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Triode

Index Triode

A triode is an electronic amplifying vacuum tube (or valve in British English) consisting of three electrodes inside an evacuated glass envelope: a heated filament or cathode, a grid, and a plate (anode). [1]

79 relations: Alkaline earth metal, Amplifier, Amplitude modulation, Anode, AT&T, AT&T Corporation, Audion, Barium, Biasing, Capacitance, Cathode, Consumer electronics, Continuous wave, Control grid, Crystal radio, Damped wave, Detector (radio), Diode, Electrode, Electron, Electronic oscillator, Electronics, European Triode Festival, Fleming valve, Gain (electronics), General Electric, Getter, Greek language, Headphones, Heat sink, High-end audio, Hot cathode, Incandescent light bulb, Inductance, Insulator (electricity), Irving Langmuir, JFET, John Ambrose Fleming, Lee de Forest, List of vacuum tubes, Loudspeaker, Marconi Company, Mass communication, Mercury (element), Passivity (engineering), Pentode, Philipp Lenard, Phonograph, Photoelectric effect, Plate electrode, ..., Power amplifier classes, Professional audio, Public address system, Radio, Radio broadcasting, Radio frequency, Radio receiver, Repeater, Robert von Lieben, Semiconductor device, Solid-state electronics, Sound film, Sound recording and reproduction, Spark-gap transmitter, Telephony, Television, Tetrode, Thermionic emission, Thorium, Thorium dioxide, Transistor, Transmitter, Tungsten, Ultra high frequency, Vacuum tube, Walter H. Schottky, William Eccles, Work function, World War I. Expand index (29 more) »

Alkaline earth metal

The alkaline earth metals are six chemical elements in group 2 of the periodic table.

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Amplifier

An amplifier, electronic amplifier or (informally) amp is an electronic device that can increase the power of a signal (a time-varying voltage or current).

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Amplitude modulation

Amplitude modulation (AM) is a modulation technique used in electronic communication, most commonly for transmitting information via a radio carrier wave.

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Anode

An anode is an electrode through which the conventional current enters into a polarized electrical device.

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AT&T

AT&T Inc. is an American multinational conglomerate holding company headquartered at Whitacre Tower in Downtown Dallas, Texas.

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AT&T Corporation

AT&T Corp., originally the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, is the subsidiary of AT&T that provides voice, video, data, and Internet telecommunications and professional services to businesses, consumers, and government agencies.

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Audion

The Audion was an electronic detecting or amplifying vacuum tube invented by American electrical engineer Lee de Forest in 1906.

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Barium

Barium is a chemical element with symbol Ba and atomic number 56.

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Biasing

Biasing in electronics means establishing predetermined voltages or currents at various points of an electronic circuit for the purpose of establishing proper operating conditions in electronic components.

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Capacitance

Capacitance is the ratio of the change in an electric charge in a system to the corresponding change in its electric potential.

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Cathode

A cathode is the electrode from which a conventional current leaves a polarized electrical device.

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Consumer electronics

Consumer electronics or home electronics are electronic (analog or digital) equipments intended for everyday use, typically in private homes.

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Continuous wave

A continuous wave or continuous waveform (CW) is an electromagnetic wave of constant amplitude and frequency, almost always a sine wave, that for mathematical analysis is considered to be of infinite duration.

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Control grid

The control grid is an electrode used in amplifying thermionic valves (vacuum tubes) such as the triode, tetrode and pentode, used to control the flow of electrons from the cathode to the anode (plate) electrode.

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Crystal radio

A crystal radio receiver, also called a crystal set, is a simple radio receiver, popular in the early days of radio.

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Damped wave

A damped wave is a wave whose amplitude of oscillation decreases with time, eventually going to zero, an exponentially decaying sinusoidal wave.

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Detector (radio)

In radio, a detector is a device or circuit that extracts information from a modulated radio frequency current or voltage.

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Diode

A diode is a two-terminal electronic component that conducts current primarily in one direction (asymmetric conductance); it has low (ideally zero) resistance in one direction, and high (ideally infinite) resistance in the other.

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Electrode

An electrode is an electrical conductor used to make contact with a nonmetallic part of a circuit (e.g. a semiconductor, an electrolyte, a vacuum or air).

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Electron

The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol or, whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge.

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Electronic oscillator

An electronic oscillator is an electronic circuit that produces a periodic, oscillating electronic signal, often a sine wave or a square wave.

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Electronics

Electronics is the discipline dealing with the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons in a vacuum, in gaseous media, and in semiconductors.

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European Triode Festival

Since 2000 each year the "European Triode Festival" (ETF) has been held in various venues in Europe (the first three events were called "Aarhus Triode Festival" aka "ATF").

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Fleming valve

The Fleming valve, also called the Fleming oscillation valve, was a thermionic valve or vacuum tube invented in 1904 by Englishman John Ambrose Fleming as a detector for early radio receivers used in electromagnetic wireless telegraphy.

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Gain (electronics)

In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a two-port circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal from the input to the output port by adding energy converted from some power supply to the signal.

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General Electric

General Electric Company (GE) is an American multinational conglomerate incorporated in New York and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Getter

A getter is a deposit of reactive material that is placed inside a vacuum system, for the purpose of completing and maintaining the vacuum.

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Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

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Headphones

Headphones (or head-phones in the early days of telephony and radio) are a pair of small loudspeaker drivers worn on or around the head over a user's ears.

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Heat sink

A heat sink (also commonly spelled heatsink) is a passive heat exchanger that transfers the heat generated by an electronic or a mechanical device to a fluid medium, often air or a liquid coolant, where it is dissipated away from the device, thereby allowing regulation of the device's temperature at optimal levels.

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High-end audio

High-end audio is a class of consumer home audio equipment marketed to audiophiles on the basis of high price or quality, and esoteric or novel sound reproduction technologies.

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Hot cathode

In vacuum tubes and gas-filled tubes, a hot cathode or thermionic cathode is a cathode electrode which is heated to make it emit electrons due to thermionic emission.

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Incandescent light bulb

An incandescent light bulb, incandescent lamp or incandescent light globe is an electric light with a wire filament heated to such a high temperature that it glows with visible light (incandescence).

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Inductance

In electromagnetism and electronics, inductance is the property of an electrical conductor by which a change in electric current through it induces an electromotive force (voltage) in the conductor.

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Insulator (electricity)

An electrical insulator is a material whose internal electric charges do not flow freely; very little electric current will flow through it under the influence of an electric field.

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Irving Langmuir

Irving Langmuir (January 31, 1881 – August 16, 1957) was an American chemist and physicist.

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JFET

The junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET or JUGFET) is the simplest type of field-effect transistor.

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John Ambrose Fleming

Sir John Ambrose Fleming FRS (29 November 1849 – 18 April 1945), an English electrical engineer and physicist, invented the first thermionic valve or vacuum tube, and also established the left-hand rule for electric motors.

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Lee de Forest

Lee de Forest (August 26, 1873 – June 30, 1961) was an American inventor, self-described "Father of Radio", and a pioneer in the development of sound-on-film recording used for motion pictures.

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List of vacuum tubes

This is a list of vacuum tubes or thermionic valves, and low-pressure gas-filled tubes, or discharge tubes.

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Loudspeaker

A loudspeaker (or loud-speaker or speaker) is an electroacoustic transducer; which converts an electrical audio signal into a corresponding sound.

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Marconi Company

The Marconi Company was a British telecommunications and engineering company that did business under that name from 1963 to 1987.

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Mass communication

Mass communication is the study of how people exchange information through mass media to large segments of the population at the same time.

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Mercury (element)

Mercury is a chemical element with symbol Hg and atomic number 80.

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Passivity (engineering)

Passivity is a property of engineering systems, used in a variety of engineering disciplines, but most commonly found in analog electronics and control systems.

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Pentode

A pentode is an electronic device having five active electrodes.

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Philipp Lenard

Philipp Eduard Anton von Lenard (7 June 1862 – 20 May 1947) was a German physicist and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905 for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of many of their properties.

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Phonograph

The phonograph is a device for the mechanical recording and reproduction of sound.

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Photoelectric effect

The photoelectric effect is the emission of electrons or other free carriers when light shines on a material.

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Plate electrode

A plate, usually called anode in Britain, is a type of electrode that forms part of a vacuum tube.

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Power amplifier classes

Power amplifier classes are, in electronics, letter symbols applied to different power amplifier types.

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Professional audio

Professional audio, abbreviated as pro audio, refers to both an activity and a category of high quality, studio-grade audio equipment.

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Public address system

A public address system (PA system) is an electronic system comprising microphones, amplifiers, loudspeakers, and related equipment.

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Radio

Radio is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.

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Radio broadcasting

Radio broadcasting is transmission by radio waves intended to reach a wide audience.

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Radio frequency

Radio frequency (RF) refers to oscillatory change in voltage or current in a circuit, waveguide or transmission line in the range extending from around twenty thousand times per second to around three hundred billion times per second, roughly between the upper limit of audio and the lower limit of infrared.

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Radio receiver

In radio communications, a radio receiver (receiver or simply radio) is an electronic device that receives radio waves and converts the information carried by them to a usable form.

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Repeater

In telecommunications, a repeater is an electronic device that receives a signal and retransmits it.

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Robert von Lieben

Robert von Lieben (September 5, 1878, Vienna – February 20, 1913, Vienna) was an Austrian physicist whose work contributed to the development of valve amplifiers.

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Semiconductor device

Semiconductor devices are electronic components that exploit the electronic properties of semiconductor materials, principally silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide, as well as organic semiconductors.

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Solid-state electronics

Solid-state electronics means semiconductor electronics; electronic equipment using semiconductor devices such as semiconductor diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits (ICs).

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Sound film

A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film.

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Sound recording and reproduction

Sound recording and reproduction is an electrical, mechanical, electronic, or digital inscription and re-creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice, singing, instrumental music, or sound effects.

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Spark-gap transmitter

A spark-gap transmitter is a device that generates radio frequency electromagnetic waves using a spark gap.

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Telephony

Telephony is the field of technology involving the development, application, and deployment of telecommunication services for the purpose of electronic transmission of voice, fax, or data, between distant parties.

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Television

Television (TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound.

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Tetrode

A tetrode is a vacuum tube (called valve in British English) having four active electrodes.

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Thermionic emission

Thermionic emission is the thermally induced flow of charge carriers from a surface or over a potential-energy barrier.

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Thorium

Thorium is a weakly radioactive metallic chemical element with symbol Th and atomic number 90.

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Thorium dioxide

Thorium dioxide (ThO2), also called thorium(IV) oxide, is a crystalline solid, often white or yellow in color.

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Transistor

A transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify or switch electronic signals and electrical power.

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Transmitter

In electronics and telecommunications, a transmitter or radio transmitter is an electronic device which produces radio waves with an antenna.

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Tungsten

Tungsten, or wolfram, is a chemical element with symbol W (referring to wolfram) and atomic number 74.

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Ultra high frequency

Ultra high frequency (UHF) is the ITU designation for radio frequencies in the range between 300 megahertz (MHz) and 3 gigahertz (GHz), also known as the decimetre band as the wavelengths range from one meter to one decimeter.

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Vacuum tube

In electronics, a vacuum tube, an electron tube, or just a tube (North America), or valve (Britain and some other regions) is a device that controls electric current between electrodes in an evacuated container.

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Walter H. Schottky

Walter Hans Schottky (23 July 1886 – 4 March 1976) was a German physicist who played a major early role in developing the theory of electron and ion emission phenomena, invented the screen-grid vacuum tube in 1915 and the pentode in 1919 while working at Siemens, co-invented the ribbon microphone and ribbon loudspeaker along with Dr.

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William Eccles

William Henry Eccles FRS (23 August 1875 – 29 April 1966) was a British physicist and a pioneer in the development of radio communication.

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Work function

In solid-state physics, the work setting (sometimes spelled workfunction) is the minimum thermodynamic work (i.e. energy) needed to remove an electron from a solid to a point in the vacuum immediately outside the solid surface.

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World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triode

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