Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Transliteration

+ Save concept

Transliteration is a type of conversion of a text from one script to another that involves swapping letters (thus trans- + liter-) in predictable ways (such as α → a, д → d, χ → ch, ն → n or æ → e). [1]

107 relations: A, Alpha, Ancient Near East, Arabic, Arabic alphabet, Arabic chat alphabet, Armenian language, Avestan, Bantu languages, Bijection, Brahmic scripts, Buckwalter transliteration, Ch (digraph), Chi (letter), Chinese language, Click consonant, Conversion of scripts, Cuneiform script, Cyrillic script, Cyrillization of Chinese, Cyrillization of Japanese, D, De (Cyrillic), Devanagari, Devanagari transliteration, E, Egyptian hieroglyphs, English language, Glagolitic script, Greece, Greek alphabet, Greek diacritics, Greek language, Greeklish, Hans Wehr transliteration, Hebraization of English, Hebrew alphabet, Indic, International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration, International Components for Unicode, Japanese language, Kha (Cyrillic), Khoisan languages, Koine Greek, Koine Greek phonology, Korean language, Language, Latin script, Letter (alphabet), Linear B, ..., List of ISO romanizations, Luwian language, Macron (diacritic), Malayalam, Map (mathematics), N, Nikita Khrushchev, Orthographic transcription, Palatine uvula, Pali, Persian alphabet, Persian language, Phone (phonetics), Phonemic orthography, Phonetic transcription, Phonetics, Romanization, Romanization of Arabic, Romanization of Belarusian, Romanization of Bulgarian, Romanization of Chinese, Romanization of Greek, Romanization of Hebrew, Romanization of Japanese, Romanization of Korean, Romanization of Macedonian, Romanization of Malayalam, Romanization of Persian, Romanization of Russian, Romanization of Serbian, Romanization of Thai, Romanization of Ukrainian, Rough breathing, Russia, Scientific transliteration of Cyrillic, Semitic languages, Semivowel, Slavic languages, Soft palate, Spread of the Latin script, Substitution cipher, Tajik alphabet, Thai language, Tocharian languages, Transcription (linguistics), Transcription into Chinese characters, Translation, Transliteration of Ancient Egyptian, Transliterations of Manchu, Ugaritic alphabet, Voiceless uvular stop, Voiceless velar fricative, Volapuk encoding, Vowel length, Working group, Writing system, Wylie transliteration. Expand index (57 more) »

A

A (named, plural As, A's, as, a's or aes) is the first letter and the first vowel of the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and A · See more »

Alpha

Alpha (uppercase, lowercase; ἄλφα, álpha, modern pronunciation álfa) is the first letter of the Greek alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Alpha · See more »

Ancient Near East

The ancient Near East was the home of early civilizations within a region roughly corresponding to the modern Middle East: Mesopotamia (modern Iraq, southeast Turkey, southwest Iran, northeastern Syria and Kuwait), ancient Egypt, ancient Iran (Elam, Media, Parthia and Persia), Anatolia/Asia Minor and Armenian Highlands (Turkey's Eastern Anatolia Region, Armenia, northwestern Iran, southern Georgia, and western Azerbaijan), the Levant (modern Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, and Jordan), Cyprus and the Arabian Peninsula.

New!!: Transliteration and Ancient Near East · See more »

Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

New!!: Transliteration and Arabic · See more »

Arabic alphabet

The Arabic alphabet (الأَبْجَدِيَّة العَرَبِيَّة, or الحُرُوف العَرَبِيَّة) or Arabic abjad is the Arabic script as it is codified for writing Arabic.

New!!: Transliteration and Arabic alphabet · See more »

Arabic chat alphabet

The Arabic chat alphabet, also known as Arabish, Araby (عربي, Arabī), Arabizi (عربيزي, Arabīzī), Mu'arrab (معرب), and Franco-Arabic (عرنسية), is an alphabet used to communicate in Arabic over the Internet or for sending messages via cellular phones.

New!!: Transliteration and Arabic chat alphabet · See more »

Armenian language

The Armenian language (reformed: հայերեն) is an Indo-European language spoken primarily by the Armenians.

New!!: Transliteration and Armenian language · See more »

Avestan

Avestan, also known historically as Zend, is a language known only from its use as the language of Zoroastrian scripture (the Avesta), from which it derives its name.

New!!: Transliteration and Avestan · See more »

Bantu languages

The Bantu languages (English:, Proto-Bantu: */baⁿtʊ̀/) technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorization which includes other "Bantoid" languages are a large family of languages spoken by the Bantu peoples throughout Sub-Saharan Africa.

New!!: Transliteration and Bantu languages · See more »

Bijection

In mathematics, a bijection, bijective function, or one-to-one correspondence is a function between the elements of two sets, where each element of one set is paired with exactly one element of the other set, and each element of the other set is paired with exactly one element of the first set.

New!!: Transliteration and Bijection · See more »

Brahmic scripts

The Brahmic scripts are a family of abugida or alphabet writing systems.

New!!: Transliteration and Brahmic scripts · See more »

Buckwalter transliteration

The Buckwalter Arabic transliteration was developed at Xerox by Tim Buckwalter in the 1990s.

New!!: Transliteration and Buckwalter transliteration · See more »

Ch (digraph)

Ch is a digraph in the Latin script.

New!!: Transliteration and Ch (digraph) · See more »

Chi (letter)

Chi (uppercase Χ, lowercase χ; χῖ) is the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, pronounced or in English.

New!!: Transliteration and Chi (letter) · See more »

Chinese language

Chinese is a group of related, but in many cases mutually unintelligible, language varieties, forming a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family.

New!!: Transliteration and Chinese language · See more »

Click consonant

Click consonants, or clicks, are speech sounds that occur as consonants in many languages of Southern Africa and in three languages of East Africa.

New!!: Transliteration and Click consonant · See more »

Conversion of scripts

The conversion of scripts or writing is a procedure of replacing text written in one script or writing system with the characters of another script or system in order to make the text (e.g., proper names) legible for users of another language or script.

New!!: Transliteration and Conversion of scripts · See more »

Cuneiform script

Cuneiform script, one of the earliest systems of writing, was invented by the Sumerians.

New!!: Transliteration and Cuneiform script · See more »

Cyrillic script

The Cyrillic script is a writing system used for various alphabets across Eurasia (particularity in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and North Asia).

New!!: Transliteration and Cyrillic script · See more »

Cyrillization of Chinese

The Cyrillization of Chinese is effected using the Palladius system for transcribing Chinese characters into the Cyrillic alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Cyrillization of Chinese · See more »

Cyrillization of Japanese

The cyrillization of Japanese is the process of transliterating or transcribing the Japanese language into Cyrillic script, either to represent Japanese proper names or terms in Cyrillic script (and various languages based on Cyrillic), or as an aid to Japanese language learning in those languages.

New!!: Transliteration and Cyrillization of Japanese · See more »

D

D (named dee) is the fourth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and D · See more »

De (Cyrillic)

De (Д д; italics: Д д) is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

New!!: Transliteration and De (Cyrillic) · See more »

Devanagari

Devanagari (देवनागरी,, a compound of "''deva''" देव and "''nāgarī''" नागरी; Hindi pronunciation), also called Nagari (Nāgarī, नागरी),Kathleen Kuiper (2010), The Culture of India, New York: The Rosen Publishing Group,, page 83 is an abugida (alphasyllabary) used in India and Nepal.

New!!: Transliteration and Devanagari · See more »

Devanagari transliteration

* There are several methods of transliteration from Devanāgarī to the Roman script (a process known as romanization) which share similarities, although no single system of transliteration has emerged as the standard.

New!!: Transliteration and Devanagari transliteration · See more »

E

E (named e, plural ees) is the fifth letter and the second vowel in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and E · See more »

Egyptian hieroglyphs

Egyptian hieroglyphs were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt.

New!!: Transliteration and Egyptian hieroglyphs · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Transliteration and English language · See more »

Glagolitic script

The Glagolitic script (Ⰳⰾⰰⰳⱁⰾⰹⱌⰰ Glagolitsa) is the oldest known Slavic alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Glagolitic script · See more »

Greece

No description.

New!!: Transliteration and Greece · See more »

Greek alphabet

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BC.

New!!: Transliteration and Greek alphabet · See more »

Greek diacritics

Greek orthography has used a variety of diacritics starting in the Hellenistic period.

New!!: Transliteration and Greek diacritics · See more »

Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

New!!: Transliteration and Greek language · See more »

Greeklish

Greeklish, a portmanteau of the words Greek and English, also known as Grenglish, Latinoellinika/Λατινοελληνικά or ASCII Greek, is the Greek language written using the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Greeklish · See more »

Hans Wehr transliteration

The Hans Wehr transliteration system is a system for transliteration of the Arabic alphabet into the Latin alphabet used in the Hans Wehr dictionary (1952; in English 1961).

New!!: Transliteration and Hans Wehr transliteration · See more »

Hebraization of English

The Hebraization of English (or Hebraicization) is the use of the Hebrew alphabet to write English.

New!!: Transliteration and Hebraization of English · See more »

Hebrew alphabet

The Hebrew alphabet (אָלֶף־בֵּית עִבְרִי), known variously by scholars as the Jewish script, square script and block script, is an abjad script used in the writing of the Hebrew language, also adapted as an alphabet script in the writing of other Jewish languages, most notably in Yiddish (lit. "Jewish" for Judeo-German), Djudío (lit. "Jewish" for Judeo-Spanish), and Judeo-Arabic.

New!!: Transliteration and Hebrew alphabet · See more »

Indic

Indic may refer to.

New!!: Transliteration and Indic · See more »

International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration

The International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration (I.A.S.T.) is a transliteration scheme that allows the lossless romanization of Indic scripts as employed by Sanskrit and related Indic languages.

New!!: Transliteration and International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration · See more »

International Components for Unicode

International Components for Unicode (ICU) is an open source project of mature C/C++ and Java libraries for Unicode support, software internationalization, and software globalization.

New!!: Transliteration and International Components for Unicode · See more »

Japanese language

is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language.

New!!: Transliteration and Japanese language · See more »

Kha (Cyrillic)

Kha or Ha (Х х; italics: Х х) is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

New!!: Transliteration and Kha (Cyrillic) · See more »

Khoisan languages

The Khoisan languages (also Khoesan or Khoesaan) are a group of African languages originally classified together by Joseph Greenberg.

New!!: Transliteration and Khoisan languages · See more »

Koine Greek

Koine Greek,.

New!!: Transliteration and Koine Greek · See more »

Koine Greek phonology

The Greek language underwent pronunciation changes during the Koine Greek period, from about 300 BC to 300 AD.

New!!: Transliteration and Koine Greek phonology · See more »

Korean language

The Korean language (Chosŏn'gŭl/Hangul: 조선말/한국어; Hanja: 朝鮮말/韓國語) is an East Asian language spoken by about 80 million people.

New!!: Transliteration and Korean language · See more »

Language

Language is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system.

New!!: Transliteration and Language · See more »

Latin script

Latin or Roman script is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the classical Latin alphabet, which is derived from a form of the Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet, used by the Etruscans.

New!!: Transliteration and Latin script · See more »

Letter (alphabet)

A letter is a grapheme (written character) in an alphabetic system of writing.

New!!: Transliteration and Letter (alphabet) · See more »

Linear B

Linear B is a syllabic script that was used for writing Mycenaean Greek, the earliest attested form of Greek.

New!!: Transliteration and Linear B · See more »

List of ISO romanizations

List of ISO standards for transliterations and transcriptions (or romanizations).

New!!: Transliteration and List of ISO romanizations · See more »

Luwian language

Luwian sometimes known as Luvian or Luish is an ancient language, or group of languages, within the Anatolian branch of the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Transliteration and Luwian language · See more »

Macron (diacritic)

A macron is a diacritical mark: it is a straight bar placed above a letter, usually a vowel.

New!!: Transliteration and Macron (diacritic) · See more »

Malayalam

Malayalam is a Dravidian language spoken across the Indian state of Kerala by the Malayali people and it is one of 22 scheduled languages of India.

New!!: Transliteration and Malayalam · See more »

Map (mathematics)

In mathematics, the term mapping, sometimes shortened to map, refers to either a function, often with some sort of special structure, or a morphism in category theory, which generalizes the idea of a function.

New!!: Transliteration and Map (mathematics) · See more »

N

N (named en) is the fourteenth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and N · See more »

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (15 April 1894 – 11 September 1971) was a Soviet statesman who led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War as the First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964, and as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, or Premier, from 1958 to 1964.

New!!: Transliteration and Nikita Khrushchev · See more »

Orthographic transcription

Orthographic transcription is a transcription method that employs the standard spelling system of each target language.

New!!: Transliteration and Orthographic transcription · See more »

Palatine uvula

The palatine uvula, usually referred to as simply the uvula, is a conic projection from the posterior edge of the middle of the soft palate, composed of connective tissue containing a number of racemose glands, and some muscular fibers (musculus uvulae).

New!!: Transliteration and Palatine uvula · See more »

Pali

Pali, or Magadhan, is a Middle Indo-Aryan language native to the Indian subcontinent.

New!!: Transliteration and Pali · See more »

Persian alphabet

The Persian alphabet (الفبای فارسی), or Perso-Arabic alphabet, is a writing system used for the Persian language.

New!!: Transliteration and Persian alphabet · See more »

Persian language

Persian, also known by its endonym Farsi (فارسی), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Transliteration and Persian language · See more »

Phone (phonetics)

In phonetics and linguistics, a phone is any distinct speech sound or gesture, regardless of whether the exact sound is critical to the meanings of words.

New!!: Transliteration and Phone (phonetics) · See more »

Phonemic orthography

In linguistics, a phonemic orthography is an orthography (system for writing a language) in which the graphemes (written symbols) correspond to the phonemes (significant spoken sounds) of the language.

New!!: Transliteration and Phonemic orthography · See more »

Phonetic transcription

Phonetic transcription (also known as phonetic script or phonetic notation) is the visual representation of speech sounds (or phones).

New!!: Transliteration and Phonetic transcription · See more »

Phonetics

Phonetics (pronounced) is the branch of linguistics that studies the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign.

New!!: Transliteration and Phonetics · See more »

Romanization

Romanization or romanisation, in linguistics, is the conversion of writing from a different writing system to the Roman (Latin) script, or a system for doing so.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization · See more »

Romanization of Arabic

The romanization of Arabic writes written and spoken Arabic in the Latin script in one of various systematic ways.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Arabic · See more »

Romanization of Belarusian

Romanization or Latinization of Belarusian is any system for transliterating written Belarusian from Cyrillic to the Latin.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Belarusian · See more »

Romanization of Bulgarian

Romanization of Bulgarian is the practice of transliteration of text in Bulgarian from its conventional Cyrillic orthography into the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Bulgarian · See more »

Romanization of Chinese

The Romanization of Chinese is the use of the Latin alphabet to write Chinese.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Chinese · See more »

Romanization of Greek

Romanization of Greek is the transliteration (letter-mapping) or transcription (sound-mapping) of text from the Greek alphabet into the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Greek · See more »

Romanization of Hebrew

Hebrew uses the Hebrew alphabet with optional vowel diacritics.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Hebrew · See more »

Romanization of Japanese

The romanization of Japanese is the use of Latin script to write the Japanese language.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Japanese · See more »

Romanization of Korean

The romanization of Korean is a system for representing the Korean language using the Latin script.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Korean · See more »

Romanization of Macedonian

The Romanization of Macedonian is the transliteration of text in the Macedonian language from the Macedonian Cyrillic alphabet into the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Macedonian · See more »

Romanization of Malayalam

There are several romanization schemes for the Malayalam script, including ITRANS and ISO 15919.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Malayalam · See more »

Romanization of Persian

Romanization of Persian or Latinization of Persian is the representation of the Persian language (Farsi, Dari and Tajik) with the Latin script.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Persian · See more »

Romanization of Russian

Romanization of Russian is the process of transliterating the Russian language from the Cyrillic script into the Latin script.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Russian · See more »

Romanization of Serbian

The romanization or latinization of Serbian is the representation of the Serbian language using Latin letters.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Serbian · See more »

Romanization of Thai

There are many systems for the romanization of the Thai language, i.e. representing the language in Latin script.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Thai · See more »

Romanization of Ukrainian

The romanization or Latinization of Ukrainian is the representation of the Ukrainian language using Latin letters.

New!!: Transliteration and Romanization of Ukrainian · See more »

Rough breathing

In the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, the rough breathing (dasỳ pneûma or δασεῖα daseîa; δασεία dasía; Latin spīritus asper), is a diacritical mark used to indicate the presence of an sound before a vowel, diphthong, or after rho.

New!!: Transliteration and Rough breathing · See more »

Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

New!!: Transliteration and Russia · See more »

Scientific transliteration of Cyrillic

Scientific transliteration, variously called academic, linguistic, international, or scholarly transliteration, is an international system for transliteration of text from the Cyrillic script to the Latin script (romanization).

New!!: Transliteration and Scientific transliteration of Cyrillic · See more »

Semitic languages

The Semitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family originating in the Middle East.

New!!: Transliteration and Semitic languages · See more »

Semivowel

In phonetics and phonology, a semivowel or glide, also known as a non-syllabic vocoid, is a sound that is phonetically similar to a vowel sound but functions as the syllable boundary, rather than as the nucleus of a syllable.

New!!: Transliteration and Semivowel · See more »

Slavic languages

The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) are the Indo-European languages spoken by the Slavic peoples.

New!!: Transliteration and Slavic languages · See more »

Soft palate

The soft palate (also known as the velum or muscular palate) is, in mammals, the soft tissue constituting the back of the roof of the mouth.

New!!: Transliteration and Soft palate · See more »

Spread of the Latin script

This article discusses the geographic spread of the Latin script throughout history, from its archaic beginnings in Latium to the dominant writing system on Earth in modernity.

New!!: Transliteration and Spread of the Latin script · See more »

Substitution cipher

In cryptography, a substitution cipher is a method of encrypting by which units of plaintext are replaced with ciphertext, according to a fixed system; the "units" may be single letters (the most common), pairs of letters, triplets of letters, mixtures of the above, and so forth.

New!!: Transliteration and Substitution cipher · See more »

Tajik alphabet

The Tajik language has been written in three alphabets over the course of its history: an adaptation of the Perso-Arabic script (specifically the Persian alphabet), an adaptation of the Latin script, and an adaptation of the Cyrillic script.

New!!: Transliteration and Tajik alphabet · See more »

Thai language

Thai, Central Thai, or Siamese, is the national and official language of Thailand and the first language of the Central Thai people and vast majority Thai of Chinese origin.

New!!: Transliteration and Thai language · See more »

Tocharian languages

Tocharian, also spelled Tokharian, is an extinct branch of the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Transliteration and Tocharian languages · See more »

Transcription (linguistics)

Transcription in the linguistic sense is the systematic representation of language in written form.

New!!: Transliteration and Transcription (linguistics) · See more »

Transcription into Chinese characters

Transcription into Chinese is the use of traditional or simplified characters to transcribe phonetically the sound of terms and names foreign to the Chinese language.

New!!: Transliteration and Transcription into Chinese characters · See more »

Translation

Translation is the communication of the meaning of a source-language text by means of an equivalent target-language text.

New!!: Transliteration and Translation · See more »

Transliteration of Ancient Egyptian

In the field of Egyptology, transliteration of Ancient Egyptian is the process of converting (or mapping) texts written in the Egyptian language to alphabetic symbols representing uniliteral hieroglyphs or their hieratic and Demotic counterparts.

New!!: Transliteration and Transliteration of Ancient Egyptian · See more »

Transliterations of Manchu

There are several systems for transliteration of the Manchu alphabet which is used for the Manchu and Xibe languages.

New!!: Transliteration and Transliterations of Manchu · See more »

Ugaritic alphabet

The Ugaritic script is a cuneiform abjad used from around either the fifteenth century BCE or 1300 BCE for Ugaritic, an extinct Northwest Semitic language, and discovered in Ugarit (modern Ras Shamra), Syria, in 1928.

New!!: Transliteration and Ugaritic alphabet · See more »

Voiceless uvular stop

The voiceless uvular stop or voiceless uvular plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Transliteration and Voiceless uvular stop · See more »

Voiceless velar fricative

The voiceless velar fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Transliteration and Voiceless velar fricative · See more »

Volapuk encoding

Volapuk encoding (кодировка "волапюк", kodirovka "volapük") or latinica (латиница) is a slang term for rendering the letters of the Cyrillic script with Latin ones.

New!!: Transliteration and Volapuk encoding · See more »

Vowel length

In linguistics, vowel length is the perceived duration of a vowel sound.

New!!: Transliteration and Vowel length · See more »

Working group

A working group or working party is a group of experts working together to achieve specified goals.

New!!: Transliteration and Working group · See more »

Writing system

A writing system is any conventional method of visually representing verbal communication.

New!!: Transliteration and Writing system · See more »

Wylie transliteration

The Wylie transliteration scheme is a method for transliterating Tibetan script using only the letters available on a typical English language typewriter.

New!!: Transliteration and Wylie transliteration · See more »

Redirects here:

Alphabet transliteration, Double transliteration, Tranliteration, Translit., Transliterate, Transliterated, Transliterates, Transliterating, Transliterations.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transliteration

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »