Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Supreme Court of the United States

+ Save concept

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States. [1]

555 relations: Abe Fortas, Abington School District v. Schempp, Abner Mikva, Abortion, Abraham Lincoln, Acronym, Adair v. United States, Adam Tomkins, Adequate and independent state ground, Adkins v. Children's Hospital, Advice and consent, Advisory opinion, Affirmative action, African Americans, Al Franken, Al Gore, Alexander Hamilton, Alfred A. Knopf, All Writs Act, Allstate, ALM (company), American Bar Association, American Civil Liberties Union, American Civil War, Amicus curiae, Andrew Jackson, Andrew Johnson, Andrew Napolitano, Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia, Appeal, Appellate jurisdiction, Architect of the Capitol, Arizona v. California, Arlen Specter, Arthur Goldberg, Article Three of the United States Constitution, Article Two of the United States Constitution, Ashcroft v. Iqbal, Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Austria, Bail, Baker v. Carr, Balance of power (federalism), Baptists, Barack Obama, Barry Goldwater, Baze v. Rees, Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, ..., Bench memorandum, Bible, Black's Law Dictionary, Bluebook, Bob Woodward, Bolling v. Sharpe, Boumediene v. Bush, Bowers v. Hardwick, Brian Leiter, Brooklyn, Brown v. Board of Education, Bryan A. Garner, Buckinghamshire, Buckley v. Valeo, Buffalo, New York, Bush v. Gore, Byron White, Cameras in the Supreme Court of the United States, Capital punishment, Capital punishment in the United States, Carolina Academic Press, Case citation, Cass Gilbert, Catholic Church, Ceres, Fife, Cert pool, Certiorari, Certiorari before judgment, Charles A. Beard, Charles Evans Hughes, Charles Warren (U.S. author), Chattanooga, Tennessee, Chicago, Chief judge, Chief Justice of the United States, Chisholm v. Georgia, Christopher Moore (Canadian historian), Chrysler, Citizens United v. FEC, City of Boerne v. Flores, Civil liberties, Clarence Thomas, Climate change, Clinton v. City of New York, CNN, Cohens v. Virginia, Commerce Clause, Common Cause, Competition law, Concurring opinion, Congressional Quarterly, Congressional Research Service, Conscription in the United States, Conservatism, Contempt of court, Cornell University Library, County Antrim, Dames & Moore v. Regan, David B. Sentelle, David Garrow, David Josiah Brewer, David Souter, Dean of Harvard Law School, Defamation, Defendant, DeFunis v. Odegaard, Democratic ideals, Demography (journal), Denver, Desegregation, Dissenting opinion, District of Columbia Court of Appeals, District of Columbia v. Heller, Donald Trump, Donald Trump Supreme Court candidates, Doubleday (publisher), Dover Publications, Dred Scott v. Sandford, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Earl Warren, Edward Douglass White, Edwin Stanton, Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Eighth and Ninth Circuits Act of 1837, Eisenstadt v. Baird, El Paso, Texas, Elena Kagan, Elena Kagan Supreme Court nomination, Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution, Encyclopædia Britannica, Engel v. Vitale, England, Episcopal Church (United States), Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Equal Protection Clause, Ex parte McCardle, Exclusionary rule, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Federal Constitutional Court, Federal government of the United States, Federal holidays in the United States, Federal Judicial Center, Federal judiciary of the United States, Federal preemption, Federalism, Federalist No. 78, Federalist Society, Felix Frankfurter, Filibuster, FindLaw, First Amendment to the United States Constitution, First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti, Florida District Courts of Appeal, Florida Star v. B. J. F., Florida Today, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Fox News, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Fred M. Vinson, Furman v. Georgia, George H. W. Bush, George Sutherland, George W. Bush, George Will, Georgia (U.S. state), Georgia v. Brailsford (1794), Gerald Ford, Gerrymandering, Gibbons v. Ogden, Gideon v. Wainwright, Gitlow v. New York, Goldwater v. Carter, Gonzales v. Carhart, Green v. County School Board of New Kent County, Gregg v. Georgia, Griswold v. Connecticut, Guantanamo Bay detention camp, Habeas corpus, Harlan F. Stone, Harriet Miers, Harry Blackmun, Harry S. Truman, Harvard Law Review, Henry Friendly, Hispanic, Horace Gray, HuffPost, Hugo Black, Humphrey's Executor v. United States, Illinois, Impeachment, Impeachment in the United States, In re Gault, In-chambers opinion, Incorporation of the Bill of Rights, Independence Hall, Independent Journal Review, Ireland, Ivy League, J. Michael Luttig, James Iredell, James MacGregor Burns, James Madison, James Monroe, James Wilson, Jan Crawford, Jeffrey Toobin, Jimmy Carter, Joan Biskupic, John Danforth, John Jay, John Marshall, John Marshall Harlan, John Marshall Harlan II, John Paul Stevens, John Roberts, John Roberts Supreme Court nomination, John Rutledge, John Tyler, Jon Corzine, Joseph Story, Judaism, Judicial activism, Judicial appointment history for United States federal courts, Judicial Circuits Act, Judicial disqualification, Judicial independence, Judicial interpretation, Judicial opinion, Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937, Judicial restraint, Judicial review, Judicial review in the United States, Judiciary Act of 1789, Judiciary Act of 1802, Judiciary Act of 1869, Jury, Justiciability, Kansas v. Colorado, Kelo v. City of New London, Kevin Gutzman, Korematsu v. United States, Laboratories of democracy, Larry Sabato, Latino, Law library, Law of the United States, Law review, Law school, Lawrence v. Texas, Lawyers' Edition, Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Legal Information Institute, Legal opinion, Legal research, Lemon v. Kurtzman, Leonard I. Garth, Lewes, Lewis F. Powell Jr., LexisNexis, Liberalism, Library of Congress, Life tenure, Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, Line-item veto, List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States by court composition, List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States by seat, List of law clerks of the Supreme Court of the United States, List of law schools attended by United States Supreme Court Justices, List of national founders, List of United States Supreme Court Justices by time in office, Lists of United States Supreme Court cases, Little, Brown and Company, Lobbying, Lochner era, Lochner v. New York, Lord's Prayer, Los Angeles Times, Louis Brandeis, Loving v. Virginia, Lucile Lomen, Lyle Denniston, Lynching of Ed Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, Mandamus, Manhattan, Mapp v. Ohio, Marbury v. Madison, Marital status, Mark Levin, Mark Tushnet, Marriage, Martin v. Hunter's Lessee, Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency, McCulloch v. Maryland, McDonald v. City of Chicago, Medium (website), Melbourne, Florida, Melrose, Massachusetts, Melville Fuller, Merrick Garland, Merrick Garland Supreme Court nomination, Methodism, Midnight Judges Act, Millard Fillmore, Miller v. California, Minersville School District v. Gobitis, Minor v. Happersett, Miranda v. Arizona, Missouri, Missouri Attorney General, Moderate, Modern liberalism in the United States, Moot court, Morrison Waite, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, Neil Gorsuch, New Deal, New Jersey, New Jersey v. Delaware, New York City, New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, New York Times Co. v. United States, Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Nixon White House tapes, NLRB v. Noel Canning, Nonacquiescence, NPR, Obergefell v. Hodges, Old City Hall (Philadelphia), Oliver Ellsworth, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Oregon v. Mitchell, Original jurisdiction, Oxford University Press, Oyez Project, Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1, Pat Buchanan, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Paul Finkelman, Penguin Group, Per curiam decision, Peter H. Irons, Petitioner, Philosophy of law, Phyllis Schlafly, Pin Point, Georgia, Planned Parenthood v. Casey, Plessy v. Ferguson, Political question, Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co., Presbyterianism, President of the United States, Procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States, Public defender, Quorum, Racial segregation in the United States, Recess appointment, Reconstruction era, Regents of the Univ. of Cal. v. Bakke, Regionalism (politics), Reporter of Decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States, Resignation, Retirement, Reuters, Reynolds v. Sims, Richard Epstein, Richard Nixon, Robert Bork, Robert H. Jackson, Robert Reich, Roberts Court, Roe v. Wade, Roger B. Taney, Ronald Reagan, Royal Exchange (New York City), Rule of four, Running of the Interns, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sacramento, California, Salmon P. Chase, Salon (website), Same-sex marriage in the United States, Samuel Alito, Samuel Alito Supreme Court nomination, Samuel Chase, San Francisco, Sandra Day O'Connor, Sanford Levinson, School voucher, Scotland, Scott Armstrong (journalist), SCOTUSblog, Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, Segal–Cover score, Selective Draft Law Cases, Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida, Senior status, Seniority, Separate but equal, Separation of powers, Seriatim, Seventh Circuit Act of 1807, Shelby County v. Holder, Sheldon v. Sill, Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Slate (magazine), Smyrna, Sodomy, Solicitor General of the United States, Sonia Sotomayor, Sonia Sotomayor Supreme Court nomination, Southern United States, Special master, Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey v. United States, State attorney general, State court (United States), State school, State supreme court, States' rights, Status quo, Stephen Breyer, Stetson University College of Law, Substantive due process, Summary judgment, Supreme court, Supreme Court Historical Society, Supreme Court of Florida, Supreme Court of Puerto Rico, Supreme Court of the Virgin Islands, Supreme Court Police, Swing vote, Tennessee, Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Tenth Circuit Act of 1863, Term limit, The American Spectator, The Atlantic, The Brethren (book), The Bronx, The Christian Science Monitor, The Federalist Papers, The Green Bag, The Guardian, The National Law Journal, The New York Times, The Nine (book), The Seattle Times, The switch in time that saved nine, The Telephone Cases, The Times (Trenton), The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Thomson Reuters, Thurgood Marshall, Time (magazine), Tom Goldstein, Trenton, New Jersey, Turkey, Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution, U.S. News & World Report, Ulysses S. Grant, Unitarianism, United States, United States Assistant Attorney General, United States Associate Attorney General, United States Attorney, United States Bill of Rights, United States Capitol, United States Capitol Police, United States Congress, United States Constitution, United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, United States courts of appeals, United States Department of Justice, United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, United States Domestic Policy Council, United States Marshals Service, United States presidential election, 2000, United States Reports, United States Senate, United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, United States Supreme Court Building, United States v. Alcoa, United States v. Butler, United States v. Curtiss-Wright Export Corp., United States v. Darby Lumber Co., United States v. Klein, United States v. Lopez, United States v. Nixon, United States v. Shipp, United States v. Texas, United States v. Virginia, United States v. Windsor, University of Cambridge, University of Chicago Press, University of Maryland, College Park, Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States, USA Today, Vienna, Viking Press, Virginia v. Tennessee, Wall Street, Ware v. Hylton, Warren E. Burger, Washington, D.C., West (publisher), West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish, West v. Barnes, West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, White House Counsel, Wickard v. Filburn, Wiley Blount Rutledge, William H. Pryor Jr., William Henry Harrison, William Howard Taft, William O. Douglas, William Paterson (judge), William Rehnquist, William Thaddeus Coleman Jr., Willis Van Devanter, Worcester v. Georgia, World War II, Writ of prohibition, Wyeth v. Levine, Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer, Zachary Taylor, Zelman v. Simmons-Harris, 2009 term opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States. Expand index (505 more) »

Abe Fortas

Abraham "Abe" Fortas (June 19, 1910 – April 5, 1982) was a U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1965 to 1969.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Abe Fortas · See more »

Abington School District v. Schempp

Abington School District v. Schempp,,. was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court decided 8–1 in favor of the respondent, Edward Schempp, and declared school-sponsored Bible reading in public schools in the United States to be unconstitutional.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Abington School District v. Schempp · See more »

Abner Mikva

Abner Joseph Mikva (January 21, 1926 – July 4, 2016) was an American politician, federal judge, lawyer and law professor.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Abner Mikva · See more »

Abortion

Abortion is the ending of pregnancy by removing an embryo or fetus before it can survive outside the uterus.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Abortion · See more »

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Abraham Lincoln · See more »

Acronym

An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components in a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Acronym · See more »

Adair v. United States

Adair v. United States, 208 U.S. 161 (1908), was a US labor law case of the United States Supreme Court which declared that bans on "yellow-dog" contracts (that forbade workers from joining labor unions) were unconstitutional.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Adair v. United States · See more »

Adam Tomkins

Adam Tomkins (born 28 June 1969) is an academic and politician based within Scotland.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Adam Tomkins · See more »

Adequate and independent state ground

The adequate and independent state ground doctrine is a doctrine of United States law governing the power of the U.S. Supreme Court to review judgments entered by state courts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Adequate and independent state ground · See more »

Adkins v. Children's Hospital

Adkins v. Children's Hospital, 261 U.S. 525 (1923), is a United States Supreme Court opinion that federal minimum wage legislation for women was an unconstitutional infringement of liberty of contract, as protected by the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Adkins v. Children's Hospital · See more »

Advice and consent

Advice and consent is an English phrase frequently used in enacting formulae of bills and in other legal or constitutional contexts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Advice and consent · See more »

Advisory opinion

An advisory opinion is an opinion issued by a court or a commission like an election commission that does not have the effect of adjudicating a specific legal case, but merely advises on the constitutionality or interpretation of a law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Advisory opinion · See more »

Affirmative action

Affirmative action, also known as reservation in India and Nepal, positive action in the UK, and employment equity (in a narrower context) in Canada and South Africa, is the policy of protecting members of groups that are known to have previously suffered from discrimination.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Affirmative action · See more »

African Americans

African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and African Americans · See more »

Al Franken

Alan Stuart Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an American comedian, writer, producer, author, and politician who served as a United States Senator from Minnesota from 2009 to 2018.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Al Franken · See more »

Al Gore

Albert Arnold Gore Jr. (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th Vice President of the United States from 1993 to 2001.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Al Gore · See more »

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was a statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Alexander Hamilton · See more »

Alfred A. Knopf

Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. is a New York publishing house that was founded by Alfred A. Knopf Sr. and Blanche Knopf in 1915.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Alfred A. Knopf · See more »

All Writs Act

The All Writs Act is a United States federal statute, codified at, which authorizes the United States federal courts to "issue all writs necessary or appropriate in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law." The act in its original form was part of the Judiciary Act of 1789.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and All Writs Act · See more »

Allstate

The Allstate Corporation is the one of the largest insurance providers in the United States and one of the largest that is publicly held.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Allstate · See more »

ALM (company)

ALM (formerly American Lawyer Media) is a media company located in New York City, and is a provider of specialized business news and information, focused primarily on the legal, insurance, and commercial real estate sectors.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and ALM (company) · See more »

American Bar Association

The American Bar Association (ABA), founded August 21, 1878, is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and American Bar Association · See more »

American Civil Liberties Union

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a nonprofit organization whose stated mission is "to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States." Officially nonpartisan, the organization has been supported and criticized by liberal and conservative organizations alike.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and American Civil Liberties Union · See more »

American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and American Civil War · See more »

Amicus curiae

An amicus curiae (literally, "friend of the court"; plural, amici curiae) is someone who is not a party to a case and may or may not have been solicited by a party, who assists a court by offering information, expertise, or insight that has a bearing on the issues in the case, and is typically presented in the form of a brief.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Amicus curiae · See more »

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Andrew Jackson · See more »

Andrew Johnson

Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 July 31, 1875) was the 17th President of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Andrew Johnson · See more »

Andrew Napolitano

Andrew Peter Napolitano (born June 6, 1950) is an American syndicated columnist whose work appears in numerous publications, such as Fox News, The Washington Times, and Reason.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Andrew Napolitano · See more »

Anthony Kennedy

Anthony McLeod Kennedy (born July 23, 1936) is the senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Anthony Kennedy · See more »

Antonin Scalia

Antonin Gregory Scalia (March 11, 1936 – February 13, 2016) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1986 until his death in 2016.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Antonin Scalia · See more »

Appeal

In law, an appeal is the process in which cases are reviewed, where parties request a formal change to an official decision.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Appeal · See more »

Appellate jurisdiction

Appellate jurisdiction is the power of a higher court to review decisions and change outcomes of decisions of lower courts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Appellate jurisdiction · See more »

Architect of the Capitol

The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is the federal agency responsible for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, and also the head of that agency.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Architect of the Capitol · See more »

Arizona v. California

Arizona v. California is a set of United States Supreme Court cases, all dealing with disputes over water distribution from the Colorado River between the states of Arizona and California.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Arizona v. California · See more »

Arlen Specter

Arlen Specter (February 12, 1930 – October 14, 2012) was an American lawyer, author, and politician who served as United States Senator for Pennsylvania.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Arlen Specter · See more »

Arthur Goldberg

Arthur Joseph Goldberg (August 8, 1908January 19, 1990) was an American statesman and jurist who served as the 9th U.S. Secretary of Labor, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and the 6th United States Ambassador to the United Nations.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Arthur Goldberg · See more »

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article Three of the United States Constitution establishes the judicial branch of the federal government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Article Three of the United States Constitution · See more »

Article Two of the United States Constitution

Article Two of the United States Constitution establishes the executive branch of the federal government, which carries out and enforces federal laws.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Article Two of the United States Constitution · See more »

Ashcroft v. Iqbal

Ashcroft v. Iqbal,, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that top government officials were not liable for the actions of their subordinates without evidence that they ordered the allegedly discriminatory activity.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ashcroft v. Iqbal · See more »

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, was assassinated by well-known stage actor John Wilkes Booth on April 14, 1865, while attending the play Our American Cousin at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. Shot in the head as he watched the play, Lincoln died the following day at 7:22 a.m., in the Petersen House opposite the theater.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Assassination of Abraham Lincoln · See more »

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

Austria

Austria (Österreich), officially the Republic of Austria (Republik Österreich), is a federal republic and a landlocked country of over 8.8 million people in Central Europe.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Austria · See more »

Bail

Bail is a set of restrictions that are imposed on a suspect while awaiting trial, to ensure they comply with the judicial process.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bail · See more »

Baker v. Carr

Baker v. Carr,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case that decided that redistricting (attempts to change the way voting districts are delineated) issues present justiciable questions, thus enabling federal courts to intervene in and to decide redistricting cases.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Baker v. Carr · See more »

Balance of power (federalism)

In federations, the balance of power is occasionally used informally to designate the degree to which power is centralized in the federal government or devolved to the subnational governments.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Balance of power (federalism) · See more »

Baptists

Baptists are Christians distinguished by baptizing professing believers only (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism), and doing so by complete immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Baptists · See more »

Barack Obama

Barack Hussein Obama II (born August 4, 1961) is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from January 20, 2009, to January 20, 2017.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Barack Obama · See more »

Barry Goldwater

Barry Morris Goldwater (January 2, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was an American politician, businessman, and author who was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–65, 1969–87) and the Republican Party's nominee for President of the United States in 1964.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Barry Goldwater · See more »

Baze v. Rees

Baze v. Rees,, is a decision by the United States Supreme Court, which upheld the constitutionality of a particular method of lethal injection used for capital punishment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Baze v. Rees · See more »

Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly

Bell Atlantic Corp.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly · See more »

Bench memorandum

A bench memorandum (pl. bench memoranda) (also known as a bench memo) is a short and neutral memo which summarizes the facts, issues, and arguments of a court case.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bench memorandum · See more »

Bible

The Bible (from Koine Greek τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books") is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bible · See more »

Black's Law Dictionary

Black's Law is the most widely used law dictionary in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Black's Law Dictionary · See more »

Bluebook

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, a style guide, prescribes the most widely used legal citation system in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bluebook · See more »

Bob Woodward

Robert Upshur Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is an American investigative journalist and non-fiction author.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bob Woodward · See more »

Bolling v. Sharpe

Bolling v. Sharpe, 347 U.S. 497 (1954), is a landmark United States Supreme Court case which deals with civil rights, specifically, segregation in the District of Columbia's public schools.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bolling v. Sharpe · See more »

Boumediene v. Bush

Boumediene v. Bush,, was a writ of habeas corpus submission made in a civilian court of the United States on behalf of Lakhdar Boumediene, a naturalized citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina, held in military detention by the United States at the Guantanamo Bay detention camps in Cuba.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Boumediene v. Bush · See more »

Bowers v. Hardwick

Bowers v. Hardwick, 478 U.S. 186 (1986), is a United States Supreme Court decision that upheld, in a 5–4 ruling, the constitutionality of a Georgia sodomy law criminalizing oral and anal sex in private between consenting adults, in this case with respect to homosexual sodomy, though the law did not differentiate between homosexual sodomy and heterosexual sodomy.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bowers v. Hardwick · See more »

Brian Leiter

Brian Leiter (born 1963) is an American philosopher and legal scholar who is Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Chicago Law School and founder and Director of Chicago's Center for Law, Philosophy & Human Values.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Brian Leiter · See more »

Brooklyn

Brooklyn is the most populous borough of New York City, with a census-estimated 2,648,771 residents in 2017.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Brooklyn · See more »

Brown v. Board of Education

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Brown v. Board of Education · See more »

Bryan A. Garner

Bryan A. Garner (born November 17, 1958) is an American lawyer, lexicographer, and teacher who has written more than two dozen books about English usage and style, and advocacy.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bryan A. Garner · See more »

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a county in South East England which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north east and Hertfordshire to the east.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Buckinghamshire · See more »

Buckley v. Valeo

Buckley v. Valeo,, is a U.S. constitutional law Supreme Court case on campaign finance.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Buckley v. Valeo · See more »

Buffalo, New York

Buffalo is the second largest city in the state of New York and the 81st most populous city in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Buffalo, New York · See more »

Bush v. Gore

Bush v. Gore,, was a decision of the United States Supreme Court that settled a recount dispute in Florida's 2000 presidential election.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Bush v. Gore · See more »

Byron White

Byron Raymond "Whizzer" White (June 8, 1917 – April 15, 2002) was an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Byron White · See more »

Cameras in the Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States does not allow cameras in the courtroom when the court is in session, a policy which is the subject of much debate.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Cameras in the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

Capital punishment

Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is a government-sanctioned practice whereby a person is put to death by the state as a punishment for a crime.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Capital punishment · See more »

Capital punishment in the United States

Capital punishment is a legal penalty in the United States, currently used by 31 states, the federal government, and the military.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Capital punishment in the United States · See more »

Carolina Academic Press

Carolina Academic Press (also known as CAP) is an academic publisher of books and software.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Carolina Academic Press · See more »

Case citation

Case citation is a system used by legal professionals to identify past court case decisions, either in series of books called reporters or law reports, or in a neutral style that identifies a decision regardless of where it is reported.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Case citation · See more »

Cass Gilbert

Cass Gilbert (November 24, 1859 – May 17, 1934) was a prominent American architect.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Cass Gilbert · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Catholic Church · See more »

Ceres, Fife

Ceres is a village in Fife, Scotland, located in a small glen approximately 2 miles over the Ceres Moor from Cupar and 7 miles from St Andrews.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ceres, Fife · See more »

Cert pool

The cert pool is a mechanism by which the Supreme Court of the United States manages the influx of petitions for certiorari ("cert") to the court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Cert pool · See more »

Certiorari

Certiorari, often abbreviated cert. in the United States, is a process for seeking judicial review and a writ issued by a court that agrees to review.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Certiorari · See more »

Certiorari before judgment

A petition for certiorari before judgment, in the Supreme Court of the United States, is a petition for a writ of certiorari in which the Supreme Court is asked to immediately review the decision of a United States District Court, without an appeal having been decided by a United States Court of Appeals, for the purpose of expediting the proceedings and obtaining a final decision.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Certiorari before judgment · See more »

Charles A. Beard

Charles Austin Beard (November 27, 1874 – September 1, 1948) was, with Frederick Jackson Turner, one of the most influential American historians of the first half of the 20th century.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Charles A. Beard · See more »

Charles Evans Hughes

Charles Evans Hughes Sr. (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was an American statesman, Republican politician, and the 11th Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Charles Evans Hughes · See more »

Charles Warren (U.S. author)

Charles Warren (March 9, 1868 – August 16, 1954) was an American lawyer and legal scholar who won a Pulitzer Prize for his book The Supreme Court in United States History (1922).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Charles Warren (U.S. author) · See more »

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Chattanooga is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, with a population of 177,571 in 2016.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Chattanooga, Tennessee · See more »

Chicago

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States, after New York City and Los Angeles.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Chicago · See more »

Chief judge

Chief judge is the highest-ranking judge of a court that has more than one judge.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Chief judge · See more »

Chief Justice of the United States

The Chief Justice of the United States is the chief judge of the Supreme Court of the United States and thus the head of the United States federal court system, which functions as the judicial branch of the nation's federal government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Chief Justice of the United States · See more »

Chisholm v. Georgia

Chisholm v. Georgia,, is considered the first United States Supreme Court case of significance and impact.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Chisholm v. Georgia · See more »

Christopher Moore (Canadian historian)

Christopher Hugh Moore (born 1950 in Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom) is an author, journalist, and blogger about Canadian history.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Christopher Moore (Canadian historian) · See more »

Chrysler

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles US LLC (commonly known as Chrysler) is the American subsidiary of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V., an Italian-American automobile manufacturer registered in the Netherlands with headquarters in London, U.K., for tax purposes.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Chrysler · See more »

Citizens United v. FEC

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission,, is a landmark U.S. constitutional law, campaign finance, and corporate law case dealing with regulation of political campaign spending by organizations.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Citizens United v. FEC · See more »

City of Boerne v. Flores

City of Boerne v. Flores,, was a US Supreme Court case concerning the scope of Congress's enforcement power under Section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and City of Boerne v. Flores · See more »

Civil liberties

Civil liberties or personal freedoms are personal guarantees and freedoms that the government cannot abridge, either by law or by judicial interpretation, without due process.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Civil liberties · See more »

Clarence Thomas

Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American judge, lawyer, and government official who currently serves as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Clarence Thomas · See more »

Climate change

Climate change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time (i.e., decades to millions of years).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Climate change · See more »

Clinton v. City of New York

Clinton v. City of New York,, is a legal case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the line-item veto as granted in the Line Item Veto Act of 1996 violated the Presentment Clause of the United States Constitution because it impermissibly gave the President of the United States the power to unilaterally amend or repeal parts of statutes that had been duly passed by the United States Congress.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Clinton v. City of New York · See more »

CNN

Cable News Network (CNN) is an American basic cable and satellite television news channel and an independent subsidiary of AT&T's WarnerMedia.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and CNN · See more »

Cohens v. Virginia

Cohens v. Virginia,, is a landmark case by the United States Supreme Court most notable for the Court's assertion of its power to review state supreme court decisions in criminal law matters when the defendant claims that their Constitutional rights have been violated.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Cohens v. Virginia · See more »

Commerce Clause

The Commerce Clause describes an enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution (Article I, Section 8, Clause 3).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Commerce Clause · See more »

Common Cause

Common Cause is a watchdog group based in Washington, D.C. with chapters in 35 states.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Common Cause · See more »

Competition law

Competition law is a law that promotes or seeks to maintain market competition by regulating anti-competitive conduct by companies.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Competition law · See more »

Concurring opinion

In law, a concurring opinion is in certain legal systems a written opinion by one or more judges of a court which agrees with the decision made by the majority of the court, but states different (or additional) reasons as the basis for his or her decision.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Concurring opinion · See more »

Congressional Quarterly

Congressional Quarterly, Inc., or CQ, is part of a privately owned publishing company called CQ Roll Call that produces a number of publications reporting primarily on the United States Congress.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Congressional Quarterly · See more »

Congressional Research Service

The Congressional Research Service (CRS), known as Congress's think tank, is a public policy research arm of the United States Congress.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Congressional Research Service · See more »

Conscription in the United States

Conscription in the United States, commonly known as the draft, has been employed by the federal government of the United States in five conflicts: the American Revolution, the American Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War (including both the Korean War and the Vietnam War).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Conscription in the United States · See more »

Conservatism

Conservatism is a political and social philosophy promoting traditional social institutions in the context of culture and civilization.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Conservatism · See more »

Contempt of court

Contempt of court, often referred to simply as "contempt", is the offense of being disobedient to or discourteous toward a court of law and its officers in the form of behavior that opposes or defies the authority, justice and dignity of the court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Contempt of court · See more »

Cornell University Library

The Cornell University Library is the library system of Cornell University.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Cornell University Library · See more »

County Antrim

County Antrim (named after the town of Antrim)) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster. The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Bushmills produces whiskey, and Portrush is a popular seaside resort and night-life area. The majority of Belfast, the capital city of Northern Ireland, is in County Antrim, with the remainder being in County Down. It is currently one of only two counties of Ireland to have a majority of the population from a Protestant background, according to the 2001 census. The other is County Down to the south.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and County Antrim · See more »

Dames & Moore v. Regan

Dames & Moore v. Regan, was a United States Supreme Court case dealing with President Jimmy Carter's Executive Order 12170, which froze Iranian assets in the United States on November 14, 1979, in response to the Iran hostage crisis which began on November 4, 1979.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Dames & Moore v. Regan · See more »

David B. Sentelle

David Bryan Sentelle (born February 12, 1943) is a Senior United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and David B. Sentelle · See more »

David Garrow

David J. Garrow (born May 11, 1953 in New Bedford, Massachusetts) is an American historian and author of the book ''Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference'' (1986), which won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for Biography.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and David Garrow · See more »

David Josiah Brewer

David Josiah Brewer (June 20, 1837 – March 28, 1910) was an American jurist and an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court for 20 years.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and David Josiah Brewer · See more »

David Souter

David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and David Souter · See more »

Dean of Harvard Law School

The Dean of Harvard Law School is the head of Harvard Law School.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Dean of Harvard Law School · See more »

Defamation

Defamation, calumny, vilification, or traducement is the communication of a false statement that, depending on the law of the country, harms the reputation of an individual, business, product, group, government, religion, or nation.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Defamation · See more »

Defendant

A defendant is a person accused of committing a crime in criminal prosecution or a person against whom some type of civil relief is being sought in a civil case.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Defendant · See more »

DeFunis v. Odegaard

DeFunis v. Odegaard,, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that the case had become moot and accordingly declined to render a merits decision on it.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and DeFunis v. Odegaard · See more »

Democratic ideals

Democratic ideals is an expression used to reflect personal qualities or standards of government behavior that are felt to be essential for the continuation of a democratic policy.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Democratic ideals · See more »

Demography (journal)

Demography is a bimonthly peer-reviewed academic journal covering issues related to population and demography.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Demography (journal) · See more »

Denver

Denver, officially the City and County of Denver, is the capital and most populous municipality of the U.S. state of Colorado.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Denver · See more »

Desegregation

Desegregation is the process of ending the separation of two groups usually referring to races.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Desegregation · See more »

Dissenting opinion

A dissenting opinion (or dissent) is an opinion in a legal case in certain legal systems written by one or more judges expressing disagreement with the majority opinion of the court which gives rise to its judgment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Dissenting opinion · See more »

District of Columbia Court of Appeals

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals is the highest court of the District of Columbia.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and District of Columbia Court of Appeals · See more »

District of Columbia v. Heller

District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), is a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that Washington, D.C.'s handgun ban and requirement that lawfully-owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and District of Columbia v. Heller · See more »

Donald Trump

Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Donald Trump · See more »

Donald Trump Supreme Court candidates

With the advice and consent of the United States Senate, the President of the United States appoints the members of the Supreme Court of the United States, which is the highest court of the federal judiciary of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Donald Trump Supreme Court candidates · See more »

Doubleday (publisher)

Doubleday is an American publishing company founded as Doubleday & McClure Company in 1897 that by 1947 was the largest in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Doubleday (publisher) · See more »

Dover Publications

Dover Publications, also known as Dover Books, is an American book publisher founded in 1941 by Hayward Cirker and his wife, Blanche.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Dover Publications · See more »

Dred Scott v. Sandford

Dred Scott v. Sandford,, also known as the Dred Scott case, was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court on US labor law and constitutional law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Dred Scott v. Sandford · See more »

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American army general and statesman who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Dwight D. Eisenhower · See more »

Earl Warren

Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was an American jurist and politician who served as the 30th Governor of California (1943–1953) and later the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (1953–1969).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Earl Warren · See more »

Edward Douglass White

Edward Douglass White Jr. (November 3, 1845 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States Senator and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Edward Douglass White · See more »

Edwin Stanton

Edwin McMasters Stanton (December 19, 1814December 24, 1869) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Secretary of War under the Lincoln Administration during most of the American Civil War.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Edwin Stanton · See more »

Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Eighth Amendment (Amendment VIII) of the United States Constitution prohibits the federal government from imposing excessive bail, excessive fines, or cruel and unusual punishments.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Eighth and Ninth Circuits Act of 1837

The Eighth and Ninth Circuits Act of 1837 was a federal statute which increased the size of the Supreme Court of the United States from seven justices to nine, and which also reorganized the circuit courts of the federal judiciary.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Eighth and Ninth Circuits Act of 1837 · See more »

Eisenstadt v. Baird

Eisenstadt v. Baird,, is a United States Supreme Court case that established the right of unmarried people to possess contraception on the same basis as married couples.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Eisenstadt v. Baird · See more »

El Paso, Texas

El Paso (from Spanish, "the pass") is a city in and the seat of El Paso County, Texas, United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and El Paso, Texas · See more »

Elena Kagan

Elena Kagan (pronounced; born April 28, 1960) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, nominated by President Barack Obama in May 10, 2010 and confirmed by the U.S. Senate on August 5, 2010.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Elena Kagan · See more »

Elena Kagan Supreme Court nomination

On May 10, 2010, President Barack Obama announced his selection of Elena Kagan for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, to replace retiring Justice John Paul Stevens.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Elena Kagan Supreme Court nomination · See more »

Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Eleventh Amendment (Amendment XI) to the United States Constitution, which was passed by Congress on March 4, 1794, and ratified by the states on February 7, 1795, deals with each state's sovereign immunity and was adopted to overrule the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Chisholm v. Georgia,.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Encyclopædia Britannica

The Encyclopædia Britannica (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Encyclopædia Britannica · See more »

Engel v. Vitale

Engel v. Vitale,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that it is unconstitutional for state officials to compose an official school prayer and encourage its recitation in public schools.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Engel v. Vitale · See more »

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and England · See more »

Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church is the United States-based member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Episcopal Church (United States) · See more »

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that administers and enforces civil rights laws against workplace discrimination.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission · See more »

Equal Protection Clause

The Equal Protection Clause is part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Equal Protection Clause · See more »

Ex parte McCardle

Ex parte McCardle,, is a United States Supreme Court decision that examines the extent of the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court to review decisions of lower courts under federal statutory law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ex parte McCardle · See more »

Exclusionary rule

In the United States, the exclusionary rule is a legal rule, based on constitutional law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Exclusionary rule · See more »

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Fairleigh Dickinson University is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian university founded in 1942.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Fairleigh Dickinson University · See more »

Federal Constitutional Court

The Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht; abbreviated: BVerfG) is the supreme constitutional court for the Federal Republic of Germany, established by the constitution or Basic Law of Germany.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federal Constitutional Court · See more »

Federal government of the United States

The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government) is the national government of the United States, a constitutional republic in North America, composed of 50 states, one district, Washington, D.C. (the nation's capital), and several territories.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federal government of the United States · See more »

Federal holidays in the United States

In the United States, a federal holiday is an authorized holiday which has been recognized by the US government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federal holidays in the United States · See more »

Federal Judicial Center

The Federal Judicial Center is the education and research agency of the United States federal courts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federal Judicial Center · See more »

Federal judiciary of the United States

The federal judiciary of the United States is one of the three co-equal branches of the federal government of the United States organized under the United States Constitution and laws of the federal government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federal judiciary of the United States · See more »

Federal preemption

In the law of the United States, federal preemption is the invalidation of a U.S. state law that conflicts with federal law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federal preemption · See more »

Federalism

Federalism is the mixed or compound mode of government, combining a general government (the central or 'federal' government) with regional governments (provincial, state, cantonal, territorial or other sub-unit governments) in a single political system.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federalism · See more »

Federalist No. 78

Federalist No.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federalist No. 78 · See more »

Federalist Society

The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called the Federalist Society, is an organization of conservatives and libertarians seeking reform of the current American legal system in accordance with a textualist or originalist interpretation of the U.S. Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Federalist Society · See more »

Felix Frankfurter

Felix Frankfurter (November 15, 1882February 22, 1965) was an American lawyer, professor, and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Felix Frankfurter · See more »

Filibuster

A filibuster is a political procedure where one or more members of parliament or congress debate over a proposed piece of legislation so as to delay or entirely prevent a decision being made on the proposal.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Filibuster · See more »

FindLaw

FindLaw is a business of Thomson Reuters that provides online legal information and online marketing services for law firms.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and FindLaw · See more »

First Amendment to the United States Constitution

The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and First Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti

First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti, 435 U.S. 765 (1978),.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti · See more »

Florida District Courts of Appeal

The Florida District Courts of Appeal (DCAs) are the intermediate appellate courts of the Florida state court system.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Florida District Courts of Appeal · See more »

Florida Star v. B. J. F.

Florida Star v. B.J.F., 491 U.S. 524 (1989), is a United States Supreme Court case involving freedom of the press and privacy rights.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Florida Star v. B. J. F. · See more »

Florida Today

Florida Today is the major daily newspaper serving Brevard County, Florida.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Florida Today · See more »

Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Fox News

Fox News (officially known as the Fox News Channel, commonly abbreviated to FNC) is an American basic cable and satellite television news channel owned by the Fox Entertainment Group, a subsidiary of 21st Century Fox.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Fox News · See more »

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Franklin D. Roosevelt · See more »

Fred M. Vinson

Frederick "Fred" Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890 – September 8, 1953) was an American Democratic politician who served the United States in all three branches of government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Fred M. Vinson · See more »

Furman v. Georgia

Furman v. Georgia, was a criminal case in which the United States Supreme Court struck down all death penalty schemes in the United States in a 5–4 decision, with each member of the majority writing a separate opinion.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Furman v. Georgia · See more »

George H. W. Bush

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 41st President of the United States from 1989 to 1993.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and George H. W. Bush · See more »

George Sutherland

George Alexander Sutherland (March 25, 1862 – July 18, 1942) was an English-born U.S. jurist and politician.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and George Sutherland · See more »

George W. Bush

George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician who served as the 43rd President of the United States from 2001 to 2009.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and George W. Bush · See more »

George Will

George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is an American political commentator.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and George Will · See more »

Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Georgia (U.S. state) · See more »

Georgia v. Brailsford (1794)

Georgia v. Brailsford,, was an early United States Supreme Court case holding that debts sequestered but not declared forfeit by states during the American Revolution could be recovered by bondholders.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Georgia v. Brailsford (1794) · See more »

Gerald Ford

Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. (born Leslie Lynch King Jr; July 14, 1913 – December 26, 2006) was an American politician who served as the 38th President of the United States from August 1974 to January 1977.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gerald Ford · See more »

Gerrymandering

Gerrymandering is a practice intended to establish a political advantage for a particular party or group by manipulating district boundaries.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gerrymandering · See more »

Gibbons v. Ogden

Gibbons v. Ogden, was a landmark decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the power to regulate interstate commerce, granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution, encompassed the power to regulate navigation.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gibbons v. Ogden · See more »

Gideon v. Wainwright

Gideon v. Wainwright,, is a landmark case in United States Supreme Court history.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gideon v. Wainwright · See more »

Gitlow v. New York

Gitlow v. New York,, was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States holding that the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution had extended the reach of certain limitations on federal government authority set forth in the First Amendment—specifically the provisions protecting freedom of speech and freedom of the press—to the governments of the individual states.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gitlow v. New York · See more »

Goldwater v. Carter

Goldwater v. Carter, 444 U.S. 996 (1979), was a United States Supreme Court case which was the result of a lawsuit filed by Senator Barry Goldwater and other members of the United States Congress challenging the right of President Jimmy Carter to unilaterally nullify the Sino-American Mutual Defense Treaty, which the United States had signed with the Republic of China, so that relations could instead be established with the People's Republic of China.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Goldwater v. Carter · See more »

Gonzales v. Carhart

Gonzales v. Carhart,, is a United States Supreme Court case that upheld the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gonzales v. Carhart · See more »

Green v. County School Board of New Kent County

Green v. County School Board of New Kent County, 391 U.S. 430 (1968) was an important United States Supreme Court case dealing with the freedom of choice plans created to avoid compliance with the Court's mandate in Brown II.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Green v. County School Board of New Kent County · See more »

Gregg v. Georgia

Gregg v. Georgia, Proffitt v. Florida, Jurek v. Texas, Woodson v. North Carolina, and Roberts v. Louisiana,, reaffirmed the United States Supreme Court's acceptance of the use of the death penalty in the United States, upholding, in particular, the death sentence imposed on Troy Leon Gregg.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Gregg v. Georgia · See more »

Griswold v. Connecticut

Griswold v. Connecticut,, is a landmark case in the United States about access to contraception.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Griswold v. Connecticut · See more »

Guantanamo Bay detention camp

The Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a United States military prison located within Guantanamo Bay Naval Base,, The Independent, 29 April 2006 also referred to as Guantánamo or GTMO, which is on the coast of Guantánamo Bay in Cuba.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Guantanamo Bay detention camp · See more »

Habeas corpus

Habeas corpus (Medieval Latin meaning literally "that you have the body") is a recourse in law through which a person can report an unlawful detention or imprisonment to a court and request that the court order the custodian of the person, usually a prison official, to bring the prisoner to court, to determine whether the detention is lawful.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Habeas corpus · See more »

Harlan F. Stone

Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American political figure, lawyer, and jurist.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Harlan F. Stone · See more »

Harriet Miers

Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945) is a Republican lawyer and former White House Counsel to President George W. Bush.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Harriet Miers · See more »

Harry Blackmun

Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908March 4, 1999) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 until 1994.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Harry Blackmun · See more »

Harry S. Truman

Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953), taking office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Harry S. Truman · See more »

Harvard Law Review

The Harvard Law Review is a law review published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Harvard Law Review · See more »

Henry Friendly

Henry Jacob Friendly (July 3, 1903 – March 11, 1986) was a prominent judge in the United States, who sat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit from 1959 through 1974 (including service as chief judge from 1971 to 1973) and in senior status until his death in 1986.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Henry Friendly · See more »

Hispanic

The term Hispanic (hispano or hispánico) broadly refers to the people, nations, and cultures that have a historical link to Spain.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Hispanic · See more »

Horace Gray

Horace Gray (March 24, 1828 – September 15, 1902) was an American jurist who ultimately served on the United States Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Horace Gray · See more »

HuffPost

HuffPost (formerly The Huffington Post and sometimes abbreviated HuffPo) is a liberal American news and opinion website and blog that has both localized and international editions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and HuffPost · See more »

Hugo Black

Hugo Lafayette Black (February 27, 1886 – September 25, 1971) was an American politician and jurist who served in the United States Senate from 1927 to 1937, and as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1937 to 1971.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Hugo Black · See more »

Humphrey's Executor v. United States

Humphrey's Executor v. United States, 295 U.S. 602 (1935), was a United States Supreme Court case decided during the Franklin Delano Roosevelt presidency, regarding the powers that a President of the United States has to remove certain executive officials of a "quasi-legislative," "quasi-judicial" administrative body created by Congress, for purely political reasons and without the consent of Congress.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Humphrey's Executor v. United States · See more »

Illinois

Illinois is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Illinois · See more »

Impeachment

Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Impeachment · See more »

Impeachment in the United States

Impeachment in the United States is the process by which the lower house of a legislature brings charges against a civil officer of government for crimes alleged to have been committed, analogous to the bringing of an indictment by a grand jury.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Impeachment in the United States · See more »

In re Gault

In re Gault,, was a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that held that juveniles accused of crimes in a delinquency proceeding must be afforded many of the same due process rights as adults, such as the right to timely notification of the charges, the right to confront witnesses, the right against self-incrimination, and the right to counsel.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and In re Gault · See more »

In-chambers opinion

An in-chambers opinion is an opinion by a single justice or judge of a multi-member appellate court, rendered on an issue that the court's rules or procedures allow a single member of the court to decide.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and In-chambers opinion · See more »

Incorporation of the Bill of Rights

Incorporation, in United States law, is the doctrine by which portions of the Bill of Rights have been made applicable to the states.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Incorporation of the Bill of Rights · See more »

Independence Hall

Independence Hall is the building where both the United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and adopted.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Independence Hall · See more »

Independent Journal Review

The Independent Journal Review is an American conservative news and opinion website based in Alexandria, Virginia.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Independent Journal Review · See more »

Ireland

Ireland (Éire; Ulster-Scots: Airlann) is an island in the North Atlantic.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ireland · See more »

Ivy League

The Ivy League is a collegiate athletic conference comprising sports teams from eight private universities in the Northeastern United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ivy League · See more »

J. Michael Luttig

John Michael Luttig (born June 13, 1954) is an American lawyer and a former United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and J. Michael Luttig · See more »

James Iredell

James Iredell (October 5, 1751 – October 20, 1799) was one of the first Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and James Iredell · See more »

James MacGregor Burns

James MacGregor Burns (August 3, 1918 in Melrose, MA – July 15, 2014 in Williamstown, MA) was an American historian and political scientist, presidential biographer, and authority on leadership studies.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and James MacGregor Burns · See more »

James Madison

James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and James Madison · See more »

James Monroe

James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fifth President of the United States from 1817 to 1825.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and James Monroe · See more »

James Wilson

James Wilson (September 14, 1742 – August 21, 1798) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and James Wilson · See more »

Jan Crawford

Jan Crawford is a television journalist, author, and lawyer.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Jan Crawford · See more »

Jeffrey Toobin

Jeffrey Ross Toobin (born May 21, 1960) is an American lawyer, blogger, author and pundit, and legal analyst for CNN and The New Yorker.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Jeffrey Toobin · See more »

Jimmy Carter

James Earl Carter Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States from 1977 to 1981.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Jimmy Carter · See more »

Joan Biskupic

Joan Biskupic (born 1956) is an American journalist, author, and lawyer who has covered the United States Supreme Court since 1989.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Joan Biskupic · See more »

John Danforth

John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936) is a retired American politician who began his career in 1968 as the Attorney General of Missouri and served three terms as United States Senator from Missouri.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Danforth · See more »

John Jay

John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Jay · See more »

John Marshall

John James Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American politician and the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 to 1835.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Marshall · See more »

John Marshall Harlan

John Marshall Harlan (June 1, 1833October 14, 1911) was an American lawyer and politician who served as an associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Marshall Harlan · See more »

John Marshall Harlan II

John Marshall Harlan (May 20, 1899 – December 29, 1971) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1955 to 1971.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Marshall Harlan II · See more »

John Paul Stevens

John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is an American lawyer and jurist who served as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1975 until his retirement in 2010.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Paul Stevens · See more »

John Roberts

John Glover Roberts Jr. (born January 27, 1955) is an American lawyer who serves as the 17th and current Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Roberts · See more »

John Roberts Supreme Court nomination

The Senate hearings on the nomination of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, began on September 12, 2005, with U.S. Senators posing questions to Roberts, who was nominated by President George W. Bush to fill the vacancy of Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Roberts Supreme Court nomination · See more »

John Rutledge

John Rutledge (September 17, 1739 – July 23, 1800) was the second Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and the first Governor of South Carolina after the Declaration of Independence.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Rutledge · See more »

John Tyler

No description.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and John Tyler · See more »

Jon Corzine

Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is an American financial executive and former politician.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Jon Corzine · See more »

Joseph Story

Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 – September 10, 1845) was an American lawyer and jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1811 to 1845.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Joseph Story · See more »

Judaism

Judaism (originally from Hebrew, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is the religion of the Jewish people.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judaism · See more »

Judicial activism

Judicial activism refers to judicial rulings that are suspected of being based on personal opinion, rather than on existing law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial activism · See more »

Judicial appointment history for United States federal courts

The appointment of federal judges for United States federal courts has become viewed as a political process in the last several decades.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial appointment history for United States federal courts · See more »

Judicial Circuits Act

The Judicial Circuits Act of 1866 (ch. 210) reorganized the United States circuit courts and provided for the gradual elimination of several seats on the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial Circuits Act · See more »

Judicial disqualification

Judicial disqualification, also referred to as recusal, is the act of abstaining from participation in an official action such as a legal proceeding due to a conflict of interest of the presiding court official or administrative officer.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial disqualification · See more »

Judicial independence

Judicial independence is the concept that the judiciary needs to be kept away from the other branches of government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial independence · See more »

Judicial interpretation

Judicial interpretation refers to different ways that the judiciary uses to interpret the law, particularly constitutional documents and legislation.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial interpretation · See more »

Judicial opinion

A judicial opinion is a form of legal opinion written by a judge or a judicial panel in the course of resolving a legal dispute, providing the decision reached to resolve the dispute, and usually indicating the facts which led to the dispute and an analysis of the law used to arrive at the decision.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial opinion · See more »

Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937

The Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937 (frequently called the "court-packing plan")Epstein, at 451.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937 · See more »

Judicial restraint

Judicial restraint is a theory of judicial interpretation that encourages judges to limit the exercise of their own power.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial restraint · See more »

Judicial review

Judicial review is a process under which executive or legislative actions are subject to review by the judiciary.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial review · See more »

Judicial review in the United States

In the United States, judicial review is the ability of a court to examine and decide if a statute, treaty or administrative regulation contradicts or violates the provisions of existing law, a State Constitution, or ultimately the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judicial review in the United States · See more »

Judiciary Act of 1789

The Judiciary Act of 1789 (ch. 20) was a United States federal statute adopted on September 24, 1789, in the first session of the First United States Congress.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judiciary Act of 1789 · See more »

Judiciary Act of 1802

The United States Judiciary Act of 1802 (2 Stat.) was a Federal statute, enacted on April 29, 1802, to reorganize the federal court system.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judiciary Act of 1802 · See more »

Judiciary Act of 1869

The Judiciary Act of 1869 (16 Stat.), also called the Circuit Judges Act of 1869, is a United States statute that stipulated that the makeup of the United States Supreme Court would consist of the Chief Justice and eight associate justices, any six of whom would constitute a quorum.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Judiciary Act of 1869 · See more »

Jury

A jury is a sworn body of people convened to render an impartial verdict (a finding of fact on a question) officially submitted to them by a court, or to set a penalty or judgment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Jury · See more »

Justiciability

Justiciability concerns the limits upon legal issues over which a court can exercise its judicial authority.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Justiciability · See more »

Kansas v. Colorado

Kansas v. Colorado is a longstanding litigation before the Supreme Court of the United States between two states of the United States, Kansas and Colorado.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Kansas v. Colorado · See more »

Kelo v. City of New London

Kelo v. City of New London, 545 U.S. 469 (2005),.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Kelo v. City of New London · See more »

Kevin Gutzman

Kevin R. Constantine Gutzman (born May 20, 1963) is an American constitutional scholar and historian.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Kevin Gutzman · See more »

Korematsu v. United States

Korematsu v. United States,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case concerning the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066, which ordered Japanese Americans into internment camps during World War II regardless of citizenship.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Korematsu v. United States · See more »

Laboratories of democracy

"Laboratories of democracy" is a phrase popularized by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis in New State Ice Co. v. Liebmann to describe how a "state may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory; and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country." Brandeis was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Laboratories of democracy · See more »

Larry Sabato

Larry Joseph Sabato (born August 7, 1952) is an American political scientist and political analyst.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Larry Sabato · See more »

Latino

Latino is a term often used in the United States to refer to people with cultural ties to Latin America, in contrast to Hispanic which is a demonym that includes Spaniards and other speakers of the Spanish language.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Latino · See more »

Law library

A law library is a special library used by law students, lawyers, judges and their law clerks, historians and other scholars of legal history in order to research the law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Law library · See more »

Law of the United States

The law of the United States comprises many levels of codified and uncodified forms of law, of which the most important is the United States Constitution, the foundation of the federal government of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Law of the United States · See more »

Law review

A law review (or law journal) is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Law review · See more »

Law school

A law school (also known as a law centre or college of law) is an institution specializing in legal education, usually involved as part of a process for becoming a lawyer within a given jurisdiction.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Law school · See more »

Lawrence v. Texas

Lawrence v. Texas,.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lawrence v. Texas · See more »

Lawyers' Edition

The United States Supreme Court Reports, Lawyers' Edition, or Lawyers' Edition (L. Ed. and L. Ed. 2d in case citations) is an unofficial reporter of Supreme Court of the United States opinions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lawyers' Edition · See more »

Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.

Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.,, is an employment discrimination decision of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. · See more »

Legal Information Institute

The Legal Information Institute (LII) is a non-profit, public service of Cornell Law School that provides no-cost access to current American and international legal research sources online at.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Legal Information Institute · See more »

Legal opinion

In law, a legal opinion is in certain jurisdictions a written explanation by a judge or group of judges that accompanies an order or ruling in a case, laying out the rationale and legal principles for the ruling.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Legal opinion · See more »

Legal research

Legal research is "the process of identifying and retrieving information necessary to support legal decision-making.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Legal research · See more »

Lemon v. Kurtzman

Lemon v. Kurtzman.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lemon v. Kurtzman · See more »

Leonard I. Garth

Leonard I. Garth (April 7, 1921 – September 22, 2016) was a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Leonard I. Garth · See more »

Lewes

Lewes is the county town of East Sussex and formerly all of Sussex.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lewes · See more »

Lewis F. Powell Jr.

Lewis Franklin Powell Jr. (September 19, 1907 – August 25, 1998) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from 1971 to 1987.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lewis F. Powell Jr. · See more »

LexisNexis

LexisNexis Group is a corporation providing computer-assisted legal research as well as business research and risk management services.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and LexisNexis · See more »

Liberalism

Liberalism is a political and moral philosophy based on liberty and equality.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Liberalism · See more »

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Library of Congress · See more »

Life tenure

A life tenure or service during good behaviour is a term of office that lasts for the office holder's lifetime (in some cases subject to mandatory retirement at a specified age), unless the office holder is removed from office for cause under extraordinary circumstances or chooses to resign.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Life tenure · See more »

Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 is a federal statute in the United States that was the first bill signed into law by US President Barack Obama on January 29, 2009.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 · See more »

Line-item veto

The line-item veto, or partial veto, is a special form of veto that authorizes a chief executive to reject particular provisions of a bill enacted by a legislature without vetoing the entire bill.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Line-item veto · See more »

List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States by court composition

The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States by court composition · See more »

List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States by seat

The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States by seat · See more »

List of law clerks of the Supreme Court of the United States

Law clerks have assisted the Supreme Court Justices in various capacities, since the first one was hired by Justice Horace Gray in 1882.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of law clerks of the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

List of law schools attended by United States Supreme Court Justices

The Constitution does not require that any federal judges have any particular educational or career background, but the work of the Court involved complex questions of law – ranging from constitutional law to administrative law to admiralty law – and consequentially, a legal education has become a de facto prerequisite to appointment on the Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of law schools attended by United States Supreme Court Justices · See more »

List of national founders

The following list of national founding figures is a record, by country, of people who were credited with establishing their nation.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of national founders · See more »

List of United States Supreme Court Justices by time in office

A total of 113 Justices have served on the Supreme Court of the United States, the highest judicial body in the United States, since it was established in 1789.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and List of United States Supreme Court Justices by time in office · See more »

Lists of United States Supreme Court cases

This page serves as an index of lists of United States Supreme Court cases.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lists of United States Supreme Court cases · See more »

Little, Brown and Company

Little, Brown and Company is an American publisher founded in 1837 by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown, and for close to two centuries has published fiction and nonfiction by American authors.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Little, Brown and Company · See more »

Lobbying

Lobbying, persuasion, or interest representation is the act of attempting to influence the actions, policies, or decisions of officials in their daily life, most often legislators or members of regulatory agencies.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lobbying · See more »

Lochner era

The Lochner era is a period in American legal history from 1897 to 1937 in which the Supreme Court of the United States is said to have made it a common practice "to strike down economic regulations adopted by a State based on the Court's own notions of the most appropriate means for the State to implement its considered policies," by using its interpretation of substantive due process to strike down laws held to be infringing on economic liberty or private contract rights.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lochner era · See more »

Lochner v. New York

Lochner v. New York, 198 U.S. 45 (1905), was a landmark U.S. labor law case in the US Supreme Court, holding that limits to working time violated the Fourteenth Amendment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lochner v. New York · See more »

Lord's Prayer

The Lord's Prayer (also called the Our Father, Pater Noster, or the Model Prayer) is a venerated Christian prayer which, according to the New Testament, Jesus taught as the way to pray: Two versions of this prayer are recorded in the gospels: a longer form within the Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew, and a shorter form in the Gospel of Luke when "one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'" Lutheran theologian Harold Buls suggested that both were original, the Matthaen version spoken by Jesus early in his ministry in Galilee, and the Lucan version one year later, "very likely in Judea".

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lord's Prayer · See more »

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Los Angeles Times · See more »

Louis Brandeis

Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Louis Brandeis · See more »

Loving v. Virginia

Loving v. Virginia, is a landmark civil rights decision of the United States Supreme Court, which invalidated laws prohibiting interracial marriage.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Loving v. Virginia · See more »

Lucile Lomen

Helen Lucile Lomen (August 21, 1920 – June 21, 1996) was the first woman to serve as a law clerk for a Supreme Court justice.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lucile Lomen · See more »

Lyle Denniston

Lyle Denniston (born March 16, 1931) is an American legal journalist, professor, and author, who has reported on the Supreme Court of the United States since 1958.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lyle Denniston · See more »

Lynching of Ed Johnson

In 1906, a young African American man named Ed Johnson was murdered by a lynch mob in his home town of Chattanooga, Tennessee.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lynching of Ed Johnson · See more »

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908January 22, 1973), often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Lyndon B. Johnson · See more »

Mandamus

Mandamus (Latin "we command") is a judicial remedy in the form of an order from a superior court, to any government, subordinate court, corporation, or public authority, to do (or forbear from doing) some specific act which that body is obliged under law to do (or refrain from doing), and which is in the nature of public duty, and in certain cases one of a statutory duty.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Mandamus · See more »

Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and its historical birthplace.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Manhattan · See more »

Mapp v. Ohio

Mapp v. Ohio,, was a landmark case in criminal procedure, in which the United States Supreme Court decided that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment, which protects against "unreasonable searches and seizures," may not be used in state law criminal prosecutions in state courts, as well as in federal criminal law prosecutions in federal courts as had previously been the law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Mapp v. Ohio · See more »

Marbury v. Madison

Marbury v. Madison,, was a U.S. Supreme Court case that established the principle of judicial review in the United States, so that American courts have the power to strike down laws, statutes, and executive actions that contravene the U.S. Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Marbury v. Madison · See more »

Marital status

Civil status, or marital status, is any of several distinct options that describe a person's relationship with a significant other.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Marital status · See more »

Mark Levin

Mark Reed Levin (born September 21, 1957) is an American lawyer, author, and radio personality.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Mark Levin · See more »

Mark Tushnet

Mark Victor Tushnet (born November 18, 1945) is a leading scholar of constitutional law and legal history, and currently the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Mark Tushnet · See more »

Marriage

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity (in-laws and other family through marriage).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Marriage · See more »

Martin v. Hunter's Lessee

Martin v. Hunter's Lessee,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case decided on March 20, 1816.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Martin v. Hunter's Lessee · See more »

Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency

Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency,,. is a 5-4 U.S. Supreme Court case in which twelve states and several cities of the United States brought suit against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to force that federal agency to regulate carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) as pollutants.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency · See more »

McCulloch v. Maryland

McCulloch v. Maryland,, was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and McCulloch v. Maryland · See more »

McDonald v. City of Chicago

McDonald v. Chicago, 561 U.S. (2010), is a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States that found that the right of an individual to "keep and bear arms" as protected under the Second Amendment is incorporated by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment against the states.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and McDonald v. City of Chicago · See more »

Medium (website)

Medium is an online publishing platform developed by Evan Williams, and launched in August 2012.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Medium (website) · See more »

Melbourne, Florida

Melbourne is a city in Brevard County, Florida, United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Melbourne, Florida · See more »

Melrose, Massachusetts

Melrose is a city located in the Greater Boston metropolitan area in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Melrose, Massachusetts · See more »

Melville Fuller

Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was a politician, lawyer, and judge from Illinois.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Melville Fuller · See more »

Merrick Garland

Merrick Brian Garland (born November 13, 1952) is the Chief United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Merrick Garland · See more »

Merrick Garland Supreme Court nomination

Following the February 2016 death of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Antonin Scalia, President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland to fill Scalia's seat on the Supreme Court on March 16, 2016.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Merrick Garland Supreme Court nomination · See more »

Methodism

Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Methodism · See more »

Midnight Judges Act

The Midnight Judges Act (also known as the Judiciary Act of 1801;, and officially An act to provide for the more convenient organization of the Courts of the United States) represented an effort to solve an issue in the U.S. Supreme Court during the early 19th century.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Midnight Judges Act · See more »

Millard Fillmore

Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the 13th President of the United States (1850–1853), the last to be a member of the Whig Party while in the White House.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Millard Fillmore · See more »

Miller v. California

Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15 (1973),.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Miller v. California · See more »

Minersville School District v. Gobitis

Minersville School District v. Gobitis,, was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States involving the religious rights of public school students under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Minersville School District v. Gobitis · See more »

Minor v. Happersett

Minor v. Happersett,, is a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that the Constitution did not grant anyone, and in this case specifically a female citizen of the state of Missouri, a right to vote even when a state law granted rights to vote to a certain class of citizens.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Minor v. Happersett · See more »

Miranda v. Arizona

Miranda v. Arizona,, was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Miranda v. Arizona · See more »

Missouri

Missouri is a state in the Midwestern United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Missouri · See more »

Missouri Attorney General

The Office of the Missouri Attorney General was created in 1806 when Missouri was part of the Louisiana Territory.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Missouri Attorney General · See more »

Moderate

Moderate is a general term for people who fall in the center category of the left–right political spectrum.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Moderate · See more »

Modern liberalism in the United States

Modern American liberalism is the dominant version of liberalism in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Modern liberalism in the United States · See more »

Moot court

Moot court is an extracurricular activity at many law schools in which participants take part in simulated court or arbitration proceedings, usually involving drafting memorials or memoranda and participating in oral argument.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Moot court · See more »

Morrison Waite

Morrison Remick "Mott" Waite (November 29, 1816 – March 23, 1888) was an attorney, judge, and politician from Ohio.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Morrison Waite · See more »

National Archives and Records Administration

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the United States government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records and with increasing public access to those documents, which comprise the National Archives.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and National Archives and Records Administration · See more »

National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the U.S. government, established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and National Endowment for the Humanities · See more »

Neil Gorsuch

Neil McGill Gorsuch (born August 29, 1967) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Neil Gorsuch · See more »

New Deal

The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms and regulations enacted in the United States 1933-36, in response to the Great Depression.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and New Deal · See more »

New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and New Jersey · See more »

New Jersey v. Delaware

New Jersey v. Delaware,, is a United States Supreme Court case in which New Jersey sued Delaware, invoking the Supreme Court's original jurisdiction under (a), following Delaware's denial of oil company BP's petition to build a liquefied natural gas pipeline and loading facility on the New Jersey side of the Delaware River.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and New Jersey v. Delaware · See more »

New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and New York City · See more »

New York Times Co. v. Sullivan

New York Times Co.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and New York Times Co. v. Sullivan · See more »

New York Times Co. v. United States

New York Times Co.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and New York Times Co. v. United States · See more »

Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Nixon White House tapes

The Nixon White House tapes are audio recordings of conversations between U.S. President Richard Nixon and Nixon administration officials, Nixon family members, and White House staff, produced between 1971 and 1973.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Nixon White House tapes · See more »

NLRB v. Noel Canning

National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning,, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court unanimously ruled that the President of the United States cannot use his or her authority under the Recess Appointment Clause of the United States Constitution to appoint public officials unless the United States Senate is in recess and not able to transact Senate business.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and NLRB v. Noel Canning · See more »

Nonacquiescence

In law, nonacquiescence is the intentional failure by one branch of the government to comply with the decision of another to some degree.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Nonacquiescence · See more »

NPR

National Public Radio (usually shortened to NPR, stylized as npr) is an American privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization based in Washington, D.C. It serves as a national syndicator to a network of over 1,000 public radio stations in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and NPR · See more »

Obergefell v. Hodges

Obergefell v. Hodges,, is a landmark civil rights case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in a 5–4 decision that the fundamental right to marry is guaranteed to same-sex couples by both the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Obergefell v. Hodges · See more »

Old City Hall (Philadelphia)

Old City Hall located at Chestnut Street at 5th Street in the Independence Hall complex of Independence National Historical Park in Center City, Philadelphia, was built in 1790–91 in the Federal style.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Old City Hall (Philadelphia) · See more »

Oliver Ellsworth

Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807) was an American lawyer, judge, politician, and diplomat.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Oliver Ellsworth · See more »

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (March 8, 1841 – March 6, 1935) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1902 to 1932, and as Acting Chief Justice of the United States from January–February 1930.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. · See more »

Oregon v. Mitchell

Oregon v. Mitchell, was a Supreme Court case which held that the United States Congress could set voting age requirements for federal elections but not for local or state elections.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Oregon v. Mitchell · See more »

Original jurisdiction

The original jurisdiction of a court is the power to hear a case for the first time, as opposed to appellate jurisdiction, when a higher court has the power to review a lower court's decision.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Original jurisdiction · See more »

Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Oxford University Press · See more »

Oyez Project

The Oyez Project at the Illinois Institute of Technology's Chicago-Kent College of Law is an unofficial online multimedia archive of the Supreme Court of the United States, especially audio of oral arguments.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Oyez Project · See more »

Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1

Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 · See more »

Pat Buchanan

Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American paleoconservative political commentator, author, syndicated columnist, politician, and broadcaster.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Pat Buchanan · See more »

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, often shortened to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or nicknamed Obamacare, is a United States federal statute enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act · See more »

Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman (born November 15, 1949, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American legal historian, and became the President of Gratz College, Melrose Park, PA in 2017.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Paul Finkelman · See more »

Penguin Group

The Penguin Group is a trade book publisher and part of Penguin Random House.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Penguin Group · See more »

Per curiam decision

In law, a per curiam decision (or opinion) is a ruling issued by an appellate court of multiple judges in which the decision rendered is made by the court (or at least, a majority of the court) acting collectively (and typically, though not necessarily, unanimously).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Per curiam decision · See more »

Peter H. Irons

Peter H. Irons (born August 11, 1940) is an American political activist, civil rights attorney, legal scholar, and professor emeritus of political science.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Peter H. Irons · See more »

Petitioner

A petitioner is a person who pleads with governmental institution for a legal remedy or a redress of grievances, through use of a petition.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Petitioner · See more »

Philosophy of law

Philosophy of law is a branch of philosophy and jurisprudence that seeks to answer basic questions about law and legal systems, such as "What is law?", "What are the criteria for legal validity?", "What is the relationship between law and morality?", and many other similar questions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Philosophy of law · See more »

Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis McAlpin Schlafly (née Stewart; August 15, 1924 – September 5, 2016) was an American constitutional lawyer and conservative political activist.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Phyllis Schlafly · See more »

Pin Point, Georgia

Pin Point is an unincorporated community in Chatham County, Georgia, United States; it is located southeast of Savannah.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Pin Point, Georgia · See more »

Planned Parenthood v. Casey

Planned Parenthood v. Casey, 505 U.S. 833 (1992), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the constitutionality of several Pennsylvania state statutory provisions regarding abortion was challenged.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Planned Parenthood v. Casey · See more »

Plessy v. Ferguson

Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896),.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Plessy v. Ferguson · See more »

Political question

In American Constitutional law, the political question doctrine is closely linked to the concept of justiciability, as it comes down to a question of whether or not the court system is an appropriate forum in which to hear the case.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Political question · See more »

Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co.

Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Company,, affirmed on rehearing,, with a ruling of 5–4, was a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the unapportioned income taxes on interest, dividends and rents imposed by the Income Tax Act of 1894 were, in effect, direct taxes, and were unconstitutional because they violated the provision that direct taxes be apportioned.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co. · See more »

Presbyterianism

Presbyterianism is a part of the reformed tradition within Protestantism which traces its origins to Britain, particularly Scotland, and Ireland.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Presbyterianism · See more »

President of the United States

The President of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and President of the United States · See more »

Procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest federal court in the United States and the only court specifically established by the Constitution of the United States, implemented in 1789.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

Public defender

A public defender is an attorney appointed to represent people who cannot afford to hire one.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Public defender · See more »

Quorum

A quorum is the minimum number of members of a deliberative assembly (a body that uses parliamentary procedure, such as a legislature) necessary to conduct the business of that group.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Quorum · See more »

Racial segregation in the United States

Racial segregation in the United States, as a general term, includes the segregation or separation of access to facilities, services, and opportunities such as housing, medical care, education, employment, and transportation along racial lines.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Racial segregation in the United States · See more »

Recess appointment

In the United States, a recess appointment is an appointment by the President of a federal official when the U.S. Senate is in recess.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Recess appointment · See more »

Reconstruction era

The Reconstruction era was the period from 1863 (the Presidential Proclamation of December 8, 1863) to 1877.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Reconstruction era · See more »

Regents of the Univ. of Cal. v. Bakke

Regents of the University of California v. Bakke,, was a landmark decision by the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Regents of the Univ. of Cal. v. Bakke · See more »

Regionalism (politics)

In politics, regionalism is a political ideology that focuses on the national or normative interests of a particular region, group of regions or another subnational entity.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Regionalism (politics) · See more »

Reporter of Decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States

The Reporter of Decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States is the official charged with editing and publishing the opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States, both when announced and when they are published in permanent bound volumes of the United States Reports. The Reporter of Decisions is responsible for only the contents of the United States Reports issued by the Government Printing Office, first in preliminary prints and later in the final bound volumes.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Reporter of Decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

Resignation

A resignation is the formal act of giving up or quitting one's office or position.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Resignation · See more »

Retirement

Retirement is the withdrawal from one's position or occupation or from one's active working life.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Retirement · See more »

Reuters

Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in London, United Kingdom.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Reuters · See more »

Reynolds v. Sims

Reynolds v. Sims, was a United States Supreme Court case that ruled that unlike in the election of the United States Senate, in the election of any chamber of a state legislature the electoral districts must be roughly equal in population (thus negating the traditional function of a State Senate, which was to allow rural counties to counterbalance large towns and cities).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Reynolds v. Sims · See more »

Richard Epstein

Richard Allen Epstein (born April 17, 1943) is an American legal scholar best known for his writings and studies on classical liberalism, libertarianism, torts, contracts, and a wide variety of topics in law and economics.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Richard Epstein · See more »

Richard Nixon

Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was an American politician who served as the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 until 1974, when he resigned from office, the only U.S. president to do so.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Richard Nixon · See more »

Robert Bork

Robert Heron Bork (March 1, 1927 – December 19, 2012) was an American judge, government official, and legal scholar who advocated the judicial philosophy of originalism.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Robert Bork · See more »

Robert H. Jackson

Robert Houghwout Jackson (February 13, 1892 – October 9, 1954) was an American attorney and judge who served as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Robert H. Jackson · See more »

Robert Reich

Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) is an American political commentator, professor, and author.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Robert Reich · See more »

Roberts Court

The Roberts Court is the time since 2005 during which the Supreme Court of the United States has been led by Chief Justice John Roberts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Roberts Court · See more »

Roe v. Wade

Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is a landmark decision issued in 1973 by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of the constitutionality of laws that criminalized or restricted access to abortions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Roe v. Wade · See more »

Roger B. Taney

Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, holding that office from 1836 until his death in 1864.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Roger B. Taney · See more »

Ronald Reagan

Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was an American politician and actor who served as the 40th President of the United States from 1981 to 1989.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ronald Reagan · See more »

Royal Exchange (New York City)

The Royal Exchange building in New York City, later known as the "Old Royal Exchange" and the Merchants Exchange was a covered marketplace located near the foot of Broad Street, near its intersection with Water Street.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Royal Exchange (New York City) · See more »

Rule of four

The rule of four is a Supreme Court of the United States practice that permits four of the nine justices to grant a writ of certiorari.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Rule of four · See more »

Running of the Interns

The Running of the Interns is a Washington, DC, tradition, sometimes called a race, that involves interns of news outlets running to deliver results of major decisions by the Supreme Court of the United States to the press.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Running of the Interns · See more »

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (born Joan Ruth Bader; March 15, 1933) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ruth Bader Ginsburg · See more »

Sacramento, California

Sacramento is the capital city of the U.S. state of California and the seat of Sacramento County.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sacramento, California · See more »

Salmon P. Chase

Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808May 7, 1873) was a U.S. politician and jurist who served as the sixth Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Salmon P. Chase · See more »

Salon (website)

Salon is an American news and opinion website, created by David Talbot in 1995 and currently owned by the Salon Media Group.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Salon (website) · See more »

Same-sex marriage in the United States

Same-sex marriage in the United States was initially established on a state-by-state basis, expanding from 1 state in 2004 to 36 states in 2015, when, on June 26, 2015, same-sex marriage was established in all 50 states as a result of the ruling of the Supreme Court of the United States in the landmark civil rights case of Obergefell v. Hodges, in which it was held that the right of same-sex couples to marry on the same terms and conditions as opposite-sex couples, with all the accompanying rights and responsibilities, is guaranteed by both the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Same-sex marriage in the United States · See more »

Samuel Alito

Samuel Anthony Alito Jr. (born April 1, 1950) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Samuel Alito · See more »

Samuel Alito Supreme Court nomination

On October 31, 2005, Samuel Alito was nominated by President George W. Bush for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to replace the retiring Sandra Day O'Connor.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Samuel Alito Supreme Court nomination · See more »

Samuel Chase

Samuel Chase (April 17, 1741 – June 19, 1811) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and a signatory to the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Maryland.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Samuel Chase · See more »

San Francisco

San Francisco (initials SF;, Spanish for 'Saint Francis'), officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the cultural, commercial, and financial center of Northern California.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and San Francisco · See more »

Sandra Day O'Connor

Sandra Day O'Connor (born March 26, 1930) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, having served from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan until 2006.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sandra Day O'Connor · See more »

Sanford Levinson

Sanford Victor Levinson (born June 17, 1941) is an American legal scholar, best known for his writings on constitutional law and as a professor at the University of Texas Law School.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sanford Levinson · See more »

School voucher

A school voucher, also called an education voucher, in a voucher system, is a certificate of government funding for a student at a school chosen by the student or the student's parents.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and School voucher · See more »

Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Scotland · See more »

Scott Armstrong (journalist)

Scott Armstrong is the current director of Information Trust, a former journalist for The Washington Post, and founder of the National Security Archive.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Scott Armstrong (journalist) · See more »

SCOTUSblog

SCOTUSblog is a law blog written by lawyers, law professors, and law students about the Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes abbreviated "SCOTUS").

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and SCOTUSblog · See more »

Second Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Second Amendment (Amendment II) to the United States Constitution protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms and was adopted on December 15, 1791, as part of the first ten amendments contained in the Bill of Rights.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Second Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Segal–Cover score

A Segal–Cover score is an attempt to measure the "perceived qualifications and ideology" of United States Supreme Court justices.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Segal–Cover score · See more »

Selective Draft Law Cases

Arver v. United States,, also known as the Selective Draft Law Cases, was a United States Supreme Court decision which upheld the Selective Service Act of 1917, and more generally, upheld conscription in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Selective Draft Law Cases · See more »

Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida

Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida,, was a United States Supreme Court case which held that Article One of the U.S. Constitution did not give the United States Congress the power to abrogate the sovereign immunity of the states that is further protected under the Eleventh Amendment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida · See more »

Senior status

Senior status is a form of semi-retirement for United States federal judges and judges in some state court systems.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Senior status · See more »

Seniority

Seniority is the concept of a person or group of people taking precedence over another person or group because the former is either older than the latter or has occupied a particular position longer than the latter.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Seniority · See more »

Separate but equal

Separate but equal was a legal doctrine in United States constitutional law according to which racial segregation did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted during the Reconstruction Era, which guaranteed "equal protection" under the law to all citizens.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Separate but equal · See more »

Separation of powers

The separation of powers is a model for the governance of a state.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Separation of powers · See more »

Seriatim

In law, seriatim (Latin for "in series") indicates that a court is addressing multiple issues in a certain order, such as the order in which the issues were originally presented to the court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Seriatim · See more »

Seventh Circuit Act of 1807

The Seventh Circuit Act of 1807 (formally, "An Act establishing Circuit Courts, and abridging the jurisdiction of the district courts in the districts of Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio",; 9th Congress, ch. 16; enacted February 24, 1807) was a federal statute which increased the size of the Supreme Court of the United States from six Justices to seven, and which also reorganized the circuit courts of the federal judiciary.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Seventh Circuit Act of 1807 · See more »

Shelby County v. Holder

Shelby County v. Holder,, is a landmark United States Supreme Court case regarding the constitutionality of two provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965: Section 5, which requires certain states and local governments to obtain federal preclearance before implementing any changes to their voting laws or practices; and Section 4(b), which contains the coverage formula that determines which jurisdictions are subjected to preclearance based on their histories of discrimination in voting.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Shelby County v. Holder · See more »

Sheldon v. Sill

Sheldon v. Sill,, is a ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States holding that Congress may restrict the jurisdiction of the lower federal courts by limiting the subjects those courts may hear, even if those subjects fall within the federal judicial power defined by the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sheldon v. Sill · See more »

Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Slate (magazine)

Slate is an online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture in the United States from a liberal perspective.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Slate (magazine) · See more »

Smyrna

Smyrna (Ancient Greek: Σμύρνη, Smýrni or Σμύρνα, Smýrna) was a Greek city dating back to antiquity located at a central and strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Smyrna · See more »

Sodomy

Sodomy is generally anal or oral sex between people or sexual activity between a person and a non-human animal (bestiality), but it may also mean any non-procreative sexual activity.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sodomy · See more »

Solicitor General of the United States

The United States Solicitor General is the fourth-highest-ranking official in the U.S. Department of Justice.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Solicitor General of the United States · See more »

Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Maria Sotomayor (born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, appointed by President Barack Obama in May 2009 and confirmed in August 2009.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sonia Sotomayor · See more »

Sonia Sotomayor Supreme Court nomination

On May 26, 2009, President Barack Obama announced his selection of Judge Sonia Sotomayor for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, to replace retiring Justice David Souter.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Sonia Sotomayor Supreme Court nomination · See more »

Southern United States

The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Southern United States · See more »

Special master

In the law of the United States, a special master is generally a subordinate official appointed by a judge to make sure that judicial orders are actually followed, or in the alternative, to hear evidence on behalf of the judge and make recommendations to the judge as to the disposition of a matter.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Special master · See more »

Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey v. United States

Standard Oil Co.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey v. United States · See more »

State attorney general

The state attorney general in each of the 50 U.S. states and territories is the chief legal advisor to the state government and the state's chief law enforcement officer.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and State attorney general · See more »

State court (United States)

In the United States, a state court has jurisdiction over disputes with some connection to a U.S. state, as opposed to the federal government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and State court (United States) · See more »

State school

State schools (also known as public schools outside England and Wales)In England and Wales, some independent schools for 13- to 18-year-olds are known as 'public schools'.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and State school · See more »

State supreme court

In the United States, a state supreme court (known by other names in some states) is the ultimate judicial tribunal in the court system of a particular state (i.e., that state's court of last resort).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and State supreme court · See more »

States' rights

In American political discourse, states' rights are political powers held for the state governments rather than the federal government according to the United States Constitution, reflecting especially the enumerated powers of Congress and the Tenth Amendment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and States' rights · See more »

Status quo

Status quo is a Latin phrase meaning the existing state of affairs, particularly with regard to social or political issues.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Status quo · See more »

Stephen Breyer

Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American lawyer, professor, and jurist who serves as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Stephen Breyer · See more »

Stetson University College of Law

Stetson University College of Law, founded in 1900 and part of Stetson University, is Florida's first law school.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Stetson University College of Law · See more »

Substantive due process

Substantive due process, in United States constitutional law, is a principle allowing courts to protect certain fundamental rights from government interference, even if procedural protections are present or the rights are not specifically mentioned elsewhere in the US Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Substantive due process · See more »

Summary judgment

In law, a summary judgment (also judgment as a matter of law) is a judgment entered by a court for one party and against another party summarily, i.e., without a full trial.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Summary judgment · See more »

Supreme court

A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of courts in many legal jurisdictions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Supreme court · See more »

Supreme Court Historical Society

The Supreme Court Historical Society is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving and communicating the history of the U.S. Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Supreme Court Historical Society · See more »

Supreme Court of Florida

The Supreme Court of Florida is the highest court in the U.S. state of Florida.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Supreme Court of Florida · See more »

Supreme Court of Puerto Rico

The Supreme Court of Puerto Rico —Tribunal Supremo de Puerto Rico (TSPR)— is the highest court of Puerto Rico, having judicial authority to interpret and decide questions of Puerto Rican law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Supreme Court of Puerto Rico · See more »

Supreme Court of the Virgin Islands

The Supreme Court of the Virgin Islands is the highest court in the territory of the United States Virgin Islands.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Supreme Court of the Virgin Islands · See more »

Supreme Court Police

The Supreme Court of the United States Police is a small U.S. federal law enforcement agency headquartered in the District of Columbia, whose mission is to ensure the integrity of the constitutional mission of the U.S. Supreme Court by protecting the Supreme Court building, the Justices, employees, guests, and visitors.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Supreme Court Police · See more »

Swing vote

A swing vote is a vote that is seen as potentially going to any of a number of candidates in an election, or, in a two-party system, may go to either of the two dominant political parties.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Swing vote · See more »

Tennessee

Tennessee (translit) is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Tennessee · See more »

Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Tenth Amendment (Amendment X) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, was ratified on December 15, 1791.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Tenth Circuit Act of 1863

The Tenth Circuit Act of 1863 was a federal statute which increased the size of the Supreme Court of the United States from nine justices to ten, and which also reorganized the circuit courts of the federal judiciary.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Tenth Circuit Act of 1863 · See more »

Term limit

A term limit is a legal restriction that limits the number of terms an officeholder may serve in a particular elected office.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Term limit · See more »

The American Spectator

The American Spectator is a conservative U.S. monthly magazine covering news and politics, edited by R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr. and published by the non-profit American Spectator Foundation.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The American Spectator · See more »

The Atlantic

The Atlantic is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Atlantic · See more »

The Brethren (book)

The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court is a 1979 book by Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Brethren (book) · See more »

The Bronx

The Bronx is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City, in the U.S. state of New York.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Bronx · See more »

The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is a nonprofit news organization that publishes daily articles in electronic format as well as a weekly print edition.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Christian Science Monitor · See more »

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Federalist Papers · See more »

The Green Bag

The Green Bag: An Entertaining Journal of Law (second series) is a quarterly legal journal dedicated to publishing "good writing" about the law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Green Bag · See more »

The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Guardian · See more »

The National Law Journal

The National Law Journal, a U.S. periodical founded in 1978 by Jerry Finkelstein, as a "sibling newspaper" of the New York Law Journal, that itself was founded in 1888.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The National Law Journal · See more »

The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The New York Times · See more »

The Nine (book)

The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court is a 2007 non-fiction book by legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Nine (book) · See more »

The Seattle Times

The Seattle Times is a daily newspaper serving Seattle, Washington, United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Seattle Times · See more »

The switch in time that saved nine

"The switch in time that saved nine" is the name given to what was perceived as the sudden jurisprudential shift by Associate Justice Owen Roberts of the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1937 case West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The switch in time that saved nine · See more »

The Telephone Cases

The Telephone Cases were a series of U.S. court cases in the 1870s and 1880s related to the invention of the telephone, which culminated in the 1888 decision of the United States Supreme Court upholding the priority of the patents belonging to Alexander Graham Bell.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Telephone Cases · See more »

The Times (Trenton)

The Times is a daily newspaper owned by Advance Publications that serves Trenton and the Mercer County, New Jersey area, with a strong focus on the government of New Jersey.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Times (Trenton) · See more »

The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Wall Street Journal · See more »

The Washington Post

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and The Washington Post · See more »

Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Thirteenth Amendment (Amendment XIII) to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Thomson Reuters

Thomson Reuters Corporation is a Canadian multinational mass media and information firm.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Thomson Reuters · See more »

Thurgood Marshall

Thurgood Marshall (July 2, 1908January 24, 1993) was an American lawyer, serving as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Thurgood Marshall · See more »

Time (magazine)

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Time (magazine) · See more »

Tom Goldstein

Thomas C. Goldstein, known as simply Tom Goldstein, is an American attorney known for his advocacy before and blogging about the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Tom Goldstein · See more »

Trenton, New Jersey

Trenton is the capital city of the U.S. state of New Jersey and the county seat of Mercer County.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Trenton, New Jersey · See more »

Turkey

Turkey (Türkiye), officially the Republic of Turkey (Türkiye Cumhuriyeti), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Turkey · See more »

Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Twenty-sixth Amendment (Amendment XXVI) to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from using age as a reason for denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States who are at least eighteen years old.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report is an American media company that publishes news, opinion, consumer advice, rankings, and analysis.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and U.S. News & World Report · See more »

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses Simpson Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American soldier and statesman who served as Commanding General of the Army and the 18th President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ulysses S. Grant · See more »

Unitarianism

Unitarianism (from Latin unitas "unity, oneness", from unus "one") is historically a Christian theological movement named for its belief that the God in Christianity is one entity, as opposed to the Trinity (tri- from Latin tres "three") which defines God as three persons in one being; the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Unitarianism · See more »

United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States · See more »

United States Assistant Attorney General

Many of the divisions and offices of the United States Department of Justice are headed by an Assistant Attorney General.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Assistant Attorney General · See more »

United States Associate Attorney General

The Associate Attorney General of the United States is the third-ranking official in the U.S. Department of Justice.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Associate Attorney General · See more »

United States Attorney

United States Attorneys (also known as chief federal prosecutors and, historically, as United States District Attorneys) represent the United States federal government in United States district courts and United States courts of appeals.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Attorney · See more »

United States Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Bill of Rights · See more »

United States Capitol

The United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building, is the home of the United States Congress, and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Capitol · See more »

United States Capitol Police

The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a federal law enforcement agency charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Capitol Police · See more »

United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Congress · See more »

United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Constitution · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces

The United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces (in case citations, C.A.A.F. or USCAAF) is an Article I court that exercises worldwide appellate jurisdiction over members of the United States Armed Forces on active duty and other persons subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (in case citations, D.C. Cir.) known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (in case citations, 8th Cir.) is a United States federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (in case citations, 11th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit; in case citations, Fed. Cir. or C.A.F.C.) is a United States court of appeals headquartered in Washington, D.C. The court was created by Congress with passage of the Federal Courts Improvement Act of 1982, which merged the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals and the appellate division of the United States Court of Claims, making the judges of the former courts into circuit judges.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit (in case citations, 5th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following federal judicial districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (in case citations, 1st Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (in case citations, 4th Cir.) is a federal court located in Richmond, Virginia, with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (in case citations, 9th Cir.) is a U.S. Federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (in case citations, 2d Cir.) is one of the thirteen United States Courts of Appeals.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (in case citations, 7th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit (in case citations, 6th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit · See more »

United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (in case citations, 3d Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts for the following districts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit · See more »

United States courts of appeals

The United States courts of appeals or circuit courts are the intermediate appellate courts of the United States federal court system.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States courts of appeals · See more »

United States Department of Justice

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is a federal executive department of the U.S. government, responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice in the United States, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The department was formed in 1870 during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. The Department of Justice administers several federal law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The department is responsible for investigating instances of financial fraud, representing the United States government in legal matters (such as in cases before the Supreme Court), and running the federal prison system. The department is also responsible for reviewing the conduct of local law enforcement as directed by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. The department is headed by the United States Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Jeff Sessions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Department of Justice · See more »

United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (in case citations, S.D.N.Y.) is a federal district court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States District Court for the Southern District of New York · See more »

United States Domestic Policy Council

The Domestic Policy Council (DPC) of the United States is the principal forum used by the President of the United States for considering domestic policy matters, excluding economic matters, which are the domain of the National Economic Council.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Domestic Policy Council · See more »

United States Marshals Service

The United States Marshals Service (USMS) is a federal law-enforcement agency within the U.S. Department of Justice.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Marshals Service · See more »

United States presidential election, 2000

The United States presidential election of 2000 was the 54th quadrennial presidential election.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States presidential election, 2000 · See more »

United States Reports

The United States Reports are the official record (law reports) of the rulings, orders, case tables (list of every case decided, in alphabetical order both by the name of the petitioner (the losing party in lower courts) and by the name of the respondent (the prevailing party below)), and other proceedings of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Reports · See more »

United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprise the legislature of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Senate · See more »

United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

The United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, informally the Senate Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of 21 U.S. Senators whose role is to oversee the Department of Justice (DOJ), consider executive nominations, and review pending legislation.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary · See more »

United States Supreme Court Building

The Supreme Court Building is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Judicial Branch thereof.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States Supreme Court Building · See more »

United States v. Alcoa

United States v. Alcoa, 148 F.2d 416 (2d Cir. 1945), is a landmark decision concerning United States antitrust law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Alcoa · See more »

United States v. Butler

United States v. Butler, 297 U.S. 1 (1936), was a U.S. Supreme Court case in which the Court held that the U.S. Congresss power to lay taxes is not limited only to the level necessary to carry out its other powers enumerated in Article I of the U.S. Constitution, but is a broad authority to tax and spend for the "general welfare" of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Butler · See more »

United States v. Curtiss-Wright Export Corp.

United States v. Curtiss-Wright Export Corp., 299 U.S. 304 (1936),.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Curtiss-Wright Export Corp. · See more »

United States v. Darby Lumber Co.

United States v. Darby Lumber Co.,., was a case in which the United States Supreme Court upheld the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, holding that the U.S. Congress had the power under the Commerce Clause to regulate employment conditions.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Darby Lumber Co. · See more »

United States v. Klein

United States v. Klein,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case stemming from the American Civil War (1861–1865).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Klein · See more »

United States v. Lopez

United States v. Alfonso D. Lopez, Jr., was the first United States Supreme Court case since the New Deal to set limits to Congress' power under the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Lopez · See more »

United States v. Nixon

United States v. Nixon, 418 U.S. 683 (1974), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case which resulted in a unanimous decision against President Richard Nixon, ordering him to deliver tape recordings and other subpoenaed materials to a federal district court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Nixon · See more »

United States v. Shipp

United States v. Shipp, 203 U.S. 563 (1906),.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Shipp · See more »

United States v. Texas

United States v. Texas,, is a United States Supreme Court case regarding the constitutionality of the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Texas · See more »

United States v. Virginia

United States v. Virginia,, is a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States struck down the long-standing male-only admission policy of the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) in a 7–1 decision. (Justice Clarence Thomas, whose son was enrolled at VMI at the time, recused himself.).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Virginia · See more »

United States v. Windsor

United States v. Windsor, (Docket No.), is a landmark civil rights case in which the United States Supreme Court held that restricting U.S. federal interpretation of "marriage" and "spouse" to apply only to opposite-sex unions, by Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), is unconstitutional under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and United States v. Windsor · See more »

University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University)The corporate title of the university is The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and University of Cambridge · See more »

University of Chicago Press

The University of Chicago Press is the largest and one of the oldest university presses in the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and University of Chicago Press · See more »

University of Maryland, College Park

The University of Maryland, College Park (commonly referred to as the University of Maryland, UMD, or simply Maryland) is a public research university located in the city of College Park in Prince George's County, Maryland, approximately from the northeast border of Washington, D.C. Founded in 1856, the university is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and University of Maryland, College Park · See more »

Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States

Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are nominated by the President and are then confirmed by the Senate.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

USA Today

USA Today is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and USA Today · See more »

Vienna

Vienna (Wien) is the federal capital and largest city of Austria and one of the nine states of Austria.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Vienna · See more »

Viking Press

Viking Press is an American publishing company now owned by Penguin Random House.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Viking Press · See more »

Virginia v. Tennessee

Virginia v. Tennessee, 148 U.S. 503 (1893), was a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, which had two questions: (1) What is the correct boundary between the two states and, if the boundary was inaccurately set, can the state ask the court to change it? (2) Does an agreement setting the boundary between two states require approval of Congress under the Compact Clause of the Constitution of the United States? When two states have a controversy between each other, the case is filed for original jurisdiction with the United States Supreme Court.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Virginia v. Tennessee · See more »

Wall Street

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Wall Street · See more »

Ware v. Hylton

Ware v. Hylton, 3 U.S. (3 Dall.) 199 (1796) is a United States Supreme Court case where a divided court ruled that an article in the Treaty of Paris, which provided that creditors on both sides should meet no lawful impediment when recovering bona fide debts, took precedence and overruled a Virginia law passed during the American Revolution which had nullified such debts.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Ware v. Hylton · See more »

Warren E. Burger

Warren Earl Burger (September 17, 1907 – June 25, 1995) was the 15th Chief Justice of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1986.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Warren E. Burger · See more »

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Washington, D.C. · See more »

West (publisher)

West (also known by its original name, West Publishing) is a business owned by Thomson Reuters that publishes legal, business, and regulatory information in print, and on electronic services such as Westlaw.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and West (publisher) · See more »

West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish

West Coast Hotel Co.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish · See more »

West v. Barnes

West v. Barnes,, was the first United States Supreme Court decision and the earliest case calling for oral argument.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and West v. Barnes · See more »

West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette

West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette,, is a decision by the United States Supreme Court holding that the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment protects students from being forced to salute the American flag or say the Pledge of Allegiance in public school.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette · See more »

White House Counsel

The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States whose role is to advise the President on all legal issues concerning the President and his Administration.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and White House Counsel · See more »

Wickard v. Filburn

Wickard v. Filburn, 317 U.S. 111 (1942), was a United States Supreme Court decision that dramatically increased the regulatory power of the federal government.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Wickard v. Filburn · See more »

Wiley Blount Rutledge

Wiley Blount Rutledge Jr. (July 20, 1894 – September 10, 1949) was an American educator and justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1943–49).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Wiley Blount Rutledge · See more »

William H. Pryor Jr.

William Holcombe Pryor Jr. (born April 26, 1962) is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and a Commissioner of the United States Sentencing Commission.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William H. Pryor Jr. · See more »

William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison Sr. (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military officer, a principal contributor in the War of 1812, and the ninth President of the United States (1841).

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William Henry Harrison · See more »

William Howard Taft

William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and the tenth Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William Howard Taft · See more »

William O. Douglas

William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898January 19, 1980) was an American jurist and politician who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William O. Douglas · See more »

William Paterson (judge)

William Paterson (December 24, 1745 – September 9, 1806) was a New Jersey statesman and a signer of the United States Constitution.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William Paterson (judge) · See more »

William Rehnquist

William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer and jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States for 33 years, first as an Associate Justice from 1972 to 1986, and then as the 16th Chief Justice of the United States from 1986 until his death in 2005.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William Rehnquist · See more »

William Thaddeus Coleman Jr.

William Thaddeus "Bill" Coleman Jr. (July 7, 1920 – March 31, 2017) was an American attorney and politician.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. · See more »

Willis Van Devanter

Willis Van Devanter (April 17, 1859 – February 8, 1941) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from January 3, 1911, to June 2, 1937.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Willis Van Devanter · See more »

Worcester v. Georgia

Worcester v. Georgia,, was a case in which the United States Supreme Court vacated the conviction of Samuel Worcester and held that the Georgia criminal statute that prohibited non-Native Americans from being present on Native American lands without a license from the state was unconstitutional.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Worcester v. Georgia · See more »

World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and World War II · See more »

Writ of prohibition

A writ of prohibition is a writ directing a subordinate to stop doing something the law prohibits.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Writ of prohibition · See more »

Wyeth v. Levine

Wyeth v. Levine, 555 U.S. 555 (2009), is a United States Supreme Court case holding that Federal regulatory clearance of a medication does not shield the manufacturer from liability under state law.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Wyeth v. Levine · See more »

Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer

Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer · See more »

Zachary Taylor

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850) was the 12th President of the United States, serving from March 1849 until his death in July 1850.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Zachary Taylor · See more »

Zelman v. Simmons-Harris

Zelman v. Simmons-Harris,, was a 5-4 decision of the United States Supreme Court that upheld an Ohio program that used school vouchers.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and Zelman v. Simmons-Harris · See more »

2009 term opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States

The 2009 term of the Supreme Court of the United States began October 5, 2009 and concluded October 3, 2010.

New!!: Supreme Court of the United States and 2009 term opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States · See more »

Redirects here:

@SCOTUS, American Supreme Court, Circuit justice, Criticism of the Supreme Court of the United States, Criticism of the United States Supreme Court, Justice positions, Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, Retired justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, S.Ct., SCOTUS, SCotUS, SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, Supreme Court (U.S.), Supreme Court (USA), Supreme Court (United States), Supreme Court justice, Supreme Court of United States, Supreme Court of the U.S., Supreme Court of the US, Supreme Court of the USA, Supreme Court of the United States of America, Supreme Court of the Unites States, Supreme Court of the Untied States, Supreme court of the united states, Supreme court of the us, Supremecourt.gov, The Supreme Court of the United States, The U.S. Supreme Court, U-S Supreme Court, U. S. Supreme Court, U.S Supreme Court, U.S. Sumpreme Court, U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, U.S. Supreme court, US Supreme Court, US Supreme court, US supreme court, United States Supreme Court, United States Supreme Court (USSC), United States Supreme Court Justice, United States Surpreme Court, United States/Supreme Court, Us supreme court.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_Court_of_the_United_States

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »