Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Solar System

+ Save concept

The Solar SystemCapitalization of the name varies. [1]

324 relations: Accretion (astrophysics), Advances in Space Research, AIP Conference Proceedings, Alan Stern, Alpha Centauri, American Journal of Physics, Ammonia, Ancient Greece, Angular momentum, Ariel (moon), Aristarchus of Samos, Asteroid, Asteroid belt, Asteroid family, Astronomical symbols, Astronomical unit, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Astronomy & Geophysics, Astronomy Now, Atmosphere, Atmosphere of Earth, Aurora, Axial tilt, Barnard's Star, Barred spiral galaxy, Barycenter, Binary system, Bow shocks in astrophysics, Brown dwarf, Callisto (moon), Cambridge University Press, Capitalization, Carbon dioxide, Cassini–Huygens, Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy, Celsius, Centaur (minor planet), Ceres (dwarf planet), Classical Kuiper belt object, Clearing the neighbourhood, Cloud, Coma (cometary), Comet, Comet Hale–Bopp, Comet West, Compact star, Contemporary Physics, Cornell University, Coronal mass ejection, Cosmic dust, ..., Cosmic ray, Crust (geology), Definition of planet, Deimos (moon), Density, Dust storm, Dwarf planet, Dysnomia (moon), Earth, Earth's magnetic field, Earth, Moon, and Planets, Ecliptic, Electromagnetic radiation, Elena V. Pitjeva, Ellipse, Enceladus, Energy, Ephemeris, Epoch (astronomy), Ericsson Globe, Eris (dwarf planet), Europa (moon), Evolutionary history of life, Exoplanet, Fluid dynamics, Focus (geometry), Formation and evolution of the Solar System, Frost line (astrophysics), G-Cloud, G-type main-sequence star, Galactic Center, Galactic coordinate system, Galactic plane, Galactic tide, Galactic year, Galileo Galilei, Ganymede (moon), Gas giant, Geomagnetic storm, Geyser, Giant planet, Gravitational collapse, Gravity, Great Red Spot, Greenhouse gas, Halley's Comet, Haumea, Heliocentrism, Heliosphere, Heliospheric current sheet, Helium, Hercules (constellation), Hilda asteroid, Hill sphere, HIP 11915, Hydra (moon), Hydrogen, Hydrogen sulfide, Hydrosphere, Hydrostatic equilibrium, Hyperbolic trajectory, IAU definition of planet, Icarus (journal), Ice cap, Ice giant, Impact crater, Inclusion (mineral), Inferior and superior planets, International Astronomical Union, Interplanetary dust cloud, Interplanetary medium, Interstellar Boundary Explorer, Interstellar medium, Io (moon), Ion, Iron, Iron(III) oxide, Isaac Newton, Johannes Kepler, Johns Hopkins University Press, Journal of Geophysical Research, Jupiter, Jupiter trojan, Kepler's laws of planetary motion, Kerberos (moon), Kreutz sungrazer, Kuiper belt, Lagrangian point, Lalande 21185, Late Middle Ages, Life, Light, Light-year, Liquid nitrogen, List of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System, List of minor-planet groups, List of natural satellites, List of nearest stars and brown dwarfs, List of Solar System extremes, Lists of geological features of the Solar System, Local Bubble, Local Interstellar Cloud, Luhman 16, Luleå, Luyten 726-8, Main sequence, Main-belt comet, Makemake, Mantle (geology), Mars, Mass, Mercury (planet), Metallicity, Meteorite, Meteoroid, Methane, Michael E. Brown, Micrometeoroid, Milky Way, Mineral, Minor planet, Minor-planet moon, Miranda (moon), Molecular cloud, Moon, Moons of Jupiter, Moons of Neptune, Moons of Pluto, Moons of Saturn, Moons of Uranus, Mountain, Myr, NASA, Natural satellite, Nature (journal), Near-Earth object, Neon, Neptune, Neptune trojan, Nice model, Nickel, Nicolaus Copernicus, Nix (moon), Nuclear fusion, Numerical model of the Solar System, O-type main-sequence star, Oberon (moon), Observable universe, Olympus Mons, Oort cloud, Orbital eccentricity, Orbital inclination, Orbital pole, Orbital resonance, Orion Arm, Orrery, Outer space, Outline of the Solar System, Oxford English Dictionary, Oxygen, Pale Blue Dot, Perihelion and aphelion, Phobos (moon), Physics, Planet, Planet Nine, Planetary core, Planetary mnemonic, Planetary nebula, Planetary system, Planetesimal, Plasma (physics), Plate tectonics, Plutino, Pluto, Plutoid, Popular Astronomy (US magazine), Potentially hazardous object, Princeton University Press, Protoplanet, Protoplanetary disk, Protoplanetary nebula, Protostar, Proxima Centauri, Proxima Centauri b, Radiant energy, Radiation pressure, Red dwarf, Red giant, Refractory (planetary science), Renaissance, Resonant trans-Neptunian object, Retrograde and prograde motion, Rift valley, Ring system, Rings of Saturn, Rock (geology), Rogue planet, Ross 154, Rupes, Saturn, Scattered disc, Science (journal), Sednoid, Semi-major and semi-minor axes, Silicate, Sirius, Small Solar System body, Solar analog, Solar apex, Solar core, Solar flare, Solar mass, Solar System, Solar System in fiction, Solar System model, Solar wind, Space probe, Space weather, Sphere, Springer Science+Business Media, Star, Stellar population, Stellar-wind bubble, Stockholm, Stockholm Arlanda Airport, Styx (moon), Sublimation (phase transition), Sun, Sunlight, Super-Earth, Supernova, Sweden Solar System, Tau Ceti, Tectonics, Terrestrial planet, The Astronomical Journal, The Astrophysical Journal, Tidal force, Tidal locking, Timeline of Solar System exploration, Titan (moon), Titania (moon), Titius–Bode law, Trans-Neptunian object, Triton (moon), Umbriel (moon), Universe, Unmanned spacecraft, Uranus, Vacuum, Valles Marineris, Vapor pressure, Vega, Venus, Volatiles, Volcano, Voyager 1, Voyager 2, Voyager program, Water, Weather, White dwarf, Wiley-Blackwell, WISE 0855−0714, Wolf 359, Zodiacal light, 10199 Chariklo, 15760 Albion, 20000 Varuna, 2060 Chiron, 50000 Quaoar, 90377 Sedna, 90482 Orcus. Expand index (274 more) »

Accretion (astrophysics)

In astrophysics, accretion is the accumulation of particles into a massive object by gravitationally attracting more matter, typically gaseous matter, in an accretion disk.

New!!: Solar System and Accretion (astrophysics) · See more »

Advances in Space Research

Advances in Space Research (ASR) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that is published 27 times per year by Elsevier.

New!!: Solar System and Advances in Space Research · See more »

AIP Conference Proceedings

AIP Conference Proceedings is a serial published by the American Institute of Physics since 1970.

New!!: Solar System and AIP Conference Proceedings · See more »

Alan Stern

Sol Alan Stern (born November 22, 1957) is an American engineer and planetary scientist.

New!!: Solar System and Alan Stern · See more »

Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri (α Centauri, abbreviated Alf Cen or α Cen) is the star system closest to the Solar System, being from the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Alpha Centauri · See more »

American Journal of Physics

The American Journal of Physics is a monthly, peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Institute of Physics.

New!!: Solar System and American Journal of Physics · See more »

Ammonia

Ammonia is a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH3.

New!!: Solar System and Ammonia · See more »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

New!!: Solar System and Ancient Greece · See more »

Angular momentum

In physics, angular momentum (rarely, moment of momentum or rotational momentum) is the rotational equivalent of linear momentum.

New!!: Solar System and Angular momentum · See more »

Ariel (moon)

Ariel is the fourth-largest of the 27 known moons of Uranus.

New!!: Solar System and Ariel (moon) · See more »

Aristarchus of Samos

Aristarchus of Samos (Ἀρίσταρχος ὁ Σάμιος, Aristarkhos ho Samios; c. 310 – c. 230 BC) was an ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician who presented the first known model that placed the Sun at the center of the known universe with the Earth revolving around it (see Solar system).

New!!: Solar System and Aristarchus of Samos · See more »

Asteroid

Asteroids are minor planets, especially those of the inner Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Asteroid · See more »

Asteroid belt

The asteroid belt is the circumstellar disc in the Solar System located roughly between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter.

New!!: Solar System and Asteroid belt · See more »

Asteroid family

An asteroid family is a population of asteroids that share similar proper orbital elements, such as semimajor axis, eccentricity, and orbital inclination.

New!!: Solar System and Asteroid family · See more »

Astronomical symbols

Astronomical symbols are symbols used to represent astronomical objects, theoretical constructs and observational events in astronomy.

New!!: Solar System and Astronomical symbols · See more »

Astronomical unit

The astronomical unit (symbol: au, ua, or AU) is a unit of length, roughly the distance from Earth to the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Astronomical unit · See more »

Astronomy & Astrophysics

Astronomy & Astrophysics is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering theoretical, observational, and instrumental astronomy and astrophysics.

New!!: Solar System and Astronomy & Astrophysics · See more »

Astronomy & Geophysics

Astronomy & Geophysics (A&G) is a scientific journal and trade magazine published on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) by Oxford University Press.

New!!: Solar System and Astronomy & Geophysics · See more »

Astronomy Now

Astronomy Now is a monthly British magazine on astronomy and space.

New!!: Solar System and Astronomy Now · See more »

Atmosphere

An atmosphere is a layer or a set of layers of gases surrounding a planet or other material body, that is held in place by the gravity of that body.

New!!: Solar System and Atmosphere · See more »

Atmosphere of Earth

The atmosphere of Earth is the layer of gases, commonly known as air, that surrounds the planet Earth and is retained by Earth's gravity.

New!!: Solar System and Atmosphere of Earth · See more »

Aurora

An aurora (plural: auroras or aurorae), sometimes referred to as polar lights, northern lights (aurora borealis) or southern lights (aurora australis), is a natural light display in the Earth's sky, predominantly seen in the high-latitude regions (around the Arctic and Antarctic).

New!!: Solar System and Aurora · See more »

Axial tilt

In astronomy, axial tilt, also known as obliquity, is the angle between an object's rotational axis and its orbital axis, or, equivalently, the angle between its equatorial plane and orbital plane.

New!!: Solar System and Axial tilt · See more »

Barnard's Star

Barnard's Star is a very-low-mass red dwarf about 6 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Ophiuchus.

New!!: Solar System and Barnard's Star · See more »

Barred spiral galaxy

A barred spiral galaxy is a spiral galaxy with a central bar-shaped structure composed of stars.

New!!: Solar System and Barred spiral galaxy · See more »

Barycenter

The barycenter (or barycentre; from the Ancient Greek βαρύς heavy + κέντρον centre) is the center of mass of two or more bodies that are orbiting each other, which is the point around which they both orbit.

New!!: Solar System and Barycenter · See more »

Binary system

A binary system is a system of two astronomical bodies which are close enough that their gravitational attraction causes them to orbit each other around a barycenter (also see animated examples).

New!!: Solar System and Binary system · See more »

Bow shocks in astrophysics

Bow shocks form the boundary between a magnetosphere and an ambient magnetized medium.

New!!: Solar System and Bow shocks in astrophysics · See more »

Brown dwarf

Brown dwarfs are substellar objects that occupy the mass range between the heaviest gas giant planets and the lightest stars, having masses between approximately 13 to 75–80 times that of Jupiter, or approximately to about.

New!!: Solar System and Brown dwarf · See more »

Callisto (moon)

Callisto (Jupiter IV) is the second-largest moon of Jupiter, after Ganymede.

New!!: Solar System and Callisto (moon) · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Solar System and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Capitalization

Capitalisation, or capitalization,see spelling differences is writing a word with its first letter as a capital letter (upper-case letter) and the remaining letters in lower case in writing systems with a case distinction.

New!!: Solar System and Capitalization · See more »

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide (chemical formula) is a colorless gas with a density about 60% higher than that of dry air.

New!!: Solar System and Carbon dioxide · See more »

Cassini–Huygens

The Cassini–Huygens mission, commonly called Cassini, was a collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) to send a probe to study the planet Saturn and its system, including its rings and natural satellites.

New!!: Solar System and Cassini–Huygens · See more »

Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy

Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy is a scientific journal covering the fields of astronomy and astrophysics.

New!!: Solar System and Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy · See more »

Celsius

The Celsius scale, previously known as the centigrade scale, is a temperature scale used by the International System of Units (SI).

New!!: Solar System and Celsius · See more »

Centaur (minor planet)

Centaurs are small solar system bodies with a semi-major axis between those of the outer planets.

New!!: Solar System and Centaur (minor planet) · See more »

Ceres (dwarf planet)

Ceres (minor-planet designation: 1 Ceres) is the largest object in the asteroid belt that lies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, slightly closer to Mars' orbit.

New!!: Solar System and Ceres (dwarf planet) · See more »

Classical Kuiper belt object

A classical Kuiper belt object, also called a cubewano ("QB1-o"), is a low-eccentricity Kuiper belt object (KBO) that orbits beyond Neptune and is not controlled by an orbital resonance with Neptune.

New!!: Solar System and Classical Kuiper belt object · See more »

Clearing the neighbourhood

"Clearing the neighbourhood around its orbit" is a criterion for a celestial body to be considered a planet in the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Clearing the neighbourhood · See more »

Cloud

In meteorology, a cloud is an aerosol consisting of a visible mass of minute liquid droplets, frozen crystals, or other particles suspended in the atmosphere of a planetary body.

New!!: Solar System and Cloud · See more »

Coma (cometary)

The coma is the nebulous envelope around the nucleus of a comet, formed when the comet passes close to the Sun on its highly elliptical orbit; as the comet warms, parts of it sublime.

New!!: Solar System and Coma (cometary) · See more »

Comet

A comet is an icy small Solar System body that, when passing close to the Sun, warms and begins to release gases, a process called outgassing.

New!!: Solar System and Comet · See more »

Comet Hale–Bopp

Comet Hale–Bopp (formally designated C/1995 O1) is a comet that was perhaps the most widely observed of the 20th century, and one of the brightest seen for many decades.

New!!: Solar System and Comet Hale–Bopp · See more »

Comet West

Comet West, formally designated C/1975 V1, 1976 VI, and 1975n, was a comet described as one of the brightest objects to pass through the inner solar system in 1976.

New!!: Solar System and Comet West · See more »

Compact star

In astronomy, the term "compact star" (or "compact object") refers collectively to white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.

New!!: Solar System and Compact star · See more »

Contemporary Physics

Contemporary Physics is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing introductory articles on important recent developments in physics.

New!!: Solar System and Contemporary Physics · See more »

Cornell University

Cornell University is a private and statutory Ivy League research university located in Ithaca, New York.

New!!: Solar System and Cornell University · See more »

Coronal mass ejection

A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a significant release of plasma and magnetic field from the solar corona.

New!!: Solar System and Coronal mass ejection · See more »

Cosmic dust

Cosmic dust, also called extraterrestrial dust or space dust, is dust which exists in outer space, as well as all over planet Earth.

New!!: Solar System and Cosmic dust · See more »

Cosmic ray

Cosmic rays are high-energy radiation, mainly originating outside the Solar System and even from distant galaxies.

New!!: Solar System and Cosmic ray · See more »

Crust (geology)

In geology, the crust is the outermost solid shell of a rocky planet, dwarf planet, or natural satellite.

New!!: Solar System and Crust (geology) · See more »

Definition of planet

The definition of planet, since the word was coined by the ancient Greeks, has included within its scope a wide range of celestial bodies.

New!!: Solar System and Definition of planet · See more »

Deimos (moon)

Deimos (systematic designation: Mars II) is the smaller and outer of the two natural satellites of the planet Mars, the other being Phobos.

New!!: Solar System and Deimos (moon) · See more »

Density

The density, or more precisely, the volumetric mass density, of a substance is its mass per unit volume.

New!!: Solar System and Density · See more »

Dust storm

A dust storm is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions.

New!!: Solar System and Dust storm · See more »

Dwarf planet

A dwarf planet is a planetary-mass object that is neither a planet nor a natural satellite.

New!!: Solar System and Dwarf planet · See more »

Dysnomia (moon)

Dysnomia (Greek: Δυσνομία)—officially (136199) Eris I Dysnomia—is the only known moon of the dwarf planet Eris (the most massive known dwarf planet in the Solar System).

New!!: Solar System and Dysnomia (moon) · See more »

Earth

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

New!!: Solar System and Earth · See more »

Earth's magnetic field

Earth's magnetic field, also known as the geomagnetic field, is the magnetic field that extends from the Earth's interior out into space, where it meets the solar wind, a stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Earth's magnetic field · See more »

Earth, Moon, and Planets

Earth, Moon, and Planets is a peer-reviewed scientific journal, published approximately ten times per year by Springer Science+Business Media.

New!!: Solar System and Earth, Moon, and Planets · See more »

Ecliptic

The ecliptic is the circular path on the celestial sphere that the Sun follows over the course of a year; it is the basis of the ecliptic coordinate system.

New!!: Solar System and Ecliptic · See more »

Electromagnetic radiation

In physics, electromagnetic radiation (EM radiation or EMR) refers to the waves (or their quanta, photons) of the electromagnetic field, propagating (radiating) through space-time, carrying electromagnetic radiant energy.

New!!: Solar System and Electromagnetic radiation · See more »

Elena V. Pitjeva

Elena Vladimirovna Pitjeva is a Russian astronomer working at the Institute of Applied Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg.

New!!: Solar System and Elena V. Pitjeva · See more »

Ellipse

In mathematics, an ellipse is a curve in a plane surrounding two focal points such that the sum of the distances to the two focal points is constant for every point on the curve.

New!!: Solar System and Ellipse · See more »

Enceladus

Enceladus is the sixth-largest moon of Saturn.

New!!: Solar System and Enceladus · See more »

Energy

In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.

New!!: Solar System and Energy · See more »

Ephemeris

In astronomy and celestial navigation, an ephemeris (plural: ephemerides) gives the positions of naturally occurring astronomical objects as well as artificial satellites in the sky at a given time or times.

New!!: Solar System and Ephemeris · See more »

Epoch (astronomy)

In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time.

New!!: Solar System and Epoch (astronomy) · See more »

Ericsson Globe

Ericsson Globe (originally known as Stockholm Globe Arena, commonly referred to in Swedish simply as Globen (The Globe) is an indoor arena located in Stockholm Globe City, Johanneshov district of Stockholm, Sweden. The Ericsson Globe is the largest hemispherical building on Earth and took two and a half years to build. Shaped like a large white ball, it has a diameter of 110 meters (361 feet) and an inner height of 85 meters (279 feet). The volume of the building is 605,000 cubic meters (21,188,800 cubic feet). It has a seating capacity of 16,000 spectators for shows and concerts, and 13,850 for ice hockey. It represents the Sun in the Sweden Solar System, the world's largest scale model of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Ericsson Globe · See more »

Eris (dwarf planet)

Eris (minor-planet designation 136199 Eris) is the most massive and second-largest (by volume) dwarf planet in the known Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Eris (dwarf planet) · See more »

Europa (moon)

Europa or as Ευρώπη (Jupiter II) is the smallest of the four Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter, and the sixth-closest to the planet.

New!!: Solar System and Europa (moon) · See more »

Evolutionary history of life

The evolutionary history of life on Earth traces the processes by which both living organisms and fossil organisms evolved since life emerged on the planet, until the present.

New!!: Solar System and Evolutionary history of life · See more »

Exoplanet

An exoplanet or extrasolar planet is a planet outside our solar system.

New!!: Solar System and Exoplanet · See more »

Fluid dynamics

In physics and engineering, fluid dynamics is a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that describes the flow of fluids - liquids and gases.

New!!: Solar System and Fluid dynamics · See more »

Focus (geometry)

In geometry, focuses or foci, singular focus, are special points with reference to which any of a variety of curves is constructed.

New!!: Solar System and Focus (geometry) · See more »

Formation and evolution of the Solar System

The formation and evolution of the Solar System began 4.6 billion years ago with the gravitational collapse of a small part of a giant molecular cloud.

New!!: Solar System and Formation and evolution of the Solar System · See more »

Frost line (astrophysics)

In astronomy or planetary science, the frost line, also known as the snow line or ice line, is the particular distance in the solar nebula from the central protostar where it is cold enough for volatile compounds such as water, ammonia, methane, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide to condense into solid ice grains.

New!!: Solar System and Frost line (astrophysics) · See more »

G-Cloud

The G-Cloud (or G-Cloud complex) is an interstellar cloud located next to the Local Interstellar Cloud.

New!!: Solar System and G-Cloud · See more »

G-type main-sequence star

A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K., G. M. H. J. Habets and J. R. W. Heintze, Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 46 (November 1981), pp.

New!!: Solar System and G-type main-sequence star · See more »

Galactic Center

The Galactic Center is the rotational center of the Milky Way.

New!!: Solar System and Galactic Center · See more »

Galactic coordinate system

The galactic coordinate system is a celestial coordinate system in spherical coordinates, with the Sun as its center, the primary direction aligned with the approximate center of the Milky Way galaxy, and the fundamental plane parallel to an approximation of the galactic plane but offset to its north.

New!!: Solar System and Galactic coordinate system · See more »

Galactic plane

The galactic plane is the plane on which the majority of a disk-shaped galaxy's mass lies.

New!!: Solar System and Galactic plane · See more »

Galactic tide

A galactic tide is a tidal force experienced by objects subject to the gravitational field of a galaxy such as the Milky Way.

New!!: Solar System and Galactic tide · See more »

Galactic year

The galactic year, also known as a cosmic year, is the duration of time required for the Sun to orbit once around the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

New!!: Solar System and Galactic year · See more »

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564Drake (1978, p. 1). The date of Galileo's birth is given according to the Julian calendar, which was then in force throughout Christendom. In 1582 it was replaced in Italy and several other Catholic countries with the Gregorian calendar. Unless otherwise indicated, dates in this article are given according to the Gregorian calendar. – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath.

New!!: Solar System and Galileo Galilei · See more »

Ganymede (moon)

Ganymede (Jupiter III) is the largest and most massive moon of Jupiter and in the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Ganymede (moon) · See more »

Gas giant

A gas giant is a giant planet composed mainly of hydrogen and helium.

New!!: Solar System and Gas giant · See more »

Geomagnetic storm

A geomagnetic storm (commonly referred to as a solar storm) is a temporary disturbance of the Earth's magnetosphere caused by a solar wind shock wave and/or cloud of magnetic field that interacts with the Earth's magnetic field.

New!!: Solar System and Geomagnetic storm · See more »

Geyser

A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by steam.

New!!: Solar System and Geyser · See more »

Giant planet

A giant planet is any massive planet.

New!!: Solar System and Giant planet · See more »

Gravitational collapse

Gravitational collapse is the contraction of an astronomical object due to the influence of its own gravity, which tends to draw matter inward toward the center of gravity.

New!!: Solar System and Gravitational collapse · See more »

Gravity

Gravity, or gravitation, is a natural phenomenon by which all things with mass or energy—including planets, stars, galaxies, and even light—are brought toward (or gravitate toward) one another.

New!!: Solar System and Gravity · See more »

Great Red Spot

The Great Red Spot is a persistent high-pressure region in the atmosphere of Jupiter, producing an anticyclonic storm 22° south of the planet's equator.

New!!: Solar System and Great Red Spot · See more »

Greenhouse gas

A greenhouse gas is a gas in an atmosphere that absorbs and emits radiant energy within the thermal infrared range.

New!!: Solar System and Greenhouse gas · See more »

Halley's Comet

Halley's Comet or Comet Halley, officially designated 1P/Halley, is a short-period comet visible from Earth every 74–79 years.

New!!: Solar System and Halley's Comet · See more »

Haumea

Haumea, minor-planet designation 136108 Haumea, is a dwarf planet located beyond Neptune's orbit.

New!!: Solar System and Haumea · See more »

Heliocentrism

Heliocentrism is the astronomical model in which the Earth and planets revolve around the Sun at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Heliocentrism · See more »

Heliosphere

The heliosphere is the bubble-like region of space dominated by the Sun, which extends far beyond the orbit of Pluto.

New!!: Solar System and Heliosphere · See more »

Heliospheric current sheet

The heliospheric current sheet is the surface within the Solar System where the polarity of the Sun's magnetic field changes from north to south.

New!!: Solar System and Heliospheric current sheet · See more »

Helium

Helium (from lit) is a chemical element with symbol He and atomic number 2.

New!!: Solar System and Helium · See more »

Hercules (constellation)

Hercules is a constellation named after Hercules, the Roman mythological hero adapted from the Greek hero Heracles.

New!!: Solar System and Hercules (constellation) · See more »

Hilda asteroid

The Hilda asteroids (adj. Hildian) are a dynamical group of asteroids in a 3:2 orbital resonance with Jupiter.

New!!: Solar System and Hilda asteroid · See more »

Hill sphere

An astronomical body's Hill sphere is the region in which it dominates the attraction of satellites.

New!!: Solar System and Hill sphere · See more »

HIP 11915

HIP 11915 is a G-type main-sequence star located about 190 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cetus.

New!!: Solar System and HIP 11915 · See more »

Hydra (moon)

Hydra is the outermost known moon of Pluto.

New!!: Solar System and Hydra (moon) · See more »

Hydrogen

Hydrogen is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1.

New!!: Solar System and Hydrogen · See more »

Hydrogen sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide is the chemical compound with the chemical formula H2S.

New!!: Solar System and Hydrogen sulfide · See more »

Hydrosphere

The hydrosphere (from Greek ὕδωρ hydōr, "water" and σφαῖρα sphaira, "sphere") is the combined mass of water found on, under, and above the surface of a planet, minor planet or natural satellite.

New!!: Solar System and Hydrosphere · See more »

Hydrostatic equilibrium

In fluid mechanics, a fluid is said to be in hydrostatic equilibrium or hydrostatic balance when it is at rest, or when the flow velocity at each point is constant over time.

New!!: Solar System and Hydrostatic equilibrium · See more »

Hyperbolic trajectory

In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics, a hyperbolic trajectory is the trajectory of any object around a central body with more than enough speed to escape the central object's gravitational pull.

New!!: Solar System and Hyperbolic trajectory · See more »

IAU definition of planet

The International Astronomical Union (IAU) defined in August 2006 that, in the Solar System, a planet is a celestial body which.

New!!: Solar System and IAU definition of planet · See more »

Icarus (journal)

Icarus is a scientific journal dedicated to the field of planetary science.

New!!: Solar System and Icarus (journal) · See more »

Ice cap

An ice cap is a mass of ice that covers less than 50,000 km2 of land area (usually covering a highland area).

New!!: Solar System and Ice cap · See more »

Ice giant

An ice giant is a giant planet composed mainly of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, such as oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur.

New!!: Solar System and Ice giant · See more »

Impact crater

An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon, or other solid body in the Solar System or elsewhere, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body.

New!!: Solar System and Impact crater · See more »

Inclusion (mineral)

In mineralogy, an inclusion is any material that is trapped inside a mineral during its formation.

New!!: Solar System and Inclusion (mineral) · See more »

Inferior and superior planets

In the Solar System, a planet is said to be inferior with respect to another planet if its orbit lies inside the other planet's orbit around the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Inferior and superior planets · See more »

International Astronomical Union

The International Astronomical Union (IAU; Union astronomique internationale, UAI) is an international association of professional astronomers, at the PhD level and beyond, active in professional research and education in astronomy.

New!!: Solar System and International Astronomical Union · See more »

Interplanetary dust cloud

The interplanetary dust cloud, or zodiacal cloud, consists of cosmic dust (small particles floating in outer space) that pervades the space between planets in the Solar System and other planetary systems.

New!!: Solar System and Interplanetary dust cloud · See more »

Interplanetary medium

The interplanetary medium is the material which fills the Solar System, and through which all the larger Solar System bodies, such as planets, dwarf planets, asteroids, and comets, move.

New!!: Solar System and Interplanetary medium · See more »

Interstellar Boundary Explorer

Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is a NASA satellite that is making a map of the boundary between the Solar System and interstellar space.

New!!: Solar System and Interstellar Boundary Explorer · See more »

Interstellar medium

In astronomy, the interstellar medium (ISM) is the matter and radiation that exists in the space between the star systems in a galaxy.

New!!: Solar System and Interstellar medium · See more »

Io (moon)

Io (Jupiter I) is the innermost of the four Galilean moons of the planet Jupiter.

New!!: Solar System and Io (moon) · See more »

Ion

An ion is an atom or molecule that has a non-zero net electrical charge (its total number of electrons is not equal to its total number of protons).

New!!: Solar System and Ion · See more »

Iron

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.

New!!: Solar System and Iron · See more »

Iron(III) oxide

Iron(III) oxide or ferric oxide is the inorganic compound with the formula Fe2O3.

New!!: Solar System and Iron(III) oxide · See more »

Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27) was an English mathematician, astronomer, theologian, author and physicist (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution.

New!!: Solar System and Isaac Newton · See more »

Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer, and astrologer.

New!!: Solar System and Johannes Kepler · See more »

Johns Hopkins University Press

The Johns Hopkins University Press (also referred to as JHU Press or JHUP) is the publishing division of Johns Hopkins University.

New!!: Solar System and Johns Hopkins University Press · See more »

Journal of Geophysical Research

The Journal of Geophysical Research is a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

New!!: Solar System and Journal of Geophysical Research · See more »

Jupiter

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest in the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Jupiter · See more »

Jupiter trojan

The Jupiter trojans, commonly called Trojan asteroids or just Trojans, are a large group of asteroids that share the planet Jupiter's orbit around the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Jupiter trojan · See more »

Kepler's laws of planetary motion

In astronomy, Kepler's laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Kepler's laws of planetary motion · See more »

Kerberos (moon)

Kerberos is a small natural satellite of Pluto, about in its longest dimension.

New!!: Solar System and Kerberos (moon) · See more »

Kreutz sungrazer

The Kreutz sungrazers (pronounced kroits) are a family of sungrazing comets, characterized by orbits taking them extremely close to the Sun at perihelion.

New!!: Solar System and Kreutz sungrazer · See more »

Kuiper belt

The Kuiper belt, occasionally called the Edgeworth–Kuiper belt, is a circumstellar disc in the outer Solar System, extending from the orbit of Neptune (at 30 AU) to approximately 50 AU from the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Kuiper belt · See more »

Lagrangian point

In celestial mechanics, the Lagrangian points (also Lagrange points, L-points, or libration points) are positions in an orbital configuration of two large bodies, wherein a small object, affected only by the gravitational forces from the two larger objects, will maintain its position relative to them.

New!!: Solar System and Lagrangian point · See more »

Lalande 21185

Lalande 21185 is a star in the constellation of Ursa Major, relevant for being the brightest red dwarf observable in the northern hemisphere (only AX Microscopii and Lacaille 9352, in the southern hemisphere, are brighter).

New!!: Solar System and Lalande 21185 · See more »

Late Middle Ages

The Late Middle Ages or Late Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from 1250 to 1500 AD.

New!!: Solar System and Late Middle Ages · See more »

Life

Life is a characteristic that distinguishes physical entities that do have biological processes, such as signaling and self-sustaining processes, from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased, or because they never had such functions and are classified as inanimate.

New!!: Solar System and Life · See more »

Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation within a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

New!!: Solar System and Light · See more »

Light-year

The light-year is a unit of length used to express astronomical distances and measures about 9.5 trillion kilometres or 5.9 trillion miles.

New!!: Solar System and Light-year · See more »

Liquid nitrogen

Liquid nitrogen is nitrogen in a liquid state at an extremely low temperature.

New!!: Solar System and Liquid nitrogen · See more »

List of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System

This is a list of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System, which are objects that have a rounded, ellipsoidal shape due to the forces of their own gravity (hydrostatic equilibrium).

New!!: Solar System and List of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System · See more »

List of minor-planet groups

A minor-planet group is a population of minor planets that share broadly similar orbits.

New!!: Solar System and List of minor-planet groups · See more »

List of natural satellites

The Solar System's planets and officially recognized dwarf planets are known to be orbited by 184 natural satellites, or moons.

New!!: Solar System and List of natural satellites · See more »

List of nearest stars and brown dwarfs

The following two lists include all the known stars and brown dwarfs that are within of the Sun, or were/will be within in the astronomically near past or future.

New!!: Solar System and List of nearest stars and brown dwarfs · See more »

List of Solar System extremes

This article describes extreme locations of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and List of Solar System extremes · See more »

Lists of geological features of the Solar System

This is a directory of lists of geological features on planets excepting Earth, moons and asteroids ordered by increasing distance from the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Lists of geological features of the Solar System · See more »

Local Bubble

The Local Bubble, or Local Cavity, is a relative cavity in the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Orion Arm of the Milky Way.

New!!: Solar System and Local Bubble · See more »

Local Interstellar Cloud

The Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC), also known as the Local Fluff, is the interstellar cloud roughly across through which the Solar System is currently moving.

New!!: Solar System and Local Interstellar Cloud · See more »

Luhman 16

Luhman 16 (WISE 1049−5319, WISE J104915.57−531906.1) is a binary brown-dwarf system in the southern constellation Vela at a distance of approximately from the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Luhman 16 · See more »

Luleå

Luleå (Westrobothnian: Lul, Leul, or Leol; Luleju) is a city on the coast of northern Sweden, and the capital of Norrbotten County, the northernmost county in Sweden.

New!!: Solar System and Luleå · See more »

Luyten 726-8

Luyten 726-8, also known as Gliese 65, is a binary star system that is one of Earth's nearest neighbors, at about 8.7 light years from Earth in the constellation Cetus.

New!!: Solar System and Luyten 726-8 · See more »

Main sequence

In astronomy, the main sequence is a continuous and distinctive band of stars that appear on plots of stellar color versus brightness.

New!!: Solar System and Main sequence · See more »

Main-belt comet

Main-belt comets (MBCs) are bodies orbiting within the asteroid belt that have shown comet-like activity during part of their orbit.

New!!: Solar System and Main-belt comet · See more »

Makemake

Makemake (minor-planet designation 136472 Makemake) is a dwarf planet and perhaps the largest Kuiper belt object in the classical population, with a diameter approximately two thirds that of Pluto.

New!!: Solar System and Makemake · See more »

Mantle (geology)

The mantle is a layer inside a terrestrial planet and some other rocky planetary bodies.

New!!: Solar System and Mantle (geology) · See more »

Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.

New!!: Solar System and Mars · See more »

Mass

Mass is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.

New!!: Solar System and Mass · See more »

Mercury (planet)

Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Mercury (planet) · See more »

Metallicity

In astronomy, metallicity is used to describe the abundance of elements present in an object that are heavier than hydrogen or helium.

New!!: Solar System and Metallicity · See more »

Meteorite

A meteorite is a solid piece of debris from an object, such as a comet, asteroid, or meteoroid, that originates in outer space and survives its passage through the atmosphere to reach the surface of a planet or moon.

New!!: Solar System and Meteorite · See more »

Meteoroid

A meteoroid is a small rocky or metallic body in outer space.

New!!: Solar System and Meteoroid · See more »

Methane

Methane is a chemical compound with the chemical formula (one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen).

New!!: Solar System and Methane · See more »

Michael E. Brown

Michael E. Brown (born June 5, 1965) is an American astronomer, who has been professor of planetary astronomy at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) since 2003.

New!!: Solar System and Michael E. Brown · See more »

Micrometeoroid

A micrometeoroid is a tiny meteoroid; a small particle of rock in space, usually weighing less than a gram.

New!!: Solar System and Micrometeoroid · See more »

Milky Way

The Milky Way is the galaxy that contains our Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Milky Way · See more »

Mineral

A mineral is a naturally occurring chemical compound, usually of crystalline form and not produced by life processes.

New!!: Solar System and Mineral · See more »

Minor planet

A minor planet is an astronomical object in direct orbit around the Sun (or more broadly, any star with a planetary system) that is neither a planet nor exclusively classified as a comet.

New!!: Solar System and Minor planet · See more »

Minor-planet moon

A minor-planet moon is an astronomical object that orbits a minor planet as its natural satellite.

New!!: Solar System and Minor-planet moon · See more »

Miranda (moon)

Miranda, also designated Uranus V, is the smallest and innermost of Uranus's five round satellites.

New!!: Solar System and Miranda (moon) · See more »

Molecular cloud

A molecular cloud, sometimes called a stellar nursery (if star formation is occurring within), is a type of interstellar cloud, the density and size of which permit the formation of molecules, most commonly molecular hydrogen (H2).

New!!: Solar System and Molecular cloud · See more »

Moon

The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth and is Earth's only permanent natural satellite.

New!!: Solar System and Moon · See more »

Moons of Jupiter

There are 69 known moons of Jupiter.

New!!: Solar System and Moons of Jupiter · See more »

Moons of Neptune

Neptune has 14 known moons, which are named for minor water deities in Greek mythology.

New!!: Solar System and Moons of Neptune · See more »

Moons of Pluto

The dwarf planet Pluto has five moons down to a detection limit of about 1 km in diameter.

New!!: Solar System and Moons of Pluto · See more »

Moons of Saturn

The moons of Saturn are numerous and diverse, ranging from tiny moonlets less than 1 kilometer across to the enormous Titan, which is larger than the planet Mercury.

New!!: Solar System and Moons of Saturn · See more »

Moons of Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet of the Solar System; it has 27 known moons, all of which are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope.

New!!: Solar System and Moons of Uranus · See more »

Mountain

A mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak.

New!!: Solar System and Mountain · See more »

Myr

The abbreviation myr, "million years", is a unit of a quantity of (i.e.) years, or 31.6 teraseconds.

New!!: Solar System and Myr · See more »

NASA

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

New!!: Solar System and NASA · See more »

Natural satellite

A natural satellite or moon is, in the most common usage, an astronomical body that orbits a planet or minor planet (or sometimes another small Solar System body).

New!!: Solar System and Natural satellite · See more »

Nature (journal)

Nature is a British multidisciplinary scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869.

New!!: Solar System and Nature (journal) · See more »

Near-Earth object

A near-Earth object (NEO) is any small Solar System body whose orbit can bring it into proximity with Earth.

New!!: Solar System and Near-Earth object · See more »

Neon

Neon is a chemical element with symbol Ne and atomic number 10.

New!!: Solar System and Neon · See more »

Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Neptune · See more »

Neptune trojan

Neptune trojans are bodies that orbit the Sun near one of the stable Lagrangian points of Neptune, similar to the trojans of other planets.

New!!: Solar System and Neptune trojan · See more »

Nice model

The Nice model is a scenario for the dynamical evolution of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Nice model · See more »

Nickel

Nickel is a chemical element with symbol Ni and atomic number 28.

New!!: Solar System and Nickel · See more »

Nicolaus Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus (Mikołaj Kopernik; Nikolaus Kopernikus; Niklas Koppernigk; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance-era mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe, likely independently of Aristarchus of Samos, who had formulated such a model some eighteen centuries earlier.

New!!: Solar System and Nicolaus Copernicus · See more »

Nix (moon)

Nix is a natural satellite of Pluto.

New!!: Solar System and Nix (moon) · See more »

Nuclear fusion

In nuclear physics, nuclear fusion is a reaction in which two or more atomic nuclei come close enough to form one or more different atomic nuclei and subatomic particles (neutrons or protons).

New!!: Solar System and Nuclear fusion · See more »

Numerical model of the Solar System

A numerical model of the Solar System is a set of mathematical equations, which, when solved, give the approximate positions of the planets as a function of time.

New!!: Solar System and Numerical model of the Solar System · See more »

O-type main-sequence star

An O-type main-sequence star (O V) is a main-sequence (core hydrogen-burning) star of spectral type O and luminosity class V. These stars have between 15 and 90 times the mass of the Sun and surface temperatures between 30,000 and 50,000 K. They are between 40,000 and 1,000,000 times as luminous as the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and O-type main-sequence star · See more »

Oberon (moon)

Oberon, also designated, is the outermost major moon of the planet Uranus.

New!!: Solar System and Oberon (moon) · See more »

Observable universe

The observable universe is a spherical region of the Universe comprising all matter that can be observed from Earth at the present time, because electromagnetic radiation from these objects has had time to reach Earth since the beginning of the cosmological expansion.

New!!: Solar System and Observable universe · See more »

Olympus Mons

Olympus Mons (Latin for Mount Olympus) is a very large shield volcano on the planet Mars.

New!!: Solar System and Olympus Mons · See more »

Oort cloud

The Oort cloud, named after the Dutch astronomer Jan Oort, sometimes called the Öpik–Oort cloud, is a theoretical cloud of predominantly icy planetesimals proposed to surround the Sun at distances ranging from.

New!!: Solar System and Oort cloud · See more »

Orbital eccentricity

The orbital eccentricity of an astronomical object is a parameter that determines the amount by which its orbit around another body deviates from a perfect circle.

New!!: Solar System and Orbital eccentricity · See more »

Orbital inclination

Orbital inclination measures the tilt of an object's orbit around a celestial body.

New!!: Solar System and Orbital inclination · See more »

Orbital pole

An orbital pole is either point at the ends of an imaginary line segment that runs through the center of an orbit (of a revolving body like a planet) and is perpendicular to the orbital plane.

New!!: Solar System and Orbital pole · See more »

Orbital resonance

In celestial mechanics, an orbital resonance occurs when orbiting bodies exert a regular, periodic gravitational influence on each other, usually because their orbital periods are related by a ratio of small integers.

New!!: Solar System and Orbital resonance · See more »

Orion Arm

The Orion Arm is a minor spiral arm of the Milky Way some across and approximately in length, containing the Solar System, including the Earth.

New!!: Solar System and Orion Arm · See more »

Orrery

An orrery is a mechanical model of the solar system that illustrates or predicts the relative positions and motions of the planets and moons, usually according to the heliocentric model.

New!!: Solar System and Orrery · See more »

Outer space

Outer space, or just space, is the expanse that exists beyond the Earth and between celestial bodies.

New!!: Solar System and Outer space · See more »

Outline of the Solar System

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the Solar System: Solar System – gravitationally bound system comprising the Sun and the objects that orbit it, either directly or indirectly.

New!!: Solar System and Outline of the Solar System · See more »

Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

New!!: Solar System and Oxford English Dictionary · See more »

Oxygen

Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8.

New!!: Solar System and Oxygen · See more »

Pale Blue Dot

Pale Blue Dot is a photograph of planet Earth taken on February 14, 1990, by the Voyager 1 space probe from a record distance of about kilometers (miles, 40.5 AU), as part of that day's ''Family Portrait'' series of images of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Pale Blue Dot · See more »

Perihelion and aphelion

The perihelion of any orbit of a celestial body about the Sun is the point where the body comes nearest to the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Perihelion and aphelion · See more »

Phobos (moon)

Phobos (systematic designation) is the innermost and larger of the two natural satellites of Mars, the other being Deimos.

New!!: Solar System and Phobos (moon) · See more »

Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

New!!: Solar System and Physics · See more »

Planet

A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or stellar remnant that is massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and has cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.

New!!: Solar System and Planet · See more »

Planet Nine

Planet Nine is a hypothetical planet in the outer region of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Planet Nine · See more »

Planetary core

The planetary core consists of the innermost layer(s) of a planet; which may be composed of solid and liquid layers.

New!!: Solar System and Planetary core · See more »

Planetary mnemonic

A planetary mnemonic refers to a phrase used to remember the planets and dwarf planets of the Solar System, with the order of words corresponding to increasing sidereal periods of the bodies.

New!!: Solar System and Planetary mnemonic · See more »

Planetary nebula

A planetary nebula, abbreviated as PN or plural PNe, is a type of emission nebula consisting of an expanding, glowing shell of ionized gas ejected from red giant stars late in their lives.

New!!: Solar System and Planetary nebula · See more »

Planetary system

A planetary system is a set of gravitationally bound non-stellar objects in or out of orbit around a star or star system.

New!!: Solar System and Planetary system · See more »

Planetesimal

Planetesimals are solid objects thought to exist in protoplanetary disks and in debris disks.

New!!: Solar System and Planetesimal · See more »

Plasma (physics)

Plasma (Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek English Lexicon, on Perseus) is one of the four fundamental states of matter, and was first described by chemist Irving Langmuir in the 1920s.

New!!: Solar System and Plasma (physics) · See more »

Plate tectonics

Plate tectonics (from the Late Latin tectonicus, from the τεκτονικός "pertaining to building") is a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of seven large plates and the movements of a larger number of smaller plates of the Earth's lithosphere, since tectonic processes began on Earth between 3 and 3.5 billion years ago.

New!!: Solar System and Plate tectonics · See more »

Plutino

In astronomy, the plutinos are a dynamical group of trans-Neptunian objects in the outermost region of the Solar System that orbit in 2:3 mean-motion resonance with Neptune.

New!!: Solar System and Plutino · See more »

Pluto

Pluto (minor planet designation: 134340 Pluto) is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, a ring of bodies beyond Neptune.

New!!: Solar System and Pluto · See more »

Plutoid

A plutoid or ice dwarf is a trans-Neptunian dwarf planet, i.e. a body orbiting beyond Neptune that is massive enough to be rounded in shape.

New!!: Solar System and Plutoid · See more »

Popular Astronomy (US magazine)

Popular Astronomy is an American magazine published by John August Media, LLC and hosted at TechnicaCuriosa.com for amateur astronomers.

New!!: Solar System and Popular Astronomy (US magazine) · See more »

Potentially hazardous object

A potentially hazardous object (PHO) is a near-Earth object – either an asteroid or a comet – with an orbit that can make exceptionally close approaches to the Earth and large enough to cause significant regional damage in the event of impact.

New!!: Solar System and Potentially hazardous object · See more »

Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University.

New!!: Solar System and Princeton University Press · See more »

Protoplanet

A protoplanet is a large planetary embryo that originated within a protoplanetary disc and has undergone internal melting to produce a differentiated interior.

New!!: Solar System and Protoplanet · See more »

Protoplanetary disk

A protoplanetary disk is a rotating circumstellar disk of dense gas and dust surrounding a young newly formed star, a T Tauri star, or Herbig Ae/Be star.

New!!: Solar System and Protoplanetary disk · See more »

Protoplanetary nebula

A protoplanetary nebula or preplanetary nebula (PPN) is an astronomical object which is at the short-lived episode during a star's rapid evolution between the late asymptotic giant branch (LAGB) phase and the subsequent planetary nebula (PN) phase.

New!!: Solar System and Protoplanetary nebula · See more »

Protostar

A protostar is a very young star that is still gathering mass from its parent molecular cloud.

New!!: Solar System and Protostar · See more »

Proxima Centauri

Proxima Centauri, or Alpha Centauri C, is a red dwarf, a small low-mass star, about from the Sun in the constellation of Centaurus.

New!!: Solar System and Proxima Centauri · See more »

Proxima Centauri b

Proxima Centauri b (also called Proxima b or Alpha Centauri Cb) is an exoplanet orbiting within the habitable zone of the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, which is the closest star to the Sun and part of a triple star system.

New!!: Solar System and Proxima Centauri b · See more »

Radiant energy

In physics, and in particular as measured by radiometry, radiant energy is the energy of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation.

New!!: Solar System and Radiant energy · See more »

Radiation pressure

Radiation pressure is the pressure exerted upon any surface due to the exchange of momentum between the object and the electromagnetic field.

New!!: Solar System and Radiation pressure · See more »

Red dwarf

A red dwarf (or M dwarf) is a small and relatively cool star on the main sequence, of M spectral type.

New!!: Solar System and Red dwarf · See more »

Red giant

A red giant is a luminous giant star of low or intermediate mass (roughly 0.3–8 solar masses) in a late phase of stellar evolution.

New!!: Solar System and Red giant · See more »

Refractory (planetary science)

In planetary science, any material that has a relatively high equilibrium condensation temperature is called refractory.

New!!: Solar System and Refractory (planetary science) · See more »

Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

New!!: Solar System and Renaissance · See more »

Resonant trans-Neptunian object

In astronomy, a resonant trans-Neptunian object is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) in mean-motion orbital resonance with Neptune.

New!!: Solar System and Resonant trans-Neptunian object · See more »

Retrograde and prograde motion

Retrograde motion in astronomy is, in general, orbital or rotational motion of an object in the direction opposite the rotation of its primary, that is the central object (right figure).

New!!: Solar System and Retrograde and prograde motion · See more »

Rift valley

A rift valley is a linear-shaped lowland between several highlands or mountain ranges created by the action of a geologic rift or fault.

New!!: Solar System and Rift valley · See more »

Ring system

A ring system is a disc or ring orbiting an astronomical object that is composed of solid material such as dust and moonlets, and is a common component of satellite systems around giant planets.

New!!: Solar System and Ring system · See more »

Rings of Saturn

The rings of Saturn are the most extensive ring system of any planet in the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Rings of Saturn · See more »

Rock (geology)

Rock or stone is a natural substance, a solid aggregate of one or more minerals or mineraloids.

New!!: Solar System and Rock (geology) · See more »

Rogue planet

A rogue planet (also termed an interstellar planet, nomad planet, free-floating planet, orphan planet, wandering planet, starless planet, or sunless planet) is a planetary-mass object that orbits a galactic center directly.

New!!: Solar System and Rogue planet · See more »

Ross 154

Ross 154 (V1216 Sgr) is a star in the southern zodiac constellation of Sagittarius.

New!!: Solar System and Ross 154 · See more »

Rupes

Rupes is the Latin word for 'cliff' (the same form rupes is both singular and plural).

New!!: Solar System and Rupes · See more »

Saturn

Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter.

New!!: Solar System and Saturn · See more »

Scattered disc

The scattered disc (or scattered disk) is a distant circumstellar disc in the Solar System that is sparsely populated by icy small solar system bodies, and are a subset of the broader family of trans-Neptunian objects.

New!!: Solar System and Scattered disc · See more »

Science (journal)

Science, also widely referred to as Science Magazine, is the peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and one of the world's top academic journals.

New!!: Solar System and Science (journal) · See more »

Sednoid

A sednoid is a trans-Neptunian object with a perihelion greater than and a semi-major axis greater than.

New!!: Solar System and Sednoid · See more »

Semi-major and semi-minor axes

In geometry, the major axis of an ellipse is its longest diameter: a line segment that runs through the center and both foci, with ends at the widest points of the perimeter.

New!!: Solar System and Semi-major and semi-minor axes · See more »

Silicate

In chemistry, a silicate is any member of a family of anions consisting of silicon and oxygen, usually with the general formula, where 0 ≤ x Silicate anions are often large polymeric molecules with an extense variety of structures, including chains and rings (as in polymeric metasilicate), double chains (as in, and sheets (as in. In geology and astronomy, the term silicate is used to mean silicate minerals, ionic solids with silicate anions; as well as rock types that consist predominantly of such minerals. In that context, the term also includes the non-ionic compound silicon dioxide (silica, quartz), which would correspond to x.

New!!: Solar System and Silicate · See more »

Sirius

Sirius (a romanization of Greek Σείριος, Seirios,."glowing" or "scorching") is a star system and the brightest star in the Earth's night sky.

New!!: Solar System and Sirius · See more »

Small Solar System body

A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, nor a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite.

New!!: Solar System and Small Solar System body · See more »

Solar analog

Solar-type star, solar analogs (also analogues), and solar twins are stars that are particularly similar to the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Solar analog · See more »

Solar apex

The solar apex, or the Apex of the Sun's Way, refers to the direction that the Sun travels with respect to the Local Standard of Rest.

New!!: Solar System and Solar apex · See more »

Solar core

The core of the Sun is considered to extend from the center to about 0.2 to 0.25 of solar radius.

New!!: Solar System and Solar core · See more »

Solar flare

A solar flare is a sudden flash of increased Sun's brightness, usually observed near its surface.

New!!: Solar System and Solar flare · See more »

Solar mass

The solar mass is a standard unit of mass in astronomy, equal to approximately.

New!!: Solar System and Solar mass · See more »

Solar System

The Solar SystemCapitalization of the name varies.

New!!: Solar System and Solar System · See more »

Solar System in fiction

The Solar System and its various bodies (planets, asteroids, moons, etc.) were the earliest objects to be treated as fictional locations in works of science fiction.

New!!: Solar System and Solar System in fiction · See more »

Solar System model

Solar System models, especially mechanical models, called orreries, that illustrate the relative positions and motions of the planets and moons in the Solar System have been built for centuries.

New!!: Solar System and Solar System model · See more »

Solar wind

The solar wind is a stream of charged particles released from the upper atmosphere of the Sun, called the corona.

New!!: Solar System and Solar wind · See more »

Space probe

A space probe is a robotic spacecraft that does not orbit the Earth, but, instead, explores further into outer space.

New!!: Solar System and Space probe · See more »

Space weather

Space weather is a branch of space physics and aeronomy concerned with the time varying conditions within the Solar System, including the solar wind, emphasizing the space surrounding the Earth, including conditions in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere, and exosphere.

New!!: Solar System and Space weather · See more »

Sphere

A sphere (from Greek σφαῖρα — sphaira, "globe, ball") is a perfectly round geometrical object in three-dimensional space that is the surface of a completely round ball (viz., analogous to the circular objects in two dimensions, where a "circle" circumscribes its "disk").

New!!: Solar System and Sphere · See more »

Springer Science+Business Media

Springer Science+Business Media or Springer, part of Springer Nature since 2015, is a global publishing company that publishes books, e-books and peer-reviewed journals in science, humanities, technical and medical (STM) publishing.

New!!: Solar System and Springer Science+Business Media · See more »

Star

A star is type of astronomical object consisting of a luminous spheroid of plasma held together by its own gravity.

New!!: Solar System and Star · See more »

Stellar population

During 1944, Walter Baade categorized groups of stars within the Milky Way into bluer stars associated with the spiral arms and the general position of yellow stars near the central galactic bulge or within globular star clusters.

New!!: Solar System and Stellar population · See more »

Stellar-wind bubble

Stellar-wind bubble is a cavity light years across filled with hot gas blown into the interstellar medium by the high-velocity (several thousand km/s) stellar wind from a single massive star of type O or B. Weaker stellar winds also blow bubble structures, which are also called astrospheres.

New!!: Solar System and Stellar-wind bubble · See more »

Stockholm

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and the most populous city in the Nordic countries; 952,058 people live in the municipality, approximately 1.5 million in the urban area, and 2.3 million in the metropolitan area.

New!!: Solar System and Stockholm · See more »

Stockholm Arlanda Airport

Stockholm Arlanda Airport, is an international airport located in the Sigtuna Municipality of Sweden, near the town of Märsta, north of Stockholm and nearly south-east of Uppsala.

New!!: Solar System and Stockholm Arlanda Airport · See more »

Styx (moon)

Styx is a small natural satellite of Pluto whose discovery was announced on 11 July 2012.

New!!: Solar System and Styx (moon) · See more »

Sublimation (phase transition)

Sublimation is the transition of a substance directly from the solid to the gas phase, without passing through the intermediate liquid phase.

New!!: Solar System and Sublimation (phase transition) · See more »

Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Sun · See more »

Sunlight

Sunlight is a portion of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun, in particular infrared, visible, and ultraviolet light.

New!!: Solar System and Sunlight · See more »

Super-Earth

A super-Earth is an extrasolar planet with a mass higher than Earth's, but substantially below the masses of the Solar System's ice giants, Uranus and Neptune, which have masses of 15 and 17 times Earth's, respectively.

New!!: Solar System and Super-Earth · See more »

Supernova

A supernova (plural: supernovae or supernovas, abbreviations: SN and SNe) is a transient astronomical event that occurs during the last stellar evolutionary stages of a star's life, either a massive star or a white dwarf, whose destruction is marked by one final, titanic explosion.

New!!: Solar System and Supernova · See more »

Sweden Solar System

The Sweden Solar System is the world's largest permanent scale model of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Sweden Solar System · See more »

Tau Ceti

Tau Ceti, Latinized from τ Ceti, is a single star in the constellation Cetus that is spectrally similar to the Sun, although it has only about 78% of the Sun's mass.

New!!: Solar System and Tau Ceti · See more »

Tectonics

Tectonics is the process that controls the structure and properties of the Earth's crust and its evolution through time.

New!!: Solar System and Tectonics · See more »

Terrestrial planet

A terrestrial planet, telluric planet, or rocky planet is a planet that is composed primarily of silicate rocks or metals.

New!!: Solar System and Terrestrial planet · See more »

The Astronomical Journal

The Astronomical Journal (often abbreviated AJ in scientific papers and references) is a peer-reviewed monthly scientific journal owned by the American Astronomical Society and currently published by IOP Publishing.

New!!: Solar System and The Astronomical Journal · See more »

The Astrophysical Journal

The Astrophysical Journal, often abbreviated ApJ (pronounced "ap jay") in references and speech, is a peer-reviewed scientific journal of astrophysics and astronomy, established in 1895 by American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler.

New!!: Solar System and The Astrophysical Journal · See more »

Tidal force

The tidal force is an apparent force that stretches a body towards the center of mass of another body due to a gradient (difference in strength) in gravitational field from the other body; it is responsible for the diverse phenomena, including tides, tidal locking, breaking apart of celestial bodies and formation of ring systems within Roche limit, and in extreme cases, spaghettification of objects.

New!!: Solar System and Tidal force · See more »

Tidal locking

Tidal locking (also called gravitational locking or captured rotation) occurs when the long-term interaction between a pair of co-orbiting astronomical bodies drives the rotation rate of at least one of them into the state where there is no more net transfer of angular momentum between this body (e.g. a planet) and its orbit around the second body (e.g. a star); this condition of "no net transfer" must be satisfied over the course of one orbit around the second body.

New!!: Solar System and Tidal locking · See more »

Timeline of Solar System exploration

This is a timeline of Solar System exploration ordered by date of spacecraft launch.

New!!: Solar System and Timeline of Solar System exploration · See more »

Titan (moon)

Titan is the largest moon of Saturn.

New!!: Solar System and Titan (moon) · See more »

Titania (moon)

No description.

New!!: Solar System and Titania (moon) · See more »

Titius–Bode law

The Titius–Bode law (sometimes termed just Bode's law) is a hypothesis that the bodies in some orbital systems, including the Sun's, orbit at semi-major axes in a function of planetary sequence.

New!!: Solar System and Titius–Bode law · See more »

Trans-Neptunian object

A trans-Neptunian object (TNO, also written transneptunian object) is any minor planet in the Solar System that orbits the Sun at a greater average distance (semi-major axis) than Neptune, 30 astronomical units (AU).

New!!: Solar System and Trans-Neptunian object · See more »

Triton (moon)

Triton is the largest natural satellite of the planet Neptune, and the first Neptunian moon to be discovered.

New!!: Solar System and Triton (moon) · See more »

Umbriel (moon)

Umbriel is a moon of Uranus discovered on October 24, 1851, by William Lassell.

New!!: Solar System and Umbriel (moon) · See more »

Universe

The Universe is all of space and time and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy.

New!!: Solar System and Universe · See more »

Unmanned spacecraft

Unmanned spacecraft are spacecraft without people ("man") on board, used for unmanned spaceflight.

New!!: Solar System and Unmanned spacecraft · See more »

Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun.

New!!: Solar System and Uranus · See more »

Vacuum

Vacuum is space devoid of matter.

New!!: Solar System and Vacuum · See more »

Valles Marineris

Valles Marineris (Latin for Mariner Valleys, named after the Mariner 9 Mars orbiter of 1971–72 which discovered it) is a system of canyons that runs along the Martian surface east of the Tharsis region.

New!!: Solar System and Valles Marineris · See more »

Vapor pressure

Vapor pressure or equilibrium vapor pressure is defined as the pressure exerted by a vapor in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed phases (solid or liquid) at a given temperature in a closed system.

New!!: Solar System and Vapor pressure · See more »

Vega

Vega, also designated Alpha Lyrae (α Lyrae, abbreviated Alpha Lyr or α Lyr), is the brightest star in the constellation of Lyra, the fifth-brightest star in the night sky, and the second-brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, after Arcturus.

New!!: Solar System and Vega · See more »

Venus

Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.

New!!: Solar System and Venus · See more »

Volatiles

In planetary science, volatiles are the group of chemical elements and chemical compounds with low boiling points that are associated with a planet's or moon's crust or atmosphere.

New!!: Solar System and Volatiles · See more »

Volcano

A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface.

New!!: Solar System and Volcano · See more »

Voyager 1

Voyager 1 is a space probe launched by NASA on September 5, 1977.

New!!: Solar System and Voyager 1 · See more »

Voyager 2

Voyager 2 is a space probe launched by NASA on August 20, 1977, to study the outer planets.

New!!: Solar System and Voyager 2 · See more »

Voyager program

The Voyager program is an American scientific program that employs two robotic probes, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, to study the outer Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and Voyager program · See more »

Water

Water is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms.

New!!: Solar System and Water · See more »

Weather

Weather is the state of the atmosphere, describing for example the degree to which it is hot or cold, wet or dry, calm or stormy, clear or cloudy.

New!!: Solar System and Weather · See more »

White dwarf

A white dwarf, also called a degenerate dwarf, is a stellar core remnant composed mostly of electron-degenerate matter.

New!!: Solar System and White dwarf · See more »

Wiley-Blackwell

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons.

New!!: Solar System and Wiley-Blackwell · See more »

WISE 0855−0714

WISE 0855−0714 (full designation WISE J085510.83−071442.5) is a (sub-) brown dwarf from Earth, whose discovery was announced in April 2014 by Kevin Luhman using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).

New!!: Solar System and WISE 0855−0714 · See more »

Wolf 359

Wolf 359 is a red dwarf star located in the constellation Leo, near the ecliptic.

New!!: Solar System and Wolf 359 · See more »

Zodiacal light

Zodiacal light (also called false dawn when seen before sunrise) is a faint, diffuse, and roughly triangular white glow that is visible in the night sky and appears to extend from the Sun's direction and along the zodiac, straddling the ecliptic.

New!!: Solar System and Zodiacal light · See more »

10199 Chariklo

10199 Chariklo (or; Χαρικλώ; provisional designation) is the largest confirmed centaur (minor planet of the outer Solar System).

New!!: Solar System and 10199 Chariklo · See more »

15760 Albion

15760 Albion, provisional designation, was the first trans-Neptunian object to be discovered after Pluto and Charon.

New!!: Solar System and 15760 Albion · See more »

20000 Varuna

20000 Varuna, provisional designation, is a large classical Kuiper belt object.

New!!: Solar System and 20000 Varuna · See more »

2060 Chiron

2060 Chiron, provisional designation, and also known as 95P/Chiron, is a minor planet in the outer Solar System, orbiting the Sun between Saturn and Uranus.

New!!: Solar System and 2060 Chiron · See more »

50000 Quaoar

50000 Quaoar, provisional designation, is a non-resonant trans-Neptunian object (cubewano) and possibly a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, located in the outermost region of the Solar System.

New!!: Solar System and 50000 Quaoar · See more »

90377 Sedna

90377 Sedna is a large minor planet in the outer reaches of the Solar System that was,, at a distance of about 86 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun, about three times as far as Neptune.

New!!: Solar System and 90377 Sedna · See more »

90482 Orcus

90482 Orcus, provisional designation, is a trans-Neptunian object from the Kuiper belt with a large moon, Vanth.

New!!: Solar System and 90482 Orcus · See more »

Redirects here:

Astronomy of the solar system, Eight planets, Inner Planet, Inner Solar System, Inner planet, Inner planets, Inner solar system, Middle solar system, Nine planets, Outer Solar System, Outer solar system, Sol System, Sol system, Sola system, Solar System (planetary), Solar System's, Solar system, Solar system., Solar-System, Solar-system, Solarsystem, Solor System, Solsector, Solsys, Sun System, Sun system, Sun's System, Suns system, System, solar, Terran System, The Solar System, The solar system.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_System

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »