Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Stellar evolution

+ Save concept

Stellar evolution is the process by which a star changes over the course of time. [1]

138 relations: Accretion (astrophysics), Age of the universe, Aldebaran, Alpha process, Angular momentum, Arcturus, Astrophysical maser, Astrophysics, Asymptotic giant branch, Binary system, Black dwarf, Black hole, Blue supergiant star, Boötes, Brown dwarf, Carbon, Carbon star, Carbon-burning process, Centrifugal force, Chandrasekhar limit, Circumstellar dust, Circumstellar envelope, CNO cycle, Computer simulation, Convection, Degenerate matter, Deuterium, Deuterium fusion, Dredge-up, Electron, Electron capture, Electron degeneracy pressure, Energy, Escape velocity, G-type main-sequence star, Galaxy formation and evolution, General relativity, Giant star, Gravitational binding energy, Gravitational collapse, Gravitational energy, Gravitational potential, Gravity, Helium, Helium flash, Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, Horizontal branch, Hydrogen, Hydrogen atom, Hydrostatic equilibrium, ..., Infrared, Instability strip, International Astronomical Union, Iron, Iron-56, Isotope, Jupiter mass, Kelvin, Kinetic energy, Luminosity, Luminous blue variable, Magnesium, Main sequence, Maser, Mathematical model, Metallicity, Milky Way, Mira variable, Molecular cloud, Nebula, Neon, Neon-burning process, Neutrino, Neutron, Neutron star, Nova, Nuclear fusion, Nuclear reaction, Nucleon, Nucleosynthesis, O-type main-sequence star, OH/IR star, Ohio State University, Oxygen, Oxygen-burning process, Pair-instability supernova, Pauli exclusion principle, Photodisintegration, Planet, Planetary nebula, Pre-main-sequence star, Pressure, Proton–proton chain reaction, Protostar, Pulsar, Quantum mechanics, R Coronae Borealis variable, Red clump, Red dwarf, Red giant, Red supergiant star, Red-giant branch, RR Lyrae variable, Schönberg–Chandrasekhar limit, Schwarzschild radius, Shock wave, Silicon, SN 1987A, Solar System, Spectroscopy, Standard solar model, Star, Star cluster, Stellar classification, Stellar nucleosynthesis, Stellar population, Stellar structure, Subdwarf B star, Subgiant, Sulfur, Sun, Supergiant star, Supernova, Taurus (constellation), Temperature, Timeline of stellar astronomy, Tip of the red-giant branch, Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff limit, Triple-alpha process, Type Ia supernova, Type II supernova, Universe, University of Maryland, College Park, Uranium, White dwarf, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Wolf–Rayet star, Yellow hypergiant. Expand index (88 more) »

Accretion (astrophysics)

In astrophysics, accretion is the accumulation of particles into a massive object by gravitationally attracting more matter, typically gaseous matter, in an accretion disk.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Accretion (astrophysics) · See more »

Age of the universe

In physical cosmology, the age of the universe is the time elapsed since the Big Bang.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Age of the universe · See more »

Aldebaran

Aldebaran, designated Alpha Tauri (α Tauri, abbreviated Alpha Tau, α Tau), is an orange giant star located about 65 light-years from the Sun in the zodiac constellation of Taurus.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Aldebaran · See more »

Alpha process

The alpha process, also known as the alpha ladder, is one of two classes of nuclear fusion reactions by which stars convert helium into heavier elements, the other being the triple-alpha process.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Alpha process · See more »

Angular momentum

In physics, angular momentum (rarely, moment of momentum or rotational momentum) is the rotational equivalent of linear momentum.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Angular momentum · See more »

Arcturus

|- bgcolor.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Arcturus · See more »

Astrophysical maser

An astrophysical maser is a naturally occurring source of stimulated spectral line emission, typically in the microwave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Astrophysical maser · See more »

Astrophysics

Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that employs the principles of physics and chemistry "to ascertain the nature of the astronomical objects, rather than their positions or motions in space".

New!!: Stellar evolution and Astrophysics · See more »

Asymptotic giant branch

The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is a region of the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram populated by evolved cool luminous stars.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Asymptotic giant branch · See more »

Binary system

A binary system is a system of two astronomical bodies which are close enough that their gravitational attraction causes them to orbit each other around a barycenter (also see animated examples).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Binary system · See more »

Black dwarf

A black dwarf is a theoretical stellar remnant, specifically a white dwarf that has cooled sufficiently that it no longer emits significant heat or light.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Black dwarf · See more »

Black hole

A black hole is a region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing—not even particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Black hole · See more »

Blue supergiant star

Blue supergiant stars are hot luminous stars, referred to scientifically as OB supergiants.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Blue supergiant star · See more »

Boötes

Boötes is a constellation in the northern sky, located between 0° and +60° declination, and 13 and 16 hours of right ascension on the celestial sphere.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Boötes · See more »

Brown dwarf

Brown dwarfs are substellar objects that occupy the mass range between the heaviest gas giant planets and the lightest stars, having masses between approximately 13 to 75–80 times that of Jupiter, or approximately to about.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Brown dwarf · See more »

Carbon

Carbon (from carbo "coal") is a chemical element with symbol C and atomic number 6.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Carbon · See more »

Carbon star

A carbon star is typically an asymptotic giant branch star, a luminous red giant, whose atmosphere contains more carbon than oxygen; the two elements combine in the upper layers of the star, forming carbon monoxide, which consumes all the oxygen in the atmosphere, leaving carbon atoms free to form other carbon compounds, giving the star a "sooty" atmosphere and a strikingly ruby red appearance.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Carbon star · See more »

Carbon-burning process

The carbon-burning process or carbon fusion is a set of nuclear fusion reactions that take place in the cores of massive stars (at least 8 \beginsmallmatrixM_\odot\endsmallmatrix at birth) that combines carbon into other elements.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Carbon-burning process · See more »

Centrifugal force

In Newtonian mechanics, the centrifugal force is an inertial force (also called a "fictitious" or "pseudo" force) directed away from the axis of rotation that appears to act on all objects when viewed in a rotating frame of reference.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Centrifugal force · See more »

Chandrasekhar limit

The Chandrasekhar limit is the maximum mass of a stable white dwarf star.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Chandrasekhar limit · See more »

Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Christmas · See more »

Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Christmas and holiday season · See more »

Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Christmas Eve · See more »

Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Christmas traditions · See more »

Circumstellar dust

Circumstellar dust is cosmic dust around a star.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Circumstellar dust · See more »

Circumstellar envelope

A circumstellar envelope (CSE) is a part of a star that has a roughly spherical shape and is not gravitationally bound to the star core.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Circumstellar envelope · See more »

CNO cycle

The CNO cycle (for carbon–nitrogen–oxygen) is one of the two known sets of fusion reactions by which stars convert hydrogen to helium, the other being the proton–proton chain reaction.

New!!: Stellar evolution and CNO cycle · See more »

Computer simulation

Computer simulation is the reproduction of the behavior of a system using a computer to simulate the outcomes of a mathematical model associated with said system.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Computer simulation · See more »

Convection

Convection is the heat transfer due to bulk movement of molecules within fluids such as gases and liquids, including molten rock (rheid).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Convection · See more »

Degenerate matter

Degenerate matter is a highly dense state of matter in which particles must occupy high states of kinetic energy in order to satisfy the Pauli exclusion principle.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Degenerate matter · See more »

Deuterium

Deuterium (or hydrogen-2, symbol or, also known as heavy hydrogen) is one of two stable isotopes of hydrogen (the other being protium, or hydrogen-1).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Deuterium · See more »

Deuterium fusion

Deuterium fusion, also called deuterium burning, is a nuclear fusion reaction that occurs in stars and some substellar objects, in which a deuterium nucleus and a proton combine to form a helium-3 nucleus.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Deuterium fusion · See more »

Dredge-up

A dredge-up is a period in the evolution of a star where a surface convection zone extends down to the layers where material has undergone nuclear fusion.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Dredge-up · See more »

Electron

The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol or, whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Electron · See more »

Electron capture

Electron capture (K-electron capture, also K-capture, or L-electron capture, L-capture) is a process in which the proton-rich nucleus of an electrically neutral atom absorbs an inner atomic electron, usually from the K or L electron shell.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Electron capture · See more »

Electron degeneracy pressure

Electron degeneracy pressure is a particular manifestation of the more general phenomenon of quantum degeneracy pressure.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Electron degeneracy pressure · See more »

Energy

In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Energy · See more »

Escape velocity

In physics, escape velocity is the minimum speed needed for an object to escape from the gravitational influence of a massive body.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Escape velocity · See more »

G-type main-sequence star

A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K., G. M. H. J. Habets and J. R. W. Heintze, Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 46 (November 1981), pp.

New!!: Stellar evolution and G-type main-sequence star · See more »

Galaxy formation and evolution

The study of galaxy formation and evolution is concerned with the processes that formed a heterogeneous universe from a homogeneous beginning, the formation of the first galaxies, the way galaxies change over time, and the processes that have generated the variety of structures observed in nearby galaxies.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Galaxy formation and evolution · See more »

General relativity

General relativity (GR, also known as the general theory of relativity or GTR) is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915 and the current description of gravitation in modern physics.

New!!: Stellar evolution and General relativity · See more »

Giant star

A giant star is a star with substantially larger radius and luminosity than a main-sequence (or dwarf) star of the same surface temperature.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Giant star · See more »

Gravitational binding energy

A gravitational binding energy is the minimum energy that must be added to a system for the system to cease being in a gravitationally bound state.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Gravitational binding energy · See more »

Gravitational collapse

Gravitational collapse is the contraction of an astronomical object due to the influence of its own gravity, which tends to draw matter inward toward the center of gravity.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Gravitational collapse · See more »

Gravitational energy

Gravitational energy is the potential energy a body with mass has in relation to another massive object due to gravity.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Gravitational energy · See more »

Gravitational potential

In classical mechanics, the gravitational potential at a location is equal to the work (energy transferred) per unit mass that would be needed to move the object from a fixed reference location to the location of the object.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Gravitational potential · See more »

Gravity

Gravity, or gravitation, is a natural phenomenon by which all things with mass or energy—including planets, stars, galaxies, and even light—are brought toward (or gravitate toward) one another.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Gravity · See more »

Helium

Helium (from lit) is a chemical element with symbol He and atomic number 2.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Helium · See more »

Helium flash

A helium flash is a very brief thermal runaway nuclear fusion of large quantities of helium into carbon through the triple-alpha process in the core of low mass stars (between 0.8 solar masses and 2.0) during their red giant phase (the Sun is predicted to experience a flash 1.2 billion years after it leaves the main sequence).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Helium flash · See more »

Hertzsprung–Russell diagram

The Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, abbreviated H–R diagram, HR diagram or HRD, is a scatter plot of stars showing the relationship between the stars' absolute magnitudes or luminosities versus their stellar classifications or effective temperatures.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Hertzsprung–Russell diagram · See more »

Horizontal branch

The horizontal branch (HB) is a stage of stellar evolution that immediately follows the red giant branch in stars whose masses are similar to the Sun's.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Horizontal branch · See more »

Hydrogen

Hydrogen is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Hydrogen · See more »

Hydrogen atom

A hydrogen atom is an atom of the chemical element hydrogen.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Hydrogen atom · See more »

Hydrostatic equilibrium

In fluid mechanics, a fluid is said to be in hydrostatic equilibrium or hydrostatic balance when it is at rest, or when the flow velocity at each point is constant over time.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Hydrostatic equilibrium · See more »

Infrared

Infrared radiation (IR) is electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, and is therefore generally invisible to the human eye (although IR at wavelengths up to 1050 nm from specially pulsed lasers can be seen by humans under certain conditions). It is sometimes called infrared light.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Infrared · See more »

Instability strip

The unqualified term instability strip usually refers to a region of the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram largely occupied by several related classes of pulsating variable stars: Delta Scuti variables, SX Phoenicis variables, and rapidly oscillating Ap stars (roAps) near the main sequence; RR Lyrae variables where it intersects the horizontal branch; and the Cepheid variables where it crosses the supergiants.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Instability strip · See more »

International Astronomical Union

The International Astronomical Union (IAU; Union astronomique internationale, UAI) is an international association of professional astronomers, at the PhD level and beyond, active in professional research and education in astronomy.

New!!: Stellar evolution and International Astronomical Union · See more »

Iron

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Iron · See more »

Iron-56

Iron-56 (56Fe) is the most common isotope of iron.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Iron-56 · See more »

Isotope

Isotopes are variants of a particular chemical element which differ in neutron number.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Isotope · See more »

Jupiter mass

Jupiter mass, also called Jovian mass is the unit of mass equal to the total mass of the planet Jupiter.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Jupiter mass · See more »

Kelvin

The Kelvin scale is an absolute thermodynamic temperature scale using as its null point absolute zero, the temperature at which all thermal motion ceases in the classical description of thermodynamics.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Kelvin · See more »

Kinetic energy

In physics, the kinetic energy of an object is the energy that it possesses due to its motion.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Kinetic energy · See more »

Luminosity

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted per unit of time by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Luminosity · See more »

Luminous blue variable

Luminous blue variables (LBVs) are massive evolved stars that show unpredictable and sometimes dramatic variations in both their spectra and brightness.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Luminous blue variable · See more »

Magnesium

Magnesium is a chemical element with symbol Mg and atomic number 12.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Magnesium · See more »

Main sequence

In astronomy, the main sequence is a continuous and distinctive band of stars that appear on plots of stellar color versus brightness.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Main sequence · See more »

Maser

A maser (an acronym for "microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation") is a device that produces coherent electromagnetic waves through amplification by stimulated emission.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Maser · See more »

Mathematical model

A mathematical model is a description of a system using mathematical concepts and language.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Mathematical model · See more »

Metallicity

In astronomy, metallicity is used to describe the abundance of elements present in an object that are heavier than hydrogen or helium.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Metallicity · See more »

Milky Way

The Milky Way is the galaxy that contains our Solar System.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Milky Way · See more »

Mira variable

Mira variables ("Mira", Latin, adj. - feminine form of adjective "wonderful"), named for the prototype star Mira, are a class of pulsating variable stars characterized by very red colours, pulsation periods longer than 100 days, and amplitudes greater than one magnitude in infrared and 2.5 magnitude at visual wavelengths.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Mira variable · See more »

Molecular cloud

A molecular cloud, sometimes called a stellar nursery (if star formation is occurring within), is a type of interstellar cloud, the density and size of which permit the formation of molecules, most commonly molecular hydrogen (H2).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Molecular cloud · See more »

Nebula

A nebula (Latin for "cloud" or "fog"; pl. nebulae, nebulæ, or nebulas) is an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other ionized gases.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Nebula · See more »

Neon

Neon is a chemical element with symbol Ne and atomic number 10.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Neon · See more »

Neon-burning process

The neon-burning process (nuclear decay) is a set of nuclear fusion reactions that take place in massive stars (at least 8 Solar masses).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Neon-burning process · See more »

Neutrino

A neutrino (denoted by the Greek letter ν) is a fermion (an elementary particle with half-integer spin) that interacts only via the weak subatomic force and gravity.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Neutrino · See more »

Neutron

| magnetic_moment.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Neutron · See more »

Neutron star

A neutron star is the collapsed core of a large star which before collapse had a total of between 10 and 29 solar masses.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Neutron star · See more »

New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

New!!: Stellar evolution and New Year · See more »

New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

New!!: Stellar evolution and New Year's Day · See more »

New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

New!!: Stellar evolution and New Year's Eve · See more »

Nova

A nova (plural novae or novas) or classical nova (CN, plural CNe) is a transient astronomical event that causes the sudden appearance of a bright, apparently "new" star, that slowly fades over several weeks or many months.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Nova · See more »

Nuclear fusion

In nuclear physics, nuclear fusion is a reaction in which two or more atomic nuclei come close enough to form one or more different atomic nuclei and subatomic particles (neutrons or protons).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Nuclear fusion · See more »

Nuclear reaction

In nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry, a nuclear reaction is semantically considered to be the process in which two nuclei, or else a nucleus of an atom and a subatomic particle (such as a proton, neutron, or high energy electron) from outside the atom, collide to produce one or more nuclides that are different from the nuclide(s) that began the process.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Nuclear reaction · See more »

Nucleon

In chemistry and physics, a nucleon is either a proton or a neutron, considered in its role as a component of an atomic nucleus.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Nucleon · See more »

Nucleosynthesis

Nucleosynthesis is the process that creates new atomic nuclei from pre-existing nucleons, primarily protons and neutrons.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Nucleosynthesis · See more »

O-type main-sequence star

An O-type main-sequence star (O V) is a main-sequence (core hydrogen-burning) star of spectral type O and luminosity class V. These stars have between 15 and 90 times the mass of the Sun and surface temperatures between 30,000 and 50,000 K. They are between 40,000 and 1,000,000 times as luminous as the Sun.

New!!: Stellar evolution and O-type main-sequence star · See more »

OH/IR star

An OH/IR star is an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star that shows strong OH maser emission and is unusually bright at near-infrared wavelengths.

New!!: Stellar evolution and OH/IR star · See more »

Ohio State University

The Ohio State University, commonly referred to as Ohio State or OSU, is a large, primarily residential, public university in Columbus, Ohio.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Ohio State University · See more »

Oxygen

Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Oxygen · See more »

Oxygen-burning process

The oxygen-burning process is a set of nuclear fusion reactions that take place in massive stars that have used up the lighter elements in their cores.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Oxygen-burning process · See more »

Pair-instability supernova

A pair-instability supernova occurs when pair production, the production of free electrons and positrons in the collision between atomic nuclei and energetic gamma rays, temporarily reduces the internal pressure supporting a supermassive star's core against gravitational collapse.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Pair-instability supernova · See more »

Pauli exclusion principle

The Pauli exclusion principle is the quantum mechanical principle which states that two or more identical fermions (particles with half-integer spin) cannot occupy the same quantum state within a quantum system simultaneously.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Pauli exclusion principle · See more »

Photodisintegration

Photodisintegration (also called phototransmutation) is a nuclear process in which an atomic nucleus absorbs a high-energy gamma ray, enters an excited state, and immediately decays by emitting a subatomic particle.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Photodisintegration · See more »

Planet

A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or stellar remnant that is massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and has cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Planet · See more »

Planetary nebula

A planetary nebula, abbreviated as PN or plural PNe, is a type of emission nebula consisting of an expanding, glowing shell of ionized gas ejected from red giant stars late in their lives.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Planetary nebula · See more »

Pre-main-sequence star

A pre-main-sequence star (also known as a PMS star and PMS object) is a star in the stage when it has not yet reached the main sequence.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Pre-main-sequence star · See more »

Pressure

Pressure (symbol: p or P) is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Pressure · See more »

Proton–proton chain reaction

The proton–proton chain reaction is one of the two (known) sets of fusion reactions by which stars convert hydrogen to helium.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Proton–proton chain reaction · See more »

Protostar

A protostar is a very young star that is still gathering mass from its parent molecular cloud.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Protostar · See more »

Pulsar

A pulsar (from pulse and -ar as in quasar) is a highly magnetized rotating neutron star or white dwarf that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Pulsar · See more »

Quantum mechanics

Quantum mechanics (QM; also known as quantum physics, quantum theory, the wave mechanical model, or matrix mechanics), including quantum field theory, is a fundamental theory in physics which describes nature at the smallest scales of energy levels of atoms and subatomic particles.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Quantum mechanics · See more »

R Coronae Borealis variable

An R Coronae Borealis variable (abbreviated RCB, R CrB) is an eruptive variable star that varies in luminosity in two modes, one low amplitude pulsation (a few tenths of a magnitude), and one irregular, unpredictably-sudden fading by 1 to 9 magnitudes.

New!!: Stellar evolution and R Coronae Borealis variable · See more »

Red clump

The red clump is a clustering of red giants in the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram at around 5,000 K and absolute magnitude (MV) +0.5, slightly hotter than most red-giant-branch stars of the same luminosity.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Red clump · See more »

Red dwarf

A red dwarf (or M dwarf) is a small and relatively cool star on the main sequence, of M spectral type.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Red dwarf · See more »

Red giant

A red giant is a luminous giant star of low or intermediate mass (roughly 0.3–8 solar masses) in a late phase of stellar evolution.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Red giant · See more »

Red supergiant star

Red supergiants are stars with a supergiant luminosity class (Yerkes class I) of spectral type K or M. They are the largest stars in the universe in terms of volume, although they are not the most massive or luminous.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Red supergiant star · See more »

Red-giant branch

The red-giant branch (RGB), sometimes called the first giant branch, is the portion of the giant branch before helium ignition occurs in the course of stellar evolution.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Red-giant branch · See more »

RR Lyrae variable

RR Lyrae variables are periodic variable stars, commonly found in globular clusters.

New!!: Stellar evolution and RR Lyrae variable · See more »

Schönberg–Chandrasekhar limit

In stellar astrophysics, the Schönberg–Chandrasekhar limit is the maximum mass of a non-fusing, isothermal core that can support an enclosing envelope.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Schönberg–Chandrasekhar limit · See more »

Schwarzschild radius

The Schwarzschild radius (sometimes historically referred to as the gravitational radius) is a physical parameter that shows up in the Schwarzschild solution to Einstein's field equations, corresponding to the radius defining the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Schwarzschild radius · See more »

Shock wave

In physics, a shock wave (also spelled shockwave), or shock, is a type of propagating disturbance.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Shock wave · See more »

Silicon

Silicon is a chemical element with symbol Si and atomic number 14.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Silicon · See more »

SN 1987A

SN 1987A was a peculiar type II supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy satellite of the Milky Way.

New!!: Stellar evolution and SN 1987A · See more »

Solar System

The Solar SystemCapitalization of the name varies.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Solar System · See more »

Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Spectroscopy · See more »

Standard solar model

The standard solar model (SSM) is a mathematical treatment of the Sun as a spherical ball of gas (in varying states of ionisation, with the hydrogen in the deep interior being a completely ionised plasma).

New!!: Stellar evolution and Standard solar model · See more »

Star

A star is type of astronomical object consisting of a luminous spheroid of plasma held together by its own gravity.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Star · See more »

Star cluster

Star clusters are groups of stars.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Star cluster · See more »

Stellar classification

In astronomy, stellar classification is the classification of stars based on their spectral characteristics.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Stellar classification · See more »

Stellar nucleosynthesis

Stellar nucleosynthesis is the theory explaining the creation (nucleosynthesis) of chemical elements by nuclear fusion reactions between atoms within the stars.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Stellar nucleosynthesis · See more »

Stellar population

During 1944, Walter Baade categorized groups of stars within the Milky Way into bluer stars associated with the spiral arms and the general position of yellow stars near the central galactic bulge or within globular star clusters.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Stellar population · See more »

Stellar structure

Stars of different mass and age have varying internal structures.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Stellar structure · See more »

Subdwarf B star

A B-type subdwarf (sdB) is a kind of subdwarf star with spectral type B. They differ from the typical subdwarf by being much hotter and brighter.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Subdwarf B star · See more »

Subgiant

A subgiant is a star that is brighter than a normal main-sequence star of the same spectral class, but not as bright as true giant stars.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Subgiant · See more »

Sulfur

Sulfur or sulphur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Sulfur · See more »

Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Sun · See more »

Supergiant star

Supergiants are among the most massive and most luminous stars.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Supergiant star · See more »

Supernova

A supernova (plural: supernovae or supernovas, abbreviations: SN and SNe) is a transient astronomical event that occurs during the last stellar evolutionary stages of a star's life, either a massive star or a white dwarf, whose destruction is marked by one final, titanic explosion.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Supernova · See more »

Taurus (constellation)

Taurus (Latin for "the Bull") is one of the constellations of the zodiac, which means it is crossed by the plane of the ecliptic.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Taurus (constellation) · See more »

Temperature

Temperature is a physical quantity expressing hot and cold.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Temperature · See more »

Timeline of stellar astronomy

Timeline of stellar astronomy.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Timeline of stellar astronomy · See more »

Tip of the red-giant branch

Tip of the red-giant branch (TRGB) is a primary distance indicator used in astronomy.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Tip of the red-giant branch · See more »

Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff limit

The Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff limit (or TOV limit) is an upper bound to the mass of cold, nonrotating neutron stars, analogous to the Chandrasekhar limit for white dwarf stars.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff limit · See more »

Triple-alpha process

The triple-alpha process is a set of nuclear fusion reactions by which three helium-4 nuclei (alpha particles) are transformed into carbon.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Triple-alpha process · See more »

Type Ia supernova

A type Ia supernova (read "type one-a") is a type of supernova that occurs in binary systems (two stars orbiting one another) in which one of the stars is a white dwarf.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Type Ia supernova · See more »

Type II supernova

A Type II supernova (plural: supernovae or supernovas) results from the rapid collapse and violent explosion of a massive star.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Type II supernova · See more »

Universe

The Universe is all of space and time and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Universe · See more »

University of Maryland, College Park

The University of Maryland, College Park (commonly referred to as the University of Maryland, UMD, or simply Maryland) is a public research university located in the city of College Park in Prince George's County, Maryland, approximately from the northeast border of Washington, D.C. Founded in 1856, the university is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland.

New!!: Stellar evolution and University of Maryland, College Park · See more »

Uranium

Uranium is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Uranium · See more »

White dwarf

A white dwarf, also called a degenerate dwarf, is a stellar core remnant composed mostly of electron-degenerate matter.

New!!: Stellar evolution and White dwarf · See more »

Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer

Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is a NASA infrared-wavelength astronomical space telescope launched in December 2009, and placed in hibernation in February 2011.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer · See more »

Wolf–Rayet star

Wolf–Rayet stars, often abbreviated as WR stars, are a rare heterogeneous set of stars with unusual spectra showing prominent broad emission lines of highly ionised helium and nitrogen or carbon.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Wolf–Rayet star · See more »

Yellow hypergiant

A yellow hypergiant is a massive star with an extended atmosphere, a spectral class from A to K, and an initial mass of about 20–60 solar masses but having lost as much as half that mass.

New!!: Stellar evolution and Yellow hypergiant · See more »

2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

New!!: Stellar evolution and 2018 · See more »

2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

New!!: Stellar evolution and 2019 · See more »

Redirects here:

Cycle of stars, Evolution of stars, Life cycle of a star, Life cycle of stars, Life of a star, Star Death, Star cycle, Star evolution, Star life cycle, Star lifecycle, Stellar Evolution, Stellar death, Stellar evolutionary model, Stellar life, Stellar life cycle, The life of a star.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_evolution

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »