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Specific orbital energy

Index Specific orbital energy

In the gravitational two-body problem, the specific orbital energy \epsilon\,\! (or vis-viva energy) of two orbiting bodies is the constant sum of their mutual potential energy (\epsilon_p\,\!) and their total kinetic energy (\epsilon_k\,\!), divided by the reduced mass. [1]

30 relations: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Apsis, Characteristic energy, Delta-v, Drag (physics), Elliptic orbit, Escape velocity, Gravitational two-body problem, Gravity drag, Hyperbolic trajectory, International Space Station, Kinetic energy, Low Earth orbit, Milky Way, Orbital eccentricity, Orbital speed, Orbital state vectors, Orbiting body, Parabolic trajectory, Potential energy, Reduced mass, Relative angular momentum, Reston, Virginia, Semi-major and semi-minor axes, Specific relative angular momentum, Standard gravitational parameter, Thrust, Vis-viva equation, Voyager 1, 1,000,000,000.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) is a professional society for the field of aerospace engineering.

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Apsis

An apsis (ἁψίς; plural apsides, Greek: ἁψῖδες) is an extreme point in the orbit of an object.

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Characteristic energy

In astrodynamics, the characteristic energy (C_3) is a measure of the excess specific energy over that required to just barely escape from a massive body.

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Delta-v

Delta-v (literally "change in velocity"), symbolised as ∆v and pronounced delta-vee, as used in spacecraft flight dynamics, is a measure of the impulse that is needed to perform a maneuver such as launch from, or landing on a planet or moon, or in-space orbital maneuver.

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Drag (physics)

In fluid dynamics, drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid friction) is a force acting opposite to the relative motion of any object moving with respect to a surrounding fluid.

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Elliptic orbit

In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics, an elliptic orbit or elliptical orbit is a Kepler orbit with an eccentricity of less than 1; this includes the special case of a circular orbit, with eccentricity equal to 0.

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Escape velocity

In physics, escape velocity is the minimum speed needed for an object to escape from the gravitational influence of a massive body.

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Gravitational two-body problem

←For further relevant mathematical developments see also Two-body problem, also Kepler orbit, and Kepler problem, and Equation of the center – Analytical expansions The gravitational two-body problem concerns the motion of two point particles that interact only with each other, due to gravity.

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Gravity drag

In astrodynamics and rocketry, gravity drag (or gravity losses) is a measure of the loss in the net performance of a rocket while it is thrusting in a gravitational field.

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Hyperbolic trajectory

In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics, a hyperbolic trajectory is the trajectory of any object around a central body with more than enough speed to escape the central object's gravitational pull.

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International Space Station

The International Space Station (ISS) is a space station, or a habitable artificial satellite, in low Earth orbit.

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Kinetic energy

In physics, the kinetic energy of an object is the energy that it possesses due to its motion.

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Low Earth orbit

A low Earth orbit (LEO) is an orbit around Earth with an altitude of or less, and with an orbital period of between about 84 and 127 minutes.

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Milky Way

The Milky Way is the galaxy that contains our Solar System.

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Orbital eccentricity

The orbital eccentricity of an astronomical object is a parameter that determines the amount by which its orbit around another body deviates from a perfect circle.

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Orbital speed

In gravitationally bound systems, the orbital speed of an astronomical body or object (e.g. planet, moon, artificial satellite, spacecraft, or star) is the speed at which it orbits around either the barycenter or, if the object is much less massive than the largest body in the system, its speed relative to that largest body.

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Orbital state vectors

In astrodynamics and celestial dynamics, the orbital state vectors (sometimes state vectors) of an orbit are cartesian vectors of position (\mathbf) and velocity (\mathbf) that together with their time (epoch) (t\) uniquely determine the trajectory of the orbiting body in space.

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Orbiting body

In astrodynamics, an orbiting body (m_2) is a body that orbits a primary body (m_1).

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Parabolic trajectory

In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics a parabolic trajectory is a Kepler orbit with the eccentricity equal to 1.

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Potential energy

In physics, potential energy is the energy possessed by an object because of its position relative to other objects, stresses within itself, its electric charge, or other factors.

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Reduced mass

In physics, the reduced mass is the "effective" inertial mass appearing in the two-body problem of Newtonian mechanics.

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Relative angular momentum

In celestial mechanics, the relative angular momentum (\mathbf\,\!) of an orbiting body (m_2\,\!) relative to a central body (m_1\,\!) is the moment of (m_2\,\!)'s relative linear momentum: where.

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Reston, Virginia

Reston is one of the leading "New Town" planned communities in the United States.

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Semi-major and semi-minor axes

In geometry, the major axis of an ellipse is its longest diameter: a line segment that runs through the center and both foci, with ends at the widest points of the perimeter.

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Specific relative angular momentum

In celestial mechanics the specific relative angular momentum \vec plays a pivotal role in the analysis of the two-body problem.

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Standard gravitational parameter

In celestial mechanics, the standard gravitational parameter μ of a celestial body is the product of the gravitational constant G and the mass M of the body.

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Thrust

Thrust is a reaction force described quantitatively by Newton's third law.

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Vis-viva equation

In astrodynamics, the vis-viva equation, also referred to as orbital-energy-invariance law, is one of the equations that model the motion of orbiting bodies.

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Voyager 1

Voyager 1 is a space probe launched by NASA on September 5, 1977.

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1,000,000,000

1,000,000,000 (one billion, short scale; one thousand million or milliard, yard, long scale) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001.

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Redirects here:

Hyperbolic excess velocity, Orbital energy.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific_orbital_energy

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