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Samuel Eliot Morison

Index Samuel Eliot Morison

Samuel Eliot Morison (July 9, 1887 – May 15, 1976) was an American historian noted for his works of maritime history and American history that were both authoritative and popular. [1]

130 relations: "V" device, Albert Bushnell Hart, Alfred A. Knopf, American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medals, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Campaign Medal, American Heritage (magazine), Amherst College, Asiatic–Pacific Campaign Medal, Azores, Bachelor of Arts, Baltimore, Balzan Prize, Bancroft Prize, Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, Battle of Savo Island, Boston, Boston College, Bucknell University, Campus, Canary Islands, Captain (United States O-6), Caribbean, Cádiz, Central America, Christopher Columbus, College of the Holy Cross, Columbia University, Commonwealth Avenue (Boston), Destroyer, East Coker, East Coker (poem), Eliot family (America), Emerson-Thoreau Medal, Equestrianism, European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, Four Quartets, Frank Knox, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Frigate, Harrison Gray Otis (politician), Hartford, Connecticut, Harvard University, Harvard University Press, Heavy cruiser, Henry Steele Commager, History of United States Naval Operations in World War II, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Intellectual, Italians, ..., J. B. Lippincott & Co., Joel Elias Spingarn, John Keegan, John Paul Jones, Kamikaze, Ketch, Legion of Merit, Lieutenant commander, Lisbon, Little, Brown and Company, Loubat Prize, Lyndon B. Johnson, Madeira, Maine, Manuscript, Maritime history, Massachusetts, Master's degree, Merrymount Press, Mount Desert Island, NAACP, Naval Order of the United States, Navy Unit Commendation, New Bedford, Massachusetts, New England, New France, Noble and Greenough School, Northeast Harbor, Maine, Of Plymouth Plantation, Oilskin, Order of Isabella the Catholic, Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, Order of the White Rose of Finland, Oxford University Press, Pacific Ocean theater of World War II, Paris Peace Conference, 1919, Philippine Liberation Medal, Portugal, Presidential Medal of Freedom, Pulitzer Prize, Puritans, Rear admiral, Regia Marina, Sailing, Samuel de Champlain, Samuel Eliot, Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature, Sciences Po, Society for Military History, Society of the Cincinnati, St. Paul's School (New Hampshire), Stereotypes of African Americans, Stroke, Synergy, T. S. Eliot, The New York Times, The Phoenix – S K Club, Trinidad, Trinity College (Connecticut), Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, Union College, United States, United States Army, United States Navy, United States Navy in World War II, United States Navy Reserve, United States Secretary of the Navy, University of California, Berkeley, University of Oxford, USS Constitution Museum, USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13), William H. Prescott, William Leuchtenburg, Williams College, Workmanship, World War I, World War I Victory Medal (United States), World War II, World War II Victory Medal (United States), Yale University. Expand index (80 more) »

"V" device

A "V" device is a metal capital letter "V" with serifs which, when worn on certain decorations awarded by the United States Armed Forces, distinguishes an award for heroism or valor in combat instead of for meritorious service or achievement.

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Albert Bushnell Hart

Albert Bushnell Hart (July 1, 1854July 16, 1943), was an American historian, writer, and editor based at Harvard University.

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Alfred A. Knopf

Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. is a New York publishing house that was founded by Alfred A. Knopf Sr. and Blanche Knopf in 1915.

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American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medals

Two American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medals are awarded each year by the academy for distinguished achievement.

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American Academy of Arts and Sciences

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the oldest learned societies in the United States of America.

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American Campaign Medal

The American Campaign Medal is a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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American Heritage (magazine)

American Heritage is a magazine dedicated to covering the history of the United States of America for a mainstream readership.

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Amherst College

Amherst College is a private liberal arts college located in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States.

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Asiatic–Pacific Campaign Medal

The Asiatic–Pacific Campaign Medal is a United States military award of the Second World War, which was awarded to any member of the United States Armed Forces who served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945.

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Azores

The Azores (or; Açores), officially the Autonomous Region of the Azores (Região Autónoma dos Açores), is one of the two autonomous regions of Portugal.

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Bachelor of Arts

A Bachelor of Arts (BA or AB, from the Latin baccalaureus artium or artium baccalaureus) is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both.

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Baltimore

Baltimore is the largest city in the U.S. state of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States.

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Balzan Prize

The International Balzan Prize Foundation awards four annual monetary prizes to people or organizations who have made outstanding achievements in the fields of humanities, natural sciences, culture, as well as for endeavours for peace and the brotherhood of man.

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Bancroft Prize

The Bancroft Prize is awarded each year by the trustees of Columbia University for books about diplomacy or the history of the Americas.

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Bartlett's Familiar Quotations

Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, often simply called Bartlett's, is an American reference work that is the longest-lived and most widely distributed collection of quotations.

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Battle of Savo Island

The Battle of Savo Island, also known as the First Battle of Savo Island and, in Japanese sources, as the, and colloquially among Allied Guadalcanal veterans as The Battle of the Five Sitting Ducks, was a naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II between the Imperial Japanese Navy and Allied naval forces.

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Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

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Boston College

Boston College (also referred to as BC) is a private Jesuit Catholic research university located in the affluent village of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States, west of downtown Boston.

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Bucknell University

Bucknell University is a private liberal arts college in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

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Campus

A campus is traditionally the land on which a college or university and related institutional buildings are situated.

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Canary Islands

The Canary Islands (Islas Canarias) is a Spanish archipelago and autonomous community of Spain located in the Atlantic Ocean, west of Morocco at the closest point.

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Captain (United States O-6)

In the United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (USPHS), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps (NOAA Corps), captain is the senior-most commissioned officer rank below that of flag officer (i.e., admirals).

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Caribbean

The Caribbean is a region that consists of the Caribbean Sea, its islands (some surrounded by the Caribbean Sea and some bordering both the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean) and the surrounding coasts.

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Cádiz

Cádiz (see other pronunciations below) is a city and port in southwestern Spain.

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Central America

Central America (América Central, Centroamérica) is the southernmost, isthmian portion of the North American continent, which connects with the South American continent on the southeast.

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Christopher Columbus

Christopher Columbus (before 31 October 145120 May 1506) was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonizer.

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College of the Holy Cross

The College of the Holy Cross or better known simply as Holy Cross is a private, undergraduate, Roman Catholic, Jesuit liberal arts college located in Worcester, Massachusetts, United States.

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Columbia University

Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

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Commonwealth Avenue (Boston)

Commonwealth Avenue (colloquially referred to as Comm Ave by locals) is a major street in the cities of Boston and Newton, Massachusetts.

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Destroyer

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, maneuverable long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller powerful short-range attackers.

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East Coker

East Coker is a village and civil parish in the South Somerset district of Somerset, England.

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East Coker (poem)

East Coker is the second poem of T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets.

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Eliot family (America)

The Eliot family is the American branch of one of several British families to hold this surname.

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Emerson-Thoreau Medal

The Emerson-Thoreau Medal is a literary prize awarded by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to persons for their total literary achievement in the broad field of literature rather than for a specific work.

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Equestrianism

Equestrianism (from Latin equester, equestr-, equus, horseman, horse), more often known as riding, horse riding (British English) or horseback riding (American English), refers to the skill of riding, driving, steeplechasing or vaulting with horses.

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European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal

The European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt The medal was intended to recognize those military service members who had performed military duty in the European Theater (to include North Africa and the Middle East) during the years of the Second World War.

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Four Quartets

Four Quartets is a set of four poems written by T. S. Eliot that were published over a six-year period.

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Frank Knox

William Franklin Knox (January 1, 1874 – April 28, 1944) was an American newspaper editor and publisher.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

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Frigate

A frigate is any of several types of warship, the term having been used for ships of various sizes and roles over the last few centuries.

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Harrison Gray Otis (politician)

Harrison Gray Otis (October 8, 1765October 28, 1848), was a businessman, lawyer, and politician, becoming one of the most important leaders of the United States' first political party, the Federalists.

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Hartford, Connecticut

Hartford is the capital of the U.S. state of Connecticut.

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Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.

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Heavy cruiser

The heavy cruiser was a type of cruiser, a naval warship designed for long range and high speed, armed generally with naval guns of roughly 203mm calibre (8 inches in caliber) of whose design parameters were dictated by the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 and the London Naval Treaty of 1930.

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Henry Steele Commager

Henry Steele Commager (October 25, 1902 – March 2, 1998) was an American historian.

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History of United States Naval Operations in World War II

The History of United States Naval Operations in World War II is a 15-volume account of the United States Navy in World War II, written by Samuel Eliot Morison and published by Little, Brown and Company between 1947 and 1962.

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) is an educational and trade publisher in the United States.

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Intellectual

An intellectual is a person who engages in critical thinking, research, and reflection about society and proposes solutions for its normative problems.

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Italians

The Italians (Italiani) are a Latin European ethnic group and nation native to the Italian peninsula.

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J. B. Lippincott & Co.

J.

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Joel Elias Spingarn

Joel Elias Spingarn (May 17, 1875 – July 26, 1939) was an American educator, literary critic, and civil rights activist.

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John Keegan

Sir John Desmond Patrick Keegan (15 May 1934 – 2 August 2012) was an English military historian, lecturer, writer and journalist.

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John Paul Jones

John Paul Jones (born John Paul; July 6, 1747 July 18, 1792) was the United States' first well-known naval commander in the American Revolutionary War.

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Kamikaze

, officially, were a part of the Japanese Special Attack Units of military aviators who initiated suicide attacks for the Empire of Japan against Allied naval vessels in the closing stages of the Pacific campaign of World War II, designed to destroy warships more effectively than possible with conventional air attacks.

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Ketch

A ketch is a two-masted sailing craft whose mainmast is taller than the mizzen mast (or aft-mast).

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Legion of Merit

The Legion of Merit (LOM) is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements.

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Lieutenant commander

Lieutenant commander (also hyphenated lieutenant-commander and abbreviated LCdr, LCdr. or LCDR) is a commissioned officer rank in many navies.

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Lisbon

Lisbon (Lisboa) is the capital and the largest city of Portugal, with an estimated population of 552,700, Census 2011 results according to the 2013 administrative division of Portugal within its administrative limits in an area of 100.05 km2.

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Little, Brown and Company

Little, Brown and Company is an American publisher founded in 1837 by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown, and for close to two centuries has published fiction and nonfiction by American authors.

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Loubat Prize

The Loubat Prize was a pair of prizes awarded by Columbia University every five years between 1898 and 1958 for the best social science works in the English language about North America.

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Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908January 22, 1973), often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963.

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Madeira

Madeira is a Portuguese archipelago situated in the north Atlantic Ocean, southwest of Portugal.

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Maine

Maine is a U.S. state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Manuscript

A manuscript (abbreviated MS for singular and MSS for plural) was, traditionally, any document written by hand -- or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten -- as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way.

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Maritime history

Maritime history is the study of human interaction with and activity at sea.

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Massachusetts

Massachusetts, officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Master's degree

A master's degree (from Latin magister) is an academic degree awarded by universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice.

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Merrymount Press

Merrymount Press was a printing press in Boston, Massachusetts, founded by Daniel Berkeley Updike in 1893.

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Mount Desert Island

Mount Desert Island (MDI) in Hancock County, Maine, is the largest island off the coast of Maine.

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NAACP

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is a civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909 as a bi-racial organization to advance justice for African Americans by a group, including, W. E. B. Du Bois, Mary White Ovington and Moorfield Storey.

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Naval Order of the United States

The Naval Order of the United States was established in 1890 as a hereditary organization in the United States for members of the American sea services.

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Navy Unit Commendation

The Navy Unit Commendation (NUC) is a United States Navy unit award that was established by order of the Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal on 18 December 1944.

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New Bedford, Massachusetts

New Bedford is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States.

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New England

New England is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

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New France

New France (Nouvelle-France) was the area colonized by France in North America during a period beginning with the exploration of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Great Britain and Spain in 1763.

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Noble and Greenough School

The Noble and Greenough School, commonly known as Nobles, is a coeducational, nonsectarian day and five-day boarding school for students in grades seven through twelve.

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Northeast Harbor, Maine

Northeast Harbor is a village on Mount Desert Island, located in the town of Mount Desert in Hancock County, Maine, United States.

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Of Plymouth Plantation

Of Plymouth Plantation was written over a period of years by William Bradford, the leader of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts.

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Oilskin

An oilskin is a waterproof garment, typically worn by sailors and by others in wet areas, such as fish-plant workers.

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Order of Isabella the Catholic

The Order of Isabella the Catholic (Orden de Isabel la Católica) is a Spanish civil order in which membership is granted in recognition of services that benefit the country.

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Order of Merit of the Italian Republic

The Order of Merit of the Italian Republic (Ordine al merito della Repubblica Italiana) was founded as the senior order of knighthood by the second President of the Italian Republic, Luigi Einaudi in 1951.

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Order of the White Rose of Finland

The Order of the White Rose of Finland (Suomen Valkoisen Ruusun ritarikunta; Finlands Vita Ros’ orden) is one of three official orders in Finland, along with the Order of the Cross of Liberty, and the Order of the Lion of Finland.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Pacific Ocean theater of World War II

The Pacific Ocean theater, during World War II, was a major theater of the war between the Allies and the Empire of Japan.

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Paris Peace Conference, 1919

The Paris Peace Conference, also known as Versailles Peace Conference, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers.

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Philippine Liberation Medal

The Philippine Liberation Medal is a military award of the Republic of the Philippines which was created by an order of Commonwealth Army of the Philippines Headquarters on 20 December 1944, and was issued as the Philippine Liberation Ribbon.

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Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic (República Portuguesa),In recognized minority languages of Portugal: Portugal is the oldest state in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the oldest in Europe, its territory having been continuously settled, invaded and fought over since prehistoric times.

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Presidential Medal of Freedom

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is an award bestowed by the President of the United States and is—along with the comparable Congressional Gold Medal—the highest civilian award of the United States.

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Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States.

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Puritans

The Puritans were English Reformed Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to "purify" the Church of England from its "Catholic" practices, maintaining that the Church of England was only partially reformed.

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Rear admiral

Rear admiral is a naval commissioned officer rank above that of a commodore (U.S equivalent of Commander) and captain, and below that of a vice admiral.

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Regia Marina

The Royal Navy (Italian: Regia Marina) was the navy of the Kingdom of Italy (Regno d'Italia) from 1861 to 1946.

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Sailing

Sailing employs the wind—acting on sails, wingsails or kites—to propel a craft on the surface of the water (sailing ship, sailboat, windsurfer, or kitesurfer), on ice (iceboat) or on land (land yacht) over a chosen course, which is often part of a larger plan of navigation.

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Samuel de Champlain

Samuel de Champlain (born Samuel Champlain; on or before August 13, 1574Fichier OrigineFor a detailed analysis of his baptismal record, see RitchThe baptism act does not contain information about the age of Samuel, neither his birth date or his place of birth. – December 25, 1635), known as "The Father of New France", was a French navigator, cartographer, draftsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat, and chronicler.

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Samuel Eliot

Samuel Eliot (December 22, 1821 – September 14, 1898) was a historian, educator, and public-minded citizen of Boston, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut.

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Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature

The Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature is for literature about the United States Navy.

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Sciences Po

The Paris Institute of Political Studies (Institut d'études politiques de Paris), commonly referred as Sciences Po, is a highly selective French university (legally a grande école).

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Society for Military History

The Society for Military History is a United States-based international organization of scholars who research, write, and teach military history of all time periods and places.

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Society of the Cincinnati

The Society of the Cincinnati is a hereditary society with branches in the United States and France, founded in 1783, to preserve the ideals and fellowship of officers of the Continental Army who served in the Revolutionary War.

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St. Paul's School (New Hampshire)

St.

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Stereotypes of African Americans

Stereotypes and generalizations about African Americans and their culture have evolved within American society dating back to the colonial years of settlement, particularly after slavery became a racial institution that was heritable.

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Stroke

A stroke is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death.

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Synergy

Synergy is the creation of a whole that is greater than the simple sum of its parts.

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T. S. Eliot

Thomas Stearns Eliot, (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965), was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and "one of the twentieth century's major poets".

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Phoenix – S K Club

The Phoenix – S K Club is one of six male final clubs at Harvard College, which traces its earliest roots to 1895.

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Trinidad

Trinidad is the larger and more populous of the two major islands of Trinidad and Tobago.

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Trinity College (Connecticut)

Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut.

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Ulrich Bonnell Phillips

Ulrich Bonnell Phillips (November 4, 1877 – January 21, 1934) was an American historian who largely defined the field of the social and economic history of the antebellum American South and slavery.

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Union College

Union College is a private, non-denominational liberal arts college located in Schenectady, New York, United States.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Army

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces.

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United States Navy

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

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United States Navy in World War II

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from 1941–45, and played the central role in the war against Japan.

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United States Navy Reserve

The United States Navy Reserve (USNR), known as the United States Naval Reserve from 1915 to 2005, is the Reserve Component (RC) of the United States Navy.

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United States Secretary of the Navy

The Secretary of the Navy (or SECNAV) is a statutory officer and the head (chief executive officer) of the Department of the Navy, a military department (component organization) within the Department of Defense of the United States of America.

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University of California, Berkeley

The University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Cal, or California) is a public research university in Berkeley, California.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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USS Constitution Museum

The USS Constitution Museum is located in the Charlestown Navy Yard, which is part of the Boston National Historical Park in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

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USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13)

USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13), was the seventh in service with the United States Navy.

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William H. Prescott

William Hickling Prescott (May 4, 1796 – January 28, 1859) was an American historian and Hispanist, who is widely recognized by historiographers to have been the first American scientific historian.

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William Leuchtenburg

William Edward Leuchtenburg (born September 28, 1922 in Ridgewood, New York) is William Rand Kenan Jr.

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Williams College

Williams College is a private liberal arts college in Williamstown, Massachusetts, United States.

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Workmanship

Workmanship is a human attribute relating to knowledge and skill at performing a task.

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World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

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World War I Victory Medal (United States)

The World War I Victory Medal is a service medal of the United States military which was first created in 1919, designed by James Earle Fraser.

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World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

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World War II Victory Medal (United States)

The World War II Victory Medal is a service medal of the United States military which was established by an Act of Congress on 6 July 1945 (Public Law 135, 79th Congress) and promulgated by Section V, War Department Bulletin 12, 1945.

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Yale University

Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut.

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Redirects here:

Morison, Samuel Eliot, S. E. Morison, Samuel E. Morison, Samuel E. Morrison, Samuel Eliot Morisson, Samuel Eliot Morrison, Samuel Eliot Morrisson, Samuel Eliott Morison, Samuel Eliott Morisson, Samuel Eliott Morrison, Samuel Eliott Morrisson, Samuel Elliot Morison, Samuel Elliot Morisson, Samuel Elliot Morrison, Samuel Elliot Morrisson, Samuel Elliott Morison, Samuel Elliott Morisson, Samuel Elliott Morrison, Samuel Elliott Morrisson.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Eliot_Morison

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