Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich)

Index Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich)

The Symphony No. [1]

143 relations: Agitprop, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Vinogradov (bass), Amen, André Previn, Anne Frank, Anti-Stalinist left, Antisemitism, Antonina W. Bouis, Arnold Pomerans, Arthur Eisen, Augmented third, Babi Yar, Bass (voice type), Bass clarinet, Bass drum, Bassoon, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, B♭ (musical note), Béla Bartók, Bell, Bernard Haitink, Białystok pogrom, Boris Godunov (opera), Boris Tishchenko, Borys Hmyria, Boudoir, Burlesque, Cadence (music), Cantata, Castanets, Celesta, Cello Concerto No. 1 (Shostakovich), Choral Arts Society of Washington, Choral symphony, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Clapper (musical instrument), Clarinet, Conscience, Contrabassoon, Cor anglais, Cymbal, Decca Records, Dmitri Shostakovich, Dorian mode, Dreyfus affair, Edison Denisov, EMI Classics, Ernst Neizvestny, Eugene Ormandy, ..., Flute, From Jewish Folk Poetry, Gennady Rozhdestvensky, Glockenspiel, Gnessin State Musical College, Gong, Gustav Mahler, Harp, Horn (instrument), Ian MacDonald, Intelligentsia, Interval (music), Jamie Macpherson, Khovanshchina, Kiev, Kirill Kondrashin, Klezmer, Kurt Masur, Lament, Literaturnaya Gazeta, Lithuania, London Symphony Orchestra, Mariss Jansons, Melodiya, Modest Mussorgsky, Morality, Moscow, Moscow Conservatory, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Movement (music), Mstislav Rostropovich, National Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, NHK Symphony Orchestra, Nicola Ghiuselev, Nikita Khrushchev, Nikita Storojev, Novy Mir, Oboe, Okko Kamu, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Orlando Figes, Pedal point, Philadelphia Orchestra, Phrygian mode, Piano, Piano Trio No. 2 (Shostakovich), Piccolo, Robert Burns, Rothschild's Violin, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Saint Petersburg, Sergei Leiferkus, Snare drum, Solomon Volkov, Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Song cycle, Songs and Dances of Death, State Symphony Capella of Russia, String Quartet No. 4 (Shostakovich), String Quartet No. 6 (Shostakovich), String Quartet No. 8 (Shostakovich), String section, Symphony No. 4 (Shostakovich), Symphony No. 7 (Shostakovich), Symphony No. 8 (Shostakovich), Tambourine, Teldec, Tempo, Testimony (book), The Holocaust, Timpani, Tom Krause, Tone row, Triangle (musical instrument), Tritone, Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, Vasily Petrenko, Veniamin Fleishman, Vernacular, Vilnius, Violin Concerto No. 1 (Shostakovich), Vladimir Ashkenazy, Wood block, Word painting, Xylophone, Yevgeny Mravinsky, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Zhdanov Doctrine, 24 Preludes and Fugues (Shostakovich). Expand index (93 more) »

Agitprop

Agitprop (from r, portmanteau of "agitation" and "propaganda") is political propaganda, especially the communist propaganda used in Soviet Russia, that is spread to the general public through popular media such as literature, plays, pamphlets, films, and other art forms with an explicitly political message.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Agitprop · See more »

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn (11 December 1918 – 3 August 2008) was a Russian novelist, historian, and short story writer.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn · See more »

Alexander Vinogradov (bass)

Alexander Vinogradov (born 1976) is a Russian bass opera singer.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Alexander Vinogradov (bass) · See more »

Amen

The word amen (Hebrew אָמֵן, Greek ἀμήν, Arabic آمِينَ) is a declaration of affirmation found in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Amen · See more »

André Previn

André George Previn, KBE (born Andreas Ludwig Priwin; April 6, 1929) is a German-American pianist, conductor, and composer.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and André Previn · See more »

Anne Frank

Annelies Marie Frank (12 June 1929 – February or March 1945)Research by The Anne Frank House in 2015 revealed that Frank may have died in February 1945 rather than in March, as Dutch authorities had long assumed.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Anne Frank · See more »

Anti-Stalinist left

The anti-Stalinist left comprises various kinds of left-wing politics critical of Joseph Stalin, of Stalinism as a political philosophy, and of the actual system of governance Stalin implemented as dictator of the Soviet Union.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Anti-Stalinist left · See more »

Antisemitism

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Antisemitism · See more »

Antonina W. Bouis

Antonina W. Bouis is a literary translator from Russian to English.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Antonina W. Bouis · See more »

Arnold Pomerans

Arnold Julius Pomerans (27 April 1920 – 30 May 2005) was a German-born British translator.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Arnold Pomerans · See more »

Arthur Eisen

--> Arthur Arturovich Eisen (Russian: Артур Артурович Эйзен), (8 June 1927 in Moscow – 26 February 2008 in Moscow), was a bass-baritone soloist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Arthur Eisen · See more »

Augmented third

In classical music from Western culture, an augmented third is an interval of five semitones.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Augmented third · See more »

Babi Yar

Babi Yar (Бабин Яр, Babyn Yar; Бабий Яр, Babiy Yar) is a ravine in the Ukrainian capital Kiev and a site of massacres carried out by German forces and by local Ukrainian collaborators during their campaign against the Soviet Union in World War II.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Babi Yar · See more »

Bass (voice type)

A bass is a type of classical male singing voice and has the lowest vocal range of all voice types.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bass (voice type) · See more »

Bass clarinet

The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bass clarinet · See more »

Bass drum

A bass drum, or kick drum, is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bass drum · See more »

Bassoon

The bassoon is a woodwind instrument in the double reed family that typically plays music written in the bass and tenor clefs, and occasionally the treble.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bassoon · See more »

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks) is based in Munich, Germany, one of two full-size symphony orchestras operated under the auspices of Bayerischer Rundfunk, or Bavarian Broadcasting (BR).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra · See more »

B♭ (musical note)

B (B-flat; also called si bémol) is the eleventh step of the Western chromatic scale (starting from C).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and B♭ (musical note) · See more »

Béla Bartók

Béla Viktor János Bartók (25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and an ethnomusicologist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Béla Bartók · See more »

Bell

A bell is a directly struck idiophone percussion instrument.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bell · See more »

Bernard Haitink

Bernard Johan Herman Haitink (born 4 March 1929) is a Dutch conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Bernard Haitink · See more »

Białystok pogrom

The Belostok (Białystok) pogrom occurred between 14–16 June 1906 (1–3 June Old Style) in Białystok, then part of the Russian Empire, now in Poland.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Białystok pogrom · See more »

Boris Godunov (opera)

Boris Godunov (Борис Годунов, Borís Godunóv) is an opera by Modest Mussorgsky (1839–1881).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Boris Godunov (opera) · See more »

Boris Tishchenko

Boris Ivanovich Tishchenko (Russian Бори́с Ива́нович Ти́щенко; 23 March 1939 – 9 December 2010) was a Russian and Soviet composer and pianist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Boris Tishchenko · See more »

Borys Hmyria

Borys Romanovich Hmyria (Борис Романович Гмиря; Борис Романович Гмыря; sometimes spelt as Gmyrya; born 1903 in Lebedyn—died 1969 in Kiev), PAU, was a Ukrainian basso cantante singer of opera and art song.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Borys Hmyria · See more »

Boudoir

A boudoir is a woman's private sitting room or salon in a furnished accommodation usually between the dining room and the bedroom, but can also refer to a woman's private bedroom.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Boudoir · See more »

Burlesque

A burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Burlesque · See more »

Cadence (music)

In Western musical theory, a cadence (Latin cadentia, "a falling") is "a melodic or harmonic configuration that creates a sense of resolution."Don Michael Randel (1999).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Cadence (music) · See more »

Cantata

A cantata (literally "sung", past participle feminine singular of the Italian verb cantare, "to sing") is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment, typically in several movements, often involving a choir.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Cantata · See more »

Castanets

Castanets are a percussion instrument (idiophone), used in Kalo, Moorish, Ottoman, ancient Roman, Italian, Spanish, Sephardic, Swiss, and Portuguese music.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Castanets · See more »

Celesta

The celesta or celeste is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Celesta · See more »

Cello Concerto No. 1 (Shostakovich)

The Cello Concerto No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Cello Concerto No. 1 (Shostakovich) · See more »

Choral Arts Society of Washington

The Choral Arts Society of Washington is a major choral organization based in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1965 by Norman Scribner, it is regarded as one of the premier symphonic choruses in the United States.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Choral Arts Society of Washington · See more »

Choral symphony

A choral symphony is a musical composition for orchestra, choir, and sometimes solo vocalists that, in its internal workings and overall musical architecture, adheres broadly to symphonic musical form.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Choral symphony · See more »

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO) is a British orchestra based in Birmingham, England.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra · See more »

Clapper (musical instrument)

A clapper is a basic form of percussion instrument.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Clapper (musical instrument) · See more »

Clarinet

The clarinet is a musical-instrument family belonging to the group known as the woodwind instruments.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Clarinet · See more »

Conscience

Conscience is an aptitude, faculty, intuition or judgment that assists in distinguishing right from wrong.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Conscience · See more »

Contrabassoon

The contrabassoon, also known as the double bassoon, is a larger version of the bassoon, sounding an octave lower.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Contrabassoon · See more »

Cor anglais

The cor anglais or original; plural: cors anglais) Longman has /kɔːz/ for British and /kɔːrz/ for American --> or English horn in North America, is a double-reed woodwind instrument in the oboe family. It is approximately one and a half times the length of an oboe. The cor anglais is a transposing instrument pitched in F, a perfect fifth lower than the oboe (a C instrument). This means that music for the cor anglais is written a perfect fifth higher than the instrument actually sounds. The fingering and playing technique used for the cor anglais are essentially the same as those of the oboe and oboists typically double on the cor anglais when required. The cor anglais normally lacks the lowest B key found on most oboes and so its sounding range stretches from E3 (written B) below middle C to C6 two octaves above middle C.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Cor anglais · See more »

Cymbal

A cymbal is a common percussion instrument.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Cymbal · See more »

Decca Records

Decca Records is a British record label established in 1929 by Edward Lewis.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Decca Records · See more »

Dmitri Shostakovich

Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich (Дми́трий Дми́триевич Шостако́вич|Dmitriy Dmitrievich Shostakovich,; 9 August 1975) was a Russian composer and pianist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Dmitri Shostakovich · See more »

Dorian mode

Dorian mode or Doric mode can refer to three very different but interrelated subjects: one of the Ancient Greek harmoniai (characteristic melodic behaviour, or the scale structure associated with it), one of the medieval musical modes, or, most commonly, one of the modern modal diatonic scales, corresponding to the white notes from D to D, or any transposition of this.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Dorian mode · See more »

Dreyfus affair

The Dreyfus Affair (l'affaire Dreyfus) was a political scandal that divided the Third French Republic from 1894 until its resolution in 1906.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Dreyfus affair · See more »

Edison Denisov

Edison Vasilievich Denisov (Эдисо́н Васи́льевич Дени́сов, April 6, 1929 – November 24, 1996) was a Russian composer in the so-called "Underground"—"Anti-Collectivist", "alternative" or "nonconformist" division of Soviet music.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Edison Denisov · See more »

EMI Classics

EMI Classics was a record label founded by EMI in 1990 in order to reduce the need to create country-specific packaging and catalogs for internationally distributed classical music releases.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and EMI Classics · See more »

Ernst Neizvestny

Ernst Iosifovich Neizvestny (Эрнст Ио́сифович Неизве́стный; April 9, 1925 – August 9, 2016) was a Russian-American sculptor, painter, graphic artist, and art philosopher.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Ernst Neizvestny · See more »

Eugene Ormandy

Eugene Ormandy (born Jenő Blau; November 18, 1899 – March 12, 1985) was an Hungarian-American conductor and violinist, best known for his association with the Philadelphia Orchestra, as its music director.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Eugene Ormandy · See more »

Flute

The flute is a family of musical instruments in the woodwind group.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Flute · See more »

From Jewish Folk Poetry

From Jewish Folk Poetry, Op.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and From Jewish Folk Poetry · See more »

Gennady Rozhdestvensky

Gennady Nikolayevich Rozhdestvensky, CBE (Генна́дий Никола́евич Рожде́ственский; 4 May 1931 – 16 June 2018) was a Soviet and Russian conductor, People's Artist of the USSR (1976), and Hero of Socialist Labour (1990).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Gennady Rozhdestvensky · See more »

Glockenspiel

A glockenspiel (or, Glocken: bells and Spiel: set) is a percussion instrument composed of a set of tuned keys arranged in the fashion of the keyboard of a piano.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Glockenspiel · See more »

Gnessin State Musical College

The Gnessin State Musical College (Государственный музыкальный колледж имени Гнесиных) and Gnessin Russian Academy of Music (Российская академия музыки имени Гнесиных) is a prominent music school in Moscow, Russia.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Gnessin State Musical College · See more »

Gong

A gong (from Malay: gong;; ra; គង - Kong; ฆ้อง Khong; cồng chiêng) is an East and Southeast Asian musical percussion instrument that takes the form of a flat, circular metal disc which is hit with a mallet.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Gong · See more »

Gustav Mahler

Gustav Mahler (7 July 1860 – 18 May 1911) was an Austro-Bohemian late-Romantic composer, and one of the leading conductors of his generation.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Gustav Mahler · See more »

Harp

The harp is a stringed musical instrument that has a number of individual strings running at an angle to its soundboard; the strings are plucked with the fingers.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Harp · See more »

Horn (instrument)

A horn is any of a family of musical instruments made of a tube, usually made of metal and often curved in various ways, with one narrow end into which the musician blows, and a wide end from which sound emerges.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Horn (instrument) · See more »

Ian MacDonald

Ian MacCormick (known by the pseudonym Ian MacDonald; 3 October 1948 – 20 August 2003) was a British music critic and author, best known for both Revolution in the Head, his critical history of the Beatles which borrowed techniques from art historians, and The New Shostakovich, a study of Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Ian MacDonald · See more »

Intelligentsia

The intelligentsia (/ɪnˌtelɪˈdʒentsiə/) (intelligentia, inteligencja, p) is a status class of educated people engaged in the complex mental labours that critique, guide, and lead in shaping the culture and politics of their society.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Intelligentsia · See more »

Interval (music)

In music theory, an interval is the difference between two pitches.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Interval (music) · See more »

Jamie Macpherson

James MacPherson (1675–1700) was a Scottish outlaw, famed for his Lament or Rant, a version of which was rewritten by the Scottish poet, Robert Burns.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Jamie Macpherson · See more »

Khovanshchina

Khovanshchina (Хованщина, Hovánščina, sometimes rendered The Khovansky Affair; since the ending -ščina is pejorative) is an opera (subtitled a 'national music drama') in five acts by Modest Mussorgsky. The work was written between 1872 and 1880 in St. Petersburg, Russia. The composer wrote the libretto based on historical sources. The opera was unfinished and unperformed when the composer died in 1881. Like Mussorgsky's earlier Boris Godunov, Khovanshchina deals with an episode in Russian history, first brought to the composer's attention by his friend the critic Vladimir Stasov. It concerns the rebellion of Prince Ivan Khovansky, the Old Believers, and the Muscovite Streltsy against the regent Sofia Alekseyevna and the two young Tsars Peter the Great and Ivan V, who were attempting to institute Westernizing reforms in Russia. Khovansky had helped to foment the Moscow Uprising of 1682, which resulted in Sofia becoming regent on behalf of her younger brother Ivan and half-brother Peter, who were crowned joint Tsars. In the fall of 1682 Prince Ivan Khovansky turned against Sofia. Supported by the Old Believers and the Streltsy, Khovansky — who supposedly wanted to install himself as the new regent — demanded the reversal of Patriarch Nikon's reforms. Sofia and her court were forced to flee Moscow. Eventually, Sofia managed to suppress the so-called Khovanshchina (Khovansky affair) with the help of the diplomat Fyodor Shaklovity, who succeeded Khovansky as leader of the Muscovite Streltsy. With the rebellion crushed, the Old Believers committed mass suicide (in the opera, at least). Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed, revised, and scored Khovanshchina in 1881–1882. Because of his extensive cuts and "recomposition", Dmitri Shostakovich revised the opera in 1959 based on Mussorgsky's vocal score, and it is the Shostakovich version that is usually performed. In 1913 Igor Stravinsky and Maurice Ravel made their own arrangement at Sergei Diaghilev's request. When Feodor Chaliapin refused to sing the part of Dosifei in any other orchestration than Rimsky-Korsakov's, Diaghilev's company employed a mixture of orchestrations which did not prove successful. The Stravinsky-Ravel orchestration was forgotten, except for Stravinsky's finale, which is still sometimes used. Although the background of the opera comprises the Moscow Uprising of 1682 and the Khovansky affair a few months later, its main themes are the struggle between progressive and reactionary political factions during the minority of Tsar Peter the Great and the passing of old Muscovy before Peter's westernizing reforms. It received its first performance in the Rimsky-Korsakov edition in 1886.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Khovanshchina · See more »

Kiev

Kiev or Kyiv (Kyiv; Kiyev; Kyjev) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Kiev · See more »

Kirill Kondrashin

Kirill Petrovich Kondrashin (Russian: Кири́лл Петро́вич Кондра́шин, Kirill Petrovič Kondrašin; – 7 March 1981), PAU, was a Soviet and Russian conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Kirill Kondrashin · See more »

Klezmer

Klezmer (Yiddish: כליזמר or קלעזמער (klezmer), pl.: כליזמרים (klezmorim) – instruments of music) is a musical tradition of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Klezmer · See more »

Kurt Masur

Kurt Masur (18 July 1927 – 19 December 2015) was a German conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Kurt Masur · See more »

Lament

A lament or lamentation is a passionate expression of grief, often in music, poetry, or song form.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Lament · See more »

Literaturnaya Gazeta

Literaturnaya Gazeta («Литературная Газета», Literary Newspaper) is a weekly cultural and political newspaper published in Russia and the Soviet Union.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Literaturnaya Gazeta · See more »

Lithuania

Lithuania (Lietuva), officially the Republic of Lithuania (Lietuvos Respublika), is a country in the Baltic region of northern-eastern Europe.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Lithuania · See more »

London Symphony Orchestra

The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO), founded in 1904, is the oldest of London's symphony orchestras.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and London Symphony Orchestra · See more »

Mariss Jansons

Mariss Ivars Georgs Jansons (born 14 January 1943) is a Latvian conductor, the son of conductor Arvīds Jansons and the singer Iraida Jansone.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Mariss Jansons · See more »

Melodiya

Melodiya, is a Russian (formerly Soviet) record label.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Melodiya · See more »

Modest Mussorgsky

Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (mɐˈdɛst pʲɪˈtrovʲɪtɕ ˈmusərkskʲɪj; –) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five".

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Modest Mussorgsky · See more »

Morality

Morality (from) is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Morality · See more »

Moscow

Moscow (a) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 13.2 million residents within the city limits and 17.1 million within the urban area.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Moscow · See more »

Moscow Conservatory

The Moscow Conservatory, also officially Moscow State Tchaikovsky Conservatory (Московская государственная консерватория им.) is an educational music institution located in Moscow, Russia.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Moscow Conservatory · See more »

Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra

The Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra is an orchestra based in Moscow, Russia.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra · See more »

Movement (music)

A movement is a self-contained part of a musical composition or musical form.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Movement (music) · See more »

Mstislav Rostropovich

Mstislav Leopoldovich "Slava" Rostropovich (Мстисла́в Леопо́льдович Ростропо́вич, Mstislav Leopol'dovič Rostropovič,; 27 March 192727 April 2007) was a Soviet and Russian cellist and conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Mstislav Rostropovich · See more »

National Symphony Orchestra

The National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), founded in 1931, is an American symphony orchestra based in Washington, D.C..

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and National Symphony Orchestra · See more »

New York Philharmonic

The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc., globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and New York Philharmonic · See more »

NHK Symphony Orchestra

The is a Japanese orchestra based in Tokyo.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and NHK Symphony Orchestra · See more »

Nicola Ghiuselev

Nicola Ghiuselev (Bulgarian: Никола Гюзелев) (also Gyuzelev; 17 August 1936 – 16 May 2014) was a Bulgarian operatic bass, particularly associated with the Italian and Russian repertories.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Nicola Ghiuselev · See more »

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (15 April 1894 – 11 September 1971) was a Soviet statesman who led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War as the First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964, and as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, or Premier, from 1958 to 1964.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Nikita Khrushchev · See more »

Nikita Storojev

Nikita Storojev is a Russian bass opera singer.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Nikita Storojev · See more »

Novy Mir

Novy Mir (Но́вый Ми́р,, New World) is a Russian language monthly literary magazine.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Novy Mir · See more »

Oboe

Oboes are a family of double reed woodwind instruments.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Oboe · See more »

Okko Kamu

Okko Tapani Kamu (born 7 March 1946, Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish orchestral conductor and violinist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Okko Kamu · See more »

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (Оди́н день Ива́на Дени́совича Odin den' Ivana Denisovicha) is a novel by Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, first published in November 1962 in the Soviet literary magazine Novy Mir (New World).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich · See more »

Orlando Figes

Orlando Guy Figes (born Islington, 20 November 1959) is a British historian and writer known for his works on Russian history.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Orlando Figes · See more »

Pedal point

In music, a pedal point (also pedal tone, pedal note, organ point, or pedal) is a sustained tone, typically in the bass, during which at least one foreign, i.e., dissonant harmony is sounded in the other parts.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Pedal point · See more »

Philadelphia Orchestra

The Philadelphia Orchestra is an American symphony orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Philadelphia Orchestra · See more »

Phrygian mode

The Phrygian mode (pronounced) can refer to three different musical modes: the ancient Greek tonos or harmonia sometimes called Phrygian, formed on a particular set of octave species or scales; the Medieval Phrygian mode, and the modern conception of the Phrygian mode as a diatonic scale, based on the latter.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Phrygian mode · See more »

Piano

The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy by Bartolomeo Cristofori around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Piano · See more »

Piano Trio No. 2 (Shostakovich)

The Piano Trio No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Piano Trio No. 2 (Shostakovich) · See more »

Piccolo

The piccolo (Italian for "small", but named ottavino in Italy) is a half-size flute, and a member of the woodwind family of musical instruments.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Piccolo · See more »

Robert Burns

Robert Burns (25 January 175921 July 1796), also known as Rabbie Burns, the Bard of Ayrshire, Ploughman Poet and various other names and epithets, was a Scottish poet and lyricist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Robert Burns · See more »

Rothschild's Violin

"Rothschild's Violin" (translit – also translated as "Rothschild's Fiddle") is a short story by Anton Chekhov.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Rothschild's Violin · See more »

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest) is a symphony orchestra in the Netherlands, based at the Amsterdam Royal Concertgebouw (concert hall).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra · See more »

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic

The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Society is a society based in Liverpool, England, that manages a professional symphony orchestra, a concert venue, and extensive programmes of learning through music.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic · See more »

Saint Petersburg

Saint Petersburg (p) is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with 5 million inhabitants in 2012, part of the Saint Petersburg agglomeration with a population of 6.2 million (2015).

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Saint Petersburg · See more »

Sergei Leiferkus

Sergei Leiferkus (born 4 April 1946) is an operatic baritone from Russia, known for his dramatic technique and powerful voice particularly in Russian and Italian language repertoire.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Sergei Leiferkus · See more »

Snare drum

A snare drum or side drum is a percussion instrument that produces a sharp staccato sound when the head is struck with a drum stick, due to the use of a series of stiff wires held under tension against the lower skin.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Snare drum · See more »

Solomon Volkov

Solomon Moiseyevich Volkov (Соломон Моисеевич Волков; born 17 April 1944) is a Russian journalist and musicologist.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Solomon Volkov · See more »

Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

The Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Sz. 110, BB 115, is a musical piece written by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók in 1937.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion · See more »

Song cycle

A song cycle (Liederkreis or Liederzyklus) is a group, or cycle, of individually complete songs designed to be performed in a sequence as a unit.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Song cycle · See more »

Songs and Dances of Death

Songs and Dances of Death (Песни и пляски смерти, Pesni i plyaski smerti) is a song cycle for voice (usually bass or bass-baritone) and piano by Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky, written in the mid-1870s, to poems by Arseny Golenishchev-Kutuzov, a relative of the composer.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Songs and Dances of Death · See more »

State Symphony Capella of Russia

The State Symphony Capella of Russia (Государственная академическая симфоническая капелла России) comprises an orchestra and choir, both based in Moscow, Russia.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and State Symphony Capella of Russia · See more »

String Quartet No. 4 (Shostakovich)

Dmitri Shostakovich's String Quartet No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and String Quartet No. 4 (Shostakovich) · See more »

String Quartet No. 6 (Shostakovich)

Dmitri Shostakovich's String Quartet No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and String Quartet No. 6 (Shostakovich) · See more »

String Quartet No. 8 (Shostakovich)

Dmitri Shostakovich's String Quartet No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and String Quartet No. 8 (Shostakovich) · See more »

String section

The string section is composed of bowed instruments belonging to the violin family.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and String section · See more »

Symphony No. 4 (Shostakovich)

Dmitri Shostakovich composed his Symphony No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Symphony No. 4 (Shostakovich) · See more »

Symphony No. 7 (Shostakovich)

Dmitri Shostakovich's Symphony No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Symphony No. 7 (Shostakovich) · See more »

Symphony No. 8 (Shostakovich)

The Symphony No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Symphony No. 8 (Shostakovich) · See more »

Tambourine

The tambourine is a musical instrument in the percussion family consisting of a frame, often of wood or plastic, with pairs of small metal jingles, called "zils".

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Tambourine · See more »

Teldec

Teldec (Telefunken-Decca Schallplatten GmbH) is a German record label in Hamburg, Germany.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Teldec · See more »

Tempo

In musical terminology, tempo ("time" in Italian; plural: tempi) is the speed or pace of a given piece.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Tempo · See more »

Testimony (book)

Testimony (Russian: Свидетельство) is a book that was published in October 1979 by the Russian musicologist Solomon Volkov.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Testimony (book) · See more »

The Holocaust

The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah, was a genocide during World War II in which Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered approximately 6 million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish population of Europe, between 1941 and 1945.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and The Holocaust · See more »

Timpani

Timpani or kettledrums (also informally called timps) are musical instruments in the percussion family.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Timpani · See more »

Tom Krause

Tom Gunnar Krause (July 5, 1934 − December 6, 2013) was a Finnish operatic bass-baritone, particularly associated with Mozart roles.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Tom Krause · See more »

Tone row

In music, a tone row or note row (Reihe or Tonreihe), also series or set,George Perle, Serial Composition and Atonality: An Introduction to the Music of Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern, fourth Edition (Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1977): 3.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Tone row · See more »

Triangle (musical instrument)

The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Triangle (musical instrument) · See more »

Tritone

In music theory, the tritone is defined as a musical interval composed of three adjacent whole tones.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Tritone · See more »

Trombone

The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Trombone · See more »

Trumpet

A trumpet is a brass instrument commonly used in classical and jazz ensembles.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Trumpet · See more »

Tuba

The tuba is the largest and lowest-pitched musical instrument in the brass family.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Tuba · See more »

Vasily Petrenko

Vasily Eduardovich Petrenko (Васи́лий Эдуа́рдович Петре́нко; born 7 July 1976) is a Russian conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Vasily Petrenko · See more »

Veniamin Fleishman

Veniamin Iosifovich Fleishman, (Вениами́н Ио́сифович Фле́йшман, July 20, 1913, Bezhetsk, Tver Governorate – September 14, 1941, Krasnoye Selo, Leningrad Oblast) was a Soviet composer.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Veniamin Fleishman · See more »

Vernacular

A vernacular, or vernacular language, is the language or variety of a language used in everyday life by the common people of a specific population.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Vernacular · See more »

Vilnius

Vilnius (see also other names) is the capital of Lithuania and its largest city, with a population of 574,221.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Vilnius · See more »

Violin Concerto No. 1 (Shostakovich)

The Violin Concerto No.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Violin Concerto No. 1 (Shostakovich) · See more »

Vladimir Ashkenazy

Vladimir Davidovich Ashkenazy (Влади́мир Дави́дович Ашкена́зи, Vladimir Davidovich Ashkenazi; born 6 July 1937) is an internationally recognized solo pianist, chamber music performer, and conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Vladimir Ashkenazy · See more »

Wood block

A wood block (also spelled as a single word, woodblock) is a small slit drum made from a single piece of wood and used as a percussion instrument.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Wood block · See more »

Word painting

Word painting (also known as tone painting or text painting) is the musical technique of composing music that reflects the literal meaning of a song's lyrics.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Word painting · See more »

Xylophone

The xylophone (from the Greek words ξύλον—xylon, "wood" + φωνή—phōnē, "sound, voice", meaning "wooden sound") is a musical instrument in the percussion family that consists of wooden bars struck by mallets.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Xylophone · See more »

Yevgeny Mravinsky

Yevgeny Aleksandrovich Mravinsky (Евге́ний Алекса́ндрович Мрави́нский) (19 January 1988), HSL, PAU, was a Soviet and Russian conductor.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Yevgeny Mravinsky · See more »

Yevgeny Yevtushenko

Yevgeny Aleksandrovich Yevtushenko (Евгений Александрович Евтушенко; 18 July 1933 – 1 April 2017) was a Soviet and Russian poet.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Yevgeny Yevtushenko · See more »

Zhdanov Doctrine

The Zhdanov Doctrine (also called Zhdanovism or Zhdanovshchina; доктрина Жданова, ждановизм, ждановщина) was a Soviet cultural doctrine developed by Central Committee secretary Andrei Zhdanov in 1946.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and Zhdanov Doctrine · See more »

24 Preludes and Fugues (Shostakovich)

24 Preludes and Fugues, Op.

New!!: Symphony No. 13 (Shostakovich) and 24 Preludes and Fugues (Shostakovich) · See more »

Redirects here:

Babi Yar Symphony, Babi-Yar, Shostakovich's Symphony No. 13 In B Flat Minor.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._13_(Shostakovich)

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »