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Terminal ballistics

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Terminal ballistics (also known as wound ballistics), a sub-field of ballistics, is the study of the behavior and effects of a projectile when it hits and transfers its energy to a target. [1]

67 relations: Aerodynamics, Anti-personnel weapon, Anti-tank warfare, APCBC, Armor-piercing shell, Ballistics, Biological warfare, Black Hills Ammunition, Chemical weapon, Composite armour, Depleted uranium, Drag (physics), Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition, Explosive material, External ballistics, Full metal jacket bullet, Fuse (explosives), Gunshot wound, Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907, High-explosive anti-tank warhead, Hollow-point bullet, Hydrostatic shock (firearms), Impact depth, Internal ballistics, Kinetic energy penetrator, Lathe, M16 rifle, Magazine (firearms), Mass, Mushroom, Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division, Numerical control, Para USA, Projectile, Reactive armour, Rifling, Sabot, Semiwadcutter, Shaped charge, Sintering, Sniper, Soft-point bullet, Stopping power, Sub-caliber round, Swaging, Table of handgun and rifle cartridges, Taylor KO Factor, Tungsten, Tungsten carbide, United States Air Force, ..., United States Armed Forces, United States Marine Corps, United States Navy, Vaporific effect, Very-low-drag bullet, Wadcutter, Warsaw Pact, Wildcat cartridge, .32 S&W Long, .380 ACP, .40 S&W, .44 Magnum, .45 ACP, 5.45×39mm, 5.56×45mm NATO, 7.62×51mm NATO, 9×19mm Parabellum. Expand index (17 more) »

Aerodynamics

Aerodynamics, from Greek ἀήρ aer (air) + δυναμική (dynamics), is the study of the motion of air, particularly its interaction with a solid object, such as an airplane wing.

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Anti-personnel weapon

An anti-personnel weapon is a weapon primarily used to maim or kill infantry and other personnel not behind armor, as opposed to attacking structures or vehicles, or hunting game.

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Anti-tank warfare

Anti-tank warfare arose as a result of the need to develop technology and tactics to destroy tanks during World War I. Since the first tanks were developed by the Triple Entente in 1916 but not operated in battle until 1917, the first anti-tank weapons were developed by the German Empire.

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APCBC

The armour-piercing capped ballistic cap (APCBC) is a type of armor-piercing shell introduced in the 1930s.

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Armor-piercing shell

An armor-piercing shell, AP for short, is a type of ammunition designed to penetrate armor.

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Ballistics

Ballistics is the field of mechanics that deals with the launching, flight, behavior, and effects of projectiles, especially bullets, unguided bombs, rockets, or the like; the science or art of designing and accelerating projectiles so as to achieve a desired performance.

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Biological warfare

Biological warfare (BW)—also known as germ warfare—is the use of biological toxins or infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi with the intent to kill or incapacitate humans, animals or plants as an act of war.

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Black Hills Ammunition

Black Hills Ammunition is an American ammunition and reloading supplies manufacturing company based in Rapid City, South Dakota.

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Chemical weapon

A chemical weapon (CW) is a specialized munition that uses chemicals formulated to inflict death or harm on humans.

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Composite armour

Composite armour is a type of vehicle armour consisting of layers of different material such as metals, plastics, ceramics or air.

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Depleted uranium

Depleted uranium (DU; also referred to in the past as Q-metal, depletalloy or D-38) is uranium with a lower content of the fissile isotope U-235 than natural uranium.

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Drag (physics)

In fluid dynamics, drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid friction) is a force acting opposite to the relative motion of any object moving with respect to a surrounding fluid.

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Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition

A Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) is an artillery or surface-to-surface missile warhead designed to burst into sub-munitions at an optimum altitude and distance from the desired target for dense area coverage.

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Explosive material

An explosive material, also called an explosive, is a reactive substance that contains a great amount of potential energy that can produce an explosion if released suddenly, usually accompanied by the production of light, heat, sound, and pressure.

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External ballistics

External ballistics or exterior ballistics is the part of ballistics that deals with the behavior of a projectile in flight.

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Full metal jacket bullet

A full metal jacket (FMJ) bullet is a small-arms projectile consisting of a soft core (often lead) encased in a shell of harder metal, such as gilding metal, cupronickel, or less commonly a steel alloy.

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Fuse (explosives)

In an explosive, pyrotechnic device, or military munition, a fuse (or fuze) is the part of the device that initiates function.

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Gunshot wound

A gunshot wound (GSW), also known as ballistic trauma, is a form of physical trauma sustained from the discharge of arms or munitions.

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Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907

The Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 are a series of international treaties and declarations negotiated at two international peace conferences at The Hague in the Netherlands.

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High-explosive anti-tank warhead

A high-explosive anti-tank (HEAT) warhead is a type of shaped charge explosive that uses the Munroe effect to penetrate thick tank armor.

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Hollow-point bullet

A hollow-point bullet is an expanding bullet that has a pit or hollowed out shape in its tip often intended to cause the bullet to expand upon entering a target as it penetrates and disrupts more tissue.

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Hydrostatic shock (firearms)

Hydrostatic shock is the controversial concept that a penetrating projectile (such as a bullet) can produce a pressure wave that causes "remote neural damage", "subtle damage in neural tissues" and/or "rapid incapacitating effects" in living targets.

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Impact depth

The physicist Sir Isaac Newton first developed this idea to get rough approximations for the impact depth for projectiles traveling at high velocities.

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Internal ballistics

Internal ballistics (also interior ballistics), a subfield of ballistics, is the study of the propulsion of a projectile.

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Kinetic energy penetrator

A kinetic energy penetrator (KEP, KE weapon, long-rod penetrator or LRP) is a type of ammunition designed to penetrate vehicle armour.

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Lathe

A lathe is a tool that rotates the workpiece about an axis of rotation to perform various operations such as cutting, sanding, knurling, drilling, deformation, facing, and turning, with tools that are applied to the workpiece to create an object with symmetry about that axis.

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M16 rifle

The M16 rifle, officially designated Rifle, Caliber 5.56 mm, M16, is a United States military adaptation of the ArmaLite AR-15 rifle.Kern, Danford Allan (2006).. m-14parts.com. A thesis presented to the Faculty of the US Army Command and General Staff College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE, Military History. Fort Leavenworth, KansasKokalis, Peter G.. Nodakspud.com The original M16 was a selective fire 5.56mm rifle with a 20-round magazine. In 1964, the M16 entered U.S. military service and the following year was deployed for jungle warfare operations during the Vietnam War. In 1969, the M16A1 replaced the M14 rifle to become the U.S. military's standard service rifle.Ezell, Edward Clinton (1983). Small Arms of the World. New York: Stackpole Books. pp. 46–47..Urdang, p. 801. The M16A1 improvements include a bolt-assist, chrome plated bore and a new 30-round magazine. In 1983, the U.S. Marine Corps adopted the M16A2 rifle and the U.S. Army adopted it in 1986. The M16A2 fires the improved 5.56×45mm NATO (M855/SS109) cartridge and has a new adjustable rear sight, case deflector, heavy barrel, improved handguard, pistol grip and buttstock, as well as a semi-auto and three-round burst only fire selector. Adopted in 1998, the M16A4 is the fourth generation of the M16 series.Weapons of the Modern Marines, by Michael Green, MBI Publishing Company, 2004, page 16 It is equipped with a removable carrying handle and Picatinny rail for mounting optics and other ancillary devices. The M16 has also been widely adopted by other militaries around the world. Total worldwide production of M16s has been approximately 8 million, making it the most-produced firearm of its 5.56 mm caliber. The U.S. Military has largely replaced the M16 in combat units with a shorter and lighter version named the M4 carbine.

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Magazine (firearms)

A magazine is an ammunition storage and feeding device within or attached to a repeating firearm.

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Mass

Mass is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.

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Mushroom

A mushroom, or toadstool, is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source.

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Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division

Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division is the principal tenant command located at Naval Support Activity Crane.

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Numerical control

Computer numerical control (CNC) is the automation of machine tools by means of computers executing pre-programmed sequences of machine control commands.

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Para USA

Para USA (Para) is an American-owned firearms manufacturer.

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Projectile

A projectile is any object thrown into space (empty or not) by the exertion of a force.

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Reactive armour

Reactive armor is a type of vehicle armor that reacts in some way to the impact of a weapon to reduce the damage done to the vehicle being protected.

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Rifling

In firearms, rifling is the helical groove pattern that is machined into the internal (bore) surface of a gun's barrel, for the purpose of exerting torque and thus imparting a spin to a projectile around its longitudinal axis during shooting.

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Sabot

A sabot is a structural device used in firearm or cannon ammunition to keep a sub-caliber flight projectile, such as a relatively small bullet or arrow-type projectile, in the center of the barrel when fired, if the bullet has a significantly smaller diameter than the bore diameter of the weapon used.

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Semiwadcutter

A semiwadcutter or SWC is a type of all-purpose bullet commonly used in revolvers.

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Shaped charge

A shaped charge is an explosive charge shaped to focus the effect of the explosive's energy.

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Sintering

Clinker nodules produced by sintering Sintering is the process of compacting and forming a solid mass of material by heat or pressure without melting it to the point of liquefaction.

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Sniper

A sniper is a military/paramilitary marksman who operates to maintain effective visual contact with the enemy and engage targets from concealed positions or at distances exceeding their detection capabilities.

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Soft-point bullet

A soft-point bullet (SP), also known as a soft-nosed bullet, is a jacketed expanding bullet with a soft metal core enclosed by a stronger metal jacket left open at the forward tip.

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Stopping power

Stopping power is the ability of a firearm or other weapon to cause enough ballistic trauma to a target (human or animal) to immediately incapacitate (and thus stop) the target.

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Sub-caliber round

A sub-caliber round is a round the diameter of which is inferior to the barrel diameter.

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Swaging

Swaging is a forging process in which the dimensions of an item are altered using dies into which the item is forced.

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Table of handgun and rifle cartridges

Table of selected pistol/submachine gun and rifle/machine gun cartridges by common name.

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Taylor KO Factor

The Taylor KO factor or TKOF is a formulaic mathematical approach for evaluating the stopping power of hunting cartridges developed by John "Pondoro" Taylor in the middle of the 20th century.

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Tungsten

Tungsten, or wolfram, is a chemical element with symbol W (referring to wolfram) and atomic number 74.

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Tungsten carbide

Tungsten carbide (chemical formula: WC) is a chemical compound (specifically, a carbide) containing equal parts of tungsten and carbon atoms.

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United States Air Force

The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial and space warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces.

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United States Armed Forces

The United States Armed Forces are the military forces of the United States of America.

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United States Marine Corps

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy.

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United States Navy

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

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Vaporific effect

Vaporific effect is a flash fire resulting from the impact of high velocity projectiles with metallic objects.

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Very-low-drag bullet

The very-low-drag bullet (VLD) is primarily a small arms ballistics development of the 1980s–1990s, driven by shooters' desire for bullets that will give a higher degree of accuracy and kinetic efficiency, especially at extended ranges.

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Wadcutter

A wadcutter is a special-purpose flat-fronted bullet specifically designed for shooting paper targets, usually at close range and at subsonic velocities typically under approximately 900 ft/s (274 m/s).

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Warsaw Pact

The Warsaw Pact, formally known as the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance, was a collective defence treaty signed in Warsaw, Poland among the Soviet Union and seven Soviet satellite states of Central and Eastern Europe during the Cold War.

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Wildcat cartridge

A wildcat cartridge, often shortened to wildcat, is a custom cartridge for which ammunition and/or firearms are not mass-produced.

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.32 S&W Long

The.32 S&W Long, also known as 7.65x23mm, is a straight-walled, centerfire, rimmed handgun cartridge, based on the earlier.32 S&W cartridge.

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.380 ACP

The.380 ACP (9×17mm) (Automatic Colt Pistol) is a rimless, straight-walled pistol cartridge developed by firearms designer John Moses Browning.

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.40 S&W

The.40 S&W (10×22mm Smith & Wesson in unofficial metric notation) is a rimless pistol cartridge developed jointly by major American firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester.

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.44 Magnum

The.44 Remington Magnum, or simply.44 Magnum (10.9×33mmR), and frequently.44 Mag, is a large-bore cartridge originally designed for revolvers.

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.45 ACP

The.45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol), or.45 Auto (11.43×23mm) is a handgun cartridge designed by John Browning in 1905, for use in his prototype Colt semi-automatic pistol.

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5.45×39mm

The 5.45×39mm cartridge is a rimless bottlenecked Intermediate cartridge.

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5.56×45mm NATO

The 5.56×45mm NATO (official NATO nomenclature 5.56 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge family developed in Belgium by FN Herstal.

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7.62×51mm NATO

The 7.62×51mm NATO (official NATO nomenclature 7.62 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge developed in the 1950s as a standard for small arms among NATO countries.

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9×19mm Parabellum

The 9×19mm Parabellum is a firearms cartridge that was designed by Georg Luger and introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) (German Weapons and Munitions Factory) for their Luger semi-automatic pistol.

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Flatpoint bullet, Hypervelocity ballistic shield.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminal_ballistics

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