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The New York Times

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The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. [1]

386 relations: Actual malice, Adobe AIR, Adolph Ochs, African Americans, Ageism, Ahmed Chalabi, Airship, Alexa Internet, Alliance for Audited Media, Alternative media, American Civil War, Andrew Cuomo, Android (operating system), Anne O'Hare McCormick, Antisemitism, Antony Loewenstein, Application software, Arthur Brisbane, Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, Arthur Hays Sulzberger, Arthur L. Carter, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., As'ad AbuKhalil, Baltic Fleet, Bashar al-Assad, Battle of Port Arthur, Beijing, Ben Bagdikian, Benjamin Netanyahu, Berkeley, California, Bernie Sanders, Bill Gates, Bill Keller, Brendan Nyhan, British Tamil, Broadsheet, Brooke Gladstone, Buffalo, New York, Burden of proof (law), Buried by the Times, Byron Calame, California, Carl Bernstein, Carlos Slim, Carr Van Anda, CBC News, Chairman, Charles Ransom Miller, Chattanooga Times Free Press, Cheltenham (typeface), ..., Chicago, Chicago Tribune, China, Chinese characters, Chinese language, Christopher Cerf (musician and television producer), Christopher Morgan (politician), Clark Hoyt, Clifton Daniel, CNN, College Point, Queens, Color photography, Columbia Journalism Review, Columbia University, Comics, Comics page, Compete.com, Cosmopolitanism, Craig S. Smith, Credibility gap, Cyberattack, Da Capo Press, Daniel Ellsberg, Daniel Okrent, David Barboza, Dean Baquet, Defamation, Democratic Party (United States), Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2016, Domain name registrar, Domain Name System, Donald Trump, Donald Trump Access Hollywood tape, Dow Jones & Company, Duke lacrosse case, Duke University, Dwight D. Eisenhower, East River, Ed Koch, Editorial, Editorial cartoon, Editorial cartoonist, Edwin B. Morgan, Eighth Avenue (Manhattan), Employment discrimination, Encyclopædia Britannica, Eric Lichtblau, False advertising, Fars News Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal Trade Commission, First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Florida, Freedom of speech, Freedom of the press, Frontline (U.S. TV series), Fucked Up, Gainesville, Florida, Gale (publisher), GamePolitics.com, Gatling gun, George Jones (publisher), George Pataki, George Plimpton, Grover Cleveland, Haaretz, Hadas Gold, Hazing, Henry Jarvis Raymond, Henry Kissinger, Highrise (documentary), Hillary Clinton, History of the New York City Police Department, Holodomor, Hong Kong, Honorific, Horace Greeley, Hyperlocal, Imperial Russian Navy, Initial public offering, Intertype Corporation, IOS, IPad, IPhone, IPod Touch, Iraq War, Israeli–Palestinian conflict, James Bennet (journalist), James Risen, Jane Grant, Jayson Blair, Jeb Bush, Jewish peoplehood, Jews, John Mearsheimer, John N. Mitchell, Joseph Pulitzer, Judith Miller, KC Johnson, Konrad Adenauer, Laos, Leslie Groves, Letter to the editor, Liberalism in the United States, Life (magazine), List of ethnic slurs, List of Governors of New York, List of New York City newspapers and magazines, List of newspapers by circulation, List of newspapers in the United States, List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, List of The New York Times employees, London, Los Angeles Times, Lyndon B. Johnson, M.I.A. (rapper), Manhattan, Manhattan Project, Marco Rubio, Margaret Sullivan (journalist), Mark Thompson (media executive), Mark von Hagen, Matt Taibbi, Max Frankel, Media Matters for America, Melbourne IT, Meyer Berger, Michael Bloomberg, Microsoft, Mirror website, Mortara case, MTV News, Nan C. Robertson, Nassau Street (Manhattan), National Film Board of Canada, National Press Club (United States), National Review, National security, National Security Agency, National Security Archive, Nazi Germany, Neil Sheehan, New Year's Eve, New York (magazine), New York City, New York City draft riots, New York City Hall, New York Herald, New York Herald Tribune, New York Journal-American, New York metropolitan area, New York Times Building (41 Park Row), New York Times Building (disambiguation), New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, New York Times Index, New York Times presidential endorsements, New York University, New York World, New-York Tribune, News ticker, Newspaper, Newspaper circulation, Newspaper of record, Newsweek, Nicholas Kristof, North Vietnam, Northeastern University, Northern California, NPR, NSA warrantless surveillance (2001–2007), Nuclear program of Iran, NYSE American, Ochs-Sulzberger family, Ombudsman, On the Media, One Times Square, Online Books Page, Op-ed, Operation Pillar of Defense, Opinion piece, Orvil Dryfoos, Page layout, Panic of 1893, Park Row (Manhattan), Patriot Act, Paywall, PBS NewsHour, PDF, Peabody Award, Penguin Group, Persuasive Games, Pew Research Center, Philadelphia, Philip Pan, Plagiarism, Podcast, Point (typography), Political science, Politico, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Presidency of Richard Nixon, President of Ireland, Press Gazette, Prime Minister of Israel, Propaganda, Public company, Public editor, Public figure, Pulitzer Prize, Punch Sulzberger, Queens, Racial discrimination, Reason (magazine), ReCAPTCHA, Recklessness (law), Red states and blue states, Renzo Piano, Republican Party (United States), Richard Bernstein, Richard Nixon, Rockefeller Republican, Rudy Giuliani, Russo-Japanese War, Same-sex marriage, Sarah Maslin Nir, Seattle, Second Intifada, Sex and gender distinction, Sexism, Shanghai, Simon & Schuster, Simon Wiesenthal Center, Simplified Chinese characters, Skyscraper, Slate (magazine), Snow Fall, Social media, Soviet Union, Spin (magazine), Sri Lankan Civil War, SS Haimun, Stalinism, Stephen Walt, Strike action, Stuart Taylor Jr., Subscription business model, Sunday Review, Supreme Court of the United States, Syrian Electronic Army, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Tammany Hall, Taoiseach, TechCrunch, Tehran Times, Telegraphy, The American Mercury, The Atlantic, The Baltimore Sun, The Daily (podcast), The Fader, The Guardian, The Holocaust, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy, The New York Times Best Seller list, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Times Building, The New York Times Company, The New York Times controversies, The New York Times crossword puzzle, The New York Times Guide to Essential Knowledge, The New York Times International Edition, The New York Times Magazine, The Observer, The Sun (New York City), The Sydney Morning Herald, The Times, The Village Voice, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Thomas Dunne Books, Thomas Friedman, Times Square, Times Square Ball, Tom Bodkin, Tony Hendra, Tony Russo (whistleblower), Torture, Traditional Chinese characters, Turner Catledge, Twitter, Typeface, Union Army, Union Stock Yards, United States Attorney General, United States Department of Defense, United States Department of Justice, United States Department of State, United States Department of War, United States district court, United States Marine Corps, United States presidential election, 1884, United States presidential election, 2004, United States presidential election, 2016, University of California, Los Angeles, USA Today, Video game, Vietnam War, Virtual private network, Voting interest, W (magazine), Walter Duranty, Washington, D.C., WBUR-FM, Wen Jiabao, William L. Laurence, William M. Tweed, William Randolph Hearst, William Rehnquist, William Safire, Windows Phone, Windows Presentation Foundation, Wired (magazine), Wireless, WNYC, World War II, World Wide Web, Wright Patman, Xinhua News Agency, Yellow journalism, Zionism, 1920 Republican National Convention, 1962–63 New York City newspaper strike, 2003 invasion of Iraq, 2012 Tunnel Creek avalanche, 2016 Democratic National Committee email leak, 229 West 43rd Street. Expand index (336 more) »

Actual malice

Actual malice in United States law is a legal requirement imposed upon public officials or public figures when they file suit for libel (defamatory printed communications).

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Adobe AIR

Adobe AIR (formerly Adobe Integrated Runtime) is a cross-platform runtime system developed by Adobe Systems for building desktop applications and mobile applications, programmed using Adobe Animate, ActionScript and optionally Apache Flex.

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Adolph Ochs

Adolph Simon Ochs (March 12, 1858 – April 8, 1935) was an American newspaper publisher and former owner of The New York Times and The Chattanooga Times (now the Chattanooga Times Free Press).

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African Americans

African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa.

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Ageism

Ageism (also spelled "agism") is stereotyping of and discrimination against individuals or groups on the basis of their age.

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Ahmed Chalabi

Ahmed Abdel Hadi Chalabi (أحمد عبد الهادي الجلبي; 30 October 1944 – 3 November 2015) was an Iraqi politician, a founder of the Iraqi National Congress (INC) and the President of the Governing Council of Iraq (37th Prime Minister of Iraq) He was interim Minister of Oil in Iraq in April–May 2005 and December 2005 – January 2006 and Deputy Prime Minister from May 2005 to May 2006.

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Airship

An airship or dirigible balloon is a type of aerostat or lighter-than-air aircraft that can navigate through the air under its own power.

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Alexa Internet

Alexa Internet, Inc. is an American company based in California that provides commercial web traffic data and analytics.

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Alliance for Audited Media

The Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) is a North American non-profit industry organization founded in 1914 by the Association of National Advertisers to help ensure media transparency and trust among advertisers and media companies.

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Alternative media

Alternative media are media that differ from established or dominant types of media in terms of their content, production, or distribution.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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Andrew Cuomo

Andrew Mark Cuomo (born December 6, 1957) is an American politician, author, and lawyer serving as the 56th and current Governor of New York, since 2011.

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Android (operating system)

Android is a mobile operating system developed by Google, based on a modified version of the Linux kernel and other open source software and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.

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Anne O'Hare McCormick

Anne O'Hare McCormick (16 May 1880 – 29 May 1954) was a foreign news correspondent for the New York Times, in an era where the field was almost exclusively "a man's world".

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Antisemitism

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.

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Antony Loewenstein

Antony Loewenstein is a freelance journalist, author, atheist Jewish-Australian, German political activist and blogger.

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Application software

An application software (app or application for short) is a computer software designed to perform a group of coordinated functions, tasks, or activities for the benefit of the user.

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Arthur Brisbane

Arthur Brisbane (December 12, 1864 – December 25, 1936) was one of the best known American newspaper editors of the 20th century as well as a successful real estate investor.

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Arthur Gregg Sulzberger

Arthur Gregg "A.G." Sulzberger (born August 5, 1980) is an American journalist who is the publisher of The New York Times. He is the son of Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., the chairman of The New York Times Company and the preceding publisher of The New York Times.

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Arthur Hays Sulzberger

Arthur Hays Sulzberger (September 12, 1891 – December 11, 1968) was the publisher of The New York Times from 1935 to 1961.

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Arthur L. Carter

Arthur L. Carter (born December 24, 1931 in New York City) is an American investment banker, publisher, and artist.

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Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr.

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. (born September 22, 1951) is an American journalist.

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As'ad AbuKhalil

As'ad AbuKhalil (أسعد أبو خليل) (born March 16, 1960) is a Lebanese-American professor of political science at California State University, Stanislaus.

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Baltic Fleet

The Baltic Fleet (Балтийский флот) is the fleet of the Russian Navy in the Baltic Sea.

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Bashar al-Assad

Bashar Hafez al-Assad (بشار حافظ الأسد, Levantine pronunciation:;; born 11 September 1965) is a Syrian politician who has been the 19th and current President of Syria since 17 July 2000.

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Battle of Port Arthur

The of Monday 8 February – Tuesday 9 February 1904 marked the commencement of the Russo-Japanese War.

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Beijing

Beijing, formerly romanized as Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's second most populous city proper, and most populous capital city.

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Ben Bagdikian

Ben Haig Bagdikian (January 30, 1920 – March 11, 2016) was an Armenian-American journalist, news media critic and commentator, and university professor.

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Benjamin Netanyahu

Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu (born 21 October 1949) is an Israeli politician serving as the 9th and current Prime Minister of Israel since 2009, previously holding the position from 1996 to 1999.

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Berkeley, California

Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern Alameda County, California.

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Bernie Sanders

Bernard Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is an American politician serving as the junior United States Senator from Vermont since 2007.

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Bill Gates

William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American business magnate, investor, author, philanthropist, humanitarian, and principal founder of Microsoft Corporation.

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Bill Keller

Bill Keller (born January 18, 1949) is an American journalist.

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Brendan Nyhan

Brendan Nyhan (born 1978) is an American political scientist and professor at Dartmouth College.

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British Tamil

British Tamils (பிரித்தானியத் தமிழர்) are British people of Tamil origin.

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Broadsheet

A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically). Other common newspaper formats include the smaller Berliner and tabloid/compact formats.

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Brooke Gladstone

Brooke Gladstone is an American journalist, author and media analyst.

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Buffalo, New York

Buffalo is the second largest city in the state of New York and the 81st most populous city in the United States.

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Burden of proof (law)

The burden of proof (onus probandi) is the obligation of a party in a trial to produce the evidence that will prove the claims they have made against the other party.

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Buried by the Times

Buried by the Times, a book by Laurel Leff, Associate Professor of journalism at Northeastern University, is a critical account of The New York Timess coverage of Nazi atrocities against Jews that culminated in the Holocaust.

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Byron Calame

Byron "Barney" Calame (born April 14, 1939 in Appleton City, Missouri) is an American journalist.

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California

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States.

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Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein (born February 14, 1944) is an American investigative journalist and author.

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Carlos Slim

Carlos Slim Helú (born January 28, 1940) is a Mexican business magnate, engineer, investor and philanthropist.

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Carr Van Anda

Carr Vattal Van Anda (December 2, 1864 – January 29, 1945) was the managing editor of The New York Times under Adolph Ochs, from 1904 to 1932.

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CBC News

CBC News is the division of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation responsible for the news gathering and production of news programs on the corporation's English-language operations, namely CBC Television, CBC Radio, CBC News Network, and CBC.ca.

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Chairman

The chairman (also chairperson, chairwoman or chair) is the highest officer of an organized group such as a board, a committee, or a deliberative assembly.

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Charles Ransom Miller

Charles Ransom Miller (January 7, 1849-July 18, 1922) was an editor-in-chief of The New York Times.

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Chattanooga Times Free Press

The Chattanooga Times Free Press is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and is distributed in the metropolitan Chattanooga region of southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia.

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Cheltenham (typeface)

Cheltenham is a typeface for display use designed in 1896 by architect Bertram Goodhue and Ingalls Kimball, director of the Cheltenham Press.

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Chicago

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States, after New York City and Los Angeles.

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Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Tribune is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by Tronc, Inc., formerly Tribune Publishing.

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

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Chinese characters

Chinese characters are logograms primarily used in the writing of Chinese and Japanese.

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Chinese language

Chinese is a group of related, but in many cases mutually unintelligible, language varieties, forming a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Christopher Cerf (musician and television producer)

Christopher Cerf (born August 19, 1941) is an American author, composer-lyricist, voice actor, and record and television producer.

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Christopher Morgan (politician)

Christopher Morgan (June 4, 1808 – April 3, 1877) was a U.S. Representative from New York.

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Clark Hoyt

Clark Hoyt is an American journalist who was the public editor of The New York Times, serving as the "readers' representative." He was the newspaper's third public editor, or ombudsman, after Daniel Okrent and Byron Calame.

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Clifton Daniel

Elbert Clifton Daniel, Jr. (September 19, 1912 – February 21, 2000) was the managing editor of the New York Times from 1964 to 1969.

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CNN

Cable News Network (CNN) is an American basic cable and satellite television news channel and an independent subsidiary of AT&T's WarnerMedia.

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College Point, Queens

College Point is a working-middle-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens.

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Color photography

Color (or colour) photography is photography that uses media capable of reproducing colors.

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Columbia Journalism Review

The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists that has been published by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961.

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Columbia University

Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

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Comics

a medium used to express ideas by images, often combined with text or other visual information.

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Comics page

The comics page of a daily newspaper is a page largely or entirely devoted to comic strips.

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Compete.com

Compete.com was a web traffic analysis service.

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Cosmopolitanism

Cosmopolitanism is the ideology that all human beings belong to a single community, based on a shared morality.

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Craig S. Smith

Craig S. Smith is an American journalist.

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Credibility gap

Credibility gap is a term that came into wide use with journalism, political and public discourse in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s.

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Cyberattack

A cyberattack is any type of offensive maneuver that targets computer information systems, infrastructures, computer networks, or personal computer devices.

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Da Capo Press

Da Capo Press is an American publishing company with headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Daniel Ellsberg

Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is an American activist and former United States military analyst who, while employed by the RAND Corporation, precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times and other newspapers.

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Daniel Okrent

Daniel Okrent (born April 2, 1948) is an American writer and editor.

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David Barboza

David Barboza is an American journalist.

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Dean Baquet

Dean P. Baquet (pronounced bah-KAY; born September 21, 1956) is an American journalist.

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Defamation

Defamation, calumny, vilification, or traducement is the communication of a false statement that, depending on the law of the country, harms the reputation of an individual, business, product, group, government, religion, or nation.

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Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (nicknamed the GOP for Grand Old Party).

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Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2016

The 2016 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses were a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the 4,051 delegates to the Democratic National Convention held July 25–28 and determine the nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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Domain name registrar

A domain name registrar is an organization that manages the reservation of Internet domain names.

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Domain Name System

The Domain Name System (DNS) is a hierarchical decentralized naming system for computers, services, or other resources connected to the Internet or a private network.

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Donald Trump

Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017.

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Donald Trump Access Hollywood tape

On October 7, 2016, during the 2016 United States presidential election, The Washington Post published a video and accompanying article about then-presidential candidate Donald Trump and television host Billy Bush having "an extremely lewd conversation about women" in 2005.

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Dow Jones & Company

Dow Jones & Company is an American publishing and financial information firm that has been owned by News Corp. since 2007.

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Duke lacrosse case

The Duke lacrosse case was a widely reported 2006 criminal case in which three members of the Duke University men's lacrosse team were falsely accused of rape.

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Duke University

Duke University is a private, non-profit, research university located in Durham, North Carolina.

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Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American army general and statesman who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961.

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East River

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City.

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Ed Koch

Edward Irving Koch (December 12, 1924February 1, 2013) was an American lawyer, politician, political commentator, movie critic and reality television arbitrator.

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Editorial

An editorial, leading article (US) or leader (UK), is an article written by the senior editorial staff or publisher of a newspaper, magazine, or any other written document, often unsigned.

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Editorial cartoon

An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is a drawing containing a commentary expressing the artist's opinion.

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Editorial cartoonist

An editorial cartoonist, also known as a political cartoonist, is an artist who draws editorial cartoons that contain some level of political or social commentary.

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Edwin B. Morgan

Edwin Barber Morgan (May 2, 1806 – October 13, 1881) was an entrepreneur and politician from the Finger Lakes region of western New York.

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Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)

Eighth Avenue is a major north-south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street.

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Employment discrimination

Employment discrimination is a form of discrimination based on race, gender, religion, national origin, physical or mental disability, age, sexual orientation, and gender identity by employers.

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Encyclopædia Britannica

The Encyclopædia Britannica (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia.

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Eric Lichtblau

Eric Lichtblau (born 1965) is an American journalist, recently reporting for The New York Times and the CNN network's investigative news unit.

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False advertising

False advertising is the use of false, misleading, or unproven information to advertise products to consumers or advertising that does not disclose its source.

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Fars News Agency

The Fars News Agency is a news agency in Iran.

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Federal Bureau of Investigation

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), formerly the Bureau of Investigation (BOI), is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States, and its principal federal law enforcement agency.

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Federal Trade Commission

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act.

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First Amendment to the United States Constitution

The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances.

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Florida

Florida (Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States.

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Freedom of speech

Freedom of speech is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or a community to articulate their opinions and ideas without fear of retaliation, censorship, or sanction.

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Freedom of the press

Freedom of the press or freedom of the media is the principle that communication and expression through various media, including printed and electronic media, especially published materials, should be considered a right to be exercised freely.

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Frontline (U.S. TV series)

Frontline (styled by the program as FRONTLINE) is the flagship investigative journalism series of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), producing in-depth documentaries on a variety of domestic and international stories and issues, and broadcasting them on air and online.

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Fucked Up

Fucked Up is a Canadian hardcore punk band from Toronto, Ontario.

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Gainesville, Florida

Gainesville is the county seat and largest city in Alachua County, Florida, United States, and the principal city of the Gainesville, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).

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Gale (publisher)

Gale is an educational publishing company based in Farmington Hills, Michigan, in the western suburbs of Detroit.

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GamePolitics.com

GamePolitics.com was a blog which covers the politics of computer and video games.

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Gatling gun

The Gatling gun is one of the best-known early rapid-fire spring loaded, hand cranked weapons and a forerunner of the modern machine gun.

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George Jones (publisher)

George Jones (August 16, 1811 – August 11, 1891) was an American journalist who, with Henry Jarvis Raymond, co-founded the New-York Daily Times, now the New York Times.

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George Pataki

George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American lawyer and Republican politician who served as the 53rd Governor of New York (1995–2006).

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George Plimpton

George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, literary editor, actor and occasional amateur sportsman.

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Grover Cleveland

Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office (1885–1889 and 1893–1897).

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Haaretz

Haaretz (הארץ) (lit. "The Land ", originally Ḥadashot Ha'aretz – חדשות הארץ, – "News of the Land ") is an Israeli newspaper.

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Hadas Gold

Hadas Gold (born February 25, 1988) is a politics, media and global business reporter for CNN.

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Hazing

Hazing (US English), initiation ceremonies (British English), bastardisation (Australian English), ragging (South Asia), or deposition, refers to the practice of rituals, challenges, and other activities involving harassment, abuse or humiliation used as a way of initiating a person into a group including a new fraternity, sorority, team, or club.

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Henry Jarvis Raymond

Henry Jarvis Raymond (January 24, 1820 – June 18, 1869) was an American journalist, politician, and co-founder of The New York Times, which he founded with George Jones.

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Henry Kissinger

Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger, May 27, 1923) is an American statesman, political scientist, diplomat and geopolitical consultant who served as the United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.

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Highrise (documentary)

Highrise is a multi-year, multimedia documentary project about life in residential highrises, directed by Katerina Cizek and produced by Gerry Flahive for the National Film Board of Canada (NFB).

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Hillary Clinton

Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is an American politician and diplomat who served as the First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, U.S. Senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, 67th United States Secretary of State from 2009 to 2013, and the Democratic Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 election.

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History of the New York City Police Department

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) had it origins in the city government of New York trying to find a better way to control the rising crime rate in early-mid 19th century New York City.

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Holodomor

The Holodomor (Голодомо́р); (derived from морити голодом, "to kill by starvation"), also known as the Terror-Famine and Famine-Genocide in Ukraine, and—before the widespread use of the term "Holodomor", and sometimes currently—also referred to as the Great Famine, and The Ukrainian Genocide of 1932–33—was a man-made famine in Soviet Ukraine in 1932 and 1933 that killed millions of Ukrainians that was part of the wider Soviet famine of 1932–33, which affected the major grain-producing areas of the country.

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Hong Kong

Hong Kong (Chinese: 香港), officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory of China on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia.

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Honorific

An honorific is a title that conveys esteem or respect for position or rank when used in addressing or referring to a person.

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Horace Greeley

Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American author, statesman, founder and editor of the New-York Tribune, among the great newspapers of its time.

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Hyperlocal

Hyperlocal is information oriented around a well-defined community with its primary focus directed toward the concerns of the population in that community.

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Imperial Russian Navy

The Imperial Russian Navy was the navy of the Russian Empire.

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Initial public offering

Initial public offering (IPO) or stock market launch is a type of public offering in which shares of a company are sold to institutional investors and usually also retail (individual) investors; an IPO is underwritten by one or more investment banks, who also arrange for the shares to be listed on one or more stock exchanges.

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Intertype Corporation

The Intertype Corporation produced the Intertype, a typecasting machine closely resembling the Linotype, and using the same matrices as the Linotype.

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IOS

iOS (formerly iPhone OS) is a mobile operating system created and developed by Apple Inc. exclusively for its hardware.

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IPad

iPad is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc., which run the iOS mobile operating system.

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IPhone

iPhone is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. The iPhone line of products use Apple's iOS mobile operating system software.

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IPod Touch

The iPod Touch (stylized and marketed as iPod touch) is an iOS-based all-purpose mobile device designed and marketed by Apple Inc. with a touchscreen-controlled user interface.

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Iraq War

The Iraq WarThe conflict is also known as the War in Iraq, the Occupation of Iraq, the Second Gulf War, and Gulf War II.

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Israeli–Palestinian conflict

The Israeli–Palestinian conflict (Ha'Sikhsukh Ha'Yisraeli-Falestini; al-Niza'a al-Filastini-al-Israili) is the ongoing struggle between Israelis and Palestinians that began in the mid-20th century.

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James Bennet (journalist)

James Douglas Bennet (born March 28, 1966) is an American journalist.

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James Risen

James Risen (born April 27, 1955) is an American journalist for The Intercept.

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Jane Grant

Jane Grant (May 29, 1892 – March 16, 1972) was a New York City journalist who co-founded The New Yorker with her first husband, Harold Ross.

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Jayson Blair

Jayson Thomas Blair (born March 23, 1976) is a former American journalist associated with The New York Times.

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Jeb Bush

John Ellis "Jeb" Bush Sr. (born February 11, 1953) is an American politician who served as the 43rd Governor of Florida from 1999 to 2007.

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Jewish peoplehood

Jewish peoplehood (Hebrew: עמיות יהודית, Amiut Yehudit) is the conception of the awareness of the underlying unity that makes an individual a part of the Jewish people.

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Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

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John Mearsheimer

John Joseph Mearsheimer (born December 14, 1947) is an American political scientist.

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John N. Mitchell

John Newton Mitchell (September 15, 1913 – November 9, 1988) was the Attorney General of the United States (1969–72) under President Richard Nixon.

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Joseph Pulitzer

Joseph J. Pulitzer (born József Pulitzer; April 10, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was a newspaper publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World.

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Judith Miller

Judith Miller (born January 2, 1948) is an American journalist and commentator.

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KC Johnson

Robert David Johnson (born 1967), also known as KC Johnson, is an American history professor at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate Center.

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Konrad Adenauer

Konrad Hermann Joseph Adenauer (5 January 1876 – 19 April 1967) was a German statesman who served as the first Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) from 1949 to 1963.

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Laos

Laos (ລາວ,, Lāo; Laos), officially the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao: ສາທາລະນະລັດ ປະຊາທິປະໄຕ ປະຊາຊົນລາວ, Sathalanalat Paxathipatai Paxaxon Lao; République démocratique populaire lao), commonly referred to by its colloquial name of Muang Lao (Lao: ເມືອງລາວ, Muang Lao), is a landlocked country in the heart of the Indochinese peninsula of Mainland Southeast Asia, bordered by Myanmar (Burma) and China to the northwest, Vietnam to the east, Cambodia to the southwest and Thailand to the west and southwest.

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Leslie Groves

Lieutenant General Leslie Richard Groves Jr. (17 August 1896 – 13 July 1970) was a United States Army Corps of Engineers officer who oversaw the construction of the Pentagon and directed the Manhattan Project, a top secret research project that developed the atomic bomb during World War II.

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Letter to the editor

A letter to the editor (sometimes abbreviated LTTE or LTE) is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern from its readers.

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Liberalism in the United States

Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.

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Life (magazine)

Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000.

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List of ethnic slurs

The following is a list of ethnic slurs (ethnophaulisms) that are, or have been, used as insinuations or allegations about members of a given ethnicity, or to refer to them in a derogatory (that is, critical or disrespectful), pejorative (disapproving or contemptuous), or otherwise insulting manner.

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List of Governors of New York

The Governor of New York is the head of the executive branch of New York's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces.

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List of New York City newspapers and magazines

This is a list of New York City newspapers and magazines.

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List of newspapers by circulation

This is a list of paid daily newspapers in the world by average circulation.

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List of newspapers in the United States

This is a list of newspapers printed and distributed in the United States.

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List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times

Since 1918, The New York Times daily newspaper has won 125 Pulitzer Prizes, a prize awarded for excellence in journalism in a range of categories.

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List of The New York Times employees

This is a list of former and current New York Times employees, reporters, and columnists.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881.

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Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908January 22, 1973), often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963.

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M.I.A. (rapper)

Mathangi "Maya" Arulpragasam (born 18 July 1975), better known by her stage name M.I.A. (pronounced as distinct initials), is a British rapper, singer-songwriter, record producer, and activist.

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Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and its historical birthplace.

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Manhattan Project

The Manhattan Project was a research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons.

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Marco Rubio

Marco Antonio Rubio (born May 28, 1971) is an American politician, attorney, and the junior United States Senator for Florida.

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Margaret Sullivan (journalist)

Margaret M. Sullivan is an American journalist who is the media columnist for The Washington Post.

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Mark Thompson (media executive)

Mark John Thompson (born 31 July 1957)“THOMPSON, Mark John Thompson,” in Who's Who 2009 (London: A & C Black, 2008); online ed., (Oxford: OUP, 2008),.

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Mark von Hagen

Mark von Hagen (born 1954) teaches Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian history at Arizona State University.

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Matt Taibbi

Matthew C. "Matt" Taibbi (born March 2, 1970) is an American author and journalist.

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Max Frankel

Max Frankel (born April 3, 1930) is an American journalist.

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Media Matters for America

Media Matters for America (MMfA) is a progressive tax-exempt, nonprofit organization, with the stated mission of "comprehensively monitoring, analyzing, and correcting conservative misinformation in the U.S. media".

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Melbourne IT

Melbourne IT is an Australian Internet company listed on the Australian Securities Exchange.

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Meyer Berger

Meyer "Mike" Berger (September 1, 1898 – February 8, 1959) was an American journalist, considered one of the finest newspaper reporters.

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Michael Bloomberg

Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born on February 14, 1942) is an American businessman, engineer, author, politician, and philanthropist.

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Microsoft

Microsoft Corporation (abbreviated as MS) is an American multinational technology company with headquarters in Redmond, Washington.

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Mirror website

Mirror websites or mirrors are replicas of other websites.

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Mortara case

The Mortara case (caso Mortara) was an Italian cause célèbre that captured the attention of much of Europe and North America in the 1850s and 1860s.

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MTV News

MTV News is the news production division of MTV.

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Nan C. Robertson

Nan C. Robertson (July 11, 1926 - October 13, 2009) was an American journalist, author and instructor in journalism.

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Nassau Street (Manhattan)

Nassau Street is a street in the Financial District of New York City.

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National Film Board of Canada

The National Film Board of Canada (or simply National Film Board or NFB) (French: Office national du film du Canada, or ONF) is Canada's public film and digital media producer and distributor.

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National Press Club (United States)

The National Press Club is a professional organization and business center for journalists and communications professionals.

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National Review

National Review (NR) is an American semi-monthly conservative editorial magazine focusing on news and commentary pieces on political, social, and cultural affairs.

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National security

National security refers to the security of a nation state, including its citizens, economy, and institutions, and is regarded as a duty of government.

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National Security Agency

The National Security Agency (NSA) is a national-level intelligence agency of the United States Department of Defense, under the authority of the Director of National Intelligence.

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National Security Archive

The National Security Archive is a 501(c)(3) non-governmental, non-profit research and archival institution located on the campus of the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1985 to check rising government secrecy, the National Security Archive is an investigative journalism center, open government advocate, international affairs research institute, and is the largest repository of declassified U.S. documents outside the federal government.

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Nazi Germany

Nazi Germany is the common English name for the period in German history from 1933 to 1945, when Germany was under the dictatorship of Adolf Hitler through the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

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Neil Sheehan

Cornelius Mahoney "Neil" Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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New York (magazine)

New York is an American biweekly magazine concerned with life, culture, politics, and style generally, and with a particular emphasis on New York City.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City draft riots

The New York City draft riots (July 13–16, 1863), known at the time as Draft Week, were violent disturbances in Lower Manhattan, widely regarded as the culmination of working-class discontent with new laws passed by Congress that year to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War.

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New York City Hall

New York City Hall, the seat of New York City government, is located at the center of City Hall Park in the Civic Center area of Lower Manhattan, between Broadway, Park Row, and Chambers Street.

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New York Herald

The New York Herald was a large-distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835, and 1924 when it merged with the New-York Tribune.

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New York Herald Tribune

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper published between 1924 and 1966.

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New York Journal-American

The New York Journal-American was a daily newspaper published in New York City from 1937 to 1966.

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New York metropolitan area

The New York metropolitan area, also referred to as the Tri-State Area, is the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass, at 4,495 mi2 (11,642 km2).

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New York Times Building (41 Park Row)

The New York Times Building, at 41 Park Row in the Civic Center neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was the home of The New York Times from 1889 to 1903, when it moved to Longacre Square, now known as Times Square.

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New York Times Building (disambiguation)

New York Times Building may refer to the following New York City buildings in Times Square.

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New York Times Co. v. Sullivan

New York Times Co.

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New York Times Index

The New York Times Index is a printed reference work published since 1913 by The New York Times newspaper.

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New York Times presidential endorsements

New York Times presidential endorsements are made every four years by The New York Times to give its readers the name of the candidate that the paper's editors believe is best suited to fit the needs of the nation.

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New York University

New York University (NYU) is a private nonprofit research university based in New York City.

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New York World

The New York World was a newspaper published in New York City from 1860 until 1931.

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New-York Tribune

The New-York Tribune was an American newspaper, first established in 1841 by editor Horace Greeley (1811–1872).

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News ticker

A news ticker (sometimes called a "crawler", "crawl" or "slide") is a primarily horizontal, text-based display either in the form of a graphic that typically resides in the lower third of the screen space on a television station or network (usually during news programming) or as a long, thin scoreboard-style display seen around the facades of some offices or public buildings dedicated to presenting headlines or minor pieces of news.

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Newspaper

A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events.

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Newspaper circulation

A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day.

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Newspaper of record

A newspaper of record is a major newspaper that has a large circulation and whose editorial and news-gathering functions are considered professional and typically authoritative.

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Newsweek

Newsweek is an American weekly magazine founded in 1933.

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Nicholas Kristof

Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American journalist and political commentator.

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North Vietnam

North Vietnam, officially the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRV) (Việt Nam Dân Chủ Cộng Hòa), was a country in Southeast Asia from 1945 to 1976, although it did not achieve widespread recognition until 1954.

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Northeastern University

Northeastern University (NU, formerly NEU) is a private research university in Boston, Massachusetts, established in 1898.

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Northern California

Northern California (colloquially known as NorCal or "The Northstate" for the northern interior counties north of Sacramento to the Oregon stateline) is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California.

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NPR

National Public Radio (usually shortened to NPR, stylized as npr) is an American privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization based in Washington, D.C. It serves as a national syndicator to a network of over 1,000 public radio stations in the United States.

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NSA warrantless surveillance (2001–2007)

NSA warrantless surveillance (also commonly referred to as "warrantless-wiretapping" or "-wiretaps") refers to the surveillance of persons within the United States, including United States citizens, during the collection of notionally foreign intelligence by the National Security Agency (NSA) as part of the Terrorist Surveillance Program.

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Nuclear program of Iran

The nuclear program of Iran has included several research sites, two uranium mines, a research reactor, and uranium processing facilities that include three known uranium enrichment plants.

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NYSE American

NYSE American, formerly known as the American Stock Exchange (AMEX), and more recently as NYSE MKT, is an American stock exchange situated in New York City, New York.

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Ochs-Sulzberger family

The Ochs-Sulzberger family are a Jewish family known for its ownership of The New York Times.

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Ombudsman

An ombudsman, ombud, or public advocate is an official who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints of maladministration or a violation of rights.

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On the Media

On the Media (OTM) is an hour-long weekly radio program, hosted by Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone, covering journalism, technology, and First Amendment issues.

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One Times Square

One Times Square, also known as 1475 Broadway, the New York Times Building, the New York Times Tower, or simply as the Times Tower, is a 25-story, skyscraper, designed by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz, located at 42nd Street and Broadway in New York City.

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Online Books Page

The Online Books Page is an index of e-text books available on the Internet.

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Op-ed

An op-ed (originally short for "opposite the editorial page" although often taken to stand for "opinion editorial") is a written prose piece typically published by a newspaper or magazine which expresses the opinion of a named author usually not affiliated with the publication's editorial board.

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Operation Pillar of Defense

Operation Pillar of Defense (עַמּוּד עָנָן, ʿAmúd ʿAnán, literally: "Pillar of Cloud") was an eight-day Israel Defense Forces (IDF) operation in the Hamas-governed Gaza Strip, which began on 14 November 2012 with the killing of Ahmed Jabari, chief of the Gaza military wing of Hamas by an Israeli airstrike.

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Opinion piece

An opinion piece is an article, published in a newspaper or magazine, that mainly reflects the author's opinion about the subject.

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Orvil Dryfoos

Orvil Eugene Dryfoos (November 8, 1912 – May 25, 1963) was the publisher of The New York Times from 1961 to his death.

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Page layout

Page layout is the part of graphic design that deals in the arrangement of visual elements on a page.

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Panic of 1893

The Panic of 1893 was a serious economic depression in the United States that began in 1893 and ended in 1897.

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Park Row (Manhattan)

Park Row is a street located in the Financial District, Civic Center, and Chinatown neighborhoods of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Patriot Act

The USA PATRIOT Act is an Act of Congress signed into law by US President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001.

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Paywall

A paywall is a method of restricting access to content via a paid subscription.

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PBS NewsHour

The PBS NewsHour is an American daily evening television news program that is broadcast on the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), airing seven nights a week on more than 350 of the public broadcaster's member stations.

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PDF

The Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format developed in the 1990s to present documents, including text formatting and images, in a manner independent of application software, hardware, and operating systems.

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Peabody Award

The George Foster Peabody Awards (or simply Peabody Awards) program, named for American businessman and philanthropist George Peabody, honor the most powerful, enlightening, and invigorating stories in television, radio, and online media.

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Penguin Group

The Penguin Group is a trade book publisher and part of Penguin Random House.

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Persuasive Games

Persuasive Games is a video game developer founded by Ian Bogost and Gerard LaFond in 2003.

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Pew Research Center

The Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan American fact tank based in Washington, D.C. It provides information on social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends shaping the United States and the world.

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Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

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Philip Pan

Philip Pan (born 20th century) is an American journalist and author.

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Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the "wrongful appropriation" and "stealing and publication" of another author's "language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions" and the representation of them as one's own original work.

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Podcast

A podcast, or generically netcast, is an episodic series of digital audio or video files which a user can download and listen to.

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Point (typography)

In typography, the point is the smallest unit of measure.

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Political science

Political science is a social science which deals with systems of governance, and the analysis of political activities, political thoughts, and political behavior.

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Politico

Politico, known earlier as The Politico, is an American political journalism company based in Arlington County, Virginia, that covers politics and policy in the United States and internationally.

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Port Authority Bus Terminal

The Port Authority Bus Terminal (colloquially known as the Port Authority and in initials as PABT) is the main gateway for interstate buses into Manhattan in New York City.

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Presidency of Richard Nixon

The presidency of Richard Nixon began at noon EST on January 20, 1969, when Richard Nixon was inaugurated as 37th President of the United States, and ended on August 9, 1974, when he resigned in the face of almost certain impeachment and removal from office, the first U.S. president ever to do so.

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President of Ireland

The President of Ireland (Uachtarán na hÉireann) is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland and the Supreme Commander of the Irish Defence Forces.

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Press Gazette

Press Gazette, formerly known as UK Press Gazette (UKPG), is a British media trade magazine dedicated to journalism and the press.

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Prime Minister of Israel

The Prime Minister of Israel (רֹאשׁ הַמֶּמְשָׁלָה, Rosh HaMemshala, lit. Head of the Government, Hebrew acronym: רה״מ; رئيس الحكومة, Ra'īs al-Ḥukūma) is the head of government of Israel and the most powerful figure in Israeli politics.

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Propaganda

Propaganda is information that is not objective and is used primarily to influence an audience and further an agenda, often by presenting facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis or perception, or using loaded language to produce an emotional rather than a rational response to the information that is presented.

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Public company

A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets.

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Public editor

The job of the public editor is to supervise the implementation of proper journalism ethics at a newspaper, and to identify and examine critical errors or omissions, and to act as a liaison to the public.

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Public figure

A public figure is a person such as a politician, celebrity, or business leader, who has a certain social position within a certain scope and a significant influence and so is often widely concerned by the public, can benefit enormously from society, and is closely related to public interests in society.

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Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States.

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Punch Sulzberger

Arthur Ochs "Punch" Sulzberger Sr. (February 5, 1926 – September 29, 2012) was an American publisher and a businessman.

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Queens

Queens is the easternmost and largest in area of the five boroughs of New York City.

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Racial discrimination

Racial discrimination refers to discrimination against individuals on the basis of their race.

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Reason (magazine)

Reason is an American libertarian monthly magazine published by the Reason Foundation.

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ReCAPTCHA

reCAPTCHA is a CAPTCHA-like system designed to establish that a computer user is human (normally in order to protect websites from bots) and, at the same time, assist in the digitization of books.

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Recklessness (law)

In criminal law and in the law of tort, recklessness may be defined as the state of mind where a person deliberately and unjustifiably pursues a course of action while consciously disregarding any risks flowing from such action.

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Red states and blue states

Since the 2000 United States presidential election, red states and blue states have referred to states of the United States whose voters predominantly choose either the Republican Party (red) or Democratic Party (blue) presidential candidates.

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Renzo Piano

Renzo Piano, (born 14 September 1937) is an Italian architect and engineer.

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Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

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Richard Bernstein

Richard Bernstein (born May 5, 1944) is an American journalist, columnist, and author.

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Richard Nixon

Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was an American politician who served as the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 until 1974, when he resigned from office, the only U.S. president to do so.

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Rockefeller Republican

The Rockefeller Republicans, also called Moderate or Liberal Republicans, were members of the Republican Party (GOP) in the 1930s–1970s who held moderate to liberal views on domestic issues, similar to those of Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York (1959–1973) and Vice President of the United States (1974–1977).

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Rudy Giuliani

Rudolph William Louis Giuliani (born May 28, 1944) is an American politician, attorney, businessman, public speaker, former mayor of New York City, and attorney to President Donald Trump.

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Russo-Japanese War

The Russo–Japanese War (Russko-yaponskaya voina; Nichirosensō; 1904–05) was fought between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea.

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Same-sex marriage

Same-sex marriage (also known as gay marriage) is the marriage of a same-sex couple, entered into in a civil or religious ceremony.

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Sarah Maslin Nir

Sarah Maslin Nir (born March 23, 1983) is an American journalist, best known for her New York Times report on the working conditions of nail salon workers, for which she was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting.

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Seattle

Seattle is a seaport city on the west coast of the United States.

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Second Intifada

The Second Intifada, also known as the Al-Aqsa Intifada (انتفاضة الأقصى; אינתיפאדת אל-אקצה Intifādat El-Aqtzah), was the second Palestinian uprising against Israel – a period of intensified Israeli–Palestinian violence.

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Sex and gender distinction

The distinction between sex and gender differentiates a person's biological sex (the anatomy of an individual's reproductive system, and secondary sex characteristics) from that person's gender, which can refer to either social roles based on the sex of the person (gender role) or personal identification of one's own gender based on an internal awareness (gender identity).

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Sexism

Sexism is prejudice or discrimination based on a person's sex or gender.

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Shanghai

Shanghai (Wu Chinese) is one of the four direct-controlled municipalities of China and the most populous city proper in the world, with a population of more than 24 million.

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Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster, Inc., a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, is an American publishing company founded in New York City in 1924 by Richard Simon and Max Schuster.

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Simon Wiesenthal Center

The Simon Wiesenthal Center (often abbreviated SWC), with headquarters in Los Angeles, California, United States, was established in 1977 and named for Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal.

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Simplified Chinese characters

Simplified Chinese characters are standardized Chinese characters prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese Characters for use in mainland China.

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Skyscraper

A skyscraper is a continuously habitable high-rise building that has over 40 floors and is taller than approximately.

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Slate (magazine)

Slate is an online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture in the United States from a liberal perspective.

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Snow Fall

"Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek," is a New York Times multimedia feature by reporter John Branch about the 2012 Tunnel Creek avalanche, published on December 20, 2012.

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Social media

Social media are computer-mediated technologies that facilitate the creation and sharing of information, ideas, career interests and other forms of expression via virtual communities and networks.

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Soviet Union

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991.

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Spin (magazine)

Spin is an American music magazine founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. The magazine stopped running in print in 2012 and currently runs as a webzine.

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Sri Lankan Civil War

The Sri Lankan Civil War was an armed conflict fought on the island of Sri Lanka.

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SS Haimun

SS Haimun was a Chinese steamer ship commanded by war correspondent Lionel James in 1904 during the Russo-Japanese War for The Times of London.

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Stalinism

Stalinism is the means of governing and related policies implemented from the 1920s to 1953 by Joseph Stalin (1878–1953).

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Stephen Walt

Stephen Martin Walt (born July 2, 1955) is an American professor of international affairs at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

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Strike action

Strike action, also called labor strike, labour strike, or simply strike, is a work stoppage caused by the mass refusal of employees to work.

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Stuart Taylor Jr.

Stuart Taylor Jr. is an American journalist and author.

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Subscription business model

The subscription business model is a business model where a customer must pay a subscription price to have access to a product or service.

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Sunday Review

Sunday Review is the opinion section of The New York Times.

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Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States.

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Syrian Electronic Army

The Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) is a group of computer hackers which first surfaced online in 2011 to support the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

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T: The New York Times Style Magazine

T: The New York Times Style Magazine is a perfect-bound magazine dedicated to fashion, living, beauty, holiday, travel and design coverage.

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Tammany Hall

Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St.

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Taoiseach

The Taoiseach (pl. Taoisigh) is the prime minister, chief executive and head of government of Ireland.

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TechCrunch

TechCrunch is an American online publisher of technology industry news founded in 2005 by Archimedes Ventures whose partners were Michael Arrington and Keith Teare.

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Tehran Times

Tehran Times began in 1979 as a foreign-language newspaper to air the voice of the Islamic Revolution.

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Telegraphy

Telegraphy (from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message.

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The American Mercury

The American Mercury was an American magazine published from 1924 to 1981.

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The Atlantic

The Atlantic is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts.

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The Baltimore Sun

The Baltimore Sun is the largest general-circulation daily newspaper based in the American state of Maryland and provides coverage of local and regional news, events, issues, people, and industries.

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The Daily (podcast)

The Daily is a daily news podcast and radio show by the American newspaper The New York Times.

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The Fader

The Fader (stylized as The FADER) is a NYC-based music magazine launched in 1999 by Rob Stone and Jon Cohen, covering music, style and culture.

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The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper.

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The Holocaust

The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah, was a genocide during World War II in which Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered approximately 6 million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish population of Europe, between 1941 and 1945.

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The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy

The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy is a book by John Mearsheimer, Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, and Stephen Walt, Professor of International Relations at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, published in late August 2007.

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The New York Times Best Seller list

The New York Times Best Seller list is widely considered the preeminent list of best-selling books in the United States.

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The New York Times Book Review

The New York Times Book Review (NYTBR) is a weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed.

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The New York Times Building

The New York Times Building is a skyscraper on the west side of Midtown Manhattan, New York City that was completed in 2007.

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The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company is an American media company which publishes its namesake, The New York Times.

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The New York Times controversies

The New York Times has been the subject of criticism from a variety of sources.

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The New York Times crossword puzzle

The New York Times crossword puzzle is a daily puzzle published in The New York Times, online at the newspaper's website, syndicated to more than 300 other newspapers and journals, and available as mobile apps.

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The New York Times Guide to Essential Knowledge

The New York Times Guide to Essential Knowledge: A Desk Reference for the Curious Mind is a single-volume reference book by The New York Times.

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The New York Times International Edition

The New York Times International Edition is an English-language newspaper printed at 38 sites throughout the world and sold in more than 160 countries and territories.

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The New York Times Magazine

The New York Times Magazine is a Sunday magazine supplement included with the Sunday edition of The New York Times.

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The Observer

The Observer is a British newspaper published on Sundays.

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The Sun (New York City)

The Sun was a New York newspaper that was published from 1833 until 1950.

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The Sydney Morning Herald

The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) is a daily compact newspaper published by Fairfax Media in Sydney, Australia.

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The Times

The Times is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England.

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The Village Voice

The Village Voice is an American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly.

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The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877.

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Thomas Dunne Books

Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin's Press, a division of Macmillan Publishers, publishes popular trade fiction and nonfiction.

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Thomas Friedman

Thomas Loren Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist and author.

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Times Square

Times Square is a major commercial intersection, tourist destination, entertainment center and neighborhood in the Midtown Manhattan section of New York City at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue.

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Times Square Ball

The Times Square Ball is a time ball located in New York City's Times Square.

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Tom Bodkin

Tom Bodkin is the Design Director at The New York Times.

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Tony Hendra

Tony Hendra (born 10 July 1941) is an English satirist, actor and writer who has worked mostly in the United States.

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Tony Russo (whistleblower)

Anthony J. Russo Jr. (October 14, 1936 – August 6, 2008) was an American researcher who assisted Daniel Ellsberg, his friend and former colleague at the RAND Corporation, in copying the Pentagon Papers.

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Torture

Torture (from the Latin tortus, "twisted") is the act of deliberately inflicting physical or psychological pain in order to fulfill some desire of the torturer or compel some action from the victim.

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Traditional Chinese characters

Traditional Chinese characters (Pinyin) are Chinese characters in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946.

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Turner Catledge

William Turner Catledge (1901–1983) was an American journalist, best known for his work at The New York Times.

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Twitter

Twitter is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets".

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Typeface

In typography, a typeface (also known as font family) is a set of one or more fonts each composed of glyphs that share common design features.

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Union Army

During the American Civil War, the Union Army referred to the United States Army, the land force that fought to preserve the Union of the collective states.

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Union Stock Yards

The Union Stock Yard & Transit Co., or The Yards, was the meatpacking district in Chicago for more than a century, starting in 1865.

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United States Attorney General

The United States Attorney General (A.G.) is the head of the United States Department of Justice per, concerned with all legal affairs, and is the chief lawyer of the United States government.

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United States Department of Defense

The Department of Defense (DoD, USDOD, or DOD) is an executive branch department of the federal government of the United States charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government concerned directly with national security and the United States Armed Forces.

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United States Department of Justice

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is a federal executive department of the U.S. government, responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice in the United States, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The department was formed in 1870 during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. The Department of Justice administers several federal law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The department is responsible for investigating instances of financial fraud, representing the United States government in legal matters (such as in cases before the Supreme Court), and running the federal prison system. The department is also responsible for reviewing the conduct of local law enforcement as directed by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. The department is headed by the United States Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Jeff Sessions.

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United States Department of State

The United States Department of State (DOS), often referred to as the State Department, is the United States federal executive department that advises the President and represents the country in international affairs and foreign policy issues.

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United States Department of War

The United States Department of War, also called the War Department (and occasionally War Office in the early years), was the United States Cabinet department originally responsible for the operation and maintenance of the United States Army, also bearing responsibility for naval affairs until the establishment of the Navy Department in 1798, and for most land-based air forces until the creation of the Department of the Air Force on September 18, 1947.

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United States district court

The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system.

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United States Marine Corps

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy.

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United States presidential election, 1884

The United States presidential election of 1884 was the 25th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 1884.

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United States presidential election, 2004

The United States presidential election of 2004, the 55th quadrennial presidential election, was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004.

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United States presidential election, 2016

The United States presidential election of 2016 was the 58th quadrennial American presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

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University of California, Los Angeles

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) is a public research university in the Westwood district of Los Angeles, United States.

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USA Today

USA Today is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company.

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Video game

A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor.

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Vietnam War

The Vietnam War (Chiến tranh Việt Nam), also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America (Kháng chiến chống Mỹ) or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975.

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Virtual private network

A virtual private network (VPN) extends a private network across a public network, and enables users to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if their computing devices were directly connected to the private network.

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Voting interest

Voting interest (or voting power) in business and accounting means the total number, or percent, of votes entitled to be cast on the issue at the time the determination of voting power is made, excluding a vote which is contingent upon the happening of a condition or event which has not occurred at the time.

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W (magazine)

W is an American fashion magazine published by Condé Nast.

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Walter Duranty

Walter Duranty (May 25, 1884 – October 3, 1957) was a Liverpool-born, Anglo-American journalist who served as the Moscow Bureau Chief of The New York Times for fourteen years (1922–1936) following the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War (1918–1921).

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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WBUR-FM

WBUR-FM (90.9 FM) is a public radio station located in Boston, Massachusetts, owned by Boston University.

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Wen Jiabao

Wen Jiabao (born 15 September 1942) was the sixth Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, serving as China's head of government for a decade between 2003 and 2013.

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William L. Laurence

William Leonard Laurence (March 7, 1888 – March 19, 1977) was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American journalist known for his science journalism writing of the 1940s and 1950s while working for The New York Times.

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William M. Tweed

William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878)—often erroneously referred to as "William Marcy Tweed" (see below), and widely known as "Boss" Tweed—was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City and State.

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William Randolph Hearst

William Randolph Hearst Sr. (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American businessman, politician, and newspaper publisher who built the nation's largest newspaper chain and media company Hearst Communications and whose flamboyant methods of yellow journalism influenced the nation's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories.

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William Rehnquist

William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer and jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States for 33 years, first as an Associate Justice from 1972 to 1986, and then as the 16th Chief Justice of the United States from 1986 until his death in 2005.

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William Safire

William Lewis Safir (December 17, 1929 – September 27, 2009), better known as William SafireSafire, William (1986).

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Windows Phone

Windows Phone (WP) is a family of discontinued mobile operating systems developed by Microsoft for smartphones as the replacement successor to Windows Mobile and Zune.

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Windows Presentation Foundation

Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is a graphical subsystem by Microsoft for rendering user interfaces in Windows-based applications.

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Wired (magazine)

Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics.

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Wireless

Wireless communication, or sometimes simply wireless, is the transfer of information or power between two or more points that are not connected by an electrical conductor.

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WNYC

WNYC is the trademark, and a set of call letters shared by a pair of non-profit, noncommercial, public radio stations located in New York City and owned by New York Public Radio, a nonprofit organization that did business as WNYC RADIO until March 2013.

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World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

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World Wide Web

The World Wide Web (abbreviated WWW or the Web) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and accessible via the Internet.

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Wright Patman

John William Wright Patman (August 6, 1893 – March 7, 1976) was a U.S. Congressman from Texas in Texas's 1st congressional district and chair of the United States House Committee on Banking and Currency (1963–75).

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Xinhua News Agency

Xinhua News Agency (English pronunciation: J. C. Wells: Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, 3rd ed., for both British and American English) or New China News Agency is the official state-run press agency of the People's Republic of China.

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Yellow journalism

Yellow journalism and the yellow press are American terms for journalism and associated newspapers that present little or no legitimate well-researched news while instead using eye-catching headlines for increased sales.

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Zionism

Zionism (צִיּוֹנוּת Tsiyyonut after Zion) is the national movement of the Jewish people that supports the re-establishment of a Jewish homeland in the territory defined as the historic Land of Israel (roughly corresponding to Canaan, the Holy Land, or the region of Palestine).

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1920 Republican National Convention

The 1920 National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States nominated Ohio Senator Warren G. Harding for President and Massachusetts Governor Calvin Coolidge for Vice President.

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1962–63 New York City newspaper strike

The 1962–63 New York City Newspaper Strike ran from December 8, 1962, until March 31, 1963, lasting for a total of 114 days.

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2003 invasion of Iraq

The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War (also called Operation Iraqi Freedom).

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2012 Tunnel Creek avalanche

The 2012 Tunnel Creek avalanche occurred on February 19, 2012, at about noon in the Tunnel Creek section of Stevens Pass, a mountain pass through the Cascade Mountains located at the border of King County and Chelan County in Washington, U.S. There were three fatalities and one injured.

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2016 Democratic National Committee email leak

The 2016 Democratic National Committee email leak is a collection of Democratic National Committee (DNC) emails stolen by Russian intelligence agency hackers and subsequently published (leaked) by DCLeaks in June and July 2016 and by WikiLeaks on July 22, 2016, during the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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229 West 43rd Street

229 West 43rd Street, formerly known as The New York Times Building, is an 18-story office building, located at 229 West 43rd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenue near Times Square in Manhattan, a borough of New York City.

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Redirects here:

@nytimes, All The News That's Fit To Print, Media Decoder, Media Decoder Blog, Metropolitan Diary, N Y Times, N. Y. Times, N.Y. Times, NY Times, NY times, NYT, NYT Cooking, NYT.com, NYTimes, NYTimes.com, NYtimes, New York Daily Times, New York Time, New York Times, New York Times (newspaper), New York Times Cooking, New York Times Sports Blog, New York Times Sunday Book Review, New York Times', New York times, New york Times, New york times, New-York Daily Times, New-York Times, Newsroom Navigator, Newyork Times, Newyorktimes, Newyorktimes.com, Ny times, Nyt.com, Nyti.ms, Nytimes, Nytimes.com, Old Gray Lady, Old Grey Lady, Sunday New York Times, TNYT, The Local East Village, The NY Times, The New York Daily Times, The New York Times Cooking, The New York Times Newsroom Navigator, The New York Times Sunday Book Review, The New York Times and the Holocaust, The New York Times', The New York Times., The New york Times, The new york times, The ny times, Times Machine, Times Reader, Times machine, TimesMachine, Timesselect, Www.nytimes.com.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_York_Times

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