal

Mikhail Nekhemyevich Tal (Mihails Tāls; Михаил Нехемьевич Таль, Mikhail Nekhem'evich Tal,; sometimes transliterated Mihails Tals or Mihail Tal; 9 November 1936 – 28 June 1992) was a Soviet Latvian chess Grandmaster and the eighth World Chess Champion (from 1960 to 1961).

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Mobile phone

A mobile phone, known as a cell phone in North America, is a portable telephone that can make and receive calls over a radio frequency link while the user is moving within a telephone service area.

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New In Chess

New In Chess (NIC) is a chess magazine that appears eight times a year with chief editors International Grandmaster Jan Timman and Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam.

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Paul Rudolf von Bilguer

Paul Rudolf (or Rudolph) von Bilguer (21 September 1815 – 16 September 1840) was a German chess master and chess theoretician from Ludwigslust in the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin.

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Pawn (chess)

The pawn (♙,♟) is the most numerous piece in the game of chess, and in most circumstances, also the weakest.

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Perpetual check

In the game of chess, perpetual check is a situation in which one player can force a draw by an unending series of checks.

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Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant

Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant (12 September 1800 – 29 October 1872) was a leading French chess master and an editor of the chess periodical Le Palamède.

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Pin (chess)

In chess, a pin is a situation brought on by an attacking piece in which a defending piece cannot move without exposing a more valuable defending piece on its other side to capture by the attacking piece.

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Promotion (chess)

Promotion is a chess rule that requires a pawn that reaches its eighth to be immediately replaced by the player's choice of a queen, knight, rook, or bishop of the same.

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Queen (chess)

The queen (♕,♛) is the most powerful piece in the game of chess, able to move any number of squares vertically, horizontally or diagonally.

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Random House

Random House is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world.

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Rook (chess)

A rook (♖,♜) is a piece in the strategy board game of chess.

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Round-robin tournament

A round-robin tournament (or all-play-all tournament) is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn.

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Ruy López de Segura

Rodrigo (Ruy) López de Segura (c. 1530 – c. 1580) was a Spanish priest and later bishop in Segura whose 1561 book Libro de la invención liberal y arte del juego del Axedrez was one of the first definitive books about modern chess in Europe, preceded only by Pedro Damiano's 1512 book, Luis Ramírez de Lucena's 1497 book (the oldest surviving printed book on chess), and the Göttingen manuscript (authorship and exact date of the manuscript are unknown).

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Stalemate

Stalemate is a situation in the game of chess where the player whose turn it is to move is not in check but has no legal move.

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Staunton chess set

The Staunton chess set is composed of a particular style of chess pieces used to play the game of chess.

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Swiss-system tournament

A Swiss-system tournament is a non-eliminating tournament format which features a set number of rounds of competition, but considerably fewer than in a round-robin tournament.

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Tassilo von Heydebrand und der Lasa

Tassilo, Baron von Heydebrand und der Lasa (known in English as "Baron von der Lasa", 17 October 1818, Berlin – 27 July 1899, Storchnest near Lissa, Greater Poland, then German Empire) was an important German chess master, chess historian and theoretician of the nineteenth century, a member of the Berlin Chess Club and a founder of the Berlin Chess School (the Berlin Pleiades).

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The Daily Telegraph

The Daily Telegraph, commonly referred to simply as The Telegraph, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally.

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The Oxford Companion to Chess

The Oxford Companion to Chess is a reference book on the game of chess, written by David Hooper and Kenneth Whyld.

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The Scotsman

The Scotsman is a Scottish compact newspaper and daily news website headquartered in Edinburgh.

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Threefold repetition

In chess and some other abstract strategy games, the threefold repetition rule (also known as repetition of position) states that a player can claim a draw if the same position occurs three times, or will occur after their next move, with the same player to move.

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Tim Krabbé

Tim Krabbé (born 13 April 1943) is a Dutch journalist and novelist.

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Time control

A time control is a mechanism in the tournament play of almost all two-player board games so that each round of the match can finish in a timely way and the tournament can proceed.

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Touch-move rule

The touch-move rule in chess specifies that, if a player deliberately touches a piece on the board when it is his turn to move, then he must move or capture that piece if it is legal to do so.

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United States Chess Federation

The United States Chess Federation (also known as US Chess or USCF) is the governing body for chess competition in the United States and represents the U.S. in FIDE, the World Chess Federation.

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White and Black in chess

In chess, the player who moves first is referred to as "White" and the player who moves second is referred to as "Black".

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Women's World Chess Championship 2008

The Women's World Chess Championship 2008 took place from August 28, 2008 to September 18 in Nalchik, Russia.

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Zugzwang

Zugzwang (German for "compulsion to move") is a situation found in chess and other games wherein one player is put at a disadvantage because they must make a move when they would prefer to pass and not move.

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Redirects here:

Chess law, Chess laws, Chess rule, Chess rules, Laws of Chess, Laws of chess, Rule of chess, Rules of Chess.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rules_of_chess

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