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Scottish Episcopal Church

Index Scottish Episcopal Church

The seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church (Eaglais Easbaigeach na h-Alba) make up the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion in Scotland. [1]

177 relations: Act of Classes, Action of Churches Together in Scotland, Alexander Forbes (bishop of Brechin), Andrew Melville, Andrew Swift, Anglican Church of Australia, Anglican Communion, Anglican Consultative Council, Anglican sacraments, Anglicanism, Anne Dyer, Anointing, Archbishop of Canterbury, Archbishop of St Andrews, Archdeacon, Arthur Rose, Baptism, Bishop, Bishop of Argyll and The Isles (Episcopal), Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness, Bishop of Ross (Scotland), Bishops' Wars, Book of Common Prayer, Book of Discipline (Church of Scotland), Bridei I, Calligraphy, Calvinism, Canon law, Catechism, Cathedral, Cathedral of The Isles, Catholic Church in Scotland, Charles Edward Stuart, Charles I of England, Charles II of England, Charles Wordsworth, Church in Wales, Church of England, Church of Ireland, Church of Scotland, Civil partnership in the United Kingdom, College bishop, Columba, Confession (religion), Confirmation, Conventicle, Covenanter, Dean (Christianity), Diocese, Diocese of Aberdeen and Orkney, ..., Diocese of Argyll and The Isles (Episcopal), Diocese of Brechin (Episcopal), Diocese of Edinburgh, Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness, Diocese of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane, Diplomat, Ecclesiastical polity, Edinburgh, Edward Ramsay, English Civil War, Episcopal Church (United States), Episcopal polity, Episcopal see, Eucharist, Evangelism, Fortriu, Full communion, Gaels, General Synod, George Gleig, George Grub, George III of the United Kingdom, Glenalmond College, Global Anglican Future Conference, Global South (Anglican), Glorious Revolution, Glorious Revolution in Scotland, Great Cumbrae, Gregor Duncan (bishop), Heaven, Hebrides, Hell, High church, Holy See, Holyrood Abbey, House of Stuart, Hymn, Ian Paton (priest), Inverness, Iona, Irish Rebellion of 1641, Jacobitism, James II of England, James Sharp (bishop), James Simpson (priest), James VI and I, Jenny Geddes, Jesus, John Armes, John Calvin, John Dowden, John Knox, John Maxwell (bishop), John Parker Lawson, John Sage, John Skinner (poet), John Spottiswoode, Kevin Pearson (bishop), Kingdom of Great Britain, Kintyre, List of Scottish Episcopal churches, Literacy, Liturgical year, Liturgy, Malcolm III of Scotland, Mark Strange (bishop), Marriage, Metropolitan bishop, Mull, New Model Army, Ninian, Nonjuring schism, Oath of allegiance, Old Catholic Church, Ordination, Paganism, Papal Jurisdiction Act 1560, Parliament of England, Parliament of Scotland, Pejorative, Perth, Scotland, Picts, Politics of Scotland, Porvoo Communion, Prayer, Precentor, Presbyterianism, Priest, Primus inter pares, Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, Project Canterbury, Qualified Chapel, Reformation, Religion in Scotland, Religious conversion, Restoration (England), Restoration (Scotland), Richard Hooker, Robert Keith (historian), Saint Margaret of Scotland, Saint Mungo, Same-sex marriage, Samuel Seabury, Scotland, Scottish Churches Parliamentary Office, Scottish Constitutional Convention, Scottish Episcopal Institute, Scottish Episcopalians Act 1711, Scottish Parliament, Scottish Reformation, Second Coming, Society, Religion and Technology Project, Southend, Argyll, Switzerland, Synod, The Killing Time, The Most Reverend, The Right Reverend, The Very Reverend, Thirteen Colonies, Thomas Lathbury, Thomas Rattray, William Carstares, William III of England, William Laud, World Council of Churches. Expand index (127 more) »

Act of Classes

The Act of Classes was passed by the Parliament of Scotland on 23 January 1649.

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Action of Churches Together in Scotland

Action of Churches Together in Scotland (ACTS) is a national ecumenical organisation of churches in Scotland, founded in 1990.

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Alexander Forbes (bishop of Brechin)

Alexander Penrose Forbes (16 June 18178 October 1875), a Scottish Episcopalian divine, he was born at Edinburgh.

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Andrew Melville

Andrew Melville (1 August 1545 – 1622) was a Scottish scholar, theologian and religious reformer.

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Andrew Swift

Andrew Christopher Swift, (born 10 January 1968) is a British Anglican priest and former engineer.

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Anglican Church of Australia

The Anglican Church of Australia is a Christian church in Australia and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion.

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Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

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Anglican Consultative Council

The Anglican Consultative Council or ACC is one of the four "Instruments of Communion" of the Anglican Communion.

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Anglican sacraments

In keeping with its prevailing self-identity as a via media or "middle path" of Western Christianity, Anglican sacramental theology expresses elements in keeping with its status as a church in the Catholic tradition and a church of the Reformation.

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Anglicanism

Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.

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Anne Dyer

Anne Catherine Dyer (born February 1957) is a British Anglican bishop and academic administrator.

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Anointing

Anointing is the ritual act of pouring aromatic oil over a person's head or entire body.

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Archbishop of Canterbury

The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury.

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Archbishop of St Andrews

The Bishop of St.

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Archdeacon

An archdeacon is a senior clergy position in the Syriac Orthodox Church, Church of the East, Chaldean Catholic Church, Anglican Communion, St Thomas Christians, Eastern Orthodox churches and some other Christian denominations, above that of most clergy and below a bishop.

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Arthur Rose

Arthur Rose (also found as Ross; 1634–1704) was a Scottish minister, Archbishop of St Andrews, and, informally, the first Episcopal Primate of Scotland, after the fall of the Restoration Episcopate in 1689.

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Baptism

Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.

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Bishop

A bishop (English derivation from the New Testament of the Christian Bible Greek επίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

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Bishop of Argyll and The Isles (Episcopal)

The Bishop of Argyll and The Isles is the Ordinary of the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Argyll and the Isles.

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Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness

The Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness is the ordinary of the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness.

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Bishop of Ross (Scotland)

The Bishop of Ross was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Ross, one of Scotland's 13 medieval bishoprics.

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Bishops' Wars

The Bishops' Wars (Bellum Episcopale) were conflicts, both political and military, which occurred in 1639 and 1640 centred on the nature of the governance of the Church of Scotland, and the rights and powers of the Crown.

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Book of Common Prayer

The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by the Continuing Anglican, Anglican realignment and other Anglican Christian churches.

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Book of Discipline (Church of Scotland)

The Book of Discipline refers to two works regulative of ecclesiastical order in the Church of Scotland, known as The First Book of Discipline (1560) and The Second Book of Discipline (1578), drawn up and printed in the Scottish Reformation.

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Bridei I

Bridei I, also known as Bridei, son of Maelchon, was king of the Picts from 554 to 584.

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Calligraphy

Calligraphy (from Greek: καλλιγραφία) is a visual art related to writing.

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Calvinism

Calvinism (also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

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Canon law

Canon law (from Greek kanon, a 'straight measuring rod, ruler') is a set of ordinances and regulations made by ecclesiastical authority (Church leadership), for the government of a Christian organization or church and its members.

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Catechism

A catechism (from κατηχέω, "to teach orally") is a summary or exposition of doctrine and serves as a learning introduction to the Sacraments traditionally used in catechesis, or Christian religious teaching of children and adult converts.

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Cathedral

A cathedral is a Christian church which contains the seat of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.

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Cathedral of The Isles

The Cathedral of The Isles and Collegiate Church of the Holy Spirit is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church in the town of Millport on the Isle of Cumbrae.

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Catholic Church in Scotland

The Catholic Church in Scotland (An Eaglais Chaitligeach; Catholic Kirk), overseen by the Scottish Bishops' Conference, is part of the worldwide Catholic Church headed by the Pope.

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Charles Edward Stuart

Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788) was the elder son of James Francis Edward Stuart, grandson of James II and VII and after 1766 the Stuart claimant to the throne of Great Britain.

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Charles I of England

Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

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Charles II of England

Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was king of England, Scotland and Ireland.

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Charles Wordsworth

Charles Wordsworth (22 August 1806 – 5 December 1892) was Bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane in Scotland.

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Church in Wales

The Church in Wales (Yr Eglwys yng Nghymru) is the Anglican church in Wales, composed of six dioceses.

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Church of England

The Church of England (C of E) is the state church of England.

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Church of Ireland

The Church of Ireland (Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann) is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion.

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Church of Scotland

The Church of Scotland (The Scots Kirk, Eaglais na h-Alba), known informally by its Scots language name, the Kirk, is the national church of Scotland.

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Civil partnership in the United Kingdom

Civil partnerships in the United Kingdom are a form of civil union granted under the Civil Partnership Act 2004, allowing same-sex couples to obtain essentially the same rights and responsibilities as civil marriage.

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College bishop

In the early days of the Scottish Episcopal Church, college bishops were men who were consecrated bishops in order to maintain apostolic succession but (extraordinarily) not appointed to any episcopal see.

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Columba

Saint Columba (Colm Cille, 'church dove'; Columbkille; 7 December 521 – 9 June 597) was an Irish abbot and missionary credited with spreading Christianity in what is today Scotland at the start of the Hiberno-Scottish mission.

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Confession (religion)

Confession, in many religions, is the acknowledgment of one's sins (sinfulness) or wrongs.

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Confirmation

In Christianity, confirmation is seen as the sealing of Christianity created in baptism.

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Conventicle

A conventicle is a small, unofficial and unofficiated religious meeting of laypeople.

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Covenanter

The Covenanters were a Scottish Presbyterian movement that played an important part in the history of Scotland, and to a lesser extent that of England and Ireland, during the 17th century.

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Dean (Christianity)

A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy.

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Diocese

The word diocese is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration".

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Diocese of Aberdeen and Orkney

The Diocese of Aberdeen and Orkney is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diocese of Argyll and The Isles (Episcopal)

The Diocese of Argyll and The Isles is in the west of Scotland, and is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diocese of Brechin (Episcopal)

The Diocese of Brechin is in the east of Scotland, and is the smallest of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diocese of Edinburgh

The Diocese of Edinburgh is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway

The Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

The Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diocese of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane

The Diocese of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Diplomat

A diplomat is a person appointed by a state to conduct diplomacy with one or more other states or international organizations.

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Ecclesiastical polity

Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or of a Christian denomination.

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Edinburgh

Edinburgh (Dùn Èideann; Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas.

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Edward Ramsay

Rev Dr Edward Bannerman Ramsay FRSE LLD (17 January 1793– 27 December1872), usually referred to as Dean Ramsay, was a clergyman of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and Dean of Edinburgh in that communion from 1841, has a place in literature through his Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character, which had gone through 22 editions at his death.

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English Civil War

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.

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Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church is the United States-based member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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Episcopal polity

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which the chief local authorities are called bishops.

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Episcopal see

The seat or cathedra of the Bishop of Rome in the Basilica of San Giovanni in Laterano An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

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Eucharist

The Eucharist (also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others.

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Evangelism

In Christianity, Evangelism is the commitment to or act of publicly preaching of the Gospel with the intention of spreading the message and teachings of Jesus Christ.

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Fortriu

Fortriu or the Kingdom of Fortriu is the name given by historians for a Pictish kingdom recorded between the 4th and 10th centuries, and often used synonymously with Pictland in general.

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Full communion

Full communion is a communion or relationship of full understanding among different Christian denominations that they share certain essential principles of Christian theology.

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Gaels

The Gaels (Na Gaeil, Na Gàidheil, Ny Gaeil) are an ethnolinguistic group native to northwestern Europe.

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General Synod

The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations.

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George Gleig

Rt Rev George Gleig FRSE FSA LLD (12 May 1753 – 9 March 1840) was a Scottish minister who transferred to the Episcopalian faith and became Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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George Grub

George Grub (1812–1892) was a Scottish church historian.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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Glenalmond College

Glenalmond College (formerly Trinity College, Glenalmond) is a co-educational independent boarding school in Perth and Kinross, Scotland, for children aged between 12 and 18 years.

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Global Anglican Future Conference

The Global Anglican Future Conference (GAFCON) was a seven-day conference of conservative Anglican bishops and leaders held in Jerusalem from 22 to 29 June 2008 to address the growing controversy of the divisions in the Anglican Communion, the rise of secularism, as well as concerns with HIV/AIDS and poverty.

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Global South (Anglican)

The Anglican Global South is a grouping of 25 of the 39 provinces of the Anglican Communion, plus the Anglican Church in North America as the 26th member.

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Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

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Glorious Revolution in Scotland

The Glorious Revolution in Scotland was part of a series of events between 1688-1689 in England and Scotland known as the Glorious Revolution.

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Great Cumbrae

Great Cumbrae (Scots, Muckle Cumbrae; Scottish Gaelic, Cumaradh Mòr; also known as Cumbrae or the Isle of Cumbrae) is the larger of the two islands known as The Cumbraes in the lower Firth of Clyde in western Scotland.

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Gregor Duncan (bishop)

Gregor Duthie Duncan is an Anglican bishop.

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Heaven

Heaven, or the heavens, is a common religious, cosmological, or transcendent place where beings such as gods, angels, spirits, saints, or venerated ancestors are said to originate, be enthroned, or live.

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Hebrides

The Hebrides (Innse Gall,; Suðreyjar) compose a widespread and diverse archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland.

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Hell

Hell, in many religious and folkloric traditions, is a place of torment and punishment in the afterlife.

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High church

The term "high church" refers to beliefs and practices of ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology, generally with an emphasis on formality and resistance to "modernisation." Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican/Episcopal tradition, where it describes Anglican churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism.

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Holy See

The Holy See (Santa Sede; Sancta Sedes), also called the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity.

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Holyrood Abbey

Holyrood Abbey is a ruined abbey of the Canons Regular in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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House of Stuart

The House of Stuart, originally Stewart, was a European royal house that originated in Scotland.

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Hymn

A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

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Ian Paton (priest)

Ian James Paton (born 1957) is a British Anglican priest.

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Inverness

Inverness (from the Inbhir Nis, meaning "Mouth of the River Ness", Inerness) is a city in the Scottish Highlands.

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Iona

Iona (Ì Chaluim Chille) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland.

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Irish Rebellion of 1641

The Irish Rebellion of 1641 (Éirí Amach 1641) began as an attempted coup d'état by Irish Catholic gentry, who tried to seize control of the English administration in Ireland to force concessions for Catholics.

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Jacobitism

Jacobitism (Seumasachas, Seacaibíteachas, Séamusachas) was a political movement in Great Britain and Ireland that aimed to restore the Roman Catholic Stuart King James II of England and Ireland (as James VII in Scotland) and his heirs to the thrones of England, Scotland, France and Ireland.

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James II of England

James II and VII (14 October 1633O.S. – 16 September 1701An assertion found in many sources that James II died 6 September 1701 (17 September 1701 New Style) may result from a miscalculation done by an author of anonymous "An Exact Account of the Sickness and Death of the Late King James II, as also of the Proceedings at St. Germains thereupon, 1701, in a letter from an English gentleman in France to his friend in London" (Somers Tracts, ed. 1809–1815, XI, pp. 339–342). The account reads: "And on Friday the 17th instant, about three in the afternoon, the king died, the day he always fasted in memory of our blessed Saviour's passion, the day he ever desired to die on, and the ninth hour, according to the Jewish account, when our Saviour was crucified." As 17 September 1701 New Style falls on a Saturday and the author insists that James died on Friday, "the day he ever desired to die on", an inevitable conclusion is that the author miscalculated the date, which later made it to various reference works. See "English Historical Documents 1660–1714", ed. by Andrew Browning (London and New York: Routledge, 2001), 136–138.) was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

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James Sharp (bishop)

James Sharp (4 May 1613 – 3 May 1679) was a Scottish minister, and later Archbishop of St Andrews (1661–1679).

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James Simpson (priest)

James Gilliland Simpson (16 October 1865 – 10 October 1948) was the Dean of Peterborough in the Church of England from 1928 to 1942.

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James VI and I

James VI and I (James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625.

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Jenny Geddes

Jenny Geddes (c. 1600 – c. 1660) was a Scottish market-trader in Edinburgh who is alleged to have thrown her stool at the head of the minister in St Giles' Cathedral in objection to the first public use of an Episcopalian Book of Common Prayer in Scotland.

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Jesus

Jesus, also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.

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John Armes

John Andrew Armes (born 10 September 1955) is the Scottish Episcopal Bishop of Edinburgh.

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John Calvin

John Calvin (Jean Calvin; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 150927 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation.

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John Dowden

John Dowden DD LLD (29 June 1840 – 30 January 1910) was an Irish-born bishop and ecclesiastical historian.

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John Knox

John Knox (– 24 November 1572) was a Scottish minister, theologian, and writer who was a leader of the country's Reformation.

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John Maxwell (bishop)

John Maxwell (died 14 February 1647) Archbishop of Tuam, son of John Maxwell of Cavens, Kirkcudbrightshire, was born in or before 1586.

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John Parker Lawson

John Parker Lawson (died 1852) was a clergyman of the Episcopal Church of Scotland and historian.

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John Sage

John Sage (1652–1711) was a Scottish nonjuring bishop and controversialist in the Jacobite interest.

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John Skinner (poet)

John Skinner (31 October 1721 – 16 June 1807) was a Scottish historian and songwriter.

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John Spottiswoode

John Spottiswoode (Spottiswood, Spotiswood, Spotiswoode or Spotswood) (1565 – 26 November 1639) was an Archbishop of St Andrews, Primate of All Scotland and historian of Scotland.

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Kevin Pearson (bishop)

Kevin Pearson (born 27 August 1954) is an Anglican bishop.

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Kingdom of Great Britain

The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,Parliament of the Kingdom of England.

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Kintyre

Kintyre (Cinn Tìre) is a peninsula in western Scotland, in the southwest of Argyll and Bute.

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List of Scottish Episcopal churches

This is a list of churches in the Scottish Episcopal Church organised by dedication.

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Literacy

Literacy is traditionally meant as the ability to read and write.

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Liturgical year

The liturgical year, also known as the church year or Christian year, as well as the kalendar, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days, including celebrations of saints, are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years.

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Liturgy

Liturgy is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions.

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Malcolm III of Scotland

Malcolm III (Gaelic: Máel Coluim mac Donnchada; c. 26 March 1031 – 13 November 1093) was King of Scots from 1058 to 1093.

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Mark Strange (bishop)

Mark Jeremy Strange (born 2 November 1961) is a British Anglican bishop.

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Marriage

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity (in-laws and other family through marriage).

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Metropolitan bishop

In Christian churches with episcopal polity, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop of a metropolis (then more precisely called metropolitan archbishop); that is, the chief city of a historical Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital.

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Mull

Mull (Muile) is the second largest island of the Inner Hebrides (after Skye), off the west coast of Scotland in the council area of Argyll and Bute.

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New Model Army

The New Model Army of England was formed in 1645 by the Parliamentarians in the English Civil War, and was disbanded in 1660 after the Restoration.

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Ninian

Ninian is a Christian saint first mentioned in the 8th century as being an early missionary among the Pictish peoples of what is now Scotland.

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Nonjuring schism

The nonjuring schism was a split in the Anglican churches of England, Scotland, and Ireland in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution of 1688, over whether William III and Mary II could legally be recognised as sovereigns.

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Oath of allegiance

An oath of allegiance is an oath whereby a subject or citizen acknowledges a duty of allegiance and swears loyalty to monarch or country.

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Old Catholic Church

The term Old Catholic Church was used from the 1850s, by groups which had separated from the Roman Catholic Church over certain doctrines, primarily concerned with papal authority; some of these groups, especially in the Netherlands, had already existed long before the term.

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Ordination

Ordination is the process by which individuals are consecrated, that is, set apart as clergy to perform various religious rites and ceremonies.

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Paganism

Paganism is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christians for populations of the Roman Empire who practiced polytheism, either because they were increasingly rural and provincial relative to the Christian population or because they were not milites Christi (soldiers of Christ).

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Papal Jurisdiction Act 1560

The Papal Jurisdiction Act 1560 (c.2) is an Act of the parliament of Scotland which is still in force.

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Parliament of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it became the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

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Parliament of Scotland

The Parliament of Scotland was the legislature of the Kingdom of Scotland.

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Pejorative

A pejorative (also called a derogatory term, a slur, a term of abuse, or a term of disparagement) is a word or grammatical form expressing a negative connotation or a low opinion of someone or something, showing a lack of respect for someone or something.

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Perth, Scotland

Perth (Peairt) is a city in central Scotland, located on the banks of the River Tay.

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Picts

The Picts were a tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age and Early Medieval periods.

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Politics of Scotland

Scotland is a country which is part of the United Kingdom.

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Porvoo Communion

The Porvoo Communion is a communion of 15 predominantly northern European, with a couple of far-southwestern European (in the Iberian Peninsula) Anglican and Evangelical Lutheran church bodies.

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Prayer

Prayer is an invocation or act that seeks to activate a rapport with an object of worship, typically a deity, through deliberate communication.

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Precentor

A precentor is a person who helps facilitate worship.

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Presbyterianism

Presbyterianism is a part of the reformed tradition within Protestantism which traces its origins to Britain, particularly Scotland, and Ireland.

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Priest

A priest or priestess (feminine) is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities.

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Primus inter pares

Primus inter pares (Πρῶτος μεταξὺ ἴσων) is a Latin phrase meaning first among equals.

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Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church

The Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, styled "The Most Reverend the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church", is the presiding bishop of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Project Canterbury

Project Canterbury (sometimes abbreviated as PC) is an online archive of material related to the history of Anglicanism.

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Qualified Chapel

A Qualified Chapel, in eighteenth and nineteenth century Scotland, was an Episcopal congregation that worshipped liturgically but accepted the Hanoverian monarchy and thereby "qualified" under the Scottish Episcopalians Act 1711 for exemption from the penal laws against the Episcopal Church of Scotland.

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Reformation

The Reformation (or, more fully, the Protestant Reformation; also, the European Reformation) was a schism in Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther and continued by Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin and other Protestant Reformers in 16th century Europe.

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Religion in Scotland

Religion in Scotland includes all forms of religious organisation and practice.

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Religious conversion

Religious conversion is the adoption of a set of beliefs identified with one particular religious denomination to the exclusion of others.

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Restoration (England)

The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period.

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Restoration (Scotland)

The Restoration was the return of the monarchy to Scotland in 1660 after the period of the Commonwealth, and the subsequent three decades of Scottish history until the Revolution and Convention of Estates of 1689.

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Richard Hooker

Richard Hooker (March 25, 1554 – 3 November 1600) was an English priest in the Church of England and an influential theologian.

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Robert Keith (historian)

Bishop Robert Keith (1681–1757) was a Scottish Episcopal bishop and historian.

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Saint Margaret of Scotland

Saint Margaret of Scotland (Scots: Saunt Magret, c. 1045 – 16 November 1093), also known as Margaret of Wessex, was an English princess and a Scottish queen.

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Saint Mungo

Kentigern (Cyndeyrn Garthwys; Kentigernus), known as Mungo, was an apostle of the Scottish Kingdom of Strathclyde in the late 6th century, and the founder and patron saint of the city of Glasgow.

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Same-sex marriage

Same-sex marriage (also known as gay marriage) is the marriage of a same-sex couple, entered into in a civil or religious ceremony.

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Samuel Seabury

Samuel Seabury (November 30, 1729February 25, 1796) was the first American Episcopal bishop, the second Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, and the first Bishop of Connecticut.

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Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

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Scottish Churches Parliamentary Office

The Scottish Churches Parliamentary Office (SCPO) was created in 1999.

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Scottish Constitutional Convention

The Scottish Constitutional Convention (SCC) was an association of Scottish political parties, churches and other civic groups, that developed a framework for a Scottish devolution.

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Scottish Episcopal Institute

The Scottish Episcopal Institute (SEI) is the theological college of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

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Scottish Episcopalians Act 1711

The Scottish Episcopalians Act 1711 (10 Ann c 10) is an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain.

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Scottish Parliament

The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba; Scots: The Scots Pairlament) is the devolved national, unicameral legislature of Scotland.

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Scottish Reformation

The Scottish Reformation was the process by which Scotland broke with the Papacy and developed a predominantly Calvinist national Kirk (church), which was strongly Presbyterian in outlook.

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Second Coming

The Second Coming (sometimes called the Second Advent or the Parousia) is a Christian and Islamic belief regarding the future (or past) return of Jesus Christ after his incarnation and ascension to heaven about two thousand years ago.

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Society, Religion and Technology Project

The Society, Religion and Technology Project - or SRT Project for short - was begun by the Church of Scotland in 1970 to address issues being raised by the impact of modern technology.

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Southend, Argyll

Southend is the main settlement at the southern end of the Kintyre peninsula in Argyll and Bute, Scotland.

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Switzerland

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state in Europe.

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Synod

A synod is a council of a church, usually convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application.

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The Killing Time

The Killing Time was a period of conflict in Scottish history between the Presbyterian Covenanter movement, based largely in the south west of the country, and the government forces of Kings Charles II and James VII.

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The Most Reverend

The Most Reverend is a style applied to certain religious figures, primarily within the historic denominations of Christianity, but occasionally in some more modern traditions also.

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The Right Reverend

The Right Reverend (abbreviations: The Rt Revd; The Rt Rev'd; The Rt Rev.) is a style applied to certain religious figures.

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The Very Reverend

The Very Reverend is a style given to certain religious figures.

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Thirteen Colonies

The Thirteen Colonies were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States of America.

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Thomas Lathbury

Thomas Lathbury (1798 – 1865) was an English cleric known as an ecclesiastical historian.

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Thomas Rattray

Thomas Rattray (1684–1743) was a Scottish Episcopalian bishop who served as the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church from 1738 to 1743.

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William Carstares

William Carstares (also Carstaires) (11 February 1649 – 28 December 1715), was a minister of the Church of Scotland, active in Whig politics.

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William III of England

William III (Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702.

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William Laud

William Laud (7 October 1573 – 10 January 1645) was an English archbishop and academic.

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World Council of Churches

The World Council of Churches (WCC) is a worldwide inter-church organization founded in 1948.

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Redirects here:

Episcopal Church in Scotland, Episcopal Church of Scotland, Episcopal Communion in Scotland, Episcopal church of Scotland, Episcopalian Church of Scotland, Episcopalian Protestants, Non-Juring Episcopalian, Scottish Episcopal, Scottish Episcopal Synod, Scottish Episcopal church, Scottish Episcopalian, Scottish Episcopalian Church, Scottish episcopal church, Scottish episcopalians, The Scottish Episcopal Church.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Episcopal_Church

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