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Thetis

Index Thetis

Thetis (Θέτις), is a figure from Greek mythology with varying mythological roles. [1]

107 relations: Achaeans (Homer), Achilles, Aeacus, Aethiopis, Agamemnon, Alcman, Ambrosia, Aphrodite, Apollonius of Rhodes, Archaic Greece, Argonautica, Arke, Athena, Balius and Xanthus, Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus), Black Sea, Boeotia, Briseis, Calchas, Chiron, Chlamys, Clash of the Titans (1981 film), Classical Greece, Cult (religious practice), Cult image, Demeter, Demiurge, Doris (mythology), E. V. Rieu, Elysium, Eos, Epic Cycle, Eris (mythology), Eros, Erwin Rohde, Giants (Greek mythology), Gorgon, Greek hero cult, Greek mythology, Hades, Hecatoncheires, Hector, Hephaestus, Hera, Herodotus, Hesiod, Homer, Iliad, Interpretatio graeca, Iran, ..., Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Judgement of Paris, Julie Christie, Laconia, Lemnos, Louvre, Lucian, Lycomedes, Lycurgus of Thrace, Madeline Miller, Maggie Smith, Meleager, Memnon (mythology), Metis (mythology), Muses, Myrmidons, Nereid, Nereus, Nymph, Oceanid, Oceanus, Oxyrhynchus, Pausanias (geographer), Peleus, Pelion, Perseus, Pindar, Polis, Poseidon, Priest, Proclus, Prometheus, Proteus, Quintus Smyrnaeus, Ray Harryhausen, Red Sea, Saturn Award, Shapeshifting, Shield of Achilles, Snake Island (Black Sea), Sparta, Styx, Tethys (mythology), Thalassa, The Shield of Achilles, Themis, Thetis (disambiguation), Trojan War, Troy (film), University of California Press, Uranus (mythology), W. H. Auden, Walter Burkert, Wolfgang Petersen, Xanthus (mythology), Xoanon, Zeus. Expand index (57 more) »

Achaeans (Homer)

The Achaeans (Ἀχαιοί Akhaioí, "the Achaeans" or "of Achaea") constitute one of the collective names for the Greeks in Homer's Iliad (used 598 times) and Odyssey.

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Achilles

In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus (Ἀχιλλεύς, Achilleus) was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad.

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Aeacus

Aeacus (also spelled Eacus; Ancient Greek: Αἰακός) was a mythological king of the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf.

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Aethiopis

The Aethiopis or Aithiopis (Greek: Αἰθιοπίς, Aíthiopís; Aethiopis) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature.

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Agamemnon

In Greek mythology, Agamemnon (Ἀγαμέμνων, Ἀgamémnōn) was the son of King Atreus and Queen Aerope of Mycenae, the brother of Menelaus, the husband of Clytemnestra and the father of Iphigenia, Electra or Laodike (Λαοδίκη), Orestes and Chrysothemis.

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Alcman

Alcman (Ἀλκμάν Alkmán; fl.  7th century BC) was an Ancient Greek choral lyric poet from Sparta.

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Ambrosia

In the ancient Greek myths, ambrosia (ἀμβροσία, "immortality") is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it.

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Aphrodite

Aphrodite is the ancient Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation.

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Apollonius of Rhodes

Apollonius of Rhodes (Ἀπολλώνιος Ῥόδιος Apollṓnios Rhódios; Apollonius Rhodius; fl. first half of 3rd century BCE), was an ancient Greek author, best known for the Argonautica, an epic poem about Jason and the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece.

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Archaic Greece

Archaic Greece was the period in Greek history lasting from the eighth century BC to the second Persian invasion of Greece in 480 BC, following the Greek Dark Ages and succeeded by the Classical period.

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Argonautica

The Argonautica (translit) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC.

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Arke

In ancient Greek religion, Arke or Arce (Ἄρκη Arkē) was a daughter of Thaumas and fraternal twin sister of Iris.

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Athena

Athena; Attic Greek: Ἀθηνᾶ, Athēnā, or Ἀθηναία, Athēnaia; Epic: Ἀθηναίη, Athēnaiē; Doric: Ἀθάνα, Athānā or Athene,; Ionic: Ἀθήνη, Athēnē often given the epithet Pallas,; Παλλὰς is the ancient Greek goddess of wisdom, handicraft, and warfare, who was later syncretized with the Roman goddess Minerva.

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Balius and Xanthus

Balius (Ancient Greek: Βάλιος, Balios, possibly "dappled") and Xanthus (Ancient Greek: Ξάνθος, Xanthos, "blonde") were, according to Greek mythology, two immortal horses, the offspring of the harpy Podarge and the West wind, Zephyrus; following another tradition, their father was Zeus.

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Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)

The Bibliotheca (Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the Bibliotheca of Pseudo-Apollodorus, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends, arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD.

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Black Sea

The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.

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Boeotia

Boeotia, sometimes alternatively Latinised as Boiotia, or Beotia (Βοιωτία,,; modern transliteration Voiotía, also Viotía, formerly Cadmeis), is one of the regional units of Greece.

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Briseis

Brisēís (Βρισηΐς,; also known as Hippodameia (Ἱπποδάμεια) was a mythical queen in Asia Minor at the time of the Trojan War. Her character lies at the heart of a dispute between Achilles and Agamemnon that drives the plot of Homer's Iliad.

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Calchas

In Greek mythology, Calchas (Κάλχας Kalkhas, possibly meaning "bronze-man"), son of Thestor, was an Argive seer, with a gift for interpreting the flight of birds that he received of Apollo: "as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp".

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Chiron

In Greek mythology, Chiron (also Cheiron or Kheiron; Χείρων "hand") was held to be the superlative centaur amongst his brethren, as he was called as the "wisest and justest of all the centaurs".

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Chlamys

The chlamys (Ancient Greek: χλαμύς, gen.: χλαμύδος) was a type of an ancient Greek cloak.

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Clash of the Titans (1981 film)

Clash of the Titans is a 1981 British-American heroic fantasy adventure film directed by Desmond Davis and written by Beverley Cross which retells the Greek mythological story of Perseus.

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Classical Greece

Classical Greece was a period of around 200 years (5th and 4th centuries BC) in Greek culture.

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Cult (religious practice)

Cult is literally the "care" (Latin cultus) owed to deities and to temples, shrines, or churches.

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Cult image

In the practice of religion, a cult image is a human-made object that is venerated or worshipped for the deity, spirit or daemon that it embodies or represents.

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Demeter

In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Demeter (Attic: Δημήτηρ Dēmḗtēr,; Doric: Δαμάτηρ Dāmā́tēr) is the goddess of the grain, agriculture, harvest, growth, and nourishment, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth.

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Demiurge

In the Platonic, Neopythagorean, Middle Platonic, and Neoplatonic schools of philosophy, the demiurge is an artisan-like figure responsible for fashioning and maintaining the physical universe.

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Doris (mythology)

Doris (Δωρίς "bounty"), an Oceanid, was a sea nymph in Greek mythology, whose name represented the bounty of the sea.

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E. V. Rieu

Emile Victor Rieu CBE (10 February 1887 – 11 May 1972) was a British classicist, publisher, poet, and initiator and editor of the Penguin Classics series of books.

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Elysium

Elysium or the Elysian Fields (Ἠλύσιον πεδίον., Ēlýsion pedíon) is a conception of the afterlife that developed over time and was maintained by some Greek religious and philosophical sects and cults.

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Eos

In Greek mythology, Eos (Ionic and Homeric Greek Ἠώς Ēōs, Attic Ἕως Éōs, "dawn", or; Aeolic Αὔως Aúōs, Doric Ἀώς Āṓs) is a Titaness and the goddess of the dawn, who rose each morning from her home at the edge of the Oceanus.

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Epic Cycle

The Epic Cycle (Ἐπικὸς Κύκλος, Epikos Kyklos) was a collection of Ancient Greek epic poems, composed in dactylic hexameter and related to the story of the Trojan War, including the Cypria, the Aethiopis, the so-called Little Iliad, the Iliupersis, the Nostoi, and the Telegony.

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Eris (mythology)

Eris (Ἔρις, "Strife") is the Greek goddess of strife and discord.

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Eros

In Greek mythology, Eros (Ἔρως, "Desire") was the Greek god of sexual attraction.

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Erwin Rohde

Erwin Rohde (October 9, 1845 – January 11, 1898) was one of the great German classical scholars of the 19th century.

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Giants (Greek mythology)

In Greek and Roman Mythology, the Giants, also called Gigantes (jye-GAHN-tees or gee-GAHN-tees; Greek: Γίγαντες, Gígantes, Γίγας, Gígas) were a race of great strength and aggression, though not necessarily of great size, known for the Gigantomachy (Gigantomachia), their battle with the Olympian gods.

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Gorgon

In Greek mythology, a Gorgon (plural: Gorgons, Γοργών/Γοργώ Gorgon/Gorgo) is a female creature.

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Greek hero cult

Hero cults were one of the most distinctive features of ancient Greek religion.

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Greek mythology

Greek mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.

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Hades

Hades (ᾍδης Háidēs) was the ancient Greek chthonic god of the underworld, which eventually took his name.

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Hecatoncheires

The HecatoncheiresDepending on the method of transliteration, the Ancient Greek ἑκατόν may be latinised as and χείρ may be transliterated as, or even.

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Hector

In Greek mythology and Roman mythology, Hector (Ἕκτωρ Hektōr) was a Trojan prince and the greatest fighter for Troy in the Trojan War.

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Hephaestus

Hephaestus (eight spellings; Ἥφαιστος Hēphaistos) is the Greek god of blacksmiths, metalworking, carpenters, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metallurgy, fire, and volcanoes.

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Hera

Hera (Ἥρᾱ, Hērā; Ἥρη, Hērē in Ionic and Homeric Greek) is the goddess of women, marriage, family, and childbirth in Ancient Greek religion and myth, one of the Twelve Olympians and the sister-wife of Zeus.

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Herodotus

Herodotus (Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (484– 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides.

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Hesiod

Hesiod (or; Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.

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Homer

Homer (Ὅμηρος, Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature.

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Iliad

The Iliad (Ἰλιάς, in Classical Attic; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer.

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Interpretatio graeca

Interpretatio graeca (Latin, "Greek translation" or "interpretation by means of Greek ") is a discourse in which ancient Greek religious concepts and practices, deities, and myths are used to interpret or attempt to understand the mythology and religion of other cultures.

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Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

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Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (29 August 1780 – 14 January 1867) was a French Neoclassical painter.

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Judgement of Paris

The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, which was one of the events that led up to the Trojan War and (in slightly later versions of the story) to the foundation of Rome.

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Julie Christie

Julie Frances Christie (born 14 April 1940) is a British actress.

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Laconia

Laconia (Λακωνία, Lakonía), also known as Lacedaemonia, is a region in the southeastern part of the Peloponnese peninsula.

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Lemnos

Lemnos (Λήμνος) is a Greek island in the northern part of the Aegean Sea.

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Louvre

The Louvre, or the Louvre Museum, is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France.

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Lucian

Lucian of Samosata (125 AD – after 180 AD) was a Hellenized Syrian satirist and rhetorician who is best known for his characteristic tongue-in-cheek style, with which he frequently ridiculed superstition, religious practices, and belief in the paranormal.

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Lycomedes

The name Lycomedes (Λυκομήδης) may refer to several characters in Greek mythology, of whom the most prominent was the king of Scyros during the Trojan War.

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Lycurgus of Thrace

In Greek mythology, Lycurgus(/laɪˈkɜːrɡəs/; Greek: Λυκοῦργος, Lykoûrgos, Ancient Greek:; c. 820 BC) (also Lykurgos, Lykourgos) was the king of the Edoni in Thrace, son of Dryas, the "oak", and father of a son whose name was also Dryas.

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Madeline Miller

Madeline Miller is an American novelist, whose debut novel was The Song of Achilles.

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Maggie Smith

Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, (born 28 December 1934) is an English actress.

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Meleager

In Greek mythology, Meleager (Meléagros) was a hero venerated in his temenos at Calydon in Aetolia.

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Memnon (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Memnon (Μέμνων) was an Ethiopian king and son of Tithonus and Eos.

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Metis (mythology)

Metis (Greek: Μῆτις - "wisdom," "skill," or "craft"), in ancient Greek religion, was a mythical Titaness belonging to the second generation of Titans.

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Muses

The Muses (/ˈmjuːzɪz/; Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, Moũsai) are the inspirational goddesses of literature, science, and the arts in Greek mythology.

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Myrmidons

The Myrmidons (Μυρμιδόνες Myrmidones) were a legendary people of Greek mythology, native to the region of Thessaly.

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Nereid

In Greek mythology, the Nereids (Νηρηΐδες Nereides, sg. Νηρηΐς Nereis) are sea nymphs (female spirits of sea waters), the 50 daughters of Nereus and Doris, sisters to Nerites.

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Nereus

In Greek mythology, Nereus (Νηρεύς) was the eldest son of Pontus (the Sea) and Gaia (the Earth), who with Doris fathered the Nereids and Nerites, with whom Nereus lived in the Aegean Sea.

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Nymph

A nymph (νύμφη, nýmphē) in Greek and Latin mythology is a minor female nature deity typically associated with a particular location or landform.

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Oceanid

In Greek mythology and, later, Roman mythology, the Oceanids or Oceanides (Ὠκεανίδες, pl.) are water nymphs who were the three thousand daughters of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys.

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Oceanus

Oceanus (Ὠκεανός Ōkeanós), also known as Ogenus (Ὤγενος Ōgenos or Ὠγηνός Ōgēnos) or Ogen (Ὠγήν Ōgēn), was a divine figure in classical antiquity, believed by the ancient Greeks and Romans to be the divine personification of the sea, an enormous river encircling the world.

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Oxyrhynchus

Oxyrhynchus (Ὀξύρρυγχος Oxýrrhynkhos; "sharp-nosed"; ancient Egyptian Pr-Medjed; Coptic Pemdje; modern Egyptian Arabic El Bahnasa) is a city in Middle Egypt, located about 160 km south-southwest of Cairo, in the governorate of Al Minya.

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Pausanias (geographer)

Pausanias (Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180) was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius.

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Peleus

In Greek mythology, Peleus (Πηλεύς, Pēleus) was a hero whose myth was already known to the hearers of Homer in the late 8th century BC.

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Pelion

Pelion or Pelium (Modern Πήλιο, Pílio; Ancient Greek/Katharevousa: Πήλιον. Pēlion) is a mountain at the southeastern part of Thessaly in central Greece, forming a hook-like peninsula between the Pagasetic Gulf and the Aegean Sea.

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Perseus

In Greek mythology, Perseus (Περσεύς) is the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty, who, alongside Cadmus and Bellerophon, was the greatest Greek hero and slayer of monsters before the days of Heracles.

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Pindar

Pindar (Πίνδαρος Pindaros,; Pindarus; c. 522 – c. 443 BC) was an Ancient Greek lyric poet from Thebes.

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Polis

Polis (πόλις), plural poleis (πόλεις), literally means city in Greek.

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Poseidon

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth.

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Priest

A priest or priestess (feminine) is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities.

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Proclus

Proclus Lycaeus (8 February 412 – 17 April 485 AD), called the Successor (Greek Πρόκλος ὁ Διάδοχος, Próklos ho Diádokhos), was a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major classical philosophers (see Damascius).

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Prometheus

In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Προμηθεύς,, meaning "forethought") is a Titan, culture hero, and trickster figure who is credited with the creation of man from clay, and who defies the gods by stealing fire and giving it to humanity, an act that enabled progress and civilization.

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Proteus

In Greek mythology, Proteus (Ancient Greek: Πρωτεύς) is an early sea-god or god of rivers and oceanic bodies of water, one of several deities whom Homer calls the "Old Man of the Sea".

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Quintus Smyrnaeus

Quintus Smyrnaeus or Quintus of Smyrna, also known as Kointos Smyrnaios (Κόϊντος Σμυρναῖος), was a Greek epic poet whose Posthomerica, following "after Homer" continues the narration of the Trojan War.

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Ray Harryhausen

Raymond Frederick Harryhausen (June 29, 1920 – May 7, 2013) was an American-British artist, designer, visual effects creator, writer and producer who created a form of stop-motion model animation known as "Dynamation".

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Red Sea

The Red Sea (also the Erythraean Sea) is a seawater inlet of the Indian Ocean, lying between Africa and Asia.

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Saturn Award

The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films; it was initially created to honor science fiction, fantasy, and horror on film, but has since grown to reward other films belonging to genre fiction, as well as on television and home media releases.

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Shapeshifting

In mythology, folklore and speculative fiction, shapeshifting is the ability of a being or creature to completely transform its physical form or shape.

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Shield of Achilles

The Shield of Achilles is the shield that Achilles uses in his fight with Hector, famously described in a passage in Book 18, lines 478–608 of Homer's Iliad.

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Snake Island (Black Sea)

Snake Island (Greek Φιδονήσι Fidonísi), also known as Serpent Island (Insula Șerpilor, Зміїний, Змеиный), is an island located in the Black Sea, near the Danube Delta.

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Sparta

Sparta (Doric Greek: Σπάρτα, Spártā; Attic Greek: Σπάρτη, Spártē) was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece.

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Styx

In Greek mythology, Styx (Στύξ) is a deity and a river that forms the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, often called "Hades" which is also the name of its ruler.

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Tethys (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Tethys (Τηθύς), was a Titan daughter of Uranus and Gaia, sister and wife of Titan-god Oceanus, mother of the Potamoi and the Oceanids.

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Thalassa

In Greek mythology, Thalassa (Θάλασσα, "sea") was the primeval spirit of the sea.

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The Shield of Achilles

The Shield of Achilles is a poem by W. H. Auden first published in 1952, and the title work of a collection of poems by Auden, published in 1955.

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Themis

Themis (Ancient Greek: Θέμις) is an ancient Greek Titaness.

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Thetis (disambiguation)

Thetis is a sea nymph in Greek mythology.

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Trojan War

In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta.

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Troy (film)

Troy is a 2004 epic period war film written by David Benioff, directed by Wolfgang Petersen and co-produced by units in Malta, Mexico and Britain's Shepperton Studios.

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University of California Press

University of California Press, otherwise known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California that engages in academic publishing.

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Uranus (mythology)

Uranus (Ancient Greek Οὐρανός, Ouranos meaning "sky" or "heaven") was the primal Greek god personifying the sky and one of the Greek primordial deities.

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W. H. Auden

Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) was an English-American poet.

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Walter Burkert

Walter Burkert (born 2 February 1931, Neuendettelsau; died 11 March 2015, Zurich) was a German scholar of Greek mythology and cult.

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Wolfgang Petersen

Wolfgang Petersen (born 14 March 1941) is a German film director and screenwriter.

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Xanthus (mythology)

In Greek mythology, the name Xanthus or Xanthos (Ancient Greek: Ξάνθος "yellow" or "fair hair") may refer to.

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Xoanon

A xoanon (ξόανον; plural: ξόανα xoana, from the verb ξέειν, xeein, to carve or scrape) was an Archaic wooden cult image of Ancient Greece.

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Zeus

Zeus (Ζεύς, Zeús) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.

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Redirects here:

Hetis, Peleus and Thetis, Thetys, Θέτις.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thetis

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