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Trailing wheel

Index Trailing wheel

On a steam locomotive, a trailing wheel or trailing axle is generally an unpowered wheel or axle (wheelset) located behind the driving wheels. [1]

22 relations: AAR wheel arrangement, Axle, Bogie, Booster engine, Driving wheel, Duplex locomotive, Leading wheel, Mason Bogie, Pennsylvania Railroad, Steam locomotive, Steam locomotive components, Steam turbine locomotive, UIC classification of locomotive axle arrangements, Wheel, Wheelset (rail transport), Whyte notation, 2-6-6-6, 2-8-2, 4-4-0, 4-8-4, 6-4-4-6, 6-8-6.

AAR wheel arrangement

The AAR wheel arrangement system is a method of classifying locomotive (or unit) wheel arrangements that was developed by the Association of American Railroads.

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Axle

An axle is a central shaft for a rotating wheel or gear.

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Bogie

A bogie (in some senses called a truck in North American English) is a chassis or framework carrying wheelsets, attached to a vehicle, thus serving as a modular subassembly of wheels and axles.

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Booster engine

A booster engine for steam locomotives is a small two-cylinder steam engine back-gear-connected to the trailing truck axle on the locomotive or, if none, the lead truck on the tender.

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Driving wheel

On a steam locomotive, a driving wheel is a powered wheel which is driven by the locomotive's pistons (or turbine, in the case of a steam turbine locomotive).

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Duplex locomotive

A duplex locomotive is a steam locomotive that divides the driving force on its wheels by using two pairs of cylinders rigidly mounted to a single locomotive frame; it is not an articulated locomotive.

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Leading wheel

The leading wheel or leading axle or pilot wheel of a steam locomotive is an unpowered wheel or axle located in front of the driving wheels.

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Mason Bogie

The Mason Bogie is a type of articulated steam locomotive suited for sharp curves and uneven track, once commonly used on narrow gauge lines in the United States.

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Pennsylvania Railroad

The Pennsylvania Railroad (or Pennsylvania Railroad Company and also known as the "Pennsy") was an American Class I railroad that was established in 1846 and was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Steam locomotive

A steam locomotive is a type of railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine.

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Steam locomotive components

This is a glossary of the components found on typical steam locomotives.

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Steam turbine locomotive

A steam turbine locomotive is a steam locomotive which transmits steam power to the wheels via a steam turbine.

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UIC classification of locomotive axle arrangements

The UIC classification of locomotive axle arrangements, sometimes known as German classificationThe Railway Data File.

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Wheel

A wheel is a circular component that is intended to rotate on an axle bearing.

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Wheelset (rail transport)

A wheelset is the wheel - axle assembly of a railroad car.

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Whyte notation

The Whyte notation for classifying steam locomotives by wheel arrangement was devised by Frederick Methvan Whyte, and came into use in the early twentieth century following a December 1900 editorial in American Engineer and Railroad Journal.

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2-6-6-6

The 2-6-6-6 (in Whyte notation) is an articulated locomotive type with 2 leading wheels, two sets of six driving wheels and six trailing wheels. Only two classes of the 2-6-6-6 type were built.

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2-8-2

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, usually in a leading truck, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles and two trailing wheels on one axle, usually in a trailing truck.

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4-4-0

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, represents the arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and no trailing wheels.

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4-8-4

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles and four trailing wheels on two axles.

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6-4-4-6

A 6-4-4-6 steam locomotive, in the Whyte notation for describing locomotive wheel arrangements, is one with six leading wheels, two sets of four driving wheels, and six trailing wheels.

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6-8-6

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, represents the arrangement of six unpowered leading wheels arranged into a three-axle leading truck, eight powered driving wheels, and six unpowered trailing wheels arranged into a three-axle trailing truck.

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Redirects here:

Trailing axle, Trailing truck, Trailing wheels.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trailing_wheel

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