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Tibetan Buddhist canon

Index Tibetan Buddhist canon

The Tibetan Buddhist canon is a loosely defined list of sacred texts recognized by various sects of Tibetan Buddhism. [1]

90 relations: Abhidharma, Abhidharma-samuccaya, Abhidharmakośakārikā, Abhisamayalankara, Adi Shankara, Anuttarayoga Tantra, Anuyoga, Aryadeva, Asanga, Atiśa, Āgama (Buddhism), Śāntarakṣita, Bhāviveka, Bodhisattvacaryāvatāra, Buddhapālita, Buton Rinchen Drub, Chandrakirti, Charya tantra yana, Chinese Buddhist canon, Dharma-dharmata-vibhaga, Dharmakirti, Digha Nikaya, Dignāga, Dunhuang, Dzogchen, Early Buddhism, Gelug, Haribhadra, Heart Sutra, Hinayana, Jamgon Ju Mipham Gyatso, Jamgon Kongtrul, Kagyu, Kalachakra, Kamalaśīla, Kangyur, Karchag Phangthangma, Lojong, Longde (Dzogchen), Mañjuśrīnāmasamgīti, Madhyamaka, Madhyamakālaṃkāra, Madhyamakāvatāra, Madhyanta-vibhaga-karika, Mahayana, Mahayana-sutra-alamkara-karika, Mahayoga, Maitreya, Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, Menngagde, ..., Nagarjuna, Nalanda, Nikāya, Nondualism, Nyingma, Nyingma Gyubum, Outer Tantras, Padmasambhava, Pāli Canon, Prajnaparamita, Pramana, Pramanavarttika, Pramāṇa-samuccaya, Ratnagotravibhāga, Religious text, Rimé movement, Sakya, Sanskrit Buddhist literature, Sarma (Tibetan Buddhism), Sarvastivada, Semde, Shantideva, Sutra, Sutrayana, Svatantrika–Prasaṅgika distinction, Tantra, Tengyur, Terma (religion), Tibet, Tibetan Buddhism, Tohoku University, Tripiṭaka, Tripitaka Koreana, Trisong Detsen, Vajrayana, Vasubandhu, Vinaya, Woodcut, Yogachara, Yogatantra. Expand index (40 more) »

Abhidharma

Abhidharma (Sanskrit) or Abhidhamma (Pali) are ancient (3rd century BCE and later) Buddhist texts which contain detailed scholastic reworkings of doctrinal material appearing in the Buddhist sutras, according to schematic classifications.

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Abhidharma-samuccaya

Abhidharma-samuccaya (Sanskrit; Tibetan Wylie: mngon pa kun btus; English: Compendium of Abhidharma) is a Buddhist text composed by Asanga.

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Abhidharmakośakārikā

The Abhidharmakośakārikā or Verses on the Treasury of Abhidharma is a key text on the Abhidharma written in Sanskrit verse by Vasubandhu in the 4th or 5th century.

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Abhisamayalankara

The "Ornament of/for Realization", abbreviated AA, is one of five Sanskrit-language Mahayana sutras which, according to Tibetan tradition, Maitreya revealed to Asaṅga in northwest India circa the 4th century AD.

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Adi Shankara

Adi Shankara (pronounced) or Shankara, was an early 8th century Indian philosopher and theologian who consolidated the doctrine of Advaita Vedanta.

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Anuttarayoga Tantra

Anuttarayoga Tantra (Sanskrit, Tibetan: bla na med pa'i rgyud), often translated as Unexcelled Yoga Tantra or Highest Yoga Tantra, is a term used in Tibetan Buddhism in the categorization of esoteric tantric Indian Buddhist texts that constitute part of the Kangyur, or the 'translated words of the Buddha' in the Tibetan Buddhist canon.

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Anuyoga

Anuyoga (Skt. अनुयोग 'further yoga') is the designation of the second of the three Inner Tantras according to the ninefold division of practice used by the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Aryadeva

Āryadeva (fl. 3rd century CE), was a disciple of Nagarjuna and author of several important Mahayana Madhyamaka Buddhist texts.

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Asanga

Asaṅga (Romaji: Mujaku) (fl. 4th century C.E.) was a major exponent of the Yogacara tradition in India, also called Vijñānavāda.

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Atiśa

(অতীশ দীপংকর শ্রীজ্ঞান; ཇོ་བོ་རྗེ་དཔལ་ལྡན་ཨ་ཏི་ཤ།) (982 - 1054 CE) was a Buddhist Bengali religious leader and master.

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Āgama (Buddhism)

In Buddhism, an āgama (आगम Prakrit/Sanskrit) is used as "sacred scriptures".

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Śāntarakṣita

(शान्तरक्षित,;, 725–788)stanford.edu: was a renowned 8th century Indian Buddhist and abbot of Nalanda.

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Bhāviveka

Bhāviveka, also called Bhavya or Bhāvaviveka (c. 500 – c. 578) was a sixth century Madhyamaka Buddhist.

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Bodhisattvacaryāvatāra

The Bodhisattvacharyāvatāra or Bodhicaryāvatāra, sometimes translated into English as A Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life, is a Mahāyāna Buddhist text written c. 700 AD in Sanskrit verse by Shantideva (Śāntideva), a Buddhist monk at Nālandā Monastic University in India.

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Buddhapālita

Buddhapālita (470–550) was a commentator on the works of Nagarjuna and Aryadeva.

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Buton Rinchen Drub

Butön Rinchen Drup, (1290–1364), 11th Abbot of Shalu Monastery, was a 14th-century Sakya master and Tibetan Buddhist leader.

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Chandrakirti

Chandrakirti was a Buddhist scholar of the Madhyamaka school and a noted commentator on the works of Nagarjuna and those of his main disciple, Aryadeva, authoring two influential works, Prasannapadā and Madhyamakāvatāra.

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Charya tantra yana

Charya tantra, Upa tantra, or Ubhaya tantra is a yana (literally "vehicle") of Esoteric Buddhism-though there is debate about whether it is considered to be buddhism, and as such is both a class of tantric literature and of praxis.

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Chinese Buddhist canon

The Chinese Buddhist Canon refers to the total body of Buddhist literature deemed canonical in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese Buddhism.

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Dharma-dharmata-vibhaga

Dharma-dharmatā-vibhāga(Chinese:辩法与法性论) (Distinguishing Phenomena and Pure Being) is a short Yogācāra work, attributed to Maitreya-nātha, which discusses the distinction and correlation (vibhāga) between phenomena (dharma) and reality (dharmatā); the work exists in both a prose and a verse version and survives only in Tibetan translation. However, the Sanskrit original was reported to exist in Tibet during the 1930s by the Indian Buddhologist and explorer, Rahul Sankrityayan.

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Dharmakirti

Dharmakīrti (fl. c. 6th or 7th century) was an influential Indian Buddhist philosopher who worked at Nālandā.

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Digha Nikaya

The Digha Nikaya (dīghanikāya; "Collection of Long Discourses") is a Buddhist scripture, the first of the five nikayas, or collections, in the Sutta Pitaka, which is one of the "three baskets" that compose the Pali Tipitaka of (Theravada) Buddhism.

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Dignāga

Dignāga (a.k.a. Diṅnāga, c. 480 – c. 540 CE) was an Indian Buddhist scholar and one of the Buddhist founders of Indian logic (hetu vidyā).

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Dunhuang

Dunhuang is a county-level city in northwestern Gansu Province, Western China.

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Dzogchen

Dzogchen or "Great Perfection", Sanskrit: अतियोग, is a tradition of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism aimed at discovering and continuing in the natural primordial state of being.

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Early Buddhism

The term Early Buddhism can refer to two distinct periods, both of which are covered in a separate article.

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Gelug

The Gelug (Wylie: dGe-Lugs-Pa) is the newest of the schools of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Haribhadra

Haribhadra Suri was a Svetambara mendicant Jain leader and author.

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Heart Sutra

The Heart Sūtra (Sanskrit or Chinese 心經 Xīnjīng) is a popular sutra in Mahāyāna Buddhism.

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Hinayana

"Hīnayāna" is a Sanskrit term literally meaning the "inferior vehicle".

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Jamgon Ju Mipham Gyatso

Jamgön Ju Mipham, or Mipham Jamyang Namgyal Gyamtso (1846–1912) (also known as "Mipham the Great") was a very influential philosopher and polymath of the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Jamgon Kongtrul

Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Thayé (1813–1899), also known as Jamgön Kongtrül the Great, was a Tibetan Buddhist scholar, poet, artist, physician, tertön and polymath.

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Kagyu

The Kagyu, Kagyü, or Kagyud school, also known as the "Oral Lineage" or Whispered Transmission school, is today regarded as one of six main schools (chos lugs) of Himalayan or Tibetan Buddhism.

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Kalachakra

The Kalachakra (Sanskrit कालचक्र,; Цогт Цагийн Хүрдэн Tsogt Tsagiin Hurden) is a term used in Vajrayana Buddhism that means wheel of time or "time-cycles".

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Kamalaśīla

Kamalaśīla (Skt. Kamalaśīla; Tib. པདྨའི་ངང་ཚུལ་, Pemé Ngang Tsul; Wyl. pad+ma'i ngang tshul) (c. 740-795) was an Indian Buddhist of Nalanda Mahavihara who accompanied Śāntarakṣita (725–788) to Tibet at the request of Trisong Detsen.

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Kangyur

The Tibetan Buddhist canon is a loosely defined list of sacred texts recognized by various schools of Tibetan Buddhism, comprising the Kangyur or Kanjur ('The Translation of the Word') and the Tengyur or Tanjur (Tengyur) ('Translation of Treatises').

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Karchag Phangthangma

The Karchag Phangthangma (dkar-chag 'Phang-thang-ma) is one of three historically attested Tibetan imperial catalogues listing translations mainly of Sanskrit Buddhist texts translated to Tibetan.

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Lojong

Lojong (Tib. བློ་སྦྱོང་) is a mind training practice in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition based on a set of aphorisms formulated in Tibet in the 12th century by Chekawa Yeshe Dorje.

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Longde (Dzogchen)

Longdé (abhyantaravarga) is the name of one of three scriptural divisions within Dzogchen, which is itself the pinnacle of the ninefold division of practice according to the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Mañjuśrīnāmasamgīti

The Mañjuśrī-Nāma-Saṃgīti (hereafter, Nama-samgiti) is considered amongst the most advanced teachings given by the Shakyamuni Buddha.

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Madhyamaka

Madhyamaka (Madhyamaka,; also known as Śūnyavāda) refers primarily to the later schools of Buddhist philosophy founded by Nagarjuna (150 CE to 250 CE).

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Madhyamakālaṃkāra

The Madhyamakālaṃkāra is an eighth-century Buddhist text, believed to have been originally composed in Sanskrit by Śāntarakṣita (725–788), which is extant in Tibetan.

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Madhyamakāvatāra

The Madhyamakāvatāra is a text by Candrakīrti (600–c. 650) on the Mādhyamaka school of Buddhist philosophy.

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Madhyanta-vibhaga-karika

The Madhyāntavibhāgakārikā (Chinese:辩中边论颂,Verses Distinguishing the Middle and the Extremes) is a key work in Buddhist philosophy of the Yogacara school attributed in the Tibetan tradition to Maitreya-nātha and in other traditions to Asanga.

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Mahayana

Mahāyāna (Sanskrit for "Great Vehicle") is one of two (or three, if Vajrayana is counted separately) main existing branches of Buddhism and a term for classification of Buddhist philosophies and practice.

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Mahayana-sutra-alamkara-karika

Mahāyāna Sūtrālamkāra kārikā ("The Adornment of Mahayana sutras") is a major work of Buddhist philosophy attributed to Maitreya-nātha as dictated to Asanga.

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Mahayoga

Mahāyoga (Sanskrit for "great yoga") is the designation of the first of the three Inner Tantras according to the ninefold division of practice used by the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Maitreya

Maitreya (Sanskrit), Metteyya (Pali), is regarded as a future Buddha of this world in Buddhist eschatology.

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Mūlamadhyamakakārikā

The Mūlamadhyamakakārikā (Sanskrit) or Fundamental Verses on the Middle Way, is a key text of the Madhyamaka-school, written by Nagarjuna.

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Menngagde

In Tibetan Buddhism and Bon, Menngakde (THL: men-ngak-dé, upadeśavarga), is the name of one of three scriptural and lineage divisions within Dzogchen (Great Perfection atiyōga).

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Nagarjuna

Nāgārjuna (c. 150 – c. 250 CE) is widely considered one of the most important Mahayana philosophers.

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Nalanda

Nalanda was a Mahavihara, a large Buddhist monastery, in the ancient kingdom of Magadha (modern-day Bihar) in India.

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Nikāya

Nikāya is a Pāḷi word meaning "volume".

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Nondualism

In spirituality, nondualism, also called non-duality, means "not two" or "one undivided without a second".

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Nyingma

The Nyingma tradition is the oldest of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism (the other three being the Kagyu, Sakya and Gelug).

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Nyingma Gyubum

Nyingma Gyubum (literally 'The Hundred Thousand Tantras of the Nyingma school') is the Mahayoga, Anuyoga and Atiyoga Tantras of the Nyingma lineage.

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Outer Tantras

The Outer Tantras are the second three divisions in the ninefold division of practice according to the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Padmasambhava

Padmasambhava (lit. "Lotus-Born"), also known as Guru Rinpoche, was an 8th-century Indian Buddhist master.

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Pāli Canon

The Pāli Canon is the standard collection of scriptures in the Theravada Buddhist tradition, as preserved in the Pāli language.

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Prajnaparamita

Prajñāpāramitā means "the Perfection of (Transcendent) Wisdom" in Mahāyāna Buddhism.

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Pramana

Pramana (Sanskrit: प्रमाण) literally means "proof" and "means of knowledge".

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Pramanavarttika

The Pramāṇavārttika (Sanskrit, Commentary on Valid Cognition; Tib. tshad ma rnam 'grel) is an influential Buddhist text on pramana (valid instruments of knowledge, epistemic criteria), a form of Indian epistemology.

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Pramāṇa-samuccaya

The Pramāṇa-samuccaya ("Compendium of Validities") is a philosophical treatise by Dignāga, an Indian Buddhist logician and epistemologist who lived from c. 480 to c. 540.

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Ratnagotravibhāga

The Ratnagotravibhāga (Sanskrit, abbreviated as RgV) and its vyākhyā commentary (abbreviated RgVV), also known as the Uttaratantraśāstra, are a compendium of the tathāgatagarbha literature.

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Religious text

Religious texts (also known as scripture, or scriptures, from the Latin scriptura, meaning "writing") are texts which religious traditions consider to be central to their practice or beliefs.

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Rimé movement

The Rimé movement is a movement involving the Sakya, Kagyu and Nyingma schools of Tibetan Buddhism, along with some Bon scholars.

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Sakya

The Sakya ("pale earth") school is one of four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism, the others being the Nyingma, Kagyu, and Gelug.

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Sanskrit Buddhist literature

Sanskrit Buddhist literature refers to Buddhist texts composed either in classical Sanskrit, or in a register that has been called "Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit", or a mixture of the two.

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Sarma (Tibetan Buddhism)

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Sarma or "New Translation" schools include the three newer (Kagyu, Sakya and Gelug) of the four main schools, comprising the following traditions and their sub-branches with their roots in the 11th century.

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Sarvastivada

The Sarvāstivāda (Sanskrit) were an early school of Buddhism that held to the existence of all dharmas in the past, present and future, the "three times".

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Semde

Semde (Sanskrit: cittavarga) translated as "mind division", "mind class" or "mind series" is the name of one of three scriptural and lineage divisions within Atiyoga, Dzogchen or the Great Perfection which is itself the pinnacle of the ninefold division of practice according to the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Shantideva

Shantideva (Sanskrit: Śāntideva;;; Шантидэва гэгээн; Tịch Thiên) was a 8th-century Indian Buddhist monk and scholar at Nalanda.

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Sutra

A sutra (Sanskrit: IAST: sūtra; Pali: sutta) is a religious discourse (teaching) in text form originating from the spiritual traditions of India, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.

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Sutrayana

Sūtrayāna, (Sanskrit) is the Indo-Tibetan three-fold classification of yanas.

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Svatantrika–Prasaṅgika distinction

The Svatantrika–Prasaṅgika distinction is a doctrinal distinction made within Tibetan Buddhism between two stances regarding the use of logic and the meaning of conventional truth within the presentation of Madhyamaka.

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Tantra

Tantra (Sanskrit: तन्त्र, literally "loom, weave, system") denotes the esoteric traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism that co-developed most likely about the middle of 1st millennium CE.

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Tengyur

The Tengyur or Tanjur or Bstan-’gyur (Tibetan: "Translation of Teachings") is the Tibetan collection of commentaries to the Buddhist teachings, or "Translated Treatises".

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Terma (religion)

Terma ("hidden treasure") are various forms of hidden teachings that are key to Vajrayana or Tibetan Buddhist and Bon religious traditions. The belief is that these teachings were originally esoterically hidden by various adepts such as Padmasambhava and dakini such as Yeshe Tsogyal (consorts) during the 8th century, for future discovery at auspicious times by other adepts, who are known as tertöns. As such, terma represent a tradition of continuous revelation in Vajrayana or Tibetan Buddhism. Termas are a part of tantric literature.

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Tibet

Tibet is a historical region covering much of the Tibetan Plateau in Central Asia.

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Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism is the form of Buddhist doctrine and institutions named after the lands of Tibet, but also found in the regions surrounding the Himalayas and much of Central Asia.

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Tohoku University

, abbreviated to, located in Sendai, Miyagi in the Tōhoku Region, Japan, is a Japanese national university.

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Tripiṭaka

The Tripiṭaka (Sanskrit) or Tipiṭaka (Pali), is the traditional term for the Buddhist scriptures.

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Tripitaka Koreana

The Tripiṭaka Koreana (lit. Goryeo Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka (Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century.

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Trisong Detsen

Trisong Detsen or Trisong Detsän was the son of Me Agtsom and the 38th emperor of Tibet.

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Vajrayana

Vajrayāna, Mantrayāna, Tantrayāna, Tantric Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism are the various Buddhist traditions of Tantra and "Secret Mantra", which developed in medieval India and spread to Tibet and East Asia.

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Vasubandhu

Vasubandhu (Sanskrit) (fl. 4th to 5th century CE) was a very influential Buddhist monk and scholar from Gandhara.

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Vinaya

The Vinaya (Pali and Sanskrit, literally meaning "leading out", "education", "discipline") is the regulatory framework for the sangha or monastic community of Buddhism based on the canonical texts called the Vinaya Pitaka.

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Woodcut

Woodcut is a relief printing technique in printmaking.

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Yogachara

Yogachara (IAST:; literally "yoga practice"; "one whose practice is yoga") is an influential school of Buddhist philosophy and psychology emphasizing phenomenology and ontology through the interior lens of meditative and yogic practices.

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Yogatantra

The 'Yogatantra' (Sanskrit) 'conveyance' (Sanskrit: yana) is the most sublime of the three Outer Tantras.

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Redirects here:

Bka'-'gyur, Bstan-'gyur, Five major topics, Tibetan canon.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_Buddhist_canon

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