Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 
New! Save your stuff! » Create account

St Marylebone Parish Church

+ Save concept Saved concepts

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. [1]

74 relations: A Rake's Progress, Anglicanism, Ash Wednesday, Benjamin West, Bentinck family, Bishop of London, Box pew, British Institute of Organ Studies, Brookwood Cemetery, Canterbury Cathedral, Cecilia Bowes-Lyon, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Chapel of ease, Charles Dickens, Charles Wesley, Choir, Church of England, Diocese of London, Dombey and Son, Dorothy Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, Douglas Edward Hopkins, Dublin, Earl of Portland, Elizabeth Ann Linley, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Elizabeth II, Emma, Lady Hamilton, Francis Bacon, Francis Perceval Eliot, Good Friday, Governor-General of India, Horatia Nelson, Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, Internet Movie Database, John Harley (bishop, died 1788), John Stainer, John the Evangelist, Lieutenant-general (United Kingdom), Liturgical east and west, London, Lord Byron, Lord William Bentinck, Marble Arch, Marylebone, Marylebone High Street, Michael Howard (musician), Neoclassicism, Oratorio, Oxford Street, Pantheon, Rome, Peterborough Cathedral, ..., Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Regent's Park, Reredos, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Rieger Orgelbau, Robert Browning, Rome, Samuel Wesley, St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, St Peter, Vere Street, Surrey, The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1957 film), The Crucifixion (Stainer), Thomas Hardwick, Thomas Harris (architect), United Kingdom, William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland, William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, William Chambers (architect), William Ewart Gladstone, William Hamilton (diplomat), William Hogarth, World War II, 1957 in film. Expand index (24 more) »

A Rake's Progress is a series of eight paintings by 18th-century English artist William Hogarth.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and A Rake's Progress · See more »

Anglicanism is a tradition within Christianity comprising the Church of England and churches which are historically tied to it or hold similar beliefs, worship practices and church structures.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Anglicanism · See more »

Ash Wednesday, a day of fasting, is the first day of Lent in Western Christianity.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Ash Wednesday · See more »

Benjamin West (October 10, 1738 – March 11, 1820) was an Anglo-American painter of historical scenes around and after the time of the American War of Independence.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Benjamin West · See more »

The Bentinck family is a prominent family belonging to both Dutch and British nobility.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Bentinck family · See more »

The Bishop of London is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Bishop of London · See more »

Box pew is a type of church pew that is encased in panelling and was prevalent in England and other Protestant countries from the 16th to early 19th century.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Box pew · See more »

The British Institute of Organ Studies, more commonly known by its acronym BIOS, is a British organisation and charity which aims to promote study and appreciation of all aspects of the pipe organ.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and British Institute of Organ Studies · See more »

Brookwood Cemetery, also known as the London Necropolis, is a burial ground in Brookwood, Surrey, England.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Brookwood Cemetery · See more »

Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Canterbury Cathedral · See more »

Cecilia Nina Bowes-Lyon, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, née Cavendish-Bentinck, (11 September 1862 – 23 June 1938) was the mother of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother and maternal grandmother and godmother of Elizabeth II.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Cecilia Bowes-Lyon, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne · See more »

A chapel of ease (sometimes chapel-of-ease) is a church building other than the parish church, built within the bounds of a parish for the attendance of those who cannot reach the parish church conveniently.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Chapel of ease · See more »

Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Charles Dickens · See more »

Charles Wesley (18 December 1707 – 29 March 1788) was an English leader of the Methodist movement, son of Anglican clergyman and poet Samuel Wesley, the younger brother of Methodist founder John Wesley and Anglican clergyman Samuel Wesley the Younger.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Charles Wesley · See more »

A choir (also known as a chorale or chorus) is a musical ensemble of singers.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Choir · See more »

The Church of England is the officially-established Christian church in England, and the mother church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Church of England · See more »

The Diocese of London forms part of the Church of England's Province of Canterbury in England.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Diocese of London · See more »

Dombey and Son is a novel by Charles Dickens, published in monthly parts from 1 October 1846 to 1 April 1848 and in one volume in 1848.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Dombey and Son · See more »

Dorothy Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (née Lady Dorothy Cavendish; 27 August 1750 - 3 June 1794) was Duchess of Portland as wife of William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, the Prime Minister of Great Britain.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Dorothy Bentinck, Duchess of Portland · See more »

Douglas Edward Hopkins (born 23 December 1902, died 1992) was a cathedral organist, who served at Peterborough Cathedral and Canterbury Cathedral.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Douglas Edward Hopkins · See more »

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Dublin · See more »

Earl of Portland is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England, first in 1633 and again in 1689.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Earl of Portland · See more »

Elizabeth Ann Sheridan (née Linley) (September 1754 – 28 June 1792) was the first daughter (and second of twelve children) of the composer Thomas Linley and his wife Mary Johnson, and was herself the wife of the leading playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Elizabeth Ann Linley · See more »

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (née Moulton-Barrett,; 6 March 1806 – 29 June 1861) was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian era.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Elizabeth Barrett Browning · See more »

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is the queen of 16 of the 53 member states in the Commonwealth of Nations.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Elizabeth II · See more »

Emma, Lady Hamilton (26 April 1765; baptised 12 May 1765 – 15 January 1815) is best remembered as the mistress of Lord Nelson and as the muse of George Romney.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Emma, Lady Hamilton · See more »

Francis Bacon, Viscount St.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Francis Bacon · See more »

Francis Perceval Eliot (September 1755 – 23 August 1818) was an English soldier, auditor and man of letters.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Francis Perceval Eliot · See more »

Good Friday is a Christian religious holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Good Friday · See more »

The Governor-General of India or the Viceroy and Governor-General of India (commonly shortened to Viceroy of India), from 1858 to 1947, was originally the titular and executive head of the British administration in India and, later, after Indian independence in 1947, the representative of the Indian monarch and head of state.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Governor-General of India · See more »

Horatia Nelson, christened as Horatia Nelson Thompson (January 29, 1801 – March 6, 1881) was the illegitimate daughter of Emma Hamilton and Horatio Nelson.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Horatia Nelson · See more »

Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson · See more »

The Internet Movie Database (abbreviated IMDb) is an online database of information related to films, television programs, and video games, including cast, production crew, fictional characters, biographies, plot summaries, trivia and reviews.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Internet Movie Database · See more »

John Harley (29 September 1728 – 7 January 1788) was a British bishop.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and John Harley (bishop, died 1788) · See more »

Sir John Stainer (6 June 1840 – 31 March 1901) was an English composer and organist whose music, though not generally much performed today (except for The Crucifixion, still heard at Passiontide in many churches of the Anglican Communion), was very popular during his lifetime.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and John Stainer · See more »

John the Evangelist (also John the Theologian or John the Divine; Εὐαγγελιστής Ἰωάννης) is traditionally regarded as the author of the Gospel of John, and other Johannine works in the New Testament — the three Epistles of John and the Book of Revelation.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and John the Evangelist · See more »

Lieutenant general (Lt Gen), formerly more commonly lieutenant-general, is a senior rank in the British Army and the Royal Marines, although the highest-ranking officer in the Royal Marines core structure at present is major general.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Lieutenant-general (United Kingdom) · See more »

Liturgical east and west refers to the idea that the end of a church which has the altar, for symbolic religious reasons, is traditionally on the east side of the church (to the right in a diagram).

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Liturgical east and west · See more »

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and London · See more »

George Gordon Byron (later Noel), 6th Baron Byron, FRS (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), commonly known simply as Lord Byron, was an English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Lord Byron · See more »

Lieutenant-General Lord William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck (14 September 1774 – 17 June 1839), known as Lord William Bentinck, was a British soldier and statesman.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Lord William Bentinck · See more »

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Marble Arch · See more »

Marylebone (or (both appropriate for the Parish Church of St. Marylebone),,, or) is an affluent inner-city area of central London, England, located within the City of Westminster.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Marylebone · See more »

Marylebone High Street is a shopping street in London, running sub-parallel to Baker Street and terminating at its northern end at the junction with the Marylebone Road.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Marylebone High Street · See more »

Michael Stockwin Howard (14 September 1922 – 4 January 2002) was an English choral conductor, organist and composer.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Michael Howard (musician) · See more »

Neoclassicism (from Greek νέος nèos and κλασσικός klassikòs classicus) is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Neoclassicism · See more »

An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, choir, and soloists.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Oratorio · See more »

Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Oxford Street · See more »

The Pantheon (or; Pantheon,Infrequently Latinized as Pantheum, as in Pliny's ''Natural History'' (XXXVI.38): "The Pantheon of Agrippa was embellished by Diogenes of Athens; and among the supporting members of this temple there are Caryatids that are almost in a class of their own, and the same is true of the figures on the angles of the pediment, which are, however, not so well known because of their lofty position," as translated by D.E. Eichholz (Agrippae Pantheum decoravit Diogenes Atheniensis; in columnis templi eius Caryatides probantur inter pauca operum, sicut in fastigio posita signa, sed propter altitudinem loci minus celebrata). from Greek Πάνθεον meaning "every god") is a building in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier building commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD).

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Pantheon, Rome · See more »

Peterborough Cathedral, properly the Cathedral Church of St Peter, St Paul and St Andrew – also known as Saint Peter's Cathedral in the United Kingdom – is the seat of the Bishop of Peterborough, dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, whose statues look down from the three high gables of the famous West Front.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Peterborough Cathedral · See more »

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (later known as the Pre-Raphaelites) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, founded in 1848 by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood · See more »

Regent's Park (officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Regent's Park · See more »

St. Josaphat Catholic Church in Detroit, Michigan. This would be called a retable in many other languages and countries. A reredos or raredos is an altarpiece, or a screen or decoration behind the altar in a church, usually depicting religious iconography or images.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Reredos · See more »

Richard Brinsley Butler Sheridan (30 October 17517 July 1816) was an Irish playwright and poet and long-term owner of the London Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Richard Brinsley Sheridan · See more »

Rieger Orgelbau is an Austrian firm of organ builders, known generally as Rieger.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Rieger Orgelbau · See more »

Robert Browning (7 May 1812 – 12 December 1889) was an English poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, and in particular the dramatic monologue, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Robert Browning · See more »

Rome (Roma, Rōma) is a city and special comune (named "Roma Capitale") in Italy.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Rome · See more »

Samuel Wesley (24 February 1766 – 11 October 1837) was an English organist and composer in the late Georgian period.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Samuel Wesley · See more »

Saint Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin, also known as The National Cathedral and Collegiate Church of Saint Patrick, Dublin, or in the Irish language as Ard-Eaglais Naomh Pádraig, founded in 1191, is the largest church in Ireland and one of Dublin's two Church of Ireland cathedrals.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin · See more »

St Peter, Vere Street, known until 1832 as the Oxford Chapel after its founder Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, is a former Anglican church off Oxford Street, London.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and St Peter, Vere Street · See more »

Surrey is a county in the south east of England, one of the home counties bordering Greater London.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Surrey · See more »

The Barretts of Wimpole Street is a 1957 Metrocolor CinemaScope film originating from the United Kingdom, and was a re-make of the earlier 1934 version by the same director, Sidney Franklin.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1957 film) · See more »

The Crucifixion: A Meditation on the Sacred Passion of the Holy Redeemer is an oratorio composed by John Stainer in 1887.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and The Crucifixion (Stainer) · See more »

Thomas Hardwick (1752–1829) was a British architect and a founding member of the Architects' Club in 1791.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Thomas Hardwick · See more »

Thomas Harris (1829/30–1900) was a British architect.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and Thomas Harris (architect) · See more »

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and United Kingdom · See more »

William Henry Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland (24 June 1768 – 27 March 1854), styled Marquess of Titchfield until 1809, was a British politician who served in various positions in the governments of George Canning and Lord Goderich.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland · See more »

William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland (14 April 1738 – 30 October 1809) was a British Whig and Tory statesman, Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Prime Minister of Great Britain, serving in 1783 and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1807 to 1809.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland · See more »

Sir William Chambers (23 February 1723 – 10 March 1796) was a Scottish-Swedish architect, based in London.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and William Chambers (architect) · See more »

William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898), was a British Liberal politician.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and William Ewart Gladstone · See more »

Sir William Hamilton KB, PC, FRS (12 January 1731 – 6 April 1803) was a Scottish diplomat, antiquarian, archaeologist and vulcanologist.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and William Hamilton (diplomat) · See more »

William Hogarth (10 November 1697 – 26 October 1764) was an English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited with pioneering western sequential art.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and William Hogarth · See more »

World War II (WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, though related conflicts began earlier.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and World War II · See more »

The year 1957 in film involved some significant events, with The Bridge on the River Kwai topping the year's box office and winning the Academy Award for Best Picture.

New!!: St Marylebone Parish Church and 1957 in film · See more »

Redirects here:

Marylebone Church, St Marylebone Church.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Marylebone_Parish_Church

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »