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S2 (star)

Index S2 (star)

Source 2 (abbreviated S2), also known as S0–2, is a star that is located close to the radio source Sagittarius A*, orbiting it with an orbital period of 15.56 ± 0.35 years, a semi-major axis of about 970 AU, and a pericenter distance of 17 light hours (18 Tm or 120 AU)—an orbit with a period only about 30% longer than that of Jupiter around the Sun, but coming no closer than about four times the distance of Neptune from the Sun. [1]

32 relations: Andrea M. Ghez, Apparent magnitude, Apsis, Astronomical radio source, Astronomical unit, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Declination, Epoch (astronomy), European Southern Observatory, Galaxy, General relativity, International Celestial Reference System, Jupiter, Kepler orbit, Light-second, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Milky Way, Neptune, Neutron star, Parsec, Right ascension, S0–102, Sagittarius (constellation), Sagittarius A*, Semi-major and semi-minor axes, Solar mass, Stellar classification, Sun, Supermassive black hole, The Astrophysical Journal, University of California, Los Angeles, White dwarf.

Andrea M. Ghez

Andrea Mia Ghez (born June 16, 1965) is an American astronomer and professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UCLA.

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Apparent magnitude

The apparent magnitude of a celestial object is a number that is a measure of its brightness as seen by an observer on Earth.

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Apsis

An apsis (ἁψίς; plural apsides, Greek: ἁψῖδες) is an extreme point in the orbit of an object.

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Astronomical radio source

Astronomical radio sources are objects in outer space that emit strong radio waves.

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Astronomical unit

The astronomical unit (symbol: au, ua, or AU) is a unit of length, roughly the distance from Earth to the Sun.

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Astronomy & Astrophysics

Astronomy & Astrophysics is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering theoretical, observational, and instrumental astronomy and astrophysics.

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Declination

In astronomy, declination (abbreviated dec; symbol δ) is one of the two angles that locate a point on the celestial sphere in the equatorial coordinate system, the other being hour angle.

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Epoch (astronomy)

In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time.

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European Southern Observatory

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is a 15-nation intergovernmental research organization for ground-based astronomy.

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Galaxy

A galaxy is a gravitationally bound system of stars, stellar remnants, interstellar gas, dust, and dark matter.

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General relativity

General relativity (GR, also known as the general theory of relativity or GTR) is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915 and the current description of gravitation in modern physics.

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International Celestial Reference System

The International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) is the current standard celestial reference system adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

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Jupiter

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest in the Solar System.

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Kepler orbit

In celestial mechanics, a Kepler orbit (or Keplerian orbit) is the motion of one body relative to another, as an ellipse, parabola, or hyperbola, which forms a two-dimensional orbital plane in three-dimensional space.

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Light-second

The light-second is a unit of length useful in astronomy, telecommunications and relativistic physics.

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Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics

The Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics is a Max Planck Institute, located in Garching, near Munich, Germany.

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Milky Way

The Milky Way is the galaxy that contains our Solar System.

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Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System.

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Neutron star

A neutron star is the collapsed core of a large star which before collapse had a total of between 10 and 29 solar masses.

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Parsec

The parsec (symbol: pc) is a unit of length used to measure large distances to astronomical objects outside the Solar System.

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Right ascension

Right ascension (abbreviated RA; symbol) is the angular distance measured only eastward along the celestial equator from the Sun at the March equinox to the (hour circle of the) point above the earth in question.

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S0–102

S0–102 is a star that is located very close to the centre of the Milky Way, near the radio source Sagittarius A*, orbiting it with an orbital period of 11.5 years.

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Sagittarius (constellation)

Sagittarius is one of the constellations of the zodiac.

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Sagittarius A*

Sagittarius A* (pronounced "Sagittarius A-star", standard abbreviation Sgr A*) is a bright and very compact astronomical radio source at the center of the Milky Way, near the border of the constellations Sagittarius and Scorpius.

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Semi-major and semi-minor axes

In geometry, the major axis of an ellipse is its longest diameter: a line segment that runs through the center and both foci, with ends at the widest points of the perimeter.

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Solar mass

The solar mass is a standard unit of mass in astronomy, equal to approximately.

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Stellar classification

In astronomy, stellar classification is the classification of stars based on their spectral characteristics.

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Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

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Supermassive black hole

A supermassive black hole (SMBH or SBH) is the largest type of black hole, on the order of hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses, and is found in the centre of almost all currently known massive galaxies.

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The Astrophysical Journal

The Astrophysical Journal, often abbreviated ApJ (pronounced "ap jay") in references and speech, is a peer-reviewed scientific journal of astrophysics and astronomy, established in 1895 by American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler.

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University of California, Los Angeles

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) is a public research university in the Westwood district of Los Angeles, United States.

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White dwarf

A white dwarf, also called a degenerate dwarf, is a stellar core remnant composed mostly of electron-degenerate matter.

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Redirects here:

S0-2, S0–2.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S2_(star)

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