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Sphinx

Index Sphinx

A sphinx (Σφίγξ, Boeotian: Φίξ, plural sphinxes or sphinges) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion. [1]

194 relations: A Greek–English Lexicon, Achaemenid Empire, Aeolic Greek, Aethiopia, Alabaster, Aladdin (1992 Disney film), Aladdin (Disney character), Alexander the Great, Amun, Ancient Egyptian deities, Anthropomorphism, Anubis, Anzû, Apostolic Palace, Apotropaic magic, Arabesque, Ares, Aschaffenburg, Asiatic lion, Assyria, Atalanta Fugiens, Atum, Aurignacian, Avatar, Avenue (landscape), Baroque, Bavaria, Belgium, Belvedere, Vienna, Bhima, Białystok, Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus), Bird, Branicki Palace, Białystok, Bronze Age, Brooklyn Museum, Capital city, Cavetto, Centaur, Ceto, Chimera (mythology), Chinthe, Chios, Chthonic, Cockatrice, Culture of Greece, Darius I, Delphi, Domus Aurea, Dragon, ..., Eagle, Echidna (mythology), Egyptian Museum, Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt, Eritrea, Europe, Freemasonry, Göbekli Tepe, Giza, Giza pyramid complex, Gods of Egypt (film), Gopuram, Granite, Great Pyramid of Giza, Great Sphinx of Giza, Greece, Greek language, Greek mythology, Griffin, Grotesque, Gustave Moreau, Harpy, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Hatshepsut, Hawk, Hellenistic art, Hera, Herodotus, Hesiod, Hetepheres II, Hieracosphinx, Himavanta, Hinduism, Horus, Human, Hybrid beasts in folklore, India, Jean Cocteau, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Jean-François Champollion, Kanyakumari district, Khafra, Khepri, Komainu, Korea, Lamassu, Legendary creature, Life (magazine), Liminality, Lion, Lion-man, List of Disney's Aladdin characters, List of hybrid creatures in folklore, Loggia, Madrid, Mahabharata, Mannerism, Manticore, Memphis, Egypt, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Michael Maier, Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi, Museo Egizio, Myanmar, Nabeul Museum, Narasimha, Neoclassical architecture, Nero, Nevalı Çori, Nian, Nile, Nue, Oedipus, Ogre, Orderliness, Orthrus, Palace of Queluz, Pantheon (religion), Pearl, Pegasus, Philosopher's stone, Phoenix (mythology), Pierre Grimal, Pixiu, Potsdam, Proper noun, Puranas, Qilin, Ra, Raphael, Régence, Renaissance, Riddle, Robert Adam, Rococo, Romanticism, Royal Palace of La Granja de San Ildefonso, Ruff (clothing), Saint Petersburg, Sanctum Sanctorum, Sanssouci Park, School of Fontainebleau, Sekhmet, Set (deity), Shaivism, Sharabha, Sheep, Shisa, Shiva, Simurgh, Sirin, Snake, Snow Lion, Sphinx of Memphis, Sphinx of Naxos, Squatting position, Sri Lanka, Srivari Brahmotsavam, Statue, Stele, Stupa, Susa, Symbolism (arts), Thailand, The Battle of the Labyrinth, The Infernal Machine (play), Thebes, Egypt, Thebes, Greece, Theogony, Thoth, Thutmose IV, Tomb, Tunisia, Turin, Turkey, Twelve Olympians, Typhon, Vahana, Vienna, Vishnu, W. W. Norton & Company, Xiezhi, Yali (mythology), Ziz. Expand index (144 more) »

A Greek–English Lexicon

A Greek–English Lexicon, often referred to as Liddell & Scott, Liddell–Scott–Jones, or LSJ, is a standard lexicographical work of the Ancient Greek language.

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Achaemenid Empire

The Achaemenid Empire, also called the First Persian Empire, was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great.

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Aeolic Greek

In linguistics, Aeolic Greek (also Aeolian, Lesbian or Lesbic dialect) is the set of dialects of Ancient Greek spoken mainly in Boeotia (a region in Central Greece); Thessaly, in the Aegean island of Lesbos; and the Greek colonies of Aeolis in Anatolia and adjoining islands.

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Aethiopia

Ancient Aethiopia (Αἰθιοπία Aithiopia) first appears as a geographical term in classical documents in reference to the upper Nile region, as well as all certain areas south of the Sahara desert and south of the Atlantic Ocean.

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Alabaster

Alabaster is a mineral or rock that is soft, often used for carving, and is processed for plaster powder.

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Aladdin (1992 Disney film)

Aladdin is a 1992 American animated musical romantic comedy fantasy adventure film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures.

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Aladdin (Disney character)

Aladdin is a fictional character and the titular protagonist of Walt Disney Pictures's animated feature film Aladdin (1992).

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Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Aléxandros ho Mégas), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty.

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Amun

Amun (also Amon, Ammon, Amen; Greek Ἄμμων Ámmōn, Ἅμμων Hámmōn) was a major ancient Egyptian deity who appears as a member of the Hermopolitan ogdoad.

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Ancient Egyptian deities

Ancient Egyptian deities are the gods and goddesses worshipped in ancient Egypt.

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Anthropomorphism

Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.

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Anubis

Anubis (Ἄνουβις, Egyptian: jnpw, Coptic: Anoup) is the Greek name of a god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion, usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head.

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Anzû

Anzû, also known as dZû and Imdugud (Sumerian: AN.IM.DUGUDMUŠEN), is a lesser divinity or monster in several Mesopotamian religions.

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Apostolic Palace

The Apostolic Palace (Palatium Apostolicum; Palazzo Apostolico) is the official residence of the Roman Catholic Pope and Bishop of Rome, which is located in Vatican City.

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Apotropaic magic

Apotropaic magic (from Greek "to ward off" from "away" and "to turn") is a type of magic intended to turn away harm or evil influences, as in deflecting misfortune or averting the evil eye.

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Arabesque

The arabesque is a form of artistic decoration consisting of "surface decorations based on rhythmic linear patterns of scrolling and interlacing foliage, tendrils" or plain lines, often combined with other elements.

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Ares

Ares (Ἄρης, Áres) is the Greek god of war.

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Aschaffenburg

Aschaffenburg is a town in northwest Bavaria, Germany.

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Asiatic lion

The Asiatic lion (Panthera leo leo) is a lion population in Gujarat, India.

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Assyria

Assyria, also called the Assyrian Empire, was a major Semitic speaking Mesopotamian kingdom and empire of the ancient Near East and the Levant.

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Atalanta Fugiens

Atalanta Fugiens or Atalanta Fleeing is an emblem book by Michael Maier (1568–1622), published by Johann Theodor de Bry in Oppenheim in 1617 (2nd edition 1618).

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Atum

Atum (Egyptian: jtm(w) or tm(w); Coptic Atoum), sometimes rendered as Atem or Tem, is an important deity in Egyptian mythology.

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Aurignacian

The Aurignacian is an archaeological tradition of the Upper Palaeolithic associated with European early modern humans (EEMH).

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Avatar

An avatar (Sanskrit: अवतार, IAST), a concept in Hinduism that means "descent", refers to the material appearance or incarnation of a deity on earth.

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Avenue (landscape)

In landscaping, an avenue, or allée, is traditionally a straight path or road with a line of trees or large shrubs running along each side, which is used, as its Latin source venire ("to come") indicates, to emphasize the "coming to," or arrival at a landscape or architectural feature.

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Baroque

The Baroque is a highly ornate and often extravagant style of architecture, art and music that flourished in Europe from the early 17th until the late 18th century.

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Bavaria

Bavaria (Bavarian and Bayern), officially the Free State of Bavaria (Freistaat Bayern), is a landlocked federal state of Germany, occupying its southeastern corner.

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Belgium

Belgium, officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a country in Western Europe bordered by France, the Netherlands, Germany and Luxembourg.

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Belvedere, Vienna

The Belvedere is a historic building complex in Vienna, Austria, consisting of two Baroque palaces (the Upper and Lower Belvedere), the Orangery, and the Palace Stables.

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Bhima

In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Bhima or Bhimasena (Sanskrit: भीम) is the second of the Pandavas.

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Białystok

Białystok (Bielastok, Balstogė, Belostok, Byalistok) is the largest city in northeastern Poland and the capital of the Podlaskie Voivodeship.

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Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)

The Bibliotheca (Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the Bibliotheca of Pseudo-Apollodorus, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends, arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD.

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Bird

Birds, also known as Aves, are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton.

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Branicki Palace, Białystok

Branicki Palace (Pałac Branickich) is a historical edifice in Białystok, Poland.

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Bronze Age

The Bronze Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, and in some areas proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization.

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Brooklyn Museum

The Brooklyn Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn.

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Capital city

A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government.

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Cavetto

A cavetto is a concave moulding with a regular curved profile that is part of a circle, widely used in architecture as well as furniture, picture frames, metalwork and other decorative arts.

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Centaur

A centaur (Κένταυρος, Kéntauros), or occasionally hippocentaur, is a mythological creature with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse.

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Ceto

Ceto (Κητώ, Kētō, "sea monster"), is a primordial sea goddess in Greek mythology, the daughter of Gaia and Pontus.

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Chimera (mythology)

The Chimera (or, also Chimaera (Chimæra); Greek: Χίμαιρα, Chímaira "she-goat") was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal.

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Chinthe

The Chinthe (ဇါဒိသိုၚ်,; သၢင်ႇသီႈ) is a leogryph (lion-like creature) that is often seen at the entrances of pagodas and temples in Burma, Cambodia, Laos and is related to the Singha (สิงห์) in Thailand and the Simha (සිංහ) in Sri Lanka as well as to other similar lion statues in other parts of Asia.

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Chios

Chios (Χίος, Khíos) is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea, off the Anatolian coast.

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Chthonic

Chthonic (from translit, "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών italic "earth") literally means "subterranean", but the word in English describes deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in Ancient Greek religion.

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Cockatrice

A cockatrice is a mythical beast, essentially a two-legged dragon or serpent-like creature with a rooster's head.

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Culture of Greece

The culture of Greece has evolved over thousands of years, beginning in Mycenaean Greece, continuing most notably into Classical Greece, through the influence of the Roman Empire and its successor the Byzantine Empire.

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Darius I

Darius I (Old Persian: Dārayava(h)uš, New Persian: rtl Dāryuš;; c. 550–486 BCE) was the fourth king of the Persian Achaemenid Empire.

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Delphi

Delphi is famous as the ancient sanctuary that grew rich as the seat of Pythia, the oracle who was consulted about important decisions throughout the ancient classical world.

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Domus Aurea

The Domus Aurea (Latin, "Golden House") was a vast landscaped palace built by the Emperor Nero in the heart of ancient Rome after the great fire in 64 AD had destroyed a large part of the city and the aristocratic villas on the Palatine Hill.

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Dragon

A dragon is a large, serpent-like legendary creature that appears in the folklore of many cultures around the world.

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Eagle

Eagle is the common name for many large birds of prey of the family Accipitridae.

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Echidna (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Echidna (Ἔχιδνα., "She-Viper") was a monster, half-woman and half-snake, who lived alone in a cave.

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Egyptian Museum

The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum or Museum of Cairo, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to an extensive collection of ancient Egyptian antiquities.

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Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt

The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XVIII, alternatively 18th Dynasty or Dynasty 18) is classified as the first Dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom period, lasting from 1549/1550 BC to 1292 BC.

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Eritrea

Eritrea (ኤርትራ), officially the State of Eritrea, is a country in the Horn of Africa, with its capital at Asmara.

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Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

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Freemasonry

Freemasonry or Masonry consists of fraternal organisations that trace their origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of stonemasons and their interaction with authorities and clients.

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Göbekli Tepe

Göbekli Tepe, Turkish for "Potbelly Hill", is an archaeological site in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, approximately northeast of the city of Şanlıurfa.

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Giza

Giza (sometimes spelled Gizah or Jizah; الجيزة; ϯⲡⲉⲣⲥⲏⲥ, ⲅⲓⲍⲁ) is the third-largest city in Egypt and the capital of the Giza Governorate.

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Giza pyramid complex

The Giza pyramid complex (أهرامات الجيزة,, "pyramids of Giza") is an archaeological site on the Giza Plateau, on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt.

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Gods of Egypt (film)

Gods of Egypt is a 2016 English-language fantasy film directed by Alex Proyas and portraying ancient Egyptian deities.

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Gopuram

A Gopuram or gopura (गोपुरम्) is a monumental gatehouse tower, usually ornate, at the entrance of a Hindu temple, in the Dravidian architecture of the Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, Karnataka, and Telangana states of Southern India.

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Granite

Granite is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture.

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Great Pyramid of Giza

The Great Pyramid of Giza (also known as the Pyramid of Khufu or the Pyramid of Cheops) is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering what is now El Giza, Egypt.

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Great Sphinx of Giza

The Great Sphinx of Giza (translit,, The Terrifying One; literally: Father of Dread), commonly referred to as the Sphinx of Giza or just the Sphinx, is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature with the body of a lion and the head of a human.

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Greece

No description.

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Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

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Greek mythology

Greek mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.

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Griffin

The griffin, griffon, or gryphon (Greek: γρύφων, grýphōn, or γρύπων, grýpōn, early form γρύψ, grýps; gryphus) is a legendary creature with the body, tail, and back legs of a lion; the head and wings of an eagle; and an eagle's talons as its front feet.

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Grotesque

Since at least the 18th century (in French and German as well as English), grotesque (or grottoesque) has come to be used as a general adjective for the strange, mysterious, magnificent, fantastic, hideous, ugly, incongruous, unpleasant, or disgusting, and thus is often used to describe weird shapes and distorted forms such as Halloween masks.

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Gustave Moreau

Gustave Moreau (6 April 1826 – 18 April 1898) was a major figure in French Symbolist painting whose main emphasis was the illustration of biblical and mythological figures.

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Harpy

In Greek mythology and Roman mythology, a harpy (plural harpies,, harpyia,; harpȳia) was a half-human and half-bird personification of storm winds, in Homeric poems.

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a fantasy book written by British author J. K. Rowling and the fourth novel in the Harry Potter series.

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Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut (also Hatchepsut; Egyptian: ḥꜣt-šps.wt "Foremost of Noble Ladies"; 1507–1458 BCE) was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt.

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Hawk

Hawks are a group of medium-sized diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae.

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Hellenistic art

Hellenistic art is the art of the period in classical antiquity generally taken to begin with the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and end with the conquest of the Greek world by the Romans, a process well underway by 146 BCE, when the Greek mainland was taken, and essentially ending in 31 BCE with the conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt following the Battle of Actium.

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Hera

Hera (Ἥρᾱ, Hērā; Ἥρη, Hērē in Ionic and Homeric Greek) is the goddess of women, marriage, family, and childbirth in Ancient Greek religion and myth, one of the Twelve Olympians and the sister-wife of Zeus.

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Herodotus

Herodotus (Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (484– 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides.

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Hesiod

Hesiod (or; Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.

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Hetepheres II

Hetepheres II was a Queen of Ancient Egypt during the 4th dynasty.

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Hieracosphinx

The hieracosphinx is a mythical beast found in Egyptian sculpture and European heraldry.

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Himavanta

The Himavanta (หิมพานต์) is a legendary forest which surrounds the base of Mount Meru in Hindu mythology.

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Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or a way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent.

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Horus

Horus is one of the most significant ancient Egyptian deities.

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Human

Humans (taxonomically Homo sapiens) are the only extant members of the subtribe Hominina.

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Hybrid beasts in folklore

Hybrid beasts appear in the folklore of a variety of cultures as legendary creatures.

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India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

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Jean Cocteau

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, writer, designer, playwright, artist and filmmaker.

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Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (29 August 1780 – 14 January 1867) was a French Neoclassical painter.

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Jean-François Champollion

Jean-François Champollion (Champollion le jeune; 23 December 17904 March 1832) was a French scholar, philologist and orientalist, known primarily as the decipherer of Egyptian hieroglyphs and a founding figure in the field of Egyptology.

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Kanyakumari district

Kanyakumari district is the southernmost district in Tamil Nadu state and mainland India.

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Khafra

Khafra (also read as Khafre, Khefren and Χεφρήν Chephren) was an ancient Egyptian king (pharaoh) of the 4th dynasty during the Old Kingdom.

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Khepri

Khepri (Egyptian: ḫprj, also transliterated Khepera, Kheper, Khepra, Chepri) is a god in the ancient Egyptian religion.

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Komainu

, often called lion-dogs in English, are statue pairs of lion-like creatures either guarding the entrance or the inner shrine of many Japanese Shinto shrines or kept inside the inner shrine itself, where they are not visible to the public.

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Korea

Korea is a region in East Asia; since 1945 it has been divided into two distinctive sovereign states: North Korea and South Korea.

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Lamassu

A lamassu (Cuneiform:,; Sumerian: lammař; Akkadian: lamassu; sometimes called a lamassus) is an Assyrian protective deity, often depicted as having a human's head, a body of a bull or a lion, and bird's wings.

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Legendary creature

A legendary, mythical, or mythological creature, traditionally called a fabulous beast or fabulous creature, is a fictitious, imaginary and often supernatural animal, often a hybrid, sometimes part human, whose existence has not or cannot be proved and that is described in folklore or fiction but also in historical accounts before history became a science.

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Life (magazine)

Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000.

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Liminality

In anthropology, liminality (from the Latin word līmen, meaning "a threshold") is the quality of ambiguity or disorientation that occurs in the middle stage of rites, when participants no longer hold their preritual status but have not yet begun the transition to the status they will hold when the rite is complete.

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Lion

The lion (Panthera leo) is a species in the cat family (Felidae).

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Lion-man

The Löwenmensch figurine or Lion-man of the Hohlenstein-Stadel is a prehistoric ivory sculpture that was discovered in the Hohlenstein-Stadel, a German cave in 1939.

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List of Disney's Aladdin characters

Disney's Aladdin franchise features an extensive cast of fictional characters.

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List of hybrid creatures in folklore

The following is a list of hybrid entities from the folklore record grouped morphologically based on their constituent species.

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Loggia

A loggia is an architectural feature which is a covered exterior gallery or corridor usually on an upper level, or sometimes ground level.

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Madrid

Madrid is the capital of Spain and the largest municipality in both the Community of Madrid and Spain as a whole.

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Mahabharata

The Mahābhārata (महाभारतम्) is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.

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Mannerism

Mannerism, also known as Late Renaissance, is a style in European art that emerged in the later years of the Italian High Renaissance around 1520 and lasted until about the end of the 16th century in Italy, when the Baroque style began to replace it.

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Manticore

The manticore (Early Middle Persian Mardyakhor) is a Persian legendary creature similar to the Egyptian sphinx.

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Memphis, Egypt

Memphis (مَنْف; ⲙⲉⲙϥⲓ; Μέμφις) was the ancient capital of Aneb-Hetch, the first nome of Lower Egypt.

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Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York, colloquially "the Met", is the largest art museum in the United States.

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Michael Maier

Michael Maier (Michael Maierus; 1568–1622) was a German physician and counsellor to Rudolf II Habsburg.

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Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi

Abū Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyyā al-Rāzī (Abūbakr Mohammad-e Zakariyyā-ye Rāzī, also known by his Latinized name Rhazes or Rasis) (854–925 CE), was a Persian polymath, physician, alchemist, philosopher, and important figure in the history of medicine.

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Museo Egizio

The Museo Egizio is an archaeological museum in Turin, Piedmont, Italy, specialising in Egyptian archaeology and anthropology.

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Myanmar

Myanmar, officially the Republic of the Union of Myanmar and also known as Burma, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia.

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Nabeul Museum

Nabeul Museum (Arabic: متحف نابل) is an archaeological museum located in Nabeul, Tunisia.

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Narasimha

Narasimha (Sanskrit: नरसिंह IAST: Narasiṃha, lit. man-lion) is an avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu, one who incarnates in the form of part lion and part man to destroy an evil, end religious persecution and calamity on Earth, thereby restoring Dharma.

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Neoclassical architecture

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century.

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Nero

Nero (Latin: Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus; 15 December 37 – 9 June 68 AD) was the last Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

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Nevalı Çori

Nevalı Çori (Nevali Çori) was an early Neolithic settlement on the middle Euphrates, in Şanlıurfa Province, Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.

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Nian

According to Chinese mythology, a Nian is a beast that lives under the sea or in the mountains.

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Nile

The Nile River (النيل, Egyptian Arabic en-Nīl, Standard Arabic an-Nīl; ⲫⲓⲁⲣⲱ, P(h)iaro; Ancient Egyptian: Ḥ'pī and Jtrw; Biblical Hebrew:, Ha-Ye'or or, Ha-Shiḥor) is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, and is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world, though some sources cite the Amazon River as the longest.

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Nue

The Nue (鵺, 鵼, 恠鳥, or 奴延鳥) is a legendary Japanese yōkai or mononoke.

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Oedipus

Oedipus (Οἰδίπους Oidípous meaning "swollen foot") was a mythical Greek king of Thebes.

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Ogre

An ogre (feminine: "ogress") is a legendary monster usually depicted as a large, hideous, man-like being that eats ordinary human beings, especially infants and children.

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Orderliness

Orderliness is associated with other qualities such as cleanliness and diligence, and the desire for order and symmetry, and is generally considered to be a desirable quality.

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Orthrus

In Greek mythology, Orthrus (Ὄρθρος, Orthros) or Orthus (Ὄρθος, Orthos) was, according to the mythographer Apollodorus, a two-headed dog who guarded Geryon's cattle and was killed by Heracles.

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Palace of Queluz

The Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz) is a Portuguese 18th-century palace located at Queluz, a freguesia of the modern-day Sintra Municipality, in the Lisbon District.

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Pantheon (religion)

A pantheon (from Greek πάνθεον pantheon, literally "(a temple) of all gods", "of or common to all gods" from πᾶν pan- "all" and θεός theos "god") is the particular set of all gods of any polytheistic religion, mythology, or tradition.

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Pearl

A pearl is a hard glistening object produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk or another animal, such as a conulariid.

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Pegasus

Pegasus (Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Pegasus, Pegasos) is a mythical winged divine stallion, and one of the most recognized creatures in Greek mythology.

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Philosopher's stone

The philosopher's stone, or stone of the philosophers (lapis philosophorum) is a legendary alchemical substance capable of turning base metals such as mercury into gold (from the Greek χρυσός khrusos, "gold", and ποιεῖν poiēin, "to make") or silver.

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Phoenix (mythology)

In Greek mythology, a phoenix (φοῖνιξ, phoînix) is a long-lived bird that cyclically regenerates or is otherwise born again.

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Pierre Grimal

Pierre Grimal (November 21, 1912, Paris – October 11, 1996, Paris) was a French historian, classicist and Latinist.

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Pixiu

Pixiu, is a Chinese mythical hybrid creature, commonly, but incorrectly referred to in the West by the Greek word "chimera", and considered a powerful protector of practitioners of Feng Shui.

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Potsdam

Potsdam is the capital and largest city of the German federal state of Brandenburg.

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Proper noun

A proper noun is a noun that in its primary application refers to a unique entity, such as London, Jupiter, Sarah, or Microsoft, as distinguished from a common noun, which usually refers to a class of entities (city, planet, person, corporation), or non-unique instances of a specific class (a city, another planet, these persons, our corporation).

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Puranas

The Puranas (singular: पुराण), are ancient Hindu texts eulogizing various deities, primarily the divine Trimurti God in Hinduism through divine stories.

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Qilin

The qilin is a mythical hooved chimerical creature known in Chinese and other East Asian cultures, said to appear with the imminent arrival or passing of a sage or illustrious ruler.

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Ra

Ra (rꜥ or rˤ; also transliterated rˤw; cuneiform: ri-a or ri-ia) or Re (ⲣⲏ, Rē) is the ancient Egyptian sun god.

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Raphael

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (March 28 or April 6, 1483April 6, 1520), known as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance.

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Régence

The Régence (Regency) was the period in French history between 1715 and 1723, when King Louis XV was a minor and the land was governed by Philippe d'Orléans, a nephew of Louis XIV of France, as prince regent.

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Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

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Riddle

A riddle is a statement or question or phrase having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved.

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Robert Adam

Robert Adam (3 July 1728 – 3 March 1792) was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer.

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Rococo

Rococo, less commonly roccoco, or "Late Baroque", was an exuberantly decorative 18th-century European style which was the final expression of the baroque movement.

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Romanticism

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850.

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Royal Palace of La Granja de San Ildefonso

The Royal Palace of La Granja de San Ildefonso (Spanish: Palacio Real de La Granja de San Ildefonso), known as La Granja, is an early 18th-century palace in the small town of San Ildefonso, located in the hills near Segovia and north of Madrid, within the Province of Segovia in central Spain.

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Ruff (clothing)

A ruff is an item of clothing worn in Western Europe from the mid-sixteenth century to the mid-seventeenth century.

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Saint Petersburg

Saint Petersburg (p) is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with 5 million inhabitants in 2012, part of the Saint Petersburg agglomeration with a population of 6.2 million (2015).

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Sanctum Sanctorum

The Sanctum Sanctorum is a fictional building appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics and is the residence of Doctor Strange.

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Sanssouci Park

Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany.

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School of Fontainebleau

The Ecole de Fontainebleau (c.1530–c.1610) refers to two periods of artistic production in France during the late Renaissance centered on the royal Château de Fontainebleau, that were crucial in forming the French version of Northern Mannerism.

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Sekhmet

In Egyptian mythology, Sekhmet (or Sachmis, also spelled Sakhmet, Sekhet, or Sakhet, among other spellings, is a warrior goddess as well as goddess of healing. She is depicted as a lioness, the fiercest hunter known to the Egyptians. It was said that her breath formed the desert. She was seen as the protector of the pharaohs and led them in warfare. Her cult was so dominant in the culture that when the first pharaoh of the twelfth dynasty, Amenemhat I, moved the capital of Egypt to Itjtawy, the centre for her cult was moved as well. Religion, the royal lineage, and the authority to govern were intrinsically interwoven in ancient Egypt during its approximately three millennia of existence. Sekhmet is also a solar deity, sometimes called the daughter of Ra and often associated with the goddesses Hathor and Bast. She bears the Solar disk and the uraeus which associates her with Wadjet and royalty. With these associations she can be construed as being a divine arbiter of Ma'at ("justice" or "order") in the Judgment Hall of Osiris, associating her with the Wadjet (later the Eye of Ra), and connecting her with Tefnut as well.

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Set (deity)

Set or Seth (Egyptian: stẖ; also transliterated Setesh, Sutekh, Setekh, or Suty) is a god of the desert, storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion.

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Shaivism

Shaivism (Śaivam) (Devanagari: शैव संप्रदाय) (Bengali: শৈব) (Tamil: சைவம்) (Telugu: శైవ సాంప్రదాయం) (Kannada:ಶೈವ ಸಂಪ್ರದಾಯ) is one of the major traditions within Hinduism that reveres Shiva as the Supreme Being.

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Sharabha

Sharabha (शरभ,, ಶರಭ, Telugu: శరభ) or Sarabha is a part-lion and part-bird beast in Hindu mythology, who, according to Sanskrit literature, is eight-legged and more powerful than a lion or an elephant, possessing the ability to clear a valley in one jump.

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Sheep

Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) are quadrupedal, ruminant mammal typically kept as livestock.

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Shisa

is a traditional Ryukyuan cultural artifact and decoration, often seen in similar pairs, resembling a cross between a lion and a dog, from Okinawan mythology.

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Shiva

Shiva (Sanskrit: शिव, IAST: Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism.

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Simurgh

--> --> Simurgh (سيمرغ), also spelled simorgh, simorg, simurg, simoorg, simorq or simourv, is a benevolent, mythical bird in Iranian mythology and literature.

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Sirin

Sirin is a mythological creature of Russian legends, with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird (usually an owl).

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Snake

Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes.

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Snow Lion

The Snow Lion, sometimes also Snowlion, is a celestial animal of Tibet.

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Sphinx of Memphis

The Sphinx of Memphis is a stone sphinx located near the remains of Memphis, Egypt.

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Sphinx of Naxos

The Sphinx of Naxos, also Sphinx of the Naxians, now in the Archaeological Museum of Delphi, is a colossal 2.22 meter tall marble statue of a sphinx, a mythical creature with the head of a woman, the chest and wings composed of the impressive feathers of a prey bird turned upward, and the body of a lioness.

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Squatting position

Squatting is a posture where the weight of the body is on the feet (as with standing) but the knees and hips are bent.

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Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka (Sinhala: ශ්‍රී ලංකා; Tamil: இலங்கை Ilaṅkai), officially the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, is an island country in South Asia, located in the Indian Ocean to the southwest of the Bay of Bengal and to the southeast of the Arabian Sea.

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Srivari Brahmotsavam

Sri Venkateswara Swami vari Brahmotsavam or Srivari Brahmotsavam is the most important annual fête celebrated at Sri Venkateswara Temple in Tirumala-Tirupati of Chittoor District in Andhra Pradesh, India.

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Statue

A statue is a sculpture, representing one or more people or animals (including abstract concepts allegorically represented as people or animals), free-standing (as opposed to a relief) and normally full-length (as opposed to a bust) and at least close to life-size, or larger.

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Stele

A steleAnglicized plural steles; Greek plural stelai, from Greek στήλη, stēlē.

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Stupa

A stupa (Sanskrit: "heap") is a mound-like or hemispherical structure containing relics (śarīra - typically the remains of Buddhist monks or nuns) that is used as a place of meditation.

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Susa

Susa (fa Šuš;; שׁוּשָׁן Šušān; Greek: Σοῦσα; ܫܘܫ Šuš; Old Persian Çūšā) was an ancient city of the Proto-Elamite, Elamite, First Persian Empire, Seleucid, Parthian, and Sasanian empires of Iran, and one of the most important cities of the Ancient Near East.

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Symbolism (arts)

Symbolism was a late nineteenth-century art movement of French, Russian and Belgian origin in poetry and other arts.

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Thailand

Thailand, officially the Kingdom of Thailand and formerly known as Siam, is a unitary state at the center of the Southeast Asian Indochinese peninsula composed of 76 provinces.

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The Battle of the Labyrinth

The Battle of the Labyrinth is an American fantasy-adventure novel based on Greek mythology written by Rick Riordan.

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The Infernal Machine (play)

The Infernal Machine, or La Machine Infernale is a French play by the dramatist Jean Cocteau, based on the ancient Greek myth of Oedipus.

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Thebes, Egypt

Thebes (Θῆβαι, Thēbai), known to the ancient Egyptians as Waset, was an ancient Egyptian city located east of the Nile about south of the Mediterranean.

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Thebes, Greece

Thebes (Θῆβαι, Thēbai,;. Θήβα, Thíva) is a city in Boeotia, central Greece.

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Theogony

The Theogony (Θεογονία, Theogonía,, i.e. "the genealogy or birth of the gods") is a poem by Hesiod (8th – 7th century BC) describing the origins and genealogies of the Greek gods, composed c. 700 BC.

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Thoth

Thoth (from Greek Θώθ; derived from Egyptian ḏḥw.ty) is one of the deities of the Egyptian pantheon.

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Thutmose IV

Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV, Thothmes in older history works in Latinized Greek; Ancient Egyptian: /ḏḥwty.ms/ Djehutymes, meaning "Thoth is born") was the 8th Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt, who ruled in approximately the 14th century BC.

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Tomb

A tomb (from τύμβος tumbos) is a repository for the remains of the dead.

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Tunisia

Tunisia (تونس; Berber: Tunes, ⵜⵓⵏⴻⵙ; Tunisie), officially the Republic of Tunisia, (الجمهورية التونسية) is a sovereign state in Northwest Africa, covering. Its northernmost point, Cape Angela, is the northernmost point on the African continent. It is bordered by Algeria to the west and southwest, Libya to the southeast, and the Mediterranean Sea to the north and east. Tunisia's population was estimated to be just under 11.93 million in 2016. Tunisia's name is derived from its capital city, Tunis, which is located on its northeast coast. Geographically, Tunisia contains the eastern end of the Atlas Mountains, and the northern reaches of the Sahara desert. Much of the rest of the country's land is fertile soil. Its of coastline include the African conjunction of the western and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Basin and, by means of the Sicilian Strait and Sardinian Channel, feature the African mainland's second and third nearest points to Europe after Gibraltar. Tunisia is a unitary semi-presidential representative democratic republic. It is considered to be the only full democracy in the Arab World. It has a high human development index. It has an association agreement with the European Union; is a member of La Francophonie, the Union for the Mediterranean, the Arab Maghreb Union, the Arab League, the OIC, the Greater Arab Free Trade Area, the Community of Sahel-Saharan States, the African Union, the Non-Aligned Movement, the Group of 77; and has obtained the status of major non-NATO ally of the United States. In addition, Tunisia is also a member state of the United Nations and a state party to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Close relations with Europe in particular with France and with Italy have been forged through economic cooperation, privatisation and industrial modernization. In ancient times, Tunisia was primarily inhabited by Berbers. Phoenician immigration began in the 12th century BC; these immigrants founded Carthage. A major mercantile power and a military rival of the Roman Republic, Carthage was defeated by the Romans in 146 BC. The Romans, who would occupy Tunisia for most of the next eight hundred years, introduced Christianity and left architectural legacies like the El Djem amphitheater. After several attempts starting in 647, the Muslims conquered the whole of Tunisia by 697, followed by the Ottoman Empire between 1534 and 1574. The Ottomans held sway for over three hundred years. The French colonization of Tunisia occurred in 1881. Tunisia gained independence with Habib Bourguiba and declared the Tunisian Republic in 1957. In 2011, the Tunisian Revolution resulted in the overthrow of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, followed by parliamentary elections. The country voted for parliament again on 26 October 2014, and for President on 23 November 2014.

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Turin

Turin (Torino; Turin) is a city and an important business and cultural centre in northern Italy.

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Turkey

Turkey (Türkiye), officially the Republic of Turkey (Türkiye Cumhuriyeti), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.

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Twelve Olympians

relief (1st century BCendash1st century AD) depicting the twelve Olympians carrying their attributes in procession; from left to right, Hestia (scepter), Hermes (winged cap and staff), Aphrodite (veiled), Ares (helmet and spear), Demeter (scepter and wheat sheaf), Hephaestus (staff), Hera (scepter), Poseidon (trident), Athena (owl and helmet), Zeus (thunderbolt and staff), Artemis (bow and quiver), Apollo (lyre), from the Walters Art Museum.Walters Art Museum, http://art.thewalters.org/detail/38764 accession number 23.40. In ancient Greek religion and mythology, the twelve Olympians are the major deities of the Greek pantheon, commonly considered to be Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Aphrodite, Hephaestus, Hermes, and either Hestia or Dionysus.

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Typhon

Typhon (Τυφῶν, Tuphōn), also Typhoeus (Τυφωεύς, Tuphōeus), Typhaon (Τυφάων, Tuphaōn) or Typhos (Τυφώς, Tuphōs), was a monstrous serpentine giant and the most deadly creature in Greek mythology.

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Vahana

Vahana (वाहन,, literally "that which carries, that which pulls") denotes the being, typically an animal or mythical entity, a particular Hindu deity is said to use as a vehicle.

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Vienna

Vienna (Wien) is the federal capital and largest city of Austria and one of the nine states of Austria.

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Vishnu

Vishnu (Sanskrit: विष्णु, IAST) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and the Supreme Being in its Vaishnavism tradition.

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W. W. Norton & Company

W.

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Xiezhi

Xiezhi (Chinese: 獬豸) or Haetae (Korean: 해태, often spelled Haitai or Haechi) is a legendary creature in Chinese and Korean mythology.

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Yali (mythology)

Yali, Yāḷi; also known as Vyala or Vidala in Sanskrit) is a mythical creature seen in many Hindu temples, often sculpted onto the pillars. It may be portrayed as part lion, part elephant and part horse, and in similar shapes. Also, it has been sometimes described as a leogryph (part lion and part griffin), with some bird-like features. Yali is a motif in Indian art and it has been widely used in south Indian sculpture, notably by Nayak Rulers. Descriptions of and references to yalis are very old, but they became prominent in south Indian sculpture in the 16th century. Yalis are believed to be more powerful than the lion/Tiger or the elephant.

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Ziz

The Ziz (Hebrew) is a giant griffin-like bird in Jewish mythology, said to be large enough to be able to block out the sun with its wingspan.

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Androsphinx, Criosphinx, Criosphinxes, Horem Akhet, Horem-Akhet, Horem-akhet, Riddle of the Sphinx, Riddle of the sphinx, SPHINX OF MODERN CHIOS, Sphinges, Sphinx (Egypt), Sphinx (fantasy), Sphinx (iconic image), Sphinx of Modern Chios, Sphinx' riddle, Sphinxes, The Riddle of the Sphinx, The Sphynx, The World Sphinxes, The sphinx.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphinx

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