Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Scattering theory

Index Scattering theory

In mathematics and physics, scattering theory is a framework for studying and understanding the scattering of waves and particles. [1]

81 relations: Acoustic location, Acoustics, Alpha particle, Atomic nucleus, Attenuation coefficient, Backscatter, Barn (unit), Billiard ball, Born approximation, Bound state, Boundary value problem, Brillouin scattering, Central force, Classical electromagnetism, Compton scattering, Continuous spectrum, Cross section (physics), Deep inelastic scattering, Differential equation, Diffuse sky radiation, Discrete spectrum, Drop (liquid), Elementary particle, Extinction (astronomy), Faddeev equations, Geophysics, Gold, Hilbert space, Hydrogen atom, Inelastic mean free path, Inelastic scattering, Integrable system, Inverse scattering problem, Inverse scattering transform, Ionization, Light, Lippmann–Schwinger equation, Manifold, Mass attenuation coefficient, Mathematical physics, Mathematics, Mean free path, Medical imaging, Mie scattering, Nondestructive testing, Opacity (optics), Operator theory, Partial differential equation, Partial wave analysis, Particle physics, ..., Physics, Plane wave, Quantum chemistry, Quantum chromodynamics, Quantum electrodynamics, Quantum field theory, Quantum mechanics, Radar, Radio wave, Rainbow, Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Refractive index, Rutherford scattering, S-matrix, Scattering, Scattering from rough surfaces, Schrödinger equation, Scintillation (physics), Seawater, Sound, Spectral line, Spectrum (functional analysis), Standard Model, Submarine, Sunlight, The Optical Society, Time, Wave, Wave equation, Wightman axioms. Expand index (31 more) »

Acoustic location

Acoustic location is the use of sound to determine the distance and direction of its source or reflector.

New!!: Scattering theory and Acoustic location · See more »

Acoustics

Acoustics is the branch of physics that deals with the study of all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids including topics such as vibration, sound, ultrasound and infrasound.

New!!: Scattering theory and Acoustics · See more »

Alpha particle

Alpha particles consist of two protons and two neutrons bound together into a particle identical to a helium-4 nucleus.

New!!: Scattering theory and Alpha particle · See more »

Atomic nucleus

The atomic nucleus is the small, dense region consisting of protons and neutrons at the center of an atom, discovered in 1911 by Ernest Rutherford based on the 1909 Geiger–Marsden gold foil experiment.

New!!: Scattering theory and Atomic nucleus · See more »

Attenuation coefficient

Attenuation coefficient or narrow beam attenuation coefficient of the volume of a material characterizes how easily it can be penetrated by a beam of light, sound, particles, or other energy or matter.

New!!: Scattering theory and Attenuation coefficient · See more »

Backscatter

In physics, backscatter (or backscattering) is the reflection of waves, particles, or signals back to the direction from which they came.

New!!: Scattering theory and Backscatter · See more »

Barn (unit)

A barn (symbol: b) is a unit of area equal to 10−28 m2 (100 fm2).

New!!: Scattering theory and Barn (unit) · See more »

Billiard ball

A billiard ball is a small, hard ball used in cue sports, such as carom billiards, pool, and snooker.

New!!: Scattering theory and Billiard ball · See more »

Born approximation

Generally in scattering theory and in particular in quantum mechanics, the Born approximation consists of taking the incident field in place of the total field as the driving field at each point in the scatterer.

New!!: Scattering theory and Born approximation · See more »

Bound state

In quantum physics, a bound state is a special quantum state of a particle subject to a potential such that the particle has a tendency to remain localised in one or more regions of space.

New!!: Scattering theory and Bound state · See more »

Boundary value problem

In mathematics, in the field of differential equations, a boundary value problem is a differential equation together with a set of additional constraints, called the boundary conditions.

New!!: Scattering theory and Boundary value problem · See more »

Brillouin scattering

Brillouin scattering, named after Léon Brillouin, refers to the interaction of light and material waves within a medium.

New!!: Scattering theory and Brillouin scattering · See more »

Central force

In classical mechanics, a central force on an object is a force that is directed along the line joining the object and the origin: where \scriptstyle \vec is the force, F is a vector valued force function, F is a scalar valued force function, r is the position vector, ||r|| is its length, and \scriptstyle \hat.

New!!: Scattering theory and Central force · See more »

Classical electromagnetism

Classical electromagnetism or classical electrodynamics is a branch of theoretical physics that studies the interactions between electric charges and currents using an extension of the classical Newtonian model.

New!!: Scattering theory and Classical electromagnetism · See more »

Compton scattering

Compton scattering, discovered by Arthur Holly Compton, is the scattering of a photon by a charged particle, usually an electron.

New!!: Scattering theory and Compton scattering · See more »

Continuous spectrum

In physics, a continuous spectrum usually means a set of attainable values for some physical quantity (such as energy or wavelength) that is best described as an interval of real numbers, as opposed to a discrete spectrum, a set of attainable values that is discrete in the mathematical sense, where there is a positive gap between each value and the next one.

New!!: Scattering theory and Continuous spectrum · See more »

Cross section (physics)

When two particles interact, their mutual cross section is the area transverse to their relative motion within which they must meet in order to scatter from each other.

New!!: Scattering theory and Cross section (physics) · See more »

Deep inelastic scattering

Deep inelastic scattering is the name given to a process used to probe the insides of hadrons (particularly the baryons, such as protons and neutrons), using electrons, muons and neutrinos.

New!!: Scattering theory and Deep inelastic scattering · See more »

Differential equation

A differential equation is a mathematical equation that relates some function with its derivatives.

New!!: Scattering theory and Differential equation · See more »

Diffuse sky radiation

Diffuse sky radiation is solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface after having been scattered from the direct solar beam by molecules or particulates in the atmosphere.

New!!: Scattering theory and Diffuse sky radiation · See more »

Discrete spectrum

A physical quantity is said to have a discrete spectrum if it takes only distinct values, with gaps between one value and the next.

New!!: Scattering theory and Discrete spectrum · See more »

Drop (liquid)

A drop or droplet is a small column of liquid, bounded completely or almost completely by free surfaces.

New!!: Scattering theory and Drop (liquid) · See more »

Elementary particle

In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle with no substructure, thus not composed of other particles.

New!!: Scattering theory and Elementary particle · See more »

Extinction (astronomy)

In astronomy, extinction is the absorption and scattering of electromagnetic radiation by dust and gas between an emitting astronomical object and the observer.

New!!: Scattering theory and Extinction (astronomy) · See more »

Faddeev equations

The Faddeev equations, named after their inventor Ludvig Faddeev, are equations that describe, at once, all the possible exchanges/interactions in a system of three particles in a fully quantum mechanical formulation.

New!!: Scattering theory and Faddeev equations · See more »

Geophysics

Geophysics is a subject of natural science concerned with the physical processes and physical properties of the Earth and its surrounding space environment, and the use of quantitative methods for their analysis.

New!!: Scattering theory and Geophysics · See more »

Gold

Gold is a chemical element with symbol Au (from aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally.

New!!: Scattering theory and Gold · See more »

Hilbert space

The mathematical concept of a Hilbert space, named after David Hilbert, generalizes the notion of Euclidean space.

New!!: Scattering theory and Hilbert space · See more »

Hydrogen atom

A hydrogen atom is an atom of the chemical element hydrogen.

New!!: Scattering theory and Hydrogen atom · See more »

Inelastic mean free path

The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) is an index of how far an electron on average travels through a solid before losing energy.

New!!: Scattering theory and Inelastic mean free path · See more »

Inelastic scattering

In chemistry, nuclear physics, and particle physics, inelastic scattering is a fundamental scattering process in which the kinetic energy of an incident particle is not conserved (in contrast to elastic scattering).

New!!: Scattering theory and Inelastic scattering · See more »

Integrable system

In the context of differential equations to integrate an equation means to solve it from initial conditions.

New!!: Scattering theory and Integrable system · See more »

Inverse scattering problem

In mathematics and physics, the inverse scattering problem is the problem of determining characteristics of an object, based on data of how it scatters incoming radiation or particles.

New!!: Scattering theory and Inverse scattering problem · See more »

Inverse scattering transform

In mathematics, the inverse scattering transform is a method for solving some non-linear partial differential equations.

New!!: Scattering theory and Inverse scattering transform · See more »

Ionization

Ionization or ionisation, is the process by which an atom or a molecule acquires a negative or positive charge by gaining or losing electrons to form ions, often in conjunction with other chemical changes.

New!!: Scattering theory and Ionization · See more »

Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation within a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

New!!: Scattering theory and Light · See more »

Lippmann–Schwinger equation

The Lippmann–Schwinger equation (named after Bernard Lippmann and Julian Schwinger) is one of the most used equations to describe particle collisions – or, more precisely, scattering – in quantum mechanics.

New!!: Scattering theory and Lippmann–Schwinger equation · See more »

Manifold

In mathematics, a manifold is a topological space that locally resembles Euclidean space near each point.

New!!: Scattering theory and Manifold · See more »

Mass attenuation coefficient

The mass attenuation coefficient, mass extinction coefficient, or mass narrow beam attenuation coefficient of the volume of a material characterizes how easily it can be penetrated by a beam of light, sound, particles, or other energy or matter.

New!!: Scattering theory and Mass attenuation coefficient · See more »

Mathematical physics

Mathematical physics refers to the development of mathematical methods for application to problems in physics.

New!!: Scattering theory and Mathematical physics · See more »

Mathematics

Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") is the study of such topics as quantity, structure, space, and change.

New!!: Scattering theory and Mathematics · See more »

Mean free path

In physics, the mean free path is the average distance traveled by a moving particle (such as an atom, a molecule, a photon) between successive impacts (collisions), which modify its direction or energy or other particle properties.

New!!: Scattering theory and Mean free path · See more »

Medical imaging

Medical imaging is the technique and process of creating visual representations of the interior of a body for clinical analysis and medical intervention, as well as visual representation of the function of some organs or tissues (physiology).

New!!: Scattering theory and Medical imaging · See more »

Mie scattering

The Mie solution to Maxwell's equations (also known as the Lorenz–Mie solution, the Lorenz–Mie–Debye solution or Mie scattering) describes the scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a homogeneous sphere.

New!!: Scattering theory and Mie scattering · See more »

Nondestructive testing

Nondestructive testing or non-destructive testing (NDT) is a wide group of analysis techniques used in science and technology industry to evaluate the properties of a material, component or system without causing damage.

New!!: Scattering theory and Nondestructive testing · See more »

Opacity (optics)

Opacity is the measure of impenetrability to electromagnetic or other kinds of radiation, especially visible light.

New!!: Scattering theory and Opacity (optics) · See more »

Operator theory

In mathematics, operator theory is the study of linear operators on function spaces, beginning with differential operators and integral operators.

New!!: Scattering theory and Operator theory · See more »

Partial differential equation

In mathematics, a partial differential equation (PDE) is a differential equation that contains unknown multivariable functions and their partial derivatives.

New!!: Scattering theory and Partial differential equation · See more »

Partial wave analysis

Partial wave analysis, in the context of quantum mechanics, refers to a technique for solving scattering problems by decomposing each wave into its constituent angular momentum components and solving using boundary conditions.

New!!: Scattering theory and Partial wave analysis · See more »

Particle physics

Particle physics (also high energy physics) is the branch of physics that studies the nature of the particles that constitute matter and radiation.

New!!: Scattering theory and Particle physics · See more »

Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

New!!: Scattering theory and Physics · See more »

Plane wave

In the physics of wave propagation, a plane wave (also spelled planewave) is a wave whose wavefronts (surfaces of constant phase) are infinite parallel planes.

New!!: Scattering theory and Plane wave · See more »

Quantum chemistry

Quantum chemistry is a branch of chemistry whose primary focus is the application of quantum mechanics in physical models and experiments of chemical systems.

New!!: Scattering theory and Quantum chemistry · See more »

Quantum chromodynamics

In theoretical physics, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of the strong interaction between quarks and gluons, the fundamental particles that make up composite hadrons such as the proton, neutron and pion.

New!!: Scattering theory and Quantum chromodynamics · See more »

Quantum electrodynamics

In particle physics, quantum electrodynamics (QED) is the relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics.

New!!: Scattering theory and Quantum electrodynamics · See more »

Quantum field theory

In theoretical physics, quantum field theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework for constructing quantum mechanical models of subatomic particles in particle physics and quasiparticles in condensed matter physics.

New!!: Scattering theory and Quantum field theory · See more »

Quantum mechanics

Quantum mechanics (QM; also known as quantum physics, quantum theory, the wave mechanical model, or matrix mechanics), including quantum field theory, is a fundamental theory in physics which describes nature at the smallest scales of energy levels of atoms and subatomic particles.

New!!: Scattering theory and Quantum mechanics · See more »

Radar

Radar is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects.

New!!: Scattering theory and Radar · See more »

Radio wave

Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum longer than infrared light.

New!!: Scattering theory and Radio wave · See more »

Rainbow

A rainbow is a meteorological phenomenon that is caused by reflection, refraction and dispersion of light in water droplets resulting in a spectrum of light appearing in the sky.

New!!: Scattering theory and Rainbow · See more »

Raman scattering

Raman scattering or the Raman effect is the inelastic scattering of a photon by molecules which are excited to higher vibrational or rotational energy levels.

New!!: Scattering theory and Raman scattering · See more »

Rayleigh scattering

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic scattering of light or other electromagnetic radiation by particles much smaller than the wavelength of the radiation.

New!!: Scattering theory and Rayleigh scattering · See more »

Refractive index

In optics, the refractive index or index of refraction of a material is a dimensionless number that describes how light propagates through that medium.

New!!: Scattering theory and Refractive index · See more »

Rutherford scattering

Rutherford scattering is the elastic scattering of charged particles by the Coulomb interaction.

New!!: Scattering theory and Rutherford scattering · See more »

S-matrix

In physics, the S-matrix or scattering matrix relates the initial state and the final state of a physical system undergoing a scattering process.

New!!: Scattering theory and S-matrix · See more »

Scattering

Scattering is a general physical process where some forms of radiation, such as light, sound, or moving particles, are forced to deviate from a straight trajectory by one or more paths due to localized non-uniformities in the medium through which they pass.

New!!: Scattering theory and Scattering · See more »

Scattering from rough surfaces

Surface roughness scattering or interface roughness scattering is the elastic scattering of a charged particle by an imperfect interface between two different materials.

New!!: Scattering theory and Scattering from rough surfaces · See more »

Schrödinger equation

In quantum mechanics, the Schrödinger equation is a mathematical equation that describes the changes over time of a physical system in which quantum effects, such as wave–particle duality, are significant.

New!!: Scattering theory and Schrödinger equation · See more »

Scintillation (physics)

Scintillation is a flash of light produced in a transparent material by the passage of a particle (an electron, an alpha particle, an ion, or a high-energy photon).

New!!: Scattering theory and Scintillation (physics) · See more »

Seawater

Seawater, or salt water, is water from a sea or ocean.

New!!: Scattering theory and Seawater · See more »

Sound

In physics, sound is a vibration that typically propagates as an audible wave of pressure, through a transmission medium such as a gas, liquid or solid.

New!!: Scattering theory and Sound · See more »

Spectral line

A spectral line is a dark or bright line in an otherwise uniform and continuous spectrum, resulting from emission or absorption of light in a narrow frequency range, compared with the nearby frequencies.

New!!: Scattering theory and Spectral line · See more »

Spectrum (functional analysis)

In mathematics, particularly in functional analysis, the spectrum of a bounded operator is a generalisation of the set of eigenvalues of a matrix.

New!!: Scattering theory and Spectrum (functional analysis) · See more »

Standard Model

The Standard Model of particle physics is the theory describing three of the four known fundamental forces (the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, and not including the gravitational force) in the universe, as well as classifying all known elementary particles.

New!!: Scattering theory and Standard Model · See more »

Submarine

A submarine (or simply sub) is a watercraft capable of independent operation underwater.

New!!: Scattering theory and Submarine · See more »

Sunlight

Sunlight is a portion of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun, in particular infrared, visible, and ultraviolet light.

New!!: Scattering theory and Sunlight · See more »

The Optical Society

The Optical Society (originally established as The Optical Society of America, OSA) is a scientific society dedicated to advancing the study of light—optics and photonics—in theory and application, by means of publishing, organizing conferences and exhibitions, partnership with industry, and education.

New!!: Scattering theory and The Optical Society · See more »

Time

Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.

New!!: Scattering theory and Time · See more »

Wave

In physics, a wave is a disturbance that transfers energy through matter or space, with little or no associated mass transport.

New!!: Scattering theory and Wave · See more »

Wave equation

The wave equation is an important second-order linear partial differential equation for the description of waves—as they occur in classical physics—such as mechanical waves (e.g. water waves, sound waves and seismic waves) or light waves.

New!!: Scattering theory and Wave equation · See more »

Wightman axioms

In physics, the Wightman axioms (also called Gårding–Wightman axioms), named after Lars Gårding and Arthur Wightman, are an attempt at a mathematically rigorous formulation of quantum field theory.

New!!: Scattering theory and Wightman axioms · See more »

Redirects here:

Direct scattering, Direct scattering problem, Scattering Theory, Scattering pattern, Scattering patterns.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scattering_theory

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »