Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Science

+ Save concept

R. P. Feynman, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol.1, Chaps.1,2,&3. [1]

586 relations: A priori and a posteriori, Abbasid Caliphate, Academic institution, Academy, Academy of Gondishapur, Academy of sciences, Accademia dei Lincei, Acidification, Affirming the consequent, Age of Enlightenment, Aircraft, Al-Kindi, Albert Einstein, Alchemy, Algebra, Almagest, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Philosophical Society, Analytic–synthetic distinction, Anatomy, Anaximander, Anaximenes of Miletus, Ancient Greek, Ancient Greek philosophy, Annals of Science, Antibiotic, Antibody, Antimatter, Antiquarian science books, Apollo program, Applied science, Arab world, Archimedes, Argument from authority, Aristarchus of Samos, Aristotelian physics, Aristotelianism, Aristotle, Arithmetic, Arsphenamine, Astrology, Astronomy, Atom, Atomic energy, Atomic theory, Atomism, Authoritarianism, Avicenna, Axiom, Babylonia, ..., Baghdad, Bakelite, Barry Stroud, Basic Books, Basic research, Battery cage, Bayesian probability, Beat reporting, Big Bang, Biology, Biotechnology, Blue skies research, Book of Optics, Branches of science, Broadcasting, Byzantine Empire, Cable television, Calculator, Calculus, Caliphate, Cambridge University Press, Camera obscura, Cancer, Car, Cargo cult science, Caroline Herschel, Cartesian doubt, Catholic Church, Causality, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Cepheid variable, Certainty, Charles Darwin, Charles Sanders Peirce, Chemistry, Chris Mooney (journalist), Christine Ladd-Franklin, Citizen science, Civilization, Classical antiquity, Classical mechanics, Classical physics, Climate change, Communications satellite, Company, Compass, Computational science, Computing, Concept, Condemnations of 1210–1277, Confirmation bias, Consciousness, Conservation of energy, Conservation of mass, Consilience, Constant of motion, Constructive empiricism, Correlation does not imply causation, Cosmic microwave background, Creation science, Critical rationalism, Criticism of science, Crystallography, CSIRO, CT scan, Curium, Daedalus (journal), David C. Lindberg, David Papineau, Decision theory, Deductive reasoning, Deep brain stimulation, Demarcation problem, Democritus, Design of experiments, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Developed country, Dialectic, Diffraction, Divination, DNA, Doxycycline, Dynamics (mechanics), Early Middle Ages, Economics, Edwina Currie, Electric current, Electric heating, Electric light, Electricity, Electromagnetism, Electron, Electronics, Emergency service, Emmy Noether, Empirical evidence, Empiricism, Encyclopédie, Energy, Energy quality, Engineering, Entertainment, Entropy, Environmental issue, Environmental protection, Environmental science, Environmental technology, Epistemological anarchism, Equations for a falling body, Ethics, Ethology, Euclid, Eutrophication, Evolution, Expansion of the universe, Explanation, Fact, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, Faience, Fallacy, Fallacy of the single cause, Fallibilism, Falsifiability, Fertilizer, First observation of gravitational waves, Floodplain, Formal science, Formula, Four causes, Francis Bacon, French Academy of Sciences, Fringe science, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Funding of science, Galen, Galileo Galilei, General relativity, Generic top-level domain, Geocentric model, Geometry, Geophysics, Georges Lemaître, Gerald J. Toomer, Gerard of Cremona, Germ theory of disease, Global Positioning System, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Government agency, Gravitational wave, Great Britain, Great Wall of China, Gross domestic product, Health care, Heliocentrism, Hellenistic philosophy, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Herophilos, Higgs boson, Hipparchus, Hippocrates, History of science, Homer, House of Wisdom, Human behavior, Human Genome Project, Humanities, Hundred Schools of Thought, Hydraulic engineering, Hygiene, Hypatia, Hypothesis, Hypothetico-deductive model, Ibn Abi Usaibia, Ibn al-Haytham, Ibn Sahl (mathematician), Idealism, Ideology, Imre Lakatos, Index of branches of science, Induced pluripotent stem cell, Inductivism, Industrial Revolution, Information technology, Information theory, Inoculation, Instrumentalism, Integrated circuit, Intercontinental ballistic missile, International Council for Science, Internet, Interpretations of quantum mechanics, Intersubjective verifiability, Iraq, Isaac Newton, Isidore of Seville, Islamic Golden Age, Isotopic labeling, Johannes Kepler, John Dalton, John Dewey, John Herschel, John Horgan (journalist), John Peckham, John Philoponus, John Ziman, Joseph Needham, Journal des sçavans, Junk science, Kaiser Wilhelm Society, Karl Popper, Keith Stanovich, Kepler's laws of planetary motion, Knowledge, Laser, Late antiquity, Latin, Learned society, LED lamp, Leucippus, Library of Alexandria, Lightning rod, Lime plaster, List of life sciences, List of natural phenomena, List of science magazines, List of scientific occupations, Literature, Logic, London, Long Island, Loudspeaker, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Lynn Townsend White Jr., Machine, Macmillan Publishers, Magic (supernatural), Magnetic resonance imaging, Magnetic tape, Magnetism, Marie Curie, Mass media, Mathematical and theoretical biology, Mathematical chemistry, Mathematical economics, Mathematical finance, Mathematical logic, Mathematical physics, Mathematics, Max Born, Max Planck Society, Measurement, Mechanical philosophy, Medical imaging, Medical prescription, Medical research, Medicine, Mercury (planet), Merriam-Webster, Mesopotamia, Metallurgy, Metaphysics, Metaphysics (Aristotle), Methodology, Michael Shermer, Microwave, Migration Period, Milesian school, Mining engineering, MMR vaccine, Mobile computing, Mobile phone, Modern history, Mohism, Momentum, Mondino de Luzzi, Mongol invasions and conquests, Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi, Musica universalis, Mythology, NASA, National Academy of Sciences, National Science Foundation, National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Natural History (Pliny), Natural law, Natural philosophy, Natural science, Natural selection, Naturalism (philosophy), Naturalized epistemology, Nature, Navigation, New Scientist, Newsday, Newtonianism, Nicolaus Copernicus, Night vision, Nina Byers, Nomenclature, Non-overlapping magisteria, Normative science, Nuclear arms race, Nuclear fusion, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Nuclear power, Nuclear reactor, Nuclear weapon, Number theory, Objectivity (science), Observation, Observational study, Occam's razor, OECD, Office of Scientific Research and Development, On the Origin of Species, Optical fiber, Optics, Optics (Ptolemy), Orbital period, Outline of physical science, Outline of science, Oxford English Dictionary, Oxfordshire, Ozone depletion, Pathological science, Paul Feyerabend, Peer review, Penicillin, Peripatetic school, Perspective (graphical), Phenomenon, Philadelphia, Philosophes, Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Philosophy, Photovoltaic effect, Physical cosmology, Physical law, Physics, Physics (Aristotle), Physiology, Physis, Plastic, Plato, Pliny the Elder, Poetry, Policy, Political philosophy, Politician, Popular culture, Popular science, Population growth, Positron emission tomography, Potential, Potentiality and actuality, Pottery, Pre-Socratic philosophy, Prediction, Printing press, Product (business), Protoscience, Pseudoscience, Psychological Science, Psychology, Ptolemy, Public awareness of science, Public policy, Public science, Public works, Pythagorean theorem, Pythagoreanism, Quantum mechanics, Radar, Radio astronomy, Radio station, Radio wave, Radioactive decay, Radiometric dating, Random House, Rationalism, Records of the Grand Historian, Regenerative medicine, Religion, Renaissance, Renaissance of the 12th century, René Descartes, Reproducibility, Research, Research and development, Research institute, Rhetoric, Richard Feynman, Rod cell, Roger Bacon, Rosalind Franklin, Royal Literary Fund, Royal Society, Salmonella, Sasanian Empire, Satellite navigation, Scholasticism, Science & Vie, Science and Civilisation in China, Science and technology studies, Science book, Science communication, Science festival, Science fiction, Science in popular culture, Science journalism, Science outreach, Science policy, Science wars, Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, Scientific American, Scientific community, Scientific controversy, Scientific dissent, Scientific journal, Scientific literature, Scientific method, Scientific misconduct, Scientific modelling, Scientific progress, Scientific realism, Scientific Revolution, Scientific theory, Scientist, Search and rescue, Semiconductor device, Separate spheres, Sima Qian, Skeptical movement, Skepticism, Smallpox, Smartphone, Social science, Society, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Sociology, Sociology of scientific knowledge, Socrates, Socratic method, Solar cell, Solar power, Sophist, Space Race, Space telescope, Spaceflight, Spanish National Research Council, Special relativity, Species, Standard Model, State (polity), Static electricity, Statistics, Steady State theory, Steven Shapin, Submarine communications cable, Sumerian language, Sun, Sunshu Ao, Supernatural, Syriac language, Systems theory, Targeted therapy, Taxonomy (biology), Technology, Telecommunication, Teleology, Telephony, Telescope, Television, Thales of Miletus, The Advancement of Learning, The Canon of Medicine, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, The Logic of Scientific Discovery, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Theophrastus, Theorem, Theoretical computer science, Theoretical linguistics, Theory, Theory of forms, Theory of relativity, Thermodynamics, Third Dynasty of Ur, Thomas Kuhn, Thought experiment, Timaeus (dialogue), Toledo School of Translators, Topology, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, Transcranial magnetic stimulation, Trial and error, Trigonometry, Trotula, Truth, Two New Sciences, Uniformitarianism, United Kingdom, United States, United States Geological Survey, United States National Library of Medicine, Universe, University, University of Bologna, University of California Museum of Paleontology, Unmoved mover, Vaccination, Vannevar Bush, Vinča culture, Vitello, Voltaire, Warring States period, Watch, Weapon, Weather forecasting, Western Europe, Western Publishing, Western Roman Empire, Western world, Wikibooks, Willard Van Orman Quine, William Whewell, Wireless, Wireless network, World view, X-ray, Ximen Bao, Yangtze, Yuval Levin, Zhou dynasty. Expand index (536 more) »

A priori and a posteriori

The Latin phrases a priori ("from the earlier") and a posteriori ("from the latter") are philosophical terms of art popularized by Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (first published in 1781, second edition in 1787), one of the most influential works in the history of philosophy.

New!!: Science and A priori and a posteriori · See more »

Abbasid Caliphate

The Abbasid Caliphate (or ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلْعَبَّاسِيَّة) was the third of the Islamic caliphates to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

New!!: Science and Abbasid Caliphate · See more »

Academic institution

Academic institution is an educational institution dedicated to education and research, which grants academic degrees.

New!!: Science and Academic institution · See more »

Academy

An academy (Attic Greek: Ἀκαδήμεια; Koine Greek Ἀκαδημία) is an institution of secondary education, higher learning, research, or honorary membership.

New!!: Science and Academy · See more »

Academy of Gondishapur

The Academy of Gondishapur (فرهنگستان گندی‌شاپور, Farhangestân-e Gondišâpur), also known as The Jondishapur University (دانشگاه جندی‌شاپور Dânešgâh-e Jondišapur), was one of the three Sasanian centers of education (Ctesiphon, Resaina, Gundeshapur) and academy of learning in the city of Gundeshapur, Iran during late antiquity, the intellectual center of the Sasanian Empire.

New!!: Science and Academy of Gondishapur · See more »

Academy of sciences

An academy of sciences is a type of learned society or academy (as special scientific institution) dedicated to sciences that may or may not be state funded.

New!!: Science and Academy of sciences · See more »

Accademia dei Lincei

The Accademia dei Lincei (literally the "Academy of the Lynx-Eyed", but anglicised as the Lincean Academy) is an Italian science academy, located at the Palazzo Corsini on the Via della Lungara in Rome, Italy.

New!!: Science and Accademia dei Lincei · See more »

Acidification

Acidification may refer to;.

New!!: Science and Acidification · See more »

Affirming the consequent

Affirming the consequent, sometimes called converse error, fallacy of the converse or confusion of necessity and sufficiency, is a formal fallacy of inferring the converse from the original statement.

New!!: Science and Affirming the consequent · See more »

Age of Enlightenment

The Enlightenment (also known as the Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Reason; in lit in Aufklärung, "Enlightenment", in L’Illuminismo, “Enlightenment” and in Spanish: La Ilustración, "Enlightenment") was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, "The Century of Philosophy".

New!!: Science and Age of Enlightenment · See more »

Aircraft

An aircraft is a machine that is able to fly by gaining support from the air.

New!!: Science and Aircraft · See more »

Al-Kindi

Abu Yūsuf Yaʻqūb ibn ʼIsḥāq aṣ-Ṣabbāḥ al-Kindī (أبو يوسف يعقوب بن إسحاق الصبّاح الكندي; Alkindus; c. 801–873 AD) was an Arab Muslim philosopher, polymath, mathematician, physician and musician.

New!!: Science and Al-Kindi · See more »

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).

New!!: Science and Albert Einstein · See more »

Alchemy

Alchemy is a philosophical and protoscientific tradition practiced throughout Europe, Africa, Brazil and Asia.

New!!: Science and Alchemy · See more »

Algebra

Algebra (from Arabic "al-jabr", literally meaning "reunion of broken parts") is one of the broad parts of mathematics, together with number theory, geometry and analysis.

New!!: Science and Algebra · See more »

Almagest

The Almagest is a 2nd-century Greek-language mathematical and astronomical treatise on the apparent motions of the stars and planetary paths, written by Claudius Ptolemy. One of the most influential scientific texts of all time, its geocentric model was accepted for more than 1200 years from its origin in Hellenistic Alexandria, in the medieval Byzantine and Islamic worlds, and in Western Europe through the Middle Ages and early Renaissance until Copernicus.

New!!: Science and Almagest · See more »

American Association for the Advancement of Science

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an American international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity.

New!!: Science and American Association for the Advancement of Science · See more »

American Philosophical Society

The American Philosophical Society (APS), founded in 1743 and located in Philadelphia, is an eminent scholarly organization of international reputation that promotes useful knowledge in the sciences and humanities through excellence in scholarly research, professional meetings, publications, library resources, and community outreach.

New!!: Science and American Philosophical Society · See more »

Analytic–synthetic distinction

The analytic–synthetic distinction (also called the analytic–synthetic dichotomy) is a semantic distinction, used primarily in philosophy to distinguish propositions (in particular, statements that are affirmative subject–predicate judgments) into two types: analytic propositions and synthetic propositions.

New!!: Science and Analytic–synthetic distinction · See more »

Anatomy

Anatomy (Greek anatomē, “dissection”) is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organisms and their parts.

New!!: Science and Anatomy · See more »

Anaximander

Anaximander (Ἀναξίμανδρος Anaximandros; was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher who lived in Miletus,"Anaximander" in Chambers's Encyclopædia.

New!!: Science and Anaximander · See more »

Anaximenes of Miletus

Anaximenes of Miletus (Ἀναξιμένης ὁ Μιλήσιος; c. 585 – c. 528 BC) was an Ancient Greek Pre-Socratic philosopher active in the latter half of the 6th century BC.

New!!: Science and Anaximenes of Miletus · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Science and Ancient Greek · See more »

Ancient Greek philosophy

Ancient Greek philosophy arose in the 6th century BC and continued throughout the Hellenistic period and the period in which Ancient Greece was part of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Science and Ancient Greek philosophy · See more »

Annals of Science

Annals of Science is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the history of science and technology.

New!!: Science and Annals of Science · See more »

Antibiotic

An antibiotic (from ancient Greek αντιβιοτικά, antibiotiká), also called an antibacterial, is a type of antimicrobial drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.

New!!: Science and Antibiotic · See more »

Antibody

An antibody (Ab), also known as an immunoglobulin (Ig), is a large, Y-shaped protein produced mainly by plasma cells that is used by the immune system to neutralize pathogens such as pathogenic bacteria and viruses.

New!!: Science and Antibody · See more »

Antimatter

In modern physics, antimatter is defined as a material composed of the antiparticle (or "partners") to the corresponding particles of ordinary matter.

New!!: Science and Antimatter · See more »

Antiquarian science books

Antiquarian science books are original historical works (e.g., books or technical papers) concerning science, mathematics and sometimes engineering.

New!!: Science and Antiquarian science books · See more »

Apollo program

The Apollo program, also known as Project Apollo, was the third United States human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished landing the first humans on the Moon from 1969 to 1972.

New!!: Science and Apollo program · See more »

Applied science

Applied science is the application of existing scientific knowledge to practical applications, like technology or inventions.

New!!: Science and Applied science · See more »

Arab world

The Arab world (العالم العربي; formally: Arab homeland, الوطن العربي), also known as the Arab nation (الأمة العربية) or the Arab states, currently consists of the 22 Arab countries of the Arab League.

New!!: Science and Arab world · See more »

Archimedes

Archimedes of Syracuse (Ἀρχιμήδης) was a Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer.

New!!: Science and Archimedes · See more »

Argument from authority

An argument from authority, also called an appeal to authority, or argumentum ad verecundiam is a form of defeasible argument in which a claimed authority's support is used as evidence for an argument's conclusion.

New!!: Science and Argument from authority · See more »

Aristarchus of Samos

Aristarchus of Samos (Ἀρίσταρχος ὁ Σάμιος, Aristarkhos ho Samios; c. 310 – c. 230 BC) was an ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician who presented the first known model that placed the Sun at the center of the known universe with the Earth revolving around it (see Solar system).

New!!: Science and Aristarchus of Samos · See more »

Aristotelian physics

Aristotelian physics is a form of natural science described in the works of the Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–).

New!!: Science and Aristotelian physics · See more »

Aristotelianism

Aristotelianism is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of Aristotle.

New!!: Science and Aristotelianism · See more »

Aristotle

Aristotle (Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs,; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece.

New!!: Science and Aristotle · See more »

Arithmetic

Arithmetic (from the Greek ἀριθμός arithmos, "number") is a branch of mathematics that consists of the study of numbers, especially the properties of the traditional operations on them—addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

New!!: Science and Arithmetic · See more »

Arsphenamine

Arsphenamine, also known as Salvarsan or compound 606, is a drug that was introduced at the beginning of the 1910s as the first effective treatment for syphilis, and was also used to treat trypanosomiasis.

New!!: Science and Arsphenamine · See more »

Astrology

Astrology is the study of the movements and relative positions of celestial objects as a means for divining information about human affairs and terrestrial events.

New!!: Science and Astrology · See more »

Astronomy

Astronomy (from ἀστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena.

New!!: Science and Astronomy · See more »

Atom

An atom is the smallest constituent unit of ordinary matter that has the properties of a chemical element.

New!!: Science and Atom · See more »

Atomic energy

Atomic energy is energy carried by atoms.

New!!: Science and Atomic energy · See more »

Atomic theory

In chemistry and physics, atomic theory is a scientific theory of the nature of matter, which states that matter is composed of discrete units called atoms.

New!!: Science and Atomic theory · See more »

Atomism

Atomism (from Greek ἄτομον, atomon, i.e. "uncuttable", "indivisible") is a natural philosophy that developed in several ancient traditions.

New!!: Science and Atomism · See more »

Authoritarianism

Authoritarianism is a form of government characterized by strong central power and limited political freedoms.

New!!: Science and Authoritarianism · See more »

Avicenna

Avicenna (also Ibn Sīnā or Abu Ali Sina; ابن سینا; – June 1037) was a Persian polymath who is regarded as one of the most significant physicians, astronomers, thinkers and writers of the Islamic Golden Age.

New!!: Science and Avicenna · See more »

Axiom

An axiom or postulate is a statement that is taken to be true, to serve as a premise or starting point for further reasoning and arguments.

New!!: Science and Axiom · See more »

Babylonia

Babylonia was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq).

New!!: Science and Babylonia · See more »

Baghdad

Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq.

New!!: Science and Baghdad · See more »

Bakelite

Bakelite (sometimes spelled Baekelite), or polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride, is the first plastic made from synthetic components.

New!!: Science and Bakelite · See more »

Barry Stroud

Barry Stroud (born 1935, Toronto) is a Canadian philosopher known for his work on philosophical skepticism, David Hume, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, among other topics.

New!!: Science and Barry Stroud · See more »

Basic Books

Basic Books is a book publisher founded in 1952 and located in New York, now an imprint of Hachette Books.

New!!: Science and Basic Books · See more »

Basic research

Basic research, also called pure research or fundamental research, has the scientific research aim to improve scientific theories for improved understanding or prediction of natural or other phenomena.

New!!: Science and Basic research · See more »

Battery cage

Battery cages are a housing system used for various animal production methods, but primarily for egg-laying hens.

New!!: Science and Battery cage · See more »

Bayesian probability

Bayesian probability is an interpretation of the concept of probability, in which, instead of frequency or propensity of some phenomenon, probability is interpreted as reasonable expectation representing a state of knowledge or as quantification of a personal belief.

New!!: Science and Bayesian probability · See more »

Beat reporting

Beat reporting, also known as specialized reporting, is a genre of journalism that can be described as the craft of in-depth reporting on a particular issue, sector, organization, or institution over time.

New!!: Science and Beat reporting · See more »

Big Bang

The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model for the universe from the earliest known periods through its subsequent large-scale evolution.

New!!: Science and Big Bang · See more »

Biology

Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their physical structure, chemical composition, function, development and evolution.

New!!: Science and Biology · See more »

Biotechnology

Biotechnology is the broad area of science involving living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or "any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use" (UN Convention on Biological Diversity, Art. 2).

New!!: Science and Biotechnology · See more »

Blue skies research

Blue skies research (also called blue sky science) is scientific research in domains where "real-world" applications are not immediately apparent.

New!!: Science and Blue skies research · See more »

Book of Optics

The Book of Optics (Kitāb al-Manāẓir; Latin: De Aspectibus or Perspectiva; Italian: Deli Aspecti) is a seven-volume treatise on optics and other fields of study composed by the medieval Arab scholar Ibn al-Haytham, known in the West as Alhazen or Alhacen (965– c. 1040 AD).

New!!: Science and Book of Optics · See more »

Branches of science

The branches of science, also referred to as sciences, "scientific fields", or "scientific disciplines" are commonly divided into three major groups.

New!!: Science and Branches of science · See more »

Broadcasting

Broadcasting is the distribution of audio or video content to a dispersed audience via any electronic mass communications medium, but typically one using the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves), in a one-to-many model.

New!!: Science and Broadcasting · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Science and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Cable television

Cable television is a system of delivering television programming to paying subscribers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or in more recent systems, light pulses through fiber-optic cables.

New!!: Science and Cable television · See more »

Calculator

An electronic calculator is typically a portable electronic device used to perform calculations, ranging from basic arithmetic to complex mathematics.

New!!: Science and Calculator · See more »

Calculus

Calculus (from Latin calculus, literally 'small pebble', used for counting and calculations, as on an abacus), is the mathematical study of continuous change, in the same way that geometry is the study of shape and algebra is the study of generalizations of arithmetic operations.

New!!: Science and Calculus · See more »

Caliphate

A caliphate (خِلافة) is a state under the leadership of an Islamic steward with the title of caliph (خَليفة), a person considered a religious successor to the Islamic prophet Muhammad and a leader of the entire ummah (community).

New!!: Science and Caliphate · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Science and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Camera obscura

Camera obscura (plural camera obscura or camera obscuras; from Latin, meaning "dark room": camera "(vaulted) chamber or room," and obscura "darkened, dark"), also referred to as pinhole image, is the natural optical phenomenon that occurs when an image of a scene at the other side of a screen (or for instance a wall) is projected through a small hole in that screen as a reversed and inverted image (left to right and upside down) on a surface opposite to the opening.

New!!: Science and Camera obscura · See more »

Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.

New!!: Science and Cancer · See more »

Car

A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation.

New!!: Science and Car · See more »

Cargo cult science

Cargo cult science is a phrase describing practices that have the semblance of being scientific, but do not in fact follow the scientific method.

New!!: Science and Cargo cult science · See more »

Caroline Herschel

Caroline Lucretia Herschel (16 March 1750 – 9 January 1848) was a German astronomer, whose most significant contributions to astronomy were the discoveries of several comets, including the periodic comet 35P/Herschel–Rigollet, which bears her name.

New!!: Science and Caroline Herschel · See more »

Cartesian doubt

Cartesian doubt is a form of methodological skepticism associated with the writings and methodology of René Descartes (15961650).

New!!: Science and Cartesian doubt · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: Science and Catholic Church · See more »

Causality

Causality (also referred to as causation, or cause and effect) is what connects one process (the cause) with another process or state (the effect), where the first is partly responsible for the second, and the second is partly dependent on the first.

New!!: Science and Causality · See more »

Centre national de la recherche scientifique

The French National Center for Scientific Research (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, CNRS) is the largest governmental research organisation in France and the largest fundamental science agency in Europe.

New!!: Science and Centre national de la recherche scientifique · See more »

Cepheid variable

A Cepheid variable is a type of star that pulsates radially, varying in both diameter and temperature and producing changes in brightness with a well-defined stable period and amplitude.

New!!: Science and Cepheid variable · See more »

Certainty

Certainty is perfect knowledge that has total security from error, or the mental state of being without doubt.

New!!: Science and Certainty · See more »

Charles Darwin

Charles Robert Darwin, (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution.

New!!: Science and Charles Darwin · See more »

Charles Sanders Peirce

Charles Sanders Peirce ("purse"; 10 September 1839 – 19 April 1914) was an American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist who is sometimes known as "the father of pragmatism".

New!!: Science and Charles Sanders Peirce · See more »

Chemistry

Chemistry is the scientific discipline involved with compounds composed of atoms, i.e. elements, and molecules, i.e. combinations of atoms: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a reaction with other compounds.

New!!: Science and Chemistry · See more »

Chris Mooney (journalist)

Christopher Cole "Chris" Mooney (born September 20, 1977) is an American journalist and author of four books including the 2005 New York Times Best Seller The Republican War on Science.

New!!: Science and Chris Mooney (journalist) · See more »

Christine Ladd-Franklin

Christine Ladd-Franklin (December 1, 1847 – March 5, 1930) was an American psychologist, logician, and mathematician.

New!!: Science and Christine Ladd-Franklin · See more »

Citizen science

Citizen science (CS; also known as community science, crowd science, crowd-sourced science, civic science, volunteer monitoring, or networked science) is scientific research conducted, in whole or in part, by amateur (or nonprofessional) scientists.

New!!: Science and Citizen science · See more »

Civilization

A civilization or civilisation (see English spelling differences) is any complex society characterized by urban development, social stratification imposed by a cultural elite, symbolic systems of communication (for example, writing systems), and a perceived separation from and domination over the natural environment.

New!!: Science and Civilization · See more »

Classical antiquity

Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 5th or 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world.

New!!: Science and Classical antiquity · See more »

Classical mechanics

Classical mechanics describes the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, and astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars and galaxies.

New!!: Science and Classical mechanics · See more »

Classical physics

Classical physics refers to theories of physics that predate modern, more complete, or more widely applicable theories.

New!!: Science and Classical physics · See more »

Climate change

Climate change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time (i.e., decades to millions of years).

New!!: Science and Climate change · See more »

Communications satellite

A communications satellite is an artificial satellite that relays and amplifies radio telecommunications signals via a transponder; it creates a communication channel between a source transmitter and a receiver at different locations on Earth.

New!!: Science and Communications satellite · See more »

Company

A company, abbreviated as co., is a legal entity made up of an association of people for carrying on a commercial or industrial enterprise.

New!!: Science and Company · See more »

Compass

A compass is an instrument used for navigation and orientation that shows direction relative to the geographic cardinal directions (or points).

New!!: Science and Compass · See more »

Computational science

Computational science (also scientific computing or scientific computation (SC)) is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary field that uses advanced computing capabilities to understand and solve complex problems.

New!!: Science and Computational science · See more »

Computing

Computing is any goal-oriented activity requiring, benefiting from, or creating computers.

New!!: Science and Computing · See more »

Concept

Concepts are mental representations, abstract objects or abilities that make up the fundamental building blocks of thoughts and beliefs.

New!!: Science and Concept · See more »

Condemnations of 1210–1277

The Condemnations at the medieval University of Paris were enacted to restrict certain teachings as being heretical.

New!!: Science and Condemnations of 1210–1277 · See more »

Confirmation bias

Confirmation bias, also called confirmatory bias or myside bias,David Perkins, a professor and researcher at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, coined the term "myside bias" referring to a preference for "my" side of an issue.

New!!: Science and Confirmation bias · See more »

Consciousness

Consciousness is the state or quality of awareness, or, of being aware of an external object or something within oneself.

New!!: Science and Consciousness · See more »

Conservation of energy

In physics, the law of conservation of energy states that the total energy of an isolated system remains constant, it is said to be ''conserved'' over time.

New!!: Science and Conservation of energy · See more »

Conservation of mass

The law of conservation of mass or principle of mass conservation states that for any system closed to all transfers of matter and energy, the mass of the system must remain constant over time, as system's mass cannot change, so quantity cannot be added nor removed.

New!!: Science and Conservation of mass · See more »

Consilience

In science and history, consilience (also convergence of evidence or concordance of evidence) refers to the principle that evidence from independent, unrelated sources can "converge" on strong conclusions.

New!!: Science and Consilience · See more »

Constant of motion

In mechanics, a constant of motion is a quantity that is conserved throughout the motion, imposing in effect a constraint on the motion.

New!!: Science and Constant of motion · See more »

Constructive empiricism

In philosophy, constructive empiricism (also empiricist structuralism) is a form of empiricism.

New!!: Science and Constructive empiricism · See more »

Correlation does not imply causation

In statistics, many statistical tests calculate correlations between variables and when two variables are found to be correlated, it is tempting to assume that this shows that one variable causes the other.

New!!: Science and Correlation does not imply causation · See more »

Cosmic microwave background

The cosmic microwave background (CMB, CMBR) is electromagnetic radiation as a remnant from an early stage of the universe in Big Bang cosmology.

New!!: Science and Cosmic microwave background · See more »

Creation science

Creation science or scientific creationism is a branch of creationism that claims to provide scientific support for the Genesis creation narrative in the Book of Genesis and disprove or reexplain the scientific facts, theories and paradigms about geology, cosmology, biological evolution, archeology, history, and linguistics.

New!!: Science and Creation science · See more »

Critical rationalism

Critical rationalism is an epistemological philosophy advanced by Karl Popper.

New!!: Science and Critical rationalism · See more »

Criticism of science

Criticism of science addresses and refines problems within science in order to improve science as a whole and its role in society.

New!!: Science and Criticism of science · See more »

Crystallography

Crystallography is the experimental science of determining the arrangement of atoms in crystalline solids (see crystal structure).

New!!: Science and Crystallography · See more »

CSIRO

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is an independent Australian federal government agency responsible for scientific research.

New!!: Science and CSIRO · See more »

CT scan

A CT scan, also known as computed tomography scan, makes use of computer-processed combinations of many X-ray measurements taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of specific areas of a scanned object, allowing the user to see inside the object without cutting.

New!!: Science and CT scan · See more »

Curium

Curium is a transuranic radioactive chemical element with symbol Cm and atomic number 96.

New!!: Science and Curium · See more »

Daedalus (journal)

Dædalus is a peer-reviewed academic journal founded in 1955 as a replacement for the Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the volume and numbering system of which it continues.

New!!: Science and Daedalus (journal) · See more »

David C. Lindberg

David C. Lindberg (November 15, 1935 – January 6, 2015) was an American historian of science.

New!!: Science and David C. Lindberg · See more »

David Papineau

David Papineau (born 1947) is a British academic philosopher, born in Como, Italy.

New!!: Science and David Papineau · See more »

Decision theory

Decision theory (or the theory of choice) is the study of the reasoning underlying an agent's choices.

New!!: Science and Decision theory · See more »

Deductive reasoning

Deductive reasoning, also deductive logic, logical deduction is the process of reasoning from one or more statements (premises) to reach a logically certain conclusion.

New!!: Science and Deductive reasoning · See more »

Deep brain stimulation

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical procedure involving the implantation of a medical device called a neurostimulator (sometimes referred to as a 'brain pacemaker'), which sends electrical impulses, through implanted electrodes, to specific targets in the brain (brain nuclei) for the treatment of movement and neuropsychiatric disorders.

New!!: Science and Deep brain stimulation · See more »

Demarcation problem

The demarcation problem in the philosophy of science is about how to distinguish between science and non-science, including between science, pseudoscience, and other products of human activity, like art and literature, and beliefs.

New!!: Science and Demarcation problem · See more »

Democritus

Democritus (Δημόκριτος, Dēmókritos, meaning "chosen of the people") was an Ancient Greek pre-Socratic philosopher primarily remembered today for his formulation of an atomic theory of the universe.

New!!: Science and Democritus · See more »

Design of experiments

The design of experiments (DOE, DOX, or experimental design) is the design of any task that aims to describe or explain the variation of information under conditions that are hypothesized to reflect the variation.

New!!: Science and Design of experiments · See more »

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG; German Research Foundation) is a German research funding organization.

New!!: Science and Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft · See more »

Developed country

A developed country, industrialized country, more developed country, or "more economically developed country" (MEDC), is a sovereign state that has a highly developed economy and advanced technological infrastructure relative to other less industrialized nations.

New!!: Science and Developed country · See more »

Dialectic

Dialectic or dialectics (διαλεκτική, dialektikḗ; related to dialogue), also known as the dialectical method, is at base a discourse between two or more people holding different points of view about a subject but wishing to establish the truth through reasoned arguments.

New!!: Science and Dialectic · See more »

Diffraction

--> Diffraction refers to various phenomena that occur when a wave encounters an obstacle or a slit.

New!!: Science and Diffraction · See more »

Divination

Divination (from Latin divinare "to foresee, to be inspired by a god", related to divinus, divine) is the attempt to gain insight into a question or situation by way of an occultic, standardized process or ritual.

New!!: Science and Divination · See more »

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a thread-like chain of nucleotides carrying the genetic instructions used in the growth, development, functioning and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses.

New!!: Science and DNA · See more »

Doxycycline

Doxycycline is an antibiotic that is used in the treatment of a number of types of infections caused by bacteria and protozoa.

New!!: Science and Doxycycline · See more »

Dynamics (mechanics)

Dynamics is the branch of applied mathematics (specifically classical mechanics) concerned with the study of forces and torques and their effect on motion, as opposed to kinematics, which studies the motion of objects without reference to these forces.

New!!: Science and Dynamics (mechanics) · See more »

Early Middle Ages

The Early Middle Ages or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 5th or 6th century to the 10th century CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages of European history.

New!!: Science and Early Middle Ages · See more »

Economics

Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

New!!: Science and Economics · See more »

Edwina Currie

Edwina Currie (née Cohen; born 13 October 1946) is a British former politician, serving as Conservative Party Member of Parliament from 1983 until 1997.

New!!: Science and Edwina Currie · See more »

Electric current

An electric current is a flow of electric charge.

New!!: Science and Electric current · See more »

Electric heating

Electric heating is a process in which electrical energy is converted to heat.

New!!: Science and Electric heating · See more »

Electric light

An electric light is a device that produces visible light from electric current.

New!!: Science and Electric light · See more »

Electricity

Electricity is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge.

New!!: Science and Electricity · See more »

Electromagnetism

Electromagnetism is a branch of physics involving the study of the electromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electrically charged particles.

New!!: Science and Electromagnetism · See more »

Electron

The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol or, whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge.

New!!: Science and Electron · See more »

Electronics

Electronics is the discipline dealing with the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons in a vacuum, in gaseous media, and in semiconductors.

New!!: Science and Electronics · See more »

Emergency service

Emergency services and rescue services are organizations which ensure public safety and health by addressing different emergencies.

New!!: Science and Emergency service · See more »

Emmy Noether

Amalie Emmy NoetherEmmy is the Rufname, the second of two official given names, intended for daily use.

New!!: Science and Emmy Noether · See more »

Empirical evidence

Empirical evidence, also known as sensory experience, is the information received by means of the senses, particularly by observation and documentation of patterns and behavior through experimentation.

New!!: Science and Empirical evidence · See more »

Empiricism

In philosophy, empiricism is a theory that states that knowledge comes only or primarily from sensory experience.

New!!: Science and Empiricism · See more »

Encyclopédie

Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers (English: Encyclopedia, or a Systematic Dictionary of the Sciences, Arts, and Crafts), better known as Encyclopédie, was a general encyclopedia published in France between 1751 and 1772, with later supplements, revised editions, and translations.

New!!: Science and Encyclopédie · See more »

Energy

In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.

New!!: Science and Energy · See more »

Energy quality

Energy quality is the contrast between different forms of energy, the different trophic levels in ecological systems and the propensity of energy to convert from one form to another.

New!!: Science and Energy quality · See more »

Engineering

Engineering is the creative application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations.

New!!: Science and Engineering · See more »

Entertainment

Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight.

New!!: Science and Entertainment · See more »

Entropy

In statistical mechanics, entropy is an extensive property of a thermodynamic system.

New!!: Science and Entropy · See more »

Environmental issue

Environmental issues are harmful effects of human activity on the biophysical environment.

New!!: Science and Environmental issue · See more »

Environmental protection

Environmental protection is a practice of protecting the natural environment on individual, organization controlled or governmental levels, for the benefit of both the environment and humans.

New!!: Science and Environmental protection · See more »

Environmental science

Environmental science is an interdisciplinary academic field that integrates physical, biological and information sciences (including ecology, biology, physics, chemistry, plant science, zoology, mineralogy, oceanology, limnology, soil science, geology and physical geography (geodesy), and atmospheric science) to the study of the environment, and the solution of environmental problems.

New!!: Science and Environmental science · See more »

Environmental technology

Environmental technology (envirotech), green technology (greentech) or clean technology (cleantech) is the application of one or more of environmental science, green chemistry, environmental monitoring and electronic devices to monitor, model and conserve the natural environment and resources, and to curb the negative impacts of human involvement.

New!!: Science and Environmental technology · See more »

Epistemological anarchism

Epistemological anarchism is an epistemological theory advanced by Austrian philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend which holds that there are no useful and exception-free methodological rules governing the progress of science or the growth of knowledge.

New!!: Science and Epistemological anarchism · See more »

Equations for a falling body

A set of equations describe the resultant trajectories when objects move owing to a constant gravitational force under normal Earth-bound conditions.

New!!: Science and Equations for a falling body · See more »

Ethics

Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.

New!!: Science and Ethics · See more »

Ethology

Ethology is the scientific and objective study of animal behaviour, usually with a focus on behaviour under natural conditions, and viewing behaviour as an evolutionarily adaptive trait.

New!!: Science and Ethology · See more »

Euclid

Euclid (Εὐκλείδης Eukleidēs; fl. 300 BC), sometimes given the name Euclid of Alexandria to distinguish him from Euclides of Megara, was a Greek mathematician, often referred to as the "founder of geometry" or the "father of geometry".

New!!: Science and Euclid · See more »

Eutrophication

Eutrophication (from Greek eutrophos, "well-nourished"), or hypertrophication, is when a body of water becomes overly enriched with minerals and nutrients that induce excessive growth of plants and algae.

New!!: Science and Eutrophication · See more »

Evolution

Evolution is change in the heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations.

New!!: Science and Evolution · See more »

Expansion of the universe

The expansion of the universe is the increase of the distance between two distant parts of the universe with time.

New!!: Science and Expansion of the universe · See more »

Explanation

An explanation is a set of statements usually constructed to describe a set of facts which clarifies the causes, context, and consequences of those facts.

New!!: Science and Explanation · See more »

Fact

A fact is a statement that is consistent with reality or can be proven with evidence.

New!!: Science and Fact · See more »

Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science

Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science (1957)—originally published in 1952 as In the Name of Science: An Entertaining Survey of the High Priests and Cultists of Science, Past and Present—was Martin Gardner's second book.

New!!: Science and Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science · See more »

Faience

Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed pottery on a delicate pale buff earthenware body.

New!!: Science and Faience · See more »

Fallacy

A fallacy is the use of invalid or otherwise faulty reasoning, or "wrong moves" in the construction of an argument.

New!!: Science and Fallacy · See more »

Fallacy of the single cause

The fallacy of the single cause, also known as complex cause, causal oversimplification, causal reductionism, and reduction fallacy, is a fallacy of questionable cause that occurs when it is assumed that there is a single, simple cause of an outcome when in reality it may have been caused by a number of only jointly sufficient causes.

New!!: Science and Fallacy of the single cause · See more »

Fallibilism

Broadly speaking, fallibilism (from Medieval Latin: fallibilis, "liable to err") is the philosophical claim that no belief can have justification which guarantees the truth of the belief.

New!!: Science and Fallibilism · See more »

Falsifiability

A statement, hypothesis, or theory has falsifiability (or is falsifiable) if it can logically be proven false by contradicting it with a basic statement.

New!!: Science and Falsifiability · See more »

Fertilizer

A fertilizer (American English) or fertiliser (British English; see spelling differences) is any material of natural or synthetic origin (other than liming materials) that is applied to soils or to plant tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants.

New!!: Science and Fertilizer · See more »

First observation of gravitational waves

The first observation of gravitational waves was made on 14 September 2015 and was announced by the LIGO and Virgo collaborations on 11 February 2016.

New!!: Science and First observation of gravitational waves · See more »

Floodplain

A floodplain or flood plain is an area of land adjacent to a stream or river which stretches from the banks of its channel to the base of the enclosing valley walls, and which experiences flooding during periods of high discharge.

New!!: Science and Floodplain · See more »

Formal science

Formal sciences are formal language disciplines concerned with formal systems, such as logic, mathematics, statistics, theoretical computer science, robotics, information theory, game theory, systems theory, decision theory, and theoretical linguistics.

New!!: Science and Formal science · See more »

Formula

In science, a formula is a concise way of expressing information symbolically, as in a mathematical formula or a chemical formula.

New!!: Science and Formula · See more »

Four causes

The "four causes" are elements of an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby explanations of change or movement are classified into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?".

New!!: Science and Four causes · See more »

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, (22 January 15619 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, and author.

New!!: Science and Francis Bacon · See more »

French Academy of Sciences

The French Academy of Sciences (French: Académie des sciences) is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research.

New!!: Science and French Academy of Sciences · See more »

Fringe science

Fringe science is an inquiry in an established field of study which departs significantly from mainstream theories in that field and is considered to be questionable by the mainstream.

New!!: Science and Fringe science · See more »

Functional magnetic resonance imaging

Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow.

New!!: Science and Functional magnetic resonance imaging · See more »

Funding of science

Research funding is a term generally covering any funding for scientific research, in the areas of both "hard" science and technology and social science.

New!!: Science and Funding of science · See more »

Galen

Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus (Κλαύδιος Γαληνός; September 129 AD – /), often Anglicized as Galen and better known as Galen of Pergamon, was a Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman Empire.

New!!: Science and Galen · See more »

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564Drake (1978, p. 1). The date of Galileo's birth is given according to the Julian calendar, which was then in force throughout Christendom. In 1582 it was replaced in Italy and several other Catholic countries with the Gregorian calendar. Unless otherwise indicated, dates in this article are given according to the Gregorian calendar. – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath.

New!!: Science and Galileo Galilei · See more »

General relativity

General relativity (GR, also known as the general theory of relativity or GTR) is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915 and the current description of gravitation in modern physics.

New!!: Science and General relativity · See more »

Generic top-level domain

Generic top-level domains (gTLDs) are one of the categories of top-level domains (TLDs) maintained by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) for use in the Domain Name System of the Internet.

New!!: Science and Generic top-level domain · See more »

Geocentric model

In astronomy, the geocentric model (also known as geocentrism, or the Ptolemaic system) is a superseded description of the universe with Earth at the center.

New!!: Science and Geocentric model · See more »

Geometry

Geometry (from the γεωμετρία; geo- "earth", -metron "measurement") is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space.

New!!: Science and Geometry · See more »

Geophysics

Geophysics is a subject of natural science concerned with the physical processes and physical properties of the Earth and its surrounding space environment, and the use of quantitative methods for their analysis.

New!!: Science and Geophysics · See more »

Georges Lemaître

Georges Henri Joseph Édouard Lemaître, RAS Associate (17 July 1894 – 20 June 1966) was a Belgian Catholic Priest, astronomer and professor of physics at the Catholic University of Leuven.

New!!: Science and Georges Lemaître · See more »

Gerald J. Toomer

Gerald James Toomer (born 23 November 1934) is a historian of astronomy and mathematics who has written numerous books and papers on ancient Greek and medieval Islamic astronomy.

New!!: Science and Gerald J. Toomer · See more »

Gerard of Cremona

Gerard of Cremona (Latin: Gerardus Cremonensis; c. 1114 – 1187) was an Italian translator of scientific books from Arabic into Latin.

New!!: Science and Gerard of Cremona · See more »

Germ theory of disease

The germ theory of disease is the currently accepted scientific theory of disease.

New!!: Science and Germ theory of disease · See more »

Global Positioning System

The Global Positioning System (GPS), originally Navstar GPS, is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States Air Force.

New!!: Science and Global Positioning System · See more »

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Gottfried Wilhelm (von) Leibniz (or; Leibnitz; – 14 November 1716) was a German polymath and philosopher who occupies a prominent place in the history of mathematics and the history of philosophy.

New!!: Science and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz · See more »

Government agency

A government or state agency, sometimes an appointed commission, is a permanent or semi-permanent organization in the machinery of government that is responsible for the oversight and administration of specific functions, such as an intelligence agency.

New!!: Science and Government agency · See more »

Gravitational wave

Gravitational waves are the disturbance in the fabric ("curvature") of spacetime generated by accelerated masses and propagate as waves outward from their source at the speed of light.

New!!: Science and Gravitational wave · See more »

Great Britain

Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.

New!!: Science and Great Britain · See more »

Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, tamped earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe with an eye to expansion.

New!!: Science and Great Wall of China · See more »

Gross domestic product

Gross domestic product (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time.

New!!: Science and Gross domestic product · See more »

Health care

Health care or healthcare is the maintenance or improvement of health via the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, illness, injury, and other physical and mental impairments in human beings.

New!!: Science and Health care · See more »

Heliocentrism

Heliocentrism is the astronomical model in which the Earth and planets revolve around the Sun at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Science and Heliocentrism · See more »

Hellenistic philosophy

Hellenistic philosophy is the period of Western philosophy that was developed in the Hellenistic civilization following Aristotle and ending with the beginning of Neoplatonism.

New!!: Science and Hellenistic philosophy · See more »

Henrietta Swan Leavitt

Henrietta Swan Leavitt (July 4, 1868 – December 12, 1921) was an American astronomer who discovered the relation between the luminosity and the period of Cepheid variable stars.

New!!: Science and Henrietta Swan Leavitt · See more »

Herophilos

Herophilos (Ἡρόφιλος; 335–280 BC), sometimes Latinised Herophilus, was a Greek physician deemed to be the first anatomist.

New!!: Science and Herophilos · See more »

Higgs boson

The Higgs boson is an elementary particle in the Standard Model of particle physics.

New!!: Science and Higgs boson · See more »

Hipparchus

Hipparchus of Nicaea (Ἵππαρχος, Hipparkhos) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician.

New!!: Science and Hipparchus · See more »

Hippocrates

Hippocrates of Kos (Hippokrátēs ho Kṓos), also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), and is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine.

New!!: Science and Hippocrates · See more »

History of science

The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences.

New!!: Science and History of science · See more »

Homer

Homer (Ὅμηρος, Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature.

New!!: Science and Homer · See more »

House of Wisdom

The House of Wisdom (بيت الحكمة; Bayt al-Hikma) refers either to a major Abbasid public academy and intellectual center in Baghdad or to a large private library belonging to the Abbasid Caliphs during the Islamic Golden Age.

New!!: Science and House of Wisdom · See more »

Human behavior

Human behavior is the responses of individuals or groups of humans to internal and external stimuli.

New!!: Science and Human behavior · See more »

Human Genome Project

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international scientific research project with the goal of determining the sequence of nucleotide base pairs that make up human DNA, and of identifying and mapping all of the genes of the human genome from both a physical and a functional standpoint.

New!!: Science and Human Genome Project · See more »

Humanities

Humanities are academic disciplines that study aspects of human society and culture.

New!!: Science and Humanities · See more »

Hundred Schools of Thought

The Hundred Schools of Thought were philosophies and schools that flourished from the 6th century to 221 BC, during the Spring and Autumn period and the Warring States period of ancient China.

New!!: Science and Hundred Schools of Thought · See more »

Hydraulic engineering

Hydraulic engineering as a sub-discipline of civil engineering is concerned with the flow and conveyance of fluids, principally water and sewage.

New!!: Science and Hydraulic engineering · See more »

Hygiene

Hygiene is a set of practices performed to preserve health.

New!!: Science and Hygiene · See more »

Hypatia

Hypatia (born 350–370; died 415 AD) was a Hellenistic Neoplatonist philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician, who lived in Alexandria, Egypt, then part of the Eastern Roman Empire.

New!!: Science and Hypatia · See more »

Hypothesis

A hypothesis (plural hypotheses) is a proposed explanation for a phenomenon.

New!!: Science and Hypothesis · See more »

Hypothetico-deductive model

The hypothetico-deductive model or method is a proposed description of scientific method.

New!!: Science and Hypothetico-deductive model · See more »

Ibn Abi Usaibia

Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿa Muʾaffaq al-Dīn Abū al-ʿAbbās Aḥmad Ibn Al-Qāsim Ibn Khalīfa al-Khazrajī (ابن أبي أصيبعة‎; 1203–1270), commonly referred to as Ibn Abi Usaibia, was a Syrian Arab physician of the 13th century CE.

New!!: Science and Ibn Abi Usaibia · See more »

Ibn al-Haytham

Hasan Ibn al-Haytham (Latinized Alhazen; full name أبو علي، الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم) was an Arab mathematician, astronomer, and physicist of the Islamic Golden Age.

New!!: Science and Ibn al-Haytham · See more »

Ibn Sahl (mathematician)

Ibn Sahl (full name Abū Saʿd al-ʿAlāʾ ibn Sahl أبو سعد العلاء ابن سهل; c. 940–1000) was a Muslim Persian mathematician and physicist of the Islamic Golden Age, associated with the Buwayhid court of Baghdad.

New!!: Science and Ibn Sahl (mathematician) · See more »

Idealism

In philosophy, idealism is the group of metaphysical philosophies that assert that reality, or reality as humans can know it, is fundamentally mental, mentally constructed, or otherwise immaterial.

New!!: Science and Idealism · See more »

Ideology

An Ideology is a collection of normative beliefs and values that an individual or group holds for other than purely epistemic reasons.

New!!: Science and Ideology · See more »

Imre Lakatos

Imre Lakatos (Lakatos Imre; November 9, 1922 – February 2, 1974) was a Hungarian philosopher of mathematics and science, known for his thesis of the fallibility of mathematics and its 'methodology of proofs and refutations' in its pre-axiomatic stages of development, and also for introducing the concept of the 'research programme' in his methodology of scientific research programmes.

New!!: Science and Imre Lakatos · See more »

Index of branches of science

Science (from Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge") is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.

New!!: Science and Index of branches of science · See more »

Induced pluripotent stem cell

Induced pluripotent stem cells (also known as iPS cells or iPSCs) are a type of pluripotent stem cell that can be generated directly from adult cells.

New!!: Science and Induced pluripotent stem cell · See more »

Inductivism

Inductivism is the traditional model of scientific method attributed to Francis Bacon, who in 1620 vowed to subvert allegedly traditional thinking.

New!!: Science and Inductivism · See more »

Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

New!!: Science and Industrial Revolution · See more »

Information technology

Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to store, retrieve, transmit, and manipulate data, or information, often in the context of a business or other enterprise.

New!!: Science and Information technology · See more »

Information theory

Information theory studies the quantification, storage, and communication of information.

New!!: Science and Information theory · See more »

Inoculation

The terms inoculation, vaccination and immunization are often used synonymously to refer to artificial induction of immunity against various infectious diseases.

New!!: Science and Inoculation · See more »

Instrumentalism

Instrumentalism is one of a multitude of modern schools of thought created by scientists and philosophers throughout the 20th century.

New!!: Science and Instrumentalism · See more »

Integrated circuit

An integrated circuit or monolithic integrated circuit (also referred to as an IC, a chip, or a microchip) is a set of electronic circuits on one small flat piece (or "chip") of semiconductor material, normally silicon.

New!!: Science and Integrated circuit · See more »

Intercontinental ballistic missile

An intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) is a guided ballistic missile with a minimum range of primarily designed for nuclear weapons delivery (delivering one or more thermonuclear warheads).

New!!: Science and Intercontinental ballistic missile · See more »

International Council for Science

The International Council for Science (ICSU, after its former name, International Council of Scientific Unions) is an international organization devoted to international cooperation in the advancement of science.

New!!: Science and International Council for Science · See more »

Internet

The Internet is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide.

New!!: Science and Internet · See more »

Interpretations of quantum mechanics

An interpretation of quantum mechanics is an attempt to explain how concepts in quantum mechanics correspond to reality.

New!!: Science and Interpretations of quantum mechanics · See more »

Intersubjective verifiability

Intersubjective verifiability is the capacity of a concept to be readily and accurately communicated between different individuals ("intersubjectively"), and to be reproduced under varying circumstances for the purposes of verification.

New!!: Science and Intersubjective verifiability · See more »

Iraq

Iraq (or; العراق; عێراق), officially known as the Republic of Iraq (جُمُهورية العِراق; کۆماری عێراق), is a country in Western Asia, bordered by Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest and Syria to the west.

New!!: Science and Iraq · See more »

Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27) was an English mathematician, astronomer, theologian, author and physicist (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution.

New!!: Science and Isaac Newton · See more »

Isidore of Seville

Saint Isidore of Seville (Isidorus Hispalensis; c. 560 – 4 April 636), a scholar and, for over three decades, Archbishop of Seville, is widely regarded as the last of the Fathers of the Church, as the 19th-century historian Montalembert put it in an oft-quoted phrase, "The last scholar of the ancient world." At a time of disintegration of classical culture, and aristocratic violence and illiteracy, he was involved in the conversion of the Arian Visigothic kings to Catholicism, both assisting his brother Leander of Seville, and continuing after his brother's death.

New!!: Science and Isidore of Seville · See more »

Islamic Golden Age

The Islamic Golden Age is the era in the history of Islam, traditionally dated from the 8th century to the 14th century, during which much of the historically Islamic world was ruled by various caliphates, and science, economic development and cultural works flourished.

New!!: Science and Islamic Golden Age · See more »

Isotopic labeling

Isotopic labeling (or isotopic labelling) is a technique used to track the passage of an isotope (an atom with a detectable variation) through a reaction, metabolic pathway, or cell.

New!!: Science and Isotopic labeling · See more »

Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer, and astrologer.

New!!: Science and Johannes Kepler · See more »

John Dalton

John Dalton FRS (6 September 1766 – 27 July 1844) was an English chemist, physicist, and meteorologist.

New!!: Science and John Dalton · See more »

John Dewey

John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, Georgist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform.

New!!: Science and John Dewey · See more »

John Herschel

Sir John Frederick William Herschel, 1st Baronet (7 March 1792 – 11 May 1871) was an English polymath, mathematician, astronomer, chemist, inventor, experimental photographer who invented the blueprint, and did botanical work.

New!!: Science and John Herschel · See more »

John Horgan (journalist)

John Horgan (born 1953) is an American science journalist best known for his 1996 book The End of Science.

New!!: Science and John Horgan (journalist) · See more »

John Peckham

John Peckham (c. 1230 – 8 December 1292) was Archbishop of Canterbury in the years 1279–1292.

New!!: Science and John Peckham · See more »

John Philoponus

John Philoponus (Ἰωάννης ὁ Φιλόπονος; c. 490 – c. 570), also known as John the Grammarian or John of Alexandria, was an Alexandrian philologist, Aristotelian commentator and Christian theologian, author of a considerable number of philosophical treatises and theological works.

New!!: Science and John Philoponus · See more »

John Ziman

John Michael Ziman (16 May 1925 – 2 January 2005) was a British-born New Zealand physicist and humanist who worked in the area of condensed matter physics.

New!!: Science and John Ziman · See more »

Joseph Needham

Noel Joseph Terence Montgomery Needham (9 December 1900 – 24 March 1995) was a British biochemist, historian and sinologist known for his scientific research and writing on the history of Chinese science and technology.

New!!: Science and Joseph Needham · See more »

Journal des sçavans

The Journal des sçavans (later renamed Journal des savants), established by Denis de Sallo, was the earliest academic journal published in Europe.

New!!: Science and Journal des sçavans · See more »

Junk science

The expression junk science is used to describe scientific data, research, or analysis considered by the person using the phrase to be spurious or fraudulent.

New!!: Science and Junk science · See more »

Kaiser Wilhelm Society

The Kaiser Wilhelm Society for the Advancement of Science (German Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften) was a German scientific institution established in the German Empire in 1911.

New!!: Science and Kaiser Wilhelm Society · See more »

Karl Popper

Sir Karl Raimund Popper (28 July 1902 – 17 September 1994) was an Austrian-British philosopher and professor.

New!!: Science and Karl Popper · See more »

Keith Stanovich

Keith E. Stanovich is Emeritus Professor of Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto and former Canada Research Chair of Applied Cognitive Science.

New!!: Science and Keith Stanovich · See more »

Kepler's laws of planetary motion

In astronomy, Kepler's laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

New!!: Science and Kepler's laws of planetary motion · See more »

Knowledge

Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something, such as facts, information, descriptions, or skills, which is acquired through experience or education by perceiving, discovering, or learning.

New!!: Science and Knowledge · See more »

Laser

A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation.

New!!: Science and Laser · See more »

Late antiquity

Late antiquity is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean world, and the Near East.

New!!: Science and Late antiquity · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Science and Latin · See more »

Learned society

A learned society (also known as a learned academy, scholarly society, or academic association) is an organisation that exists to promote an academic discipline, profession, or a group of related disciplines such as the arts.

New!!: Science and Learned society · See more »

LED lamp

A LED lamp or LED light bulb is an electric light for use in light fixtures that produces light using light-emitting diode (LED).

New!!: Science and LED lamp · See more »

Leucippus

Leucippus (Λεύκιππος, Leúkippos; fl. 5th cent. BCE) is reported in some ancient sources to have been a philosopher who was the earliest Greek to develop the theory of atomism—the idea that everything is composed entirely of various imperishable, indivisible elements called atoms.

New!!: Science and Leucippus · See more »

Library of Alexandria

The Royal Library of Alexandria or Ancient Library of Alexandria in Alexandria, Egypt, was one of the largest and most significant libraries of the ancient world.

New!!: Science and Library of Alexandria · See more »

Lightning rod

A lightning rod (US, AUS) or lightning conductor (UK) is a metal rod mounted on a structure and intended to protect the structure from a lightning strike.

New!!: Science and Lightning rod · See more »

Lime plaster

Lime plaster is a type of plaster composed of sand, water, and lime, usually non-hydraulic hydrated lime (also known as slaked lime, high calcium lime or air lime).

New!!: Science and Lime plaster · See more »

List of life sciences

The life sciences or biological sciences comprise the branches of science that involve the scientific study of life and organisms – such as microorganisms, plants, and animals including human beings – as well as related considerations like bioethics.

New!!: Science and List of life sciences · See more »

List of natural phenomena

Types of natural phenomena include, but are not limited to, the following: Weather, fog, thunder, tornadoes; biological processes, decomposition, germination; physical processes, wave propagation, erosion; tidal flow, and natural disasters such as electromagnetic pulses, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes.

New!!: Science and List of natural phenomena · See more »

List of science magazines

A science magazine is a periodical publication with news, opinions and reports about science, generally written for a non-expert audience.

New!!: Science and List of science magazines · See more »

List of scientific occupations

This is a list of science and science-related occupations, which include various scientific occupations, careers based upon scientific research disciplines and explorers.

New!!: Science and List of scientific occupations · See more »

Literature

Literature, most generically, is any body of written works.

New!!: Science and Literature · See more »

Logic

Logic (from the logikḗ), originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth, and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference.

New!!: Science and Logic · See more »

London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

New!!: Science and London · See more »

Long Island

Long Island is a densely populated island off the East Coast of the United States, beginning at New York Harbor just 0.35 miles (0.56 km) from Manhattan Island and extending eastward into the Atlantic Ocean.

New!!: Science and Long Island · See more »

Loudspeaker

A loudspeaker (or loud-speaker or speaker) is an electroacoustic transducer; which converts an electrical audio signal into a corresponding sound.

New!!: Science and Loudspeaker · See more »

Ludwig Wittgenstein

Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (26 April 1889 – 29 April 1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language.

New!!: Science and Ludwig Wittgenstein · See more »

Lynn Townsend White Jr.

Lynn Townsend White Jr. (April 29, 1907 – March 30, 1987) was an American historian.

New!!: Science and Lynn Townsend White Jr. · See more »

Machine

A machine uses power to apply forces and control movement to perform an intended action.

New!!: Science and Machine · See more »

Macmillan Publishers

Macmillan Publishers Ltd (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group) is an international publishing company owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group.

New!!: Science and Macmillan Publishers · See more »

Magic (supernatural)

Magic is a category in Western culture into which have been placed various beliefs and practices considered separate from both religion and science.

New!!: Science and Magic (supernatural) · See more »

Magnetic resonance imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body in both health and disease.

New!!: Science and Magnetic resonance imaging · See more »

Magnetic tape

Magnetic tape is a medium for magnetic recording, made of a thin, magnetizable coating on a long, narrow strip of plastic film.

New!!: Science and Magnetic tape · See more »

Magnetism

Magnetism is a class of physical phenomena that are mediated by magnetic fields.

New!!: Science and Magnetism · See more »

Marie Curie

Marie Skłodowska Curie (born Maria Salomea Skłodowska; 7 November 18674 July 1934) was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity.

New!!: Science and Marie Curie · See more »

Mass media

The mass media is a diversified collection of media technologies that reach a large audience via mass communication.

New!!: Science and Mass media · See more »

Mathematical and theoretical biology

Mathematical and theoretical biology is a branch of biology which employs theoretical analysis, mathematical models and abstractions of the living organisms to investigate the principles that govern the structure, development and behavior of the systems, as opposed to experimental biology which deals with the conduction of experiments to prove and validate the scientific theories.

New!!: Science and Mathematical and theoretical biology · See more »

Mathematical chemistry

Mathematical chemistry is the area of research engaged in novel applications of mathematics to chemistry; it concerns itself principally with the mathematical modeling of chemical phenomena.

New!!: Science and Mathematical chemistry · See more »

Mathematical economics

Mathematical economics is the application of mathematical methods to represent theories and analyze problems in economics.

New!!: Science and Mathematical economics · See more »

Mathematical finance

Mathematical finance, also known as quantitative finance, is a field of applied mathematics, concerned with mathematical modeling of financial markets.

New!!: Science and Mathematical finance · See more »

Mathematical logic

Mathematical logic is a subfield of mathematics exploring the applications of formal logic to mathematics.

New!!: Science and Mathematical logic · See more »

Mathematical physics

Mathematical physics refers to the development of mathematical methods for application to problems in physics.

New!!: Science and Mathematical physics · See more »

Mathematics

Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") is the study of such topics as quantity, structure, space, and change.

New!!: Science and Mathematics · See more »

Max Born

Max Born (11 December 1882 – 5 January 1970) was a German physicist and mathematician who was instrumental in the development of quantum mechanics.

New!!: Science and Max Born · See more »

Max Planck Society

The Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. V.; abbreviated MPG) is a formally independent non-governmental and non-profit association of German research institutes founded in 1911 as the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and renamed the Max Planck Society in 1948 in honor of its former president, theoretical physicist Max Planck.

New!!: Science and Max Planck Society · See more »

Measurement

Measurement is the assignment of a number to a characteristic of an object or event, which can be compared with other objects or events.

New!!: Science and Measurement · See more »

Mechanical philosophy

The mechanical philosophy is a natural philosophy describing the universe as similar to a large-scale mechanism.

New!!: Science and Mechanical philosophy · See more »

Medical imaging

Medical imaging is the technique and process of creating visual representations of the interior of a body for clinical analysis and medical intervention, as well as visual representation of the function of some organs or tissues (physiology).

New!!: Science and Medical imaging · See more »

Medical prescription

A prescription is a health-care program implemented by a physician or other qualified health care practitioner in the form of instructions that govern the plan of care for an individual patient.

New!!: Science and Medical prescription · See more »

Medical research

Biomedical research (or experimental medicine) encompasses a wide array of research, extending from "basic research" (also called bench science or bench research), – involving fundamental scientific principles that may apply to a ''preclinical'' understanding – to clinical research, which involves studies of people who may be subjects in clinical trials.

New!!: Science and Medical research · See more »

Medicine

Medicine is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

New!!: Science and Medicine · See more »

Mercury (planet)

Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System.

New!!: Science and Mercury (planet) · See more »

Merriam-Webster

Merriam–Webster, Incorporated is an American company that publishes reference books which is especially known for its dictionaries.

New!!: Science and Merriam-Webster · See more »

Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia is a historical region in West Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

New!!: Science and Mesopotamia · See more »

Metallurgy

Metallurgy is a domain of materials science and engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their inter-metallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys.

New!!: Science and Metallurgy · See more »

Metaphysics

Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy that explores the nature of being, existence, and reality.

New!!: Science and Metaphysics · See more »

Metaphysics (Aristotle)

Metaphysics (Greek: τὰ μετὰ τὰ φυσικά; Latin: Metaphysica) is one of the principal works of Aristotle and the first major work of the branch of philosophy with the same name.

New!!: Science and Metaphysics (Aristotle) · See more »

Methodology

Methodology is the systematic, theoretical analysis of the methods applied to a field of study.

New!!: Science and Methodology · See more »

Michael Shermer

Michael Brant Shermer (born September 8, 1954) is an American science writer, historian of science, founder of The Skeptics Society, and editor-in-chief of its magazine Skeptic, which is largely devoted to investigating pseudoscientific and supernatural claims.

New!!: Science and Michael Shermer · See more »

Microwave

Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from one meter to one millimeter; with frequencies between and.

New!!: Science and Microwave · See more »

Migration Period

The Migration Period was a period during the decline of the Roman Empire around the 4th to 6th centuries AD in which there were widespread migrations of peoples within or into Europe, mostly into Roman territory, notably the Germanic tribes and the Huns.

New!!: Science and Migration Period · See more »

Milesian school

The Milesian school was a school of thought founded in the 6th century BC.

New!!: Science and Milesian school · See more »

Mining engineering

Mining engineering is an engineering discipline that applies science and technology to the extraction of minerals from the earth.

New!!: Science and Mining engineering · See more »

MMR vaccine

The MMR vaccine (also known as the MPR vaccine after the Latin names of the diseases) is an immunization vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles).

New!!: Science and MMR vaccine · See more »

Mobile computing

Mobile computing is human–computer interaction by which a computer is expected to be transported during normal usage, which allows for transmission of data, voice and video.

New!!: Science and Mobile computing · See more »

Mobile phone

A mobile phone, known as a cell phone in North America, is a portable telephone that can make and receive calls over a radio frequency link while the user is moving within a telephone service area.

New!!: Science and Mobile phone · See more »

Modern history

Modern history, the modern period or the modern era, is the linear, global, historiographical approach to the time frame after post-classical history.

New!!: Science and Modern history · See more »

Mohism

Mohism or Moism was an ancient Chinese philosophy of logic, rational thought and science developed by the academic scholars who studied under the ancient Chinese philosopher Mozi (c. 470 BC – c. 391 BC) and embodied in an eponymous book: the Mozi.

New!!: Science and Mohism · See more »

Momentum

In Newtonian mechanics, linear momentum, translational momentum, or simply momentum (pl. momenta) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object.

New!!: Science and Momentum · See more »

Mondino de Luzzi

Mondino de Luzzi, or de Liuzzi or de Lucci, (ca. 1270 – 1326), also known as Mundinus, was an Italian physician, anatomist and professor of surgery, who lived and worked in Bologna.

New!!: Science and Mondino de Luzzi · See more »

Mongol invasions and conquests

Mongol invasions and conquests took place throughout the 13th century, resulting in the vast Mongol Empire, which by 1300 covered much of Asia and Eastern Europe.

New!!: Science and Mongol invasions and conquests · See more »

Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi

Abū Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyyā al-Rāzī (Abūbakr Mohammad-e Zakariyyā-ye Rāzī, also known by his Latinized name Rhazes or Rasis) (854–925 CE), was a Persian polymath, physician, alchemist, philosopher, and important figure in the history of medicine.

New!!: Science and Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi · See more »

Musica universalis

Musica universalis (literally universal music), also called Music of the spheres or Harmony of the Spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of musica (the Medieval Latin term for music).

New!!: Science and Musica universalis · See more »

Mythology

Mythology refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people or to the study of such myths.

New!!: Science and Mythology · See more »

NASA

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

New!!: Science and NASA · See more »

National Academy of Sciences

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a United States nonprofit, non-governmental organization.

New!!: Science and National Academy of Sciences · See more »

National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering.

New!!: Science and National Science Foundation · See more »

National Scientific and Technical Research Council

The National Scientific and Technical Research Council (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, CONICET) is an Argentine government agency which directs and co-ordinates most of the scientific and technical research done in universities and institutes.

New!!: Science and National Scientific and Technical Research Council · See more »

Natural History (Pliny)

The Natural History (Naturalis Historia) is a book about the whole of the natural world in Latin by Pliny the Elder, a Roman author and naval commander who died in 79 AD.

New!!: Science and Natural History (Pliny) · See more »

Natural law

Natural law (ius naturale, lex naturalis) is a philosophy asserting that certain rights are inherent by virtue of human nature, endowed by nature—traditionally by God or a transcendent source—and that these can be understood universally through human reason.

New!!: Science and Natural law · See more »

Natural philosophy

Natural philosophy or philosophy of nature (from Latin philosophia naturalis) was the philosophical study of nature and the physical universe that was dominant before the development of modern science.

New!!: Science and Natural philosophy · See more »

Natural science

Natural science is a branch of science concerned with the description, prediction, and understanding of natural phenomena, based on empirical evidence from observation and experimentation.

New!!: Science and Natural science · See more »

Natural selection

Natural selection is the differential survival and reproduction of individuals due to differences in phenotype.

New!!: Science and Natural selection · See more »

Naturalism (philosophy)

In philosophy, naturalism is the "idea or belief that only natural (as opposed to supernatural or spiritual) laws and forces operate in the world." Adherents of naturalism (i.e., naturalists) assert that natural laws are the rules that govern the structure and behavior of the natural universe, that the changing universe at every stage is a product of these laws.

New!!: Science and Naturalism (philosophy) · See more »

Naturalized epistemology

Naturalized epistemology, coined by W. V. O. Quine, is a collection of philosophic views concerned with the theory of knowledge that emphasize the role of natural scientific methods.

New!!: Science and Naturalized epistemology · See more »

Nature

Nature, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, or material world or universe.

New!!: Science and Nature · See more »

Navigation

Navigation is a field of study that focuses on the process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another.

New!!: Science and Navigation · See more »

New Scientist

New Scientist, first published on 22 November 1956, is a weekly, English-language magazine that covers all aspects of science and technology.

New!!: Science and New Scientist · See more »

Newsday

Newsday is an American daily newspaper that primarily serves Nassau and Suffolk counties and the New York City borough of Queens on Long Island, although it is sold throughout the New York metropolitan area.

New!!: Science and Newsday · See more »

Newtonianism

Newtonianism is a philosophical and scientific doctrine inspired by the beliefs and methods of natural philosopher Isaac Newton.

New!!: Science and Newtonianism · See more »

Nicolaus Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus (Mikołaj Kopernik; Nikolaus Kopernikus; Niklas Koppernigk; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance-era mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe, likely independently of Aristarchus of Samos, who had formulated such a model some eighteen centuries earlier.

New!!: Science and Nicolaus Copernicus · See more »

Night vision

Night vision is the ability to see in low-light conditions.

New!!: Science and Night vision · See more »

Nina Byers

Nina Byers (January 19, 1930 – June 5, 2014) was a theoretical physicist, Research Professor and Professor of Physics emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA.

New!!: Science and Nina Byers · See more »

Nomenclature

Nomenclature is a system of names or terms, or the rules for forming these terms in a particular field of arts or sciences.

New!!: Science and Nomenclature · See more »

Non-overlapping magisteria

Non-overlapping magisteria (NOMA) is the view that was advocated by Stephen Jay Gould that science and religion each represent different areas of inquiry, fact vs.

New!!: Science and Non-overlapping magisteria · See more »

Normative science

In the applied sciences, normative science is a type of information that is developed, presented, or interpreted based on an assumed, usually unstated, preference for a particular policy or class of policies.

New!!: Science and Normative science · See more »

Nuclear arms race

The nuclear arms race was a competition for supremacy in nuclear warfare between the United States, the Soviet Union, and their respective allies during the Cold War.

New!!: Science and Nuclear arms race · See more »

Nuclear fusion

In nuclear physics, nuclear fusion is a reaction in which two or more atomic nuclei come close enough to form one or more different atomic nuclei and subatomic particles (neutrons or protons).

New!!: Science and Nuclear fusion · See more »

Nuclear magnetic resonance

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a physical phenomenon in which nuclei in a magnetic field absorb and re-emit electromagnetic radiation.

New!!: Science and Nuclear magnetic resonance · See more »

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), is a spectroscopic technique to observe local magnetic fields around atomic nuclei.

New!!: Science and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy · See more »

Nuclear power

Nuclear power is the use of nuclear reactions that release nuclear energy to generate heat, which most frequently is then used in steam turbines to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant.

New!!: Science and Nuclear power · See more »

Nuclear reactor

A nuclear reactor, formerly known as an atomic pile, is a device used to initiate and control a self-sustained nuclear chain reaction.

New!!: Science and Nuclear reactor · See more »

Nuclear weapon

A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb).

New!!: Science and Nuclear weapon · See more »

Number theory

Number theory, or in older usage arithmetic, is a branch of pure mathematics devoted primarily to the study of the integers.

New!!: Science and Number theory · See more »

Objectivity (science)

Objectivity in science is a value that informs how science is practiced and how scientific truths are discovered.

New!!: Science and Objectivity (science) · See more »

Observation

Observation is the active acquisition of information from a primary source.

New!!: Science and Observation · See more »

Observational study

In fields such as epidemiology, social sciences, psychology and statistics, an observational study draws inferences from a sample to a population where the independent variable is not under the control of the researcher because of ethical concerns or logistical constraints.

New!!: Science and Observational study · See more »

Occam's razor

Occam's razor (also Ockham's razor or Ocham's razor; Latin: lex parsimoniae "law of parsimony") is the problem-solving principle that, the simplest explanation tends to be the right one.

New!!: Science and Occam's razor · See more »

OECD

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD; Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques, OCDE) is an intergovernmental economic organisation with 35 member countries, founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade.

New!!: Science and OECD · See more »

Office of Scientific Research and Development

The Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) was an agency of the United States federal government created to coordinate scientific research for military purposes during World War II.

New!!: Science and Office of Scientific Research and Development · See more »

On the Origin of Species

On the Origin of Species (or more completely, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life),The book's full original title was On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life.

New!!: Science and On the Origin of Species · See more »

Optical fiber

An optical fiber or optical fibre is a flexible, transparent fiber made by drawing glass (silica) or plastic to a diameter slightly thicker than that of a human hair.

New!!: Science and Optical fiber · See more »

Optics

Optics is the branch of physics which involves the behaviour and properties of light, including its interactions with matter and the construction of instruments that use or detect it.

New!!: Science and Optics · See more »

Optics (Ptolemy)

Ptolemy's Optics (2nd century) is a (partially lost) work on geometrical optics, dealing with reflection, refraction, and colour.

New!!: Science and Optics (Ptolemy) · See more »

Orbital period

The orbital period is the time a given astronomical object takes to complete one orbit around another object, and applies in astronomy usually to planets or asteroids orbiting the Sun, moons orbiting planets, exoplanets orbiting other stars, or binary stars.

New!!: Science and Orbital period · See more »

Outline of physical science

Physical science is a branch of natural science that studies non-living systems, in contrast to life science.

New!!: Science and Outline of physical science · See more »

Outline of science

The following outline is provided as a topical overview of science: Science – the systematic effort of acquiring knowledge—through observation and experimentation coupled with logic and reasoning to find out what can be proved or not proved—and the knowledge thus acquired.

New!!: Science and Outline of science · See more »

Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

New!!: Science and Oxford English Dictionary · See more »

Oxfordshire

Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Oxonium, the Latin name for Oxford) is a county in South East England.

New!!: Science and Oxfordshire · See more »

Ozone depletion

Ozone depletion describes two related events observed since the late 1970s: a steady lowering of about four percent in the total amount of ozone in Earth's atmosphere(the ozone layer), and a much larger springtime decrease in stratospheric ozone around Earth's polar regions.

New!!: Science and Ozone depletion · See more »

Pathological science

Pathological science is an area of research where "people are tricked into false results...

New!!: Science and Pathological science · See more »

Paul Feyerabend

Paul Karl Feyerabend (January 13, 1924 – February 11, 1994) was an Austrian-born philosopher of science best known for his work as a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked for three decades (1958–1989).

New!!: Science and Paul Feyerabend · See more »

Peer review

Peer review is the evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work (peers).

New!!: Science and Peer review · See more »

Penicillin

Penicillin (PCN or pen) is a group of antibiotics which include penicillin G (intravenous use), penicillin V (use by mouth), procaine penicillin, and benzathine penicillin (intramuscular use).

New!!: Science and Penicillin · See more »

Peripatetic school

The Peripatetic school was a school of philosophy in Ancient Greece.

New!!: Science and Peripatetic school · See more »

Perspective (graphical)

Perspective (from perspicere "to see through") in the graphic arts is an approximate representation, generally on a flat surface (such as paper), of an image as it is seen by the eye.

New!!: Science and Perspective (graphical) · See more »

Phenomenon

A phenomenon (Greek: φαινόμενον, phainómenon, from the verb phainein, to show, shine, appear, to be manifest or manifest itself, plural phenomena) is any thing which manifests itself.

New!!: Science and Phenomenon · See more »

Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

New!!: Science and Philadelphia · See more »

Philosophes

The philosophes (French for "philosophers") were the intellectuals of the 18th-century Enlightenment.

New!!: Science and Philosophes · See more »

Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica

Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Latin for Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy), often referred to as simply the Principia, is a work in three books by Isaac Newton, in Latin, first published 5 July 1687.

New!!: Science and Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica · See more »

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

Philosophical Transactions, titled Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (often abbreviated as Phil. Trans.) from 1776, is a scientific journal published by the Royal Society.

New!!: Science and Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society · See more »

Philosophy

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom") is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

New!!: Science and Philosophy · See more »

Photovoltaic effect

The photovoltaic effect is the creation of voltage and electric current in a material upon exposure to light and is a physical and chemical property/phenomenon.

New!!: Science and Photovoltaic effect · See more »

Physical cosmology

Physical cosmology is the study of the largest-scale structures and dynamics of the Universe and is concerned with fundamental questions about its origin, structure, evolution, and ultimate fate.

New!!: Science and Physical cosmology · See more »

Physical law

A physical law or scientific law is a theoretical statement "inferred from particular facts, applicable to a defined group or class of phenomena, and expressible by the statement that a particular phenomenon always occurs if certain conditions be present." Physical laws are typically conclusions based on repeated scientific experiments and observations over many years and which have become accepted universally within the scientific community.

New!!: Science and Physical law · See more »

Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

New!!: Science and Physics · See more »

Physics (Aristotle)

The Physics (Greek: Φυσικὴ ἀκρόασις Phusike akroasis; Latin: Physica, or Naturalis Auscultationes, possibly meaning "lectures on nature") is a named text, written in ancient Greek, collated from a collection of surviving manuscripts known as the Corpus Aristotelicum because attributed to the 4th-century BC philosopher, teacher, and mentor of Macedonian rulers, Aristotle.

New!!: Science and Physics (Aristotle) · See more »

Physiology

Physiology is the scientific study of normal mechanisms, and their interactions, which work within a living system.

New!!: Science and Physiology · See more »

Physis

Physis (Greek: italic phusis) is a Greek theological, philosophical, and scientific term usually translated into English as "nature".

New!!: Science and Physis · See more »

Plastic

Plastic is material consisting of any of a wide range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compounds that are malleable and so can be molded into solid objects.

New!!: Science and Plastic · See more »

Plato

Plato (Πλάτων Plátōn, in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

New!!: Science and Plato · See more »

Pliny the Elder

Pliny the Elder (born Gaius Plinius Secundus, AD 23–79) was a Roman author, naturalist and natural philosopher, a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire, and friend of emperor Vespasian.

New!!: Science and Pliny the Elder · See more »

Poetry

Poetry (the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning.

New!!: Science and Poetry · See more »

Policy

A policy is a deliberate system of principles to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes.

New!!: Science and Policy · See more »

Political philosophy

Political philosophy, or political theory, is the study of topics such as politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law, and the enforcement of laws by authority: what they are, why (or even if) they are needed, what, if anything, makes a government legitimate, what rights and freedoms it should protect and why, what form it should take and why, what the law is, and what duties citizens owe to a legitimate government, if any, and when it may be legitimately overthrown, if ever.

New!!: Science and Political philosophy · See more »

Politician

A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government.

New!!: Science and Politician · See more »

Popular culture

Popular culture (also called pop culture) is generally recognized as a set of the practices, beliefs, and objects that are dominant or ubiquitous in a society at a given point in time.

New!!: Science and Popular culture · See more »

Popular science

Popular science (also called pop-science or popsci) is an interpretation of science intended for a general audience.

New!!: Science and Popular science · See more »

Population growth

In biology or human geography, population growth is the increase in the number of individuals in a population.

New!!: Science and Population growth · See more »

Positron emission tomography

Positron-emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine functional imaging technique that is used to observe metabolic processes in the body as an aid to the diagnosis of disease.

New!!: Science and Positron emission tomography · See more »

Potential

Potential generally refers to a currently unrealized ability.

New!!: Science and Potential · See more »

Potentiality and actuality

In philosophy, potentiality and actuality are principles of a dichotomy which Aristotle used to analyze motion, causality, ethics, and physiology in his Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics and De Anima, which is about the human psyche.

New!!: Science and Potentiality and actuality · See more »

Pottery

Pottery is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares, of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain.

New!!: Science and Pottery · See more »

Pre-Socratic philosophy

A number of early Greek philosophers active before and during the time of Socrates are collectively known as the Pre-Socratics.

New!!: Science and Pre-Socratic philosophy · See more »

Prediction

A prediction (Latin præ-, "before," and dicere, "to say"), or forecast, is a statement about a future event.

New!!: Science and Prediction · See more »

Printing press

A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink.

New!!: Science and Printing press · See more »

Product (business)

In marketing, a product is anything that can be offered to a market that might satisfy a want or need.

New!!: Science and Product (business) · See more »

Protoscience

In the philosophy of science, there are several definitions of protoscience.

New!!: Science and Protoscience · See more »

Pseudoscience

Pseudoscience consists of statements, beliefs, or practices that are claimed to be both scientific and factual, but are incompatible with the scientific method.

New!!: Science and Pseudoscience · See more »

Psychological Science

Psychological Science, the flagship journal of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by SAGE Publications.

New!!: Science and Psychological Science · See more »

Psychology

Psychology is the science of behavior and mind, including conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as feeling and thought.

New!!: Science and Psychology · See more »

Ptolemy

Claudius Ptolemy (Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos; Claudius Ptolemaeus) was a Greco-Roman mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.

New!!: Science and Ptolemy · See more »

Public awareness of science

Public awareness of science (PAwS), public understanding of science (PUS), or more recently, Public Engagement with Science and Technology (PEST) are terms relating to the attitudes, behaviours, opinions, and activities that comprise the relations between the general public or lay society as a whole to scientific knowledge and organisation.

New!!: Science and Public awareness of science · See more »

Public policy

Public policy is the principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues, in a manner consistent with law and institutional customs.

New!!: Science and Public policy · See more »

Public science

Public science is an increasingly popular term for research that is conducted amongst, or includes, the public.

New!!: Science and Public science · See more »

Public works

Public works (or internal improvements historically in the United States)Carter Goodrich, (Greenwood Press, 1960)Stephen Minicucci,, Studies in American Political Development (2004), 18:2:160-185 Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Science and Public works · See more »

Pythagorean theorem

In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem, also known as Pythagoras' theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle.

New!!: Science and Pythagorean theorem · See more »

Pythagoreanism

Pythagoreanism originated in the 6th century BC, based on the teachings and beliefs held by Pythagoras and his followers, the Pythagoreans, who were considerably influenced by mathematics and mysticism.

New!!: Science and Pythagoreanism · See more »

Quantum mechanics

Quantum mechanics (QM; also known as quantum physics, quantum theory, the wave mechanical model, or matrix mechanics), including quantum field theory, is a fundamental theory in physics which describes nature at the smallest scales of energy levels of atoms and subatomic particles.

New!!: Science and Quantum mechanics · See more »

Radar

Radar is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects.

New!!: Science and Radar · See more »

Radio astronomy

Radio astronomy is a subfield of astronomy that studies celestial objects at radio frequencies.

New!!: Science and Radio astronomy · See more »

Radio station

A radio station is a set of equipment necessary to carry on communication via radio waves.

New!!: Science and Radio station · See more »

Radio wave

Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum longer than infrared light.

New!!: Science and Radio wave · See more »

Radioactive decay

Radioactive decay (also known as nuclear decay or radioactivity) is the process by which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy (in terms of mass in its rest frame) by emitting radiation, such as an alpha particle, beta particle with neutrino or only a neutrino in the case of electron capture, gamma ray, or electron in the case of internal conversion.

New!!: Science and Radioactive decay · See more »

Radiometric dating

Radiometric dating or radioactive dating is a technique used to date materials such as rocks or carbon, in which trace radioactive impurities were selectively incorporated when they were formed.

New!!: Science and Radiometric dating · See more »

Random House

Random House is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world.

New!!: Science and Random House · See more »

Rationalism

In philosophy, rationalism is the epistemological view that "regards reason as the chief source and test of knowledge" or "any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification".

New!!: Science and Rationalism · See more »

Records of the Grand Historian

The Records of the Grand Historian, also known by its Chinese name Shiji, is a monumental history of ancient China and the world finished around 94 BC by the Han dynasty official Sima Qian after having been started by his father, Sima Tan, Grand Astrologer to the imperial court.

New!!: Science and Records of the Grand Historian · See more »

Regenerative medicine

Regenerative medicine is a branch of translational research in tissue engineering and molecular biology which deals with the "process of replacing, engineering or regenerating human cells, tissues or organs to restore or establish normal function".

New!!: Science and Regenerative medicine · See more »

Religion

Religion may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements.

New!!: Science and Religion · See more »

Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

New!!: Science and Renaissance · See more »

Renaissance of the 12th century

The Renaissance of the 12th century was a period of many changes at the outset of the high Middle Ages.

New!!: Science and Renaissance of the 12th century · See more »

René Descartes

René Descartes (Latinized: Renatus Cartesius; adjectival form: "Cartesian"; 31 March 1596 – 11 February 1650) was a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist.

New!!: Science and René Descartes · See more »

Reproducibility

Reproducibility is the closeness of the agreement between the results of measurements of the same measurand carried out under changed conditions of measurement.

New!!: Science and Reproducibility · See more »

Research

Research comprises "creative and systematic work undertaken to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of humans, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications." It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support theorems, or develop new theories.

New!!: Science and Research · See more »

Research and development

Research and development (R&D, R+D, or R'n'D), also known in Europe as research and technological development (RTD), refers to innovative activities undertaken by corporations or governments in developing new services or products, or improving existing services or products.

New!!: Science and Research and development · See more »

Research institute

A research institute or research center is an establishment founded for doing research.

New!!: Science and Research institute · See more »

Rhetoric

Rhetoric is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade, or motivate particular audiences in specific situations.

New!!: Science and Rhetoric · See more »

Richard Feynman

Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist, known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model.

New!!: Science and Richard Feynman · See more »

Rod cell

Rod cells are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that can function in less intense light than the other type of visual photoreceptor, cone cells.

New!!: Science and Rod cell · See more »

Roger Bacon

Roger Bacon (Rogerus or Rogerius Baconus, Baconis, also Rogerus), also known by the scholastic accolade Doctor, was an English philosopher and Franciscan friar who placed considerable emphasis on the study of nature through empiricism.

New!!: Science and Roger Bacon · See more »

Rosalind Franklin

Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 192016 April 1958) was an English chemist and X-ray crystallographer who made contributions to the understanding of the molecular structures of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), RNA (ribonucleic acid), viruses, coal, and graphite.

New!!: Science and Rosalind Franklin · See more »

Royal Literary Fund

The Royal Literary Fund (RLF) is a benevolent fund set up to help published British writers in financial difficulties.

New!!: Science and Royal Literary Fund · See more »

Royal Society

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society.

New!!: Science and Royal Society · See more »

Salmonella

Salmonella is a genus of rod-shaped (bacillus) Gram-negative bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

New!!: Science and Salmonella · See more »

Sasanian Empire

The Sasanian Empire, also known as the Sassanian, Sasanid, Sassanid or Neo-Persian Empire (known to its inhabitants as Ērānshahr in Middle Persian), was the last period of the Persian Empire (Iran) before the rise of Islam, named after the House of Sasan, which ruled from 224 to 651 AD. The Sasanian Empire, which succeeded the Parthian Empire, was recognised as one of the leading world powers alongside its neighbouring arch-rival the Roman-Byzantine Empire, for a period of more than 400 years.Norman A. Stillman The Jews of Arab Lands pp 22 Jewish Publication Society, 1979 International Congress of Byzantine Studies Proceedings of the 21st International Congress of Byzantine Studies, London, 21–26 August 2006, Volumes 1-3 pp 29. Ashgate Pub Co, 30 sep. 2006 The Sasanian Empire was founded by Ardashir I, after the fall of the Parthian Empire and the defeat of the last Arsacid king, Artabanus V. At its greatest extent, the Sasanian Empire encompassed all of today's Iran, Iraq, Eastern Arabia (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatif, Qatar, UAE), the Levant (Syria, Palestine, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan), the Caucasus (Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Dagestan), Egypt, large parts of Turkey, much of Central Asia (Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan), Yemen and Pakistan. According to a legend, the vexilloid of the Sasanian Empire was the Derafsh Kaviani.Khaleghi-Motlagh, The Sasanian Empire during Late Antiquity is considered to have been one of Iran's most important and influential historical periods and constituted the last great Iranian empire before the Muslim conquest and the adoption of Islam. In many ways, the Sasanian period witnessed the peak of ancient Iranian civilisation. The Sasanians' cultural influence extended far beyond the empire's territorial borders, reaching as far as Western Europe, Africa, China and India. It played a prominent role in the formation of both European and Asian medieval art. Much of what later became known as Islamic culture in art, architecture, music and other subject matter was transferred from the Sasanians throughout the Muslim world.

New!!: Science and Sasanian Empire · See more »

Satellite navigation

A satellite navigation or satnav system is a system that uses satellites to provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning.

New!!: Science and Satellite navigation · See more »

Scholasticism

Scholasticism is a method of critical thought which dominated teaching by the academics ("scholastics", or "schoolmen") of medieval universities in Europe from about 1100 to 1700, and a program of employing that method in articulating and defending dogma in an increasingly pluralistic context.

New!!: Science and Scholasticism · See more »

Science & Vie

Science & Vie (French for Science and Life) is a monthly science magazine published in France.

New!!: Science and Science & Vie · See more »

Science and Civilisation in China

Science and Civilisation in China (1954–) is a series of books initiated and edited by British biochemist, historian and sinologist Joseph Needham, Ph.D (1900–1995).

New!!: Science and Science and Civilisation in China · See more »

Science and technology studies

Science and technology studies, or science, technology and society studies (both abbreviated STS) is the study of how society, politics, and culture affect scientific research and technological innovation, and how these, in turn, affect society, politics and culture.

New!!: Science and Science and technology studies · See more »

Science book

A science book is a work of nonfiction, usually written by a scientist, researcher, or professor like Stephen Hawking (A Brief History of Time), or sometimes by a non-scientist such as Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything).

New!!: Science and Science book · See more »

Science communication

Science communication is the public communication of science-related topics to non-experts.

New!!: Science and Science communication · See more »

Science festival

A science festival is a festival that showcases science and technology with the same freshness and flair that would be expected from an arts or music festival.

New!!: Science and Science festival · See more »

Science fiction

Science fiction (often shortened to Sci-Fi or SF) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, spaceflight, time travel, and extraterrestrial life.

New!!: Science and Science fiction · See more »

Science in popular culture

Science in popular culture is the treatment of scientific themes and issues in popular media such as cinema, music, television and novels.

New!!: Science and Science in popular culture · See more »

Science journalism

Science journalism conveys reporting about science to the public.

New!!: Science and Science journalism · See more »

Science outreach

Science outreach, also called Education and Public Outreach (EPO or E/PO) or simply public outreach, is an umbrella term for a variety of activities by research institutes, universities, and institutions such as science museums, aimed at promoting public awareness (and understanding) of science and making informal contributions to science education.

New!!: Science and Science outreach · See more »

Science policy

Science policy is concerned with the allocation of resources for the conduct of science towards the goal of best serving the public interest.

New!!: Science and Science policy · See more »

Science wars

The science wars were a series of intellectual exchanges, between scientific realists and postmodernist critics, about the nature of scientific theory and intellectual inquiry.

New!!: Science and Science wars · See more »

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), previously Science, Math, Engineering, and Technology (SMET), is a term used to group together these academic disciplines.

New!!: Science and Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics · See more »

Scientific American

Scientific American (informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine.

New!!: Science and Scientific American · See more »

Scientific community

The scientific community is a diverse network of interacting scientists.

New!!: Science and Scientific community · See more »

Scientific controversy

A scientific controversy is a substantial disagreement among scientists.

New!!: Science and Scientific controversy · See more »

Scientific dissent

Scientific dissent is dissent from scientific consensus.

New!!: Science and Scientific dissent · See more »

Scientific journal

In academic publishing, a scientific journal is a periodical publication intended to further the progress of science, usually by reporting new research.

New!!: Science and Scientific journal · See more »

Scientific literature

Scientific literature comprises scholarly publications that report original empirical and theoretical work in the natural and social sciences, and within an academic field, often abbreviated as the literature.

New!!: Science and Scientific literature · See more »

Scientific method

Scientific method is an empirical method of knowledge acquisition, which has characterized the development of natural science since at least the 17th century, involving careful observation, which includes rigorous skepticism about what one observes, given that cognitive assumptions about how the world works influence how one interprets a percept; formulating hypotheses, via induction, based on such observations; experimental testing and measurement of deductions drawn from the hypotheses; and refinement (or elimination) of the hypotheses based on the experimental findings.

New!!: Science and Scientific method · See more »

Scientific misconduct

Scientific misconduct is the violation of the standard codes of scholarly conduct and ethical behavior in the publication of professional scientific research.

New!!: Science and Scientific misconduct · See more »

Scientific modelling

Scientific modelling is a scientific activity, the aim of which is to make a particular part or feature of the world easier to understand, define, quantify, visualize, or simulate by referencing it to existing and usually commonly accepted knowledge.

New!!: Science and Scientific modelling · See more »

Scientific progress

Scientific progress is the idea that science increases its problem-solving ability through the application of the scientific method.

New!!: Science and Scientific progress · See more »

Scientific realism

Scientific realism is the view that the universe described by science is real regardless of how it may be interpreted.

New!!: Science and Scientific realism · See more »

Scientific Revolution

The Scientific Revolution was a series of events that marked the emergence of modern science during the early modern period, when developments in mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology (including human anatomy) and chemistry transformed the views of society about nature.

New!!: Science and Scientific Revolution · See more »

Scientific theory

A scientific theory is an explanation of an aspect of the natural world that can be repeatedly tested, in accordance with the scientific method, using a predefined protocol of observation and experiment.

New!!: Science and Scientific theory · See more »

Scientist

A scientist is a person engaging in a systematic activity to acquire knowledge that describes and predicts the natural world.

New!!: Science and Scientist · See more »

Search and rescue

Search and rescue (SAR) is the search for and provision of aid to people who are in distress or imminent danger.

New!!: Science and Search and rescue · See more »

Semiconductor device

Semiconductor devices are electronic components that exploit the electronic properties of semiconductor materials, principally silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide, as well as organic semiconductors.

New!!: Science and Semiconductor device · See more »

Separate spheres

Terms such as separate spheres and domestic–public dichotomy refer to a social phenomenon, within modern societies that feature, to some degree, an empirical separation between a domestic or private sphere and a public or social sphere.

New!!: Science and Separate spheres · See more »

Sima Qian

Sima Qian was a Chinese historian of the early Han dynasty (206AD220).

New!!: Science and Sima Qian · See more »

Skeptical movement

The skeptical movement (also spelled sceptical) is a modern social movement based on the idea of scientific skepticism (also called rational skepticism).

New!!: Science and Skeptical movement · See more »

Skepticism

Skepticism (American English) or scepticism (British English, Australian English) is generally any questioning attitude or doubt towards one or more items of putative knowledge or belief.

New!!: Science and Skepticism · See more »

Smallpox

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.

New!!: Science and Smallpox · See more »

Smartphone

A smartphone is a handheld personal computer with a mobile operating system and an integrated mobile broadband cellular network connection for voice, SMS, and Internet data communication; most, if not all, smartphones also support Wi-Fi.

New!!: Science and Smartphone · See more »

Social science

Social science is a major category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society.

New!!: Science and Social science · See more »

Society

A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations.

New!!: Science and Society · See more »

Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) is an academic association dedicated to the use of mathematics in industry.

New!!: Science and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics · See more »

Sociology

Sociology is the scientific study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture.

New!!: Science and Sociology · See more »

Sociology of scientific knowledge

The sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) is the study of science as a social activity, especially dealing with "the social conditions and effects of science, and with the social structures and processes of scientific activity." The sociology of scientific ignorance (SSI) is complementary to the sociology of scientific knowledge.

New!!: Science and Sociology of scientific knowledge · See more »

Socrates

Socrates (Sōkrátēs,; – 399 BC) was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher, of the Western ethical tradition of thought.

New!!: Science and Socrates · See more »

Socratic method

The Socratic method, also can be known as maieutics, method of elenchus, elenctic method, or Socratic debate, is a form of cooperative argumentative dialogue between individuals, based on asking and answering questions to stimulate critical thinking and to draw out ideas and underlying presumptions.

New!!: Science and Socratic method · See more »

Solar cell

A solar cell, or photovoltaic cell, is an electrical device that converts the energy of light directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect, which is a physical and chemical phenomenon.

New!!: Science and Solar cell · See more »

Solar power

Solar power is the conversion of energy from sunlight into electricity, either directly using photovoltaics (PV), indirectly using concentrated solar power, or a combination.

New!!: Science and Solar power · See more »

Sophist

A sophist (σοφιστής, sophistes) was a specific kind of teacher in ancient Greece, in the fifth and fourth centuries BC.

New!!: Science and Sophist · See more »

Space Race

The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability.

New!!: Science and Space Race · See more »

Space telescope

A space telescope or space observatory is an instrument located in outer space to observe distant planets, galaxies and other astronomical objects.

New!!: Science and Space telescope · See more »

Spaceflight

Spaceflight (also written space flight) is ballistic flight into or through outer space.

New!!: Science and Spaceflight · See more »

Spanish National Research Council

The Spanish National Research Council (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC) is the largest public institution dedicated to research in Spain and the third largest in Europe.

New!!: Science and Spanish National Research Council · See more »

Special relativity

In physics, special relativity (SR, also known as the special theory of relativity or STR) is the generally accepted and experimentally well-confirmed physical theory regarding the relationship between space and time.

New!!: Science and Special relativity · See more »

Species

In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition.

New!!: Science and Species · See more »

Standard Model

The Standard Model of particle physics is the theory describing three of the four known fundamental forces (the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, and not including the gravitational force) in the universe, as well as classifying all known elementary particles.

New!!: Science and Standard Model · See more »

State (polity)

A state is a compulsory political organization with a centralized government that maintains a monopoly of the legitimate use of force within a certain geographical territory.

New!!: Science and State (polity) · See more »

Static electricity

Static electricity is an imbalance of electric charges within or on the surface of a material.

New!!: Science and Static electricity · See more »

Statistics

Statistics is a branch of mathematics dealing with the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and organization of data.

New!!: Science and Statistics · See more »

Steady State theory

In cosmology, the Steady State theory is an alternative to the Big Bang model of the evolution of our universe.

New!!: Science and Steady State theory · See more »

Steven Shapin

Steven Shapin is an American historian and sociologist of science.

New!!: Science and Steven Shapin · See more »

Submarine communications cable

A submarine communications cable is a cable laid on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean and sea.

New!!: Science and Submarine communications cable · See more »

Sumerian language

Sumerian (𒅴𒂠 "native tongue") is the language of ancient Sumer and a language isolate that was spoken in southern Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq).

New!!: Science and Sumerian language · See more »

Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Science and Sun · See more »

Sunshu Ao

Sunshu Ao (孫叔敖, ca. 630, † ca. 593 BCE) was a Chinese hydrologist and politician.

New!!: Science and Sunshu Ao · See more »

Supernatural

The supernatural (Medieval Latin: supernātūrālis: supra "above" + naturalis "natural", first used: 1520–1530 AD) is that which exists (or is claimed to exist), yet cannot be explained by laws of nature.

New!!: Science and Supernatural · See more »

Syriac language

Syriac (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ), also known as Syriac Aramaic or Classical Syriac, is a dialect of Middle Aramaic.

New!!: Science and Syriac language · See more »

Systems theory

Systems theory is the interdisciplinary study of systems.

New!!: Science and Systems theory · See more »

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy or molecularly targeted therapy is one of the major modalities of medical treatment (pharmacotherapy) for cancer, others being hormonal therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy.

New!!: Science and Targeted therapy · See more »

Taxonomy (biology)

Taxonomy is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics.

New!!: Science and Taxonomy (biology) · See more »

Technology

Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia) is first robustly defined by Jacob Bigelow in 1829 as: "...principles, processes, and nomenclatures of the more conspicuous arts, particularly those which involve applications of science, and which may be considered useful, by promoting the benefit of society, together with the emolument of those who pursue them".

New!!: Science and Technology · See more »

Telecommunication

Telecommunication is the transmission of signs, signals, messages, words, writings, images and sounds or information of any nature by wire, radio, optical or other electromagnetic systems.

New!!: Science and Telecommunication · See more »

Teleology

Teleology or finality is a reason or explanation for something in function of its end, purpose, or goal.

New!!: Science and Teleology · See more »

Telephony

Telephony is the field of technology involving the development, application, and deployment of telecommunication services for the purpose of electronic transmission of voice, fax, or data, between distant parties.

New!!: Science and Telephony · See more »

Telescope

A telescope is an optical instrument that aids in the observation of remote objects by collecting electromagnetic radiation (such as visible light).

New!!: Science and Telescope · See more »

Television

Television (TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound.

New!!: Science and Television · See more »

Thales of Miletus

Thales of Miletus (Θαλῆς (ὁ Μιλήσιος), Thalēs; 624 – c. 546 BC) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer from Miletus in Asia Minor (present-day Milet in Turkey).

New!!: Science and Thales of Miletus · See more »

The Advancement of Learning

Title page The Advancement of Learning (full title: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human) is a 1605 book by Francis Bacon.

New!!: Science and The Advancement of Learning · See more »

The Canon of Medicine

The Canon of Medicine (القانون في الطب al-Qānūn fī al-Ṭibb) is an encyclopedia of medicine in five books compiled by Persian philosopher Avicenna (Ibn Sina) and completed in 1025.

New!!: Science and The Canon of Medicine · See more »

The Feynman Lectures on Physics

The Feynman Lectures on Physics is a physics textbook based on some lectures by Richard P. Feynman, a Nobel laureate who has sometimes been called "The Great Explainer".

New!!: Science and The Feynman Lectures on Physics · See more »

The Logic of Scientific Discovery

The Logic of Scientific Discovery is a 1959 book about the philosophy of science by Karl Popper.

New!!: Science and The Logic of Scientific Discovery · See more »

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962; second edition 1970; third edition 1996; fourth edition 2012) is a book about the history of science by the philosopher Thomas S. Kuhn.

New!!: Science and The Structure of Scientific Revolutions · See more »

Theophrastus

Theophrastus (Θεόφραστος Theόphrastos; c. 371 – c. 287 BC), a Greek native of Eresos in Lesbos,Gavin Hardy and Laurence Totelin, Ancient Botany, 2015, p. 8.

New!!: Science and Theophrastus · See more »

Theorem

In mathematics, a theorem is a statement that has been proven on the basis of previously established statements, such as other theorems, and generally accepted statements, such as axioms.

New!!: Science and Theorem · See more »

Theoretical computer science

Theoretical computer science, or TCS, is a subset of general computer science and mathematics that focuses on more mathematical topics of computing and includes the theory of computation.

New!!: Science and Theoretical computer science · See more »

Theoretical linguistics

For|the journal|Theoretical Linguistics (journal) Multiple issues| one source|date.

New!!: Science and Theoretical linguistics · See more »

Theory

A theory is a contemplative and rational type of abstract or generalizing thinking, or the results of such thinking.

New!!: Science and Theory · See more »

Theory of forms

The theory of Forms or theory of Ideas is Plato's argument that non-physical (but substantial) forms (or ideas) represent the most accurate reality.

New!!: Science and Theory of forms · See more »

Theory of relativity

The theory of relativity usually encompasses two interrelated theories by Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity.

New!!: Science and Theory of relativity · See more »

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is the branch of physics concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work.

New!!: Science and Thermodynamics · See more »

Third Dynasty of Ur

The terms "Third Dynasty of Ur" and "Neo-Sumerian Empire" refer to both a 22nd to 21st century BC (middle chronology) Sumerian ruling dynasty based in the city of Ur and a short-lived territorial-political state which some historians consider to have been a nascent empire.

New!!: Science and Third Dynasty of Ur · See more »

Thomas Kuhn

Thomas Samuel Kuhn (July 18, 1922 – June 17, 1996) was an American physicist, historian and philosopher of science whose controversial 1962 book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions was influential in both academic and popular circles, introducing the term paradigm shift, which has since become an English-language idiom.

New!!: Science and Thomas Kuhn · See more »

Thought experiment

A thought experiment (Gedankenexperiment, Gedanken-Experiment or Gedankenerfahrung) considers some hypothesis, theory, or principle for the purpose of thinking through its consequences.

New!!: Science and Thought experiment · See more »

Timaeus (dialogue)

Timaeus (Timaios) is one of Plato's dialogues, mostly in the form of a long monologue given by the title character Timaeus of Locri, written c. 360 BC.

New!!: Science and Timaeus (dialogue) · See more »

Toledo School of Translators

The Toledo School of Translators (Escuela de Traductores de Toledo) is the group of scholars who worked together in the city of Toledo during the 12th and 13th centuries, to translate many of the philosophical and scientific works from Classical Arabic.

New!!: Science and Toledo School of Translators · See more »

Topology

In mathematics, topology (from the Greek τόπος, place, and λόγος, study) is concerned with the properties of space that are preserved under continuous deformations, such as stretching, crumpling and bending, but not tearing or gluing.

New!!: Science and Topology · See more »

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (TLP) (Latin for "Logico-Philosophical Treatise") is the only book-length philosophical work published by the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein in his lifetime.

New!!: Science and Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus · See more »

Transcranial magnetic stimulation

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a method in which a changing magnetic field is used to cause electric current to flow in a small region of the brain via electromagnetic induction.

New!!: Science and Transcranial magnetic stimulation · See more »

Trial and error

Trial and error is a fundamental method of problem solving.

New!!: Science and Trial and error · See more »

Trigonometry

Trigonometry (from Greek trigōnon, "triangle" and metron, "measure") is a branch of mathematics that studies relationships involving lengths and angles of triangles.

New!!: Science and Trigonometry · See more »

Trotula

Trotula is a name referring to a group of three texts on women's medicine, the Trotula, that were composed in the southern Italian port town of Salerno in the 12th century.

New!!: Science and Trotula · See more »

Truth

Truth is most often used to mean being in accord with fact or reality, or fidelity to an original or standard.

New!!: Science and Truth · See more »

Two New Sciences

The Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Relating to Two New Sciences (Discorsi e Dimostrazioni Matematiche Intorno a Due Nuove Scienze), published in 1638 was Galileo's final book and a scientific testament covering much of his work in physics over the preceding thirty years.

New!!: Science and Two New Sciences · See more »

Uniformitarianism

Uniformitarianism, also known as the Doctrine of Uniformity,, "The assumption of spatial and temporal invariance of natural laws is by no means unique to geology since it amounts to a warrant for inductive inference which, as Bacon showed nearly four hundred years ago, is the basic mode of reasoning in empirical science.

New!!: Science and Uniformitarianism · See more »

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

New!!: Science and United Kingdom · See more »

United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

New!!: Science and United States · See more »

United States Geological Survey

The United States Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States government.

New!!: Science and United States Geological Survey · See more »

United States National Library of Medicine

The United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), operated by the United States federal government, is the world's largest medical library.

New!!: Science and United States National Library of Medicine · See more »

Universe

The Universe is all of space and time and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy.

New!!: Science and Universe · See more »

University

A university (universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines.

New!!: Science and University · See more »

University of Bologna

The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO), founded in 1088, is the oldest university in continuous operation, as well as one of the leading academic institutions in Italy and Europe.

New!!: Science and University of Bologna · See more »

University of California Museum of Paleontology

The University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP) is a paleontology museum located on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley.

New!!: Science and University of California Museum of Paleontology · See more »

Unmoved mover

The unmoved mover (that which moves without being moved) or prime mover (primum movens) is a concept advanced by Aristotle as a primary cause or "mover" of all the motion in the universe.

New!!: Science and Unmoved mover · See more »

Vaccination

Vaccination is the administration of antigenic material (a vaccine) to stimulate an individual's immune system to develop adaptive immunity to a pathogen.

New!!: Science and Vaccination · See more »

Vannevar Bush

Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator, who during World War II headed the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD), through which almost all wartime military R&D was carried out, including initiation and early administration of the Manhattan Project.

New!!: Science and Vannevar Bush · See more »

Vinča culture

The Vinča culture, also known as Turdaș culture or Turdaș–Vinča culture, is a Neolithic archaeological culture in Serbia and smaller parts of Romania (particularly Transylvania), dated to the period 5700–4500 BC.

New!!: Science and Vinča culture · See more »

Vitello

Witelo (also Erazmus Ciołek Witelo; Witelon; Vitellio; Vitello; Vitello Thuringopolonis; Vitulon; Erazm Ciołek); born ca.

New!!: Science and Vitello · See more »

Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on Christianity as a whole, especially the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state.

New!!: Science and Voltaire · See more »

Warring States period

The Warring States period was an era in ancient Chinese history of warfare, as well as bureaucratic and military reforms and consolidation, following the Spring and Autumn period and concluding with the Qin wars of conquest that saw the annexation of all other contender states, which ultimately led to the Qin state's victory in 221 BC as the first unified Chinese empire known as the Qin dynasty.

New!!: Science and Warring States period · See more »

Watch

A watch is a timepiece intended to be carried or worn by a person.

New!!: Science and Watch · See more »

Weapon

A weapon, arm or armament is any device used with intent to inflict damage or harm.

New!!: Science and Weapon · See more »

Weather forecasting

Weather forecasting is the application of science and technology to predict the conditions of the atmosphere for a given location and time.

New!!: Science and Weather forecasting · See more »

Western Europe

Western Europe is the region comprising the western part of Europe.

New!!: Science and Western Europe · See more »

Western Publishing

Western Publishing, also known as Western Printing and Lithographing Company, was a Racine, Wisconsin, firm responsible for publishing the Little Golden Books.

New!!: Science and Western Publishing · See more »

Western Roman Empire

In historiography, the Western Roman Empire refers to the western provinces of the Roman Empire at any one time during which they were administered by a separate independent Imperial court, coequal with that administering the eastern half, then referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire.

New!!: Science and Western Roman Empire · See more »

Western world

The Western world refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe and the Americas.

New!!: Science and Western world · See more »

Wikibooks

Wikibooks (previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks) is a wiki-based Wikimedia project hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation for the creation of free content e-book textbooks and annotated texts that anyone can edit.

New!!: Science and Wikibooks · See more »

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (known to intimates as "Van"; June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition, recognized as "one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century." From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement.

New!!: Science and Willard Van Orman Quine · See more »

William Whewell

William Whewell (24 May 1794 – 6 March 1866) was an English polymath, scientist, Anglican priest, philosopher, theologian, and historian of science.

New!!: Science and William Whewell · See more »

Wireless

Wireless communication, or sometimes simply wireless, is the transfer of information or power between two or more points that are not connected by an electrical conductor.

New!!: Science and Wireless · See more »

Wireless network

A wireless network is a computer network that uses wireless data connections between network nodes.

New!!: Science and Wireless network · See more »

World view

A world view or worldview is the fundamental cognitive orientation of an individual or society encompassing the whole of the individual's or society's knowledge and point of view.

New!!: Science and World view · See more »

X-ray

X-rays make up X-radiation, a form of electromagnetic radiation.

New!!: Science and X-ray · See more »

Ximen Bao

Ximen Bao was a Chinese hydraulic engineer, philosopher, and politician.

New!!: Science and Ximen Bao · See more »

Yangtze

The Yangtze, which is 6,380 km (3,964 miles) long, is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world.

New!!: Science and Yangtze · See more »

Yuval Levin

Yuval Levin is an American political analyst, public intellectual, academic, and journalist.

New!!: Science and Yuval Levin · See more »

Zhou dynasty

The Zhou dynasty or the Zhou Kingdom was a Chinese dynasty that followed the Shang dynasty and preceded the Qin dynasty.

New!!: Science and Zhou dynasty · See more »

Redirects here:

Basic theories of science, Classification of the sciences, Definition of science, Definitions of science, Empirical sciences, General Science, General science, Nature of science, ScienCe, ScienCes, Science and society, Science fact, Sciences, Scientific, Scientific knowledge, Scientifically, Scientificity.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »