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U.S. state

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A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. [1]

243 relations: Act of Congress, Admission to the Union, Alaska, Algonquian languages, Allegheny Mountains, American Civil War, American Samoa, Americans, Antebellum South, Appellate court, Article Five of the United States Constitution, Article Four of the United States Constitution, Article One of the United States Constitution, Articles of Confederation, At-large, Baker v. Carr, Ballot, Bicameralism, Bleeding Kansas, Border Ruffian, British colonization of the Americas, British North America, California, Cengage, Charles I of England, Charles II of England, Child custody, Circuit court, Citizen legislature, Citizenship of the United States, Civil law (legal system), Classes of United States Senators, Colony of Virginia, Comity, Commerce Clause, Committee of the Whole (United States House of Representatives), Common law, Commonwealth, Commonwealth (U.S. insular area), Commonwealth (U.S. state), Commonwealth of England, Concurrent resolution, Confederate States of America, Constitution of Alabama, Constitution of Puerto Rico, Constitutional convention (political meeting), Convention to propose amendments to the United States Constitution, Cornell Law School, County (United States), Direct election, ..., District court, District of Columbia retrocession, District of Maine, Due process, Education in the United States, Electoral College (United States), Electoral system, Ellis Island, Enabling act, Energy Information Administration, Enumerated powers (United States), Eponym, Equal footing, Ethnonym, Executive (government), Extradition, Extradition Clause, Fayette County, Kentucky, Federal government of the United States, Federal judiciary of the United States, Federal jurisdiction (United States), Federal republic, Federalism, Federated state, First-past-the-post voting, Five Civilized Tribes, Founding Fathers of the United States, Free-Stater (Kansas), Freedom of movement under United States law, Full Faith and Credit Clause, Full-time, General election, Google Books, Government, Governor (United States), Guam, Hawaii, Hawaiian language, Head of government, Head of state, Health care in the United States, Home rule, Hot pursuit, Human rights, Impeachment, Incorporation of the Bill of Rights, Indian Territory, Indigenous languages of the Americas, Indirect election, Infrastructure, Insular area, Interregnum (England), Interstate compact, Interstate Highway System, Iroquoian languages, Jefferson County, Kentucky, John Wiley & Sons, Kansas Territory, Latin, Latinisation of names, Law of the United States, Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico, Lieutenant governor (United States), Lincoln County, Kentucky, Line-item veto in the United States, List of river borders of U.S. states, List of U.S. state partition proposals, Local government in the United States, Lord Protector, Louisiana (New France), Mexican Cession, Mexico, Michael P. Riccards, Michigan Territory, Minnesota Legislature, Mississippi Territory, Mormon pioneers, National Archives and Records Administration, National League of Cities, National Minimum Drinking Age Act, Nebraska Legislature, New France, New Hampshire Grants, New Jersey, New Jersey v. New York, New Spain, New York (state), Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives, North Carolina, Northern Mariana Islands, Northwest Ordinance, Oklahoma Territory, Oliver Cromwell, One man, one vote, Ordinance of Secession, Organized incorporated territories of the United States, Parole, Part-time contract, Perpetual Union, Platte Purchase, Plenary power, Plurality-at-large voting, Political union, Polity, Polynesian languages, Preamble to the United States Constitution, Prentice Hall, President of the United States, Privileges and Immunities Clause, Puerto Rican status referendum, 2017, Puerto Rico, Ratification, Recall election, Reconstruction era, Redistricting, Republic of Texas, Republicanism, Republicanism in the United States, Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, Restored Government of Virginia, Reynolds v. Sims, Rhode Island, Russian America, Salt Lake City, Seat of government, Secession, Secession in the United States, Secretary of state (U.S. state government), Separation of powers, Single-member district, Siouan languages, South Dakota v. Dole, Southwest Territory, Sovereign state, Sovereignty, Spanish Florida, State (polity), State attorney general, State cessions, State constitution (United States), State court (United States), State governments of the United States, State legislature (United States), State of Deseret, State of Franklin, State of Sequoyah, State ratifying conventions, State supreme court, States' rights, Status (law), Superior court, Supermajority, Supremacy Clause, Supreme Court of the United States, Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Texas v. White, The New York Times, Thirteen Colonies, Toledo War, Transportation in the United States, Treaty, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution, Unicameralism, Unincorporated territories of the United States, Unitary executive theory, Unitary state, United States, United States Census, United States Congress, United States congressional apportionment, United States Constitution, United States House of Representatives, United States Numbered Highway System, United States presidential election, United States presidential election, 2016, United States Senate, United States v. Lopez, United States v. Morrison, United States Virgin Islands, Unorganized territory, Uto-Aztecan languages, Vermont Republic, Veto, Vice President of the United States, Voting rights in the United States, Washington, D.C., Washington, D.C. statehood referendum, 2016, White House, Wickard v. Filburn, Wyoming, 1967 Detroit riot. Expand index (193 more) »

Act of Congress

An Act of Congress is a statute enacted by the United States Congress.

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Admission to the Union

The Admission to the Union Clause of the United States Constitution, oftentimes called the New States Clause, and found at Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1, authorizes the Congress to admit new states into the United States beyond the thirteen already in existence at the time the Constitution went into effect.

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Alaska

Alaska (Alax̂sxax̂) is a U.S. state located in the northwest extremity of North America.

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Algonquian languages

The Algonquian languages (or; also Algonkian) are a subfamily of Native American languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family.

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Allegheny Mountains

The Allegheny Mountain Range, informally the Alleghenies and also spelled Alleghany and Allegany, is part of the vast Appalachian Mountain Range of the eastern United States and Canada and posed a significant barrier to land travel in less technologically advanced eras.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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American Samoa

American Samoa (Amerika Sāmoa,; also Amelika Sāmoa or Sāmoa Amelika) is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of Samoa.

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Americans

Americans are citizens of the United States of America.

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Antebellum South

The Antebellum era was a period in the history of the Southern United States, from the late 18th century until the start of the American Civil War in 1861, marked by the economic growth of the South.

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Appellate court

An appellate court, commonly called an appeals court, court of appeals (American English), appeal court (British English), court of second instance or second instance court, is any court of law that is empowered to hear an appeal of a trial court or other lower tribunal.

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Article Five of the United States Constitution

Article Five of the United States Constitution describes the process whereby the Constitution, the nation's frame of government, may be altered.

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Article Four of the United States Constitution

Article Four of the United States Constitution outlines the relationship between each state and the others, and the several States and the federal government.

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Article One of the United States Constitution

Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress.

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Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution.

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At-large

At-large is a designation for members of a governing body who are elected or appointed to represent the whole membership of the body (for example, a city, state or province, nation, club or association), rather than a subset of that membership.

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Baker v. Carr

Baker v. Carr,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case that decided that redistricting (attempts to change the way voting districts are delineated) issues present justiciable questions, thus enabling federal courts to intervene in and to decide redistricting cases.

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Ballot

A ballot is a device used to cast votes in an election, and may be a piece of paper or a small ball used in secret voting.

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Bicameralism

A bicameral legislature divides the legislators into two separate assemblies, chambers, or houses.

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Bleeding Kansas

Bleeding Kansas, Bloody Kansas or the Border War was a series of violent civil confrontations in the United States between 1854 and 1861 which emerged from a political and ideological debate over the legality of slavery in the proposed state of Kansas.

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Border Ruffian

In Kansas, Border Ruffians was the name applied to pro-slavery activists from the slave state of Missouri, who in 1854 to 1860 crossed the state border into Kansas Territory to force the acceptance of slavery there.

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British colonization of the Americas

The British colonization of the Americas (including colonization by both the English and the Scots) began in 1607 in Jamestown, Virginia, and reached its peak when colonies had been established throughout the Americas.

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British North America

The term "British North America" refers to the former territories of the British Empire on the mainland of North America.

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California

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States.

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Cengage

Cengage is an educational content, technology, and services company for the higher education, K-12, professional, and library markets worldwide.

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Charles I of England

Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

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Charles II of England

Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was king of England, Scotland and Ireland.

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Child custody

Child custody and legal guardianship are legal terms which are used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent or guardian and a child in that person's care, such as the right to make decisions on behalf of a child and the duty to care for and support the child.

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Circuit court

Circuit courts are court systems in several common law jurisdictions.

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Citizen legislature

A citizen legislature is a legislative chamber made up primarily of citizens who have a full-time occupation besides being a legislator.

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Citizenship of the United States

Citizenship of the United States is a status that entails specific rights, duties and benefits.

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Civil law (legal system)

Civil law, civilian law, or Roman law is a legal system originating in Europe, intellectualized within the framework of Roman law, the main feature of which is that its core principles are codified into a referable system which serves as the primary source of law.

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Classes of United States Senators

The three classes of United States Senators are made up of 33 or 34 Senate seats each.

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Colony of Virginia

The Colony of Virginia, chartered in 1606 and settled in 1607, was the first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey GilbertGILBERT (Saunders Family), SIR HUMPHREY" (history), Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online, University of Toronto, May 2, 2005 in 1583, and the subsequent further south Roanoke Island (modern eastern North Carolina) by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s. The founder of the new colony was the Virginia Company, with the first two settlements in Jamestown on the north bank of the James River and Popham Colony on the Kennebec River in modern-day Maine, both in 1607. The Popham colony quickly failed due to a famine, disease, and conflict with local Native American tribes in the first two years. Jamestown occupied land belonging to the Powhatan Confederacy, and was also at the brink of failure before the arrival of a new group of settlers and supplies by ship in 1610. Tobacco became Virginia's first profitable export, the production of which had a significant impact on the society and settlement patterns. In 1624, the Virginia Company's charter was revoked by King James I, and the Virginia colony was transferred to royal authority as a crown colony. After the English Civil War in the 1640s and 50s, the Virginia colony was nicknamed "The Old Dominion" by King Charles II for its perceived loyalty to the English monarchy during the era of the Protectorate and Commonwealth of England.. From 1619 to 1775/1776, the colonial legislature of Virginia was the House of Burgesses, which governed in conjunction with a colonial governor. Jamestown on the James River remained the capital of the Virginia colony until 1699; from 1699 until its dissolution the capital was in Williamsburg. The colony experienced its first major political turmoil with Bacon's Rebellion of 1676. After declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1775, before the Declaration of Independence was officially adopted, the Virginia colony became the Commonwealth of Virginia, one of the original thirteen states of the United States, adopting as its official slogan "The Old Dominion". The entire modern states of West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, and portions of Ohio and Western Pennsylvania were later created from the territory encompassed, or claimed by, the colony of Virginia at the time of further American independence in July 1776.

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Comity

In law, comity is "a practice among different political entities (as countries, states, or courts of different jurisdictions)" involving the "mutual recognition of legislative, executive, and judicial acts.".

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Commerce Clause

The Commerce Clause describes an enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution (Article I, Section 8, Clause 3).

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Committee of the Whole (United States House of Representatives)

In the United States House of Representatives, a Committee of the Whole House is a congressional committee that includes all members of the House.

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Common law

Common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.

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Commonwealth

A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good.

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Commonwealth (U.S. insular area)

In the terminology of the United States insular areas, a Commonwealth is a type of organized but unincorporated dependent territory.

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Commonwealth (U.S. state)

Commonwealth is a designation used by four of the 50 states of the United States in their full official state names: Kentucky, Massachusetts,, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

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Commonwealth of England

The Commonwealth was the period from 1649 to 1660 when England and Wales, later along with Ireland and Scotland, was ruled as a republic following the end of the Second English Civil War and the trial and execution of Charles I. The republic's existence was declared through "An Act declaring England to be a Commonwealth", adopted by the Rump Parliament on 19 May 1649.

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Concurrent resolution

A concurrent resolution is a resolution (a legislative measure) adopted by both houses of a bicameral legislature that lacks the force of law (is non-binding) and does not require the approval of the chief executive (president).

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Confederate States of America

The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865.

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Constitution of Alabama

The Constitution of the State of Alabama is the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Alabama.

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Constitution of Puerto Rico

The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Constitución del Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico) is the controlling government document of Puerto Rico.

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Constitutional convention (political meeting)

A constitutional convention is a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution.

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Convention to propose amendments to the United States Constitution

A Convention to propose amendments to the United States Constitution, also called an Article V Convention, or Amendments Convention, called for by two-thirds (currently 34) of the state legislatures, is one of two processes authorized by Article Five of the United States Constitution whereby the Constitution, the nation's frame of government, may be altered.

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Cornell Law School

Cornell Law School is the law school of Cornell University, a private Ivy League university located in Ithaca, New York.

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County (United States)

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority.

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Direct election

Direct election is a system of choosing political officeholders in which the voters directly cast ballots for the person, persons, or political party that they desire to see elected.

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District court

District courts are a category of courts which exists in several nations.

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District of Columbia retrocession

The District of Columbia retrocession was the process of returning to the U.S. state of Virginia a part of the land that had been ceded to the federal government of the United States for the purpose of creating Washington, D.C., the capital city.

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District of Maine

The District of Maine was the governmental designation for what is now the U.S. state of Maine from October 25, 1780 to March 15, 1820, when it was admitted to the Union as the 23rd state.

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Due process

Due process is the legal requirement that the state must respect all legal rights that are owed to a person.

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Education in the United States

Education in the United States is provided by public, private and home schools.

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Electoral College (United States)

The United States Electoral College is the mechanism established by the United States Constitution for the election of the president and vice president of the United States by small groups of appointed representatives, electors, from each state and the District of Columbia.

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Electoral system

An electoral system is a set of rules that determines how elections and referendums are conducted and how their results are determined.

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Ellis Island

Ellis Island, in Upper New York Bay, was the gateway for over 12 million immigrants to the U.S. as the United States' busiest immigrant inspection station for over 60 years from 1892 until 1954.

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Enabling act

An enabling act is a piece of legislation by which a legislative body grants an entity which depends on it (for authorization or legitimacy) the power to take certain actions.

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Energy Information Administration

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment.

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Enumerated powers (United States)

The Enumerated powers (also called Expressed powers, Explicit powers or Delegated powers) of the United States Congress are listed in Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution.

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Eponym

An eponym is a person, place, or thing after whom or after which something is named, or believed to be named.

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Equal footing

The equal footing doctrine, also known as equality of the states, is the principle in United States constitutional law that all states admitted to the Union under the Constitution since 1789 enter on equal footing with the 13 states already in the Union at that time.

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Ethnonym

An ethnonym (from the ἔθνος, éthnos, "nation" and ὄνομα, ónoma, "name") is a name applied to a given ethnic group.

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Executive (government)

The executive is the organ exercising authority in and holding responsibility for the governance of a state.

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Extradition

Extradition is the act by one jurisdiction of delivering a person who has been accused of committing a crime in another jurisdiction or has been convicted of a crime in that other jurisdiction into the custody of a law enforcement agency of that other jurisdiction.

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Extradition Clause

The Extradition Clause or Interstate Rendition Clause of the United States Constitution is Article IV, Section 2, Clause 2, which provides for the extradition of a criminal back to the state where he or she has committed a crime.

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Fayette County, Kentucky

Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky.

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Federal government of the United States

The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government) is the national government of the United States, a constitutional republic in North America, composed of 50 states, one district, Washington, D.C. (the nation's capital), and several territories.

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Federal judiciary of the United States

The federal judiciary of the United States is one of the three co-equal branches of the federal government of the United States organized under the United States Constitution and laws of the federal government.

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Federal jurisdiction (United States)

Federal jurisdiction refers to the legal scope of the government's powers in the United States of America.

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Federal republic

A federal republic is a federation of states with a republican form of government.

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Federalism

Federalism is the mixed or compound mode of government, combining a general government (the central or 'federal' government) with regional governments (provincial, state, cantonal, territorial or other sub-unit governments) in a single political system.

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Federated state

A federated state (which may also be referred to by various terms such as a state, a province, a canton, a land) is a territorial and constitutional community forming part of a federation.

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First-past-the-post voting

A first-past-the-post (FPTP) voting method is one in which voters indicate on a ballot the candidate of their choice, and the candidate who receives the most votes wins.

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Five Civilized Tribes

The term "Five Civilized Tribes" derives from the colonial and early federal period in the history of the United States.

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Founding Fathers of the United States

The Founding Fathers of the United States led the American Revolution against the Kingdom of Great Britain.

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Free-Stater (Kansas)

Free-Staters was the name given to settlers in Kansas Territory during the Bleeding Kansas era in the 1850s who opposed the extension of slavery.

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Freedom of movement under United States law

Freedom of movement under United States law is governed primarily by the Privileges and Immunities Clause of the United States Constitution which states, "The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States." As far back as the circuit court ruling in Corfield v. Coryell, 6 Fed. Cas. 546 (1823), freedom of movement has been judicially recognized as a fundamental Constitutional right.

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Full Faith and Credit Clause

Article IV, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, known as the "Full Faith and Credit Clause", addresses the duties that states within the United States have to respect the "public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state." According to the Supreme Court, there is a difference between the credit owed to laws (i.e. legislative measures and common law) as compared to the credit owed to judgments.

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Full-time

Full-time employment is employment in which a person works a minimum number of hours defined as such by his/her employer.

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General election

A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are chosen.

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Google Books

Google Books (previously known as Google Book Search and Google Print and by its codename Project Ocean) is a service from Google Inc. that searches the full text of books and magazines that Google has scanned, converted to text using optical character recognition (OCR), and stored in its digital database.

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Government

A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.

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Governor (United States)

In the United States, a governor serves as the chief executive officer and commander-in-chief in each of the fifty states and in the five permanently inhabited territories, functioning as both head of state and head of government therein.

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Guam

Guam (Chamorro: Guåhån) is an unincorporated and organized territory of the United States in Micronesia in the western Pacific Ocean.

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Hawaii

Hawaii (Hawaii) is the 50th and most recent state to have joined the United States, having received statehood on August 21, 1959.

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Hawaiian language

The Hawaiian language (Hawaiian: Ōlelo Hawaii) is a Polynesian language that takes its name from Hawaiokinai, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed.

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Head of government

A head of government (or chief of government) is a generic term used for either the highest or second highest official in the executive branch of a sovereign state, a federated state, or a self-governing colony, (commonly referred to as countries, nations or nation-states) who often presides over a cabinet, a group of ministers or secretaries who lead executive departments.

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Head of state

A head of state (or chief of state) is the public persona that officially represents the national unity and legitimacy of a sovereign state.

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Health care in the United States

Health care in the United States is provided by many distinct organizations.

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Home rule

Home rule is government of a colony, dependent country, or region by its own citizens.

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Hot pursuit

Hot pursuit (also known as fresh or immediate pursuit) refers to the urgent and direct pursuit of a criminal suspect by law enforcement officers, or by belligerents under international rules of engagement for military forces.

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Human rights

Human rights are moral principles or normsJames Nickel, with assistance from Thomas Pogge, M.B.E. Smith, and Leif Wenar, December 13, 2013, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy,, Retrieved August 14, 2014 that describe certain standards of human behaviour and are regularly protected as natural and legal rights in municipal and international law.

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Impeachment

Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government.

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Incorporation of the Bill of Rights

Incorporation, in United States law, is the doctrine by which portions of the Bill of Rights have been made applicable to the states.

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Indian Territory

As general terms, Indian Territory, the Indian Territories, or Indian country describe an evolving land area set aside by the United States Government for the relocation of Native Americans who held aboriginal title to their land.

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Indigenous languages of the Americas

Indigenous languages of the Americas are spoken by indigenous peoples from Alaska and Greenland to the southern tip of South America, encompassing the land masses that constitute the Americas.

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Indirect election

An indirect election is an election in which voters do not choose between candidates for an office, but elect people who then choose.

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Infrastructure

Infrastructure is the fundamental facilities and systems serving a country, city, or other area, including the services and facilities necessary for its economy to function.

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Insular area

An insular area of the United States is a U.S. territory that is neither a part of one of the 50 states nor of a Federal district.

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Interregnum (England)

The Interregnum was the period between the execution of Charles I on 30 January 1649 and the arrival of his son Charles II in London on 29 May 1660 which marked the start of the Restoration.

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Interstate compact

In the United States of America, an interstate compact is an agreement between two or more states.

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Interstate Highway System

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, is a network of controlled-access highways that forms part of the National Highway System in the United States.

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Iroquoian languages

The Iroquoian languages are a language family of indigenous peoples of North America.

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Jefferson County, Kentucky

Jefferson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky.

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John Wiley & Sons

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., also referred to as Wiley, is a global publishing company that specializes in academic publishing.

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Kansas Territory

The Territory of Kansas was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from May 30, 1854, until January 29, 1861, when the eastern portion of the territory was admitted to the Union as the state of Kansas.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Latinisation of names

Latinisation or Latinization is the practice of rendering a non-Latin name (or word) in a Latin style.

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Law of the United States

The law of the United States comprises many levels of codified and uncodified forms of law, of which the most important is the United States Constitution, the foundation of the federal government of the United States.

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Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico

The Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico (Asamblea Legislativa de Puerto Rico) is the territorial legislature of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, responsible for the legislative branch of the government of Puerto Rico.

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Lieutenant governor (United States)

In the United States, 45 of the 50 states have an office of lieutenant governor.

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Lincoln County, Kentucky

Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky.

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Line-item veto in the United States

In United States government, the line-item veto, or partial veto, is the power of an executive authority to nullify or cancel specific provisions of a bill, usually a budget appropriations bill, without vetoing the entire legislative package.

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List of river borders of U.S. states

Because of its unique history, many of the boundaries of the political divisions of the United States were artificially constructed (rather than being permitted to evolve and drawn using natural features of the landscape).

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List of U.S. state partition proposals

Since the establishment of the United States in 1776, numerous state partition proposals have been put forward that would partition an existing state (or states) in order that a particular region within might either join another state, or create a new state.

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Local government in the United States

Local government in the United States refers to governmental jurisdictions below the level of the state.

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Lord Protector

Lord Protector (pl. Lords Protectors) is a title that has been used in British constitutional law for the head of state.

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Louisiana (New France)

Louisiana (La Louisiane; La Louisiane française) or French Louisiana was an administrative district of New France.

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Mexican Cession

The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.

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Mexico

Mexico (México; Mēxihco), officially called the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos) is a federal republic in the southern portion of North America.

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Michael P. Riccards

Michael P. Riccards (born October 2, 1944 in Elizabeth, New Jersey) is an American political scientist, writer, and professor.

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Michigan Territory

The Territory of Michigan was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from June 30, 1805, until January 26, 1837, when the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Michigan.

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Minnesota Legislature

The Minnesota Legislature is the bicameral legislature of the U.S. state of Minnesota consisting of two houses: the Senate and the House of Representatives.

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Mississippi Territory

The Territory of Mississippi was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from April 7, 1798, until December 10, 1817, when the western half of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Mississippi and the eastern half became the Alabama Territory until its admittance to the Union as the State of Alabama on December 14, 1819.

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Mormon pioneers

The Mormon pioneers were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), also known as Latter-day Saints, who migrated across the United States from the Midwest to the Salt Lake Valley in what is today the U.S. state of Utah.

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National Archives and Records Administration

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the United States government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records and with increasing public access to those documents, which comprise the National Archives.

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National League of Cities

The National League of Cities (NLC) is an advocacy organization in the United States that represents the country's 19,000 cities, towns, and villages along with 49 state municipal leagues.

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National Minimum Drinking Age Act

The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 was passed by the United States Congress on July 17, 1984.

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Nebraska Legislature

The Nebraska Legislature (also called the Unicameral) is the supreme legislative body of the state of Nebraska.

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New France

New France (Nouvelle-France) was the area colonized by France in North America during a period beginning with the exploration of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Great Britain and Spain in 1763.

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New Hampshire Grants

The New Hampshire Grants or Benning Wentworth Grants were land grants made between 1749 and 1764 by the colonial governor of the Province of New Hampshire, Benning Wentworth.

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New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States.

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New Jersey v. New York

New Jersey v. New York,, was a United States Supreme Court case in which it was determined that roughly 90% of Ellis Island was part of New Jersey rather than New York.

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New Spain

The Viceroyalty of New Spain (Virreinato de la Nueva España) was an integral territorial entity of the Spanish Empire, established by Habsburg Spain during the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

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New York (state)

New York is a state in the northeastern United States.

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Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives (called either delegates or resident commissioner, in the case of Puerto Rico) are representatives of their territory in the House of Representatives, but who do not have a right to vote on proposed legislation in the full House but are nevertheless able to participate in certain other House functions.

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North Carolina

North Carolina is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States.

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Northern Mariana Islands

The Northern Mariana Islands, officially the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI; Sankattan Siha Na Islas Mariånas; Refaluwasch or Carolinian: Commonwealth Téél Falúw kka Efáng llól Marianas), is an insular area and commonwealth of the United States consisting of 15 islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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Northwest Ordinance

The Northwest Ordinance (formally An Ordinance for the Government of the Territory of the United States, North-West of the River Ohio, and also known as The Ordinance of 1787) enacted July 13, 1787, was an act of the Congress of the Confederation of the United States.

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Oklahoma Territory

The Territory of Oklahoma was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from May 2, 1890, until November 16, 1907, when it was joined with the Indian Territory under a new constitution and admitted to the Union as the State of Oklahoma.

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Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 15993 September 1658) was an English military and political leader.

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One man, one vote

One man, one vote (or one person, one vote) is a slogan used by advocates of political equality through various electoral reforms such as universal suffrage, proportional representation, or the elimination of plurality voting, malapportionment, or gerrymandering.

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Ordinance of Secession

The Ordinance of Secession is the general name given to documents drafted and ratified in 1860 and 1861 by each of the thirteen southern states and the Territory of Arizona formally seceding from the United States of America.

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Organized incorporated territories of the United States

Organized incorporated territories are territories of the United States that are both incorporated (part of the United States proper) and organized (having an organized government authorized by an Organic Act passed by the U.S. Congress, usually consisting of a territorial legislature, territorial governor, and a basic judicial system).

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Parole

Parole is a temporary release of a prisoner who agrees to certain conditions before the completion of the maximum sentence period, originating from the French parole ("voice, spoken words").

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Part-time contract

A part-time contract is a form of employment that carries fewer hours per week than a full-time job.

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Perpetual Union

The Perpetual Union is a feature of the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, which established the United States of America as a national entity.

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Platte Purchase

The Platte Purchase was a land acquisition in 1836 by the United States government from American Indian tribes.

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Plenary power

A plenary power or plenary authority is a complete and absolute power to take action on a particular issue, with no limitations.

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Plurality-at-large voting

Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV), is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election.

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Political union

A political union is a type of state which is composed of or created out of smaller states.

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Polity

A polity is any kind of political entity.

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Polynesian languages

The Polynesian languages are a language family spoken in geographical Polynesia and on a patchwork of outliers from south central Micronesia to small islands off the northeast of the larger islands of the southeast Solomon Islands and sprinkled through Vanuatu.

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Preamble to the United States Constitution

The Preamble to the United States Constitution is a brief introductory statement of the Constitution's fundamental purposes and guiding principles.

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Prentice Hall

Prentice Hall is a major educational publisher owned by Pearson plc.

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President of the United States

The President of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

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Privileges and Immunities Clause

The Privileges and Immunities Clause (U.S. Constitution, Article IV, Section 2, Clause 1, also known as the Comity Clause) prevents a state from treating citizens of other states in a discriminatory manner.

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Puerto Rican status referendum, 2017

A referendum on the political status of Puerto Rico was held in Puerto Rico on June 11, 2017.

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Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico (Spanish for "Rich Port"), officially the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico, "Free Associated State of Puerto Rico") and briefly called Porto Rico, is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the northeast Caribbean Sea.

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Ratification

Ratification is a principal's approval of an act of its agent that lacked the authority to bind the principal legally.

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Recall election

A recall election (also called a recall referendum or representative recall) is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office through a direct vote before that official's term has ended.

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Reconstruction era

The Reconstruction era was the period from 1863 (the Presidential Proclamation of December 8, 1863) to 1877.

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Redistricting

Redistricting is the process of drawing electoral district boundaries in the United States.

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Republic of Texas

The Republic of Texas (República de Tejas) was an independent sovereign state in North America that existed from March 2, 1836, to February 19, 1846.

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Republicanism

Republicanism is an ideology centered on citizenship in a state organized as a republic under which the people hold popular sovereignty.

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Republicanism in the United States

Modern republicanism is a guiding political philosophy of the United States that has been a major part of American civic thought since its founding.

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Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico

The Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico (Spanish: Comisionado Residente de Puerto Rico) is a non-voting member of the United States House of Representatives elected by the voters of Puerto Rico every four years, the only member of the House of Representatives who serves a four-year term.

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Restored Government of Virginia

The Restored Government of Virginia, also known as the Reorganized Government of Virginia, was the Unionist government of Virginia during the American Civil War (1861–1865).

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Reynolds v. Sims

Reynolds v. Sims, was a United States Supreme Court case that ruled that unlike in the election of the United States Senate, in the election of any chamber of a state legislature the electoral districts must be roughly equal in population (thus negating the traditional function of a State Senate, which was to allow rural counties to counterbalance large towns and cities).

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Rhode Island

Rhode Island, officially the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, is a state in the New England region of the United States.

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Russian America

Russian America (Русская Америка, Russkaya Amerika) was the name of the Russian colonial possessions in North America from 1733 to 1867.

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Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City (often shortened to Salt Lake and abbreviated as SLC) is the capital and the most populous municipality of the U.S. state of Utah.

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Seat of government

The seat of government is (as defined by Brewer's Politics) "the building, complex of buildings or the city from which a government exercises its authority".

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Secession

Secession (derived from the Latin term secessio) is the withdrawal of a group from a larger entity, especially a political entity, but also from any organization, union or military alliance.

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Secession in the United States

In the context of the United States, secession primarily refers to the withdrawal of one or more States from the Union that constitutes the United States; but may loosely refer to leaving a State or territory to form a separate territory or new State, or to the severing of an area from a city or county within a State.

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Secretary of state (U.S. state government)

Secretary of state is an official in the state governments of 47 of the 50 states of the United States, as well as Puerto Rico and other U.S. possessions.

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Separation of powers

The separation of powers is a model for the governance of a state.

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Single-member district

A single-member district or single-member constituency is an electoral district that returns one officeholder to a body with multiple members such as a legislature.

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Siouan languages

Siouan or Siouan–Catawban is a language family of North America that is located primarily in the Great Plains, Ohio and Mississippi valleys and southeastern North America with a few outlier languages in the east.

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South Dakota v. Dole

South Dakota v. Dole,, was a case in which the United States Supreme Court considered the limitations that the Constitution places on the authority of the United States Congress when it uses its authority to influence the individual states in areas of authority normally reserved to the states.

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Southwest Territory

The Territory South of the River Ohio, more commonly known as the Southwest Territory, was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from May 26, 1790, until June 1, 1796, when it was admitted to the United States as the State of Tennessee.

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Sovereign state

A sovereign state is, in international law, a nonphysical juridical entity that is represented by one centralized government that has sovereignty over a geographic area.

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Sovereignty

Sovereignty is the full right and power of a governing body over itself, without any interference from outside sources or bodies.

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Spanish Florida

Spanish Florida refers to the Spanish territory of La Florida, which was the first major European land claim and attempted settlement in North America during the European Age of Discovery.

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State (polity)

A state is a compulsory political organization with a centralized government that maintains a monopoly of the legitimate use of force within a certain geographical territory.

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State attorney general

The state attorney general in each of the 50 U.S. states and territories is the chief legal advisor to the state government and the state's chief law enforcement officer.

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State cessions

The state cessions are those areas of the United States that the separate states ceded to the federal government in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

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State constitution (United States)

In the United States, each state has its own constitution.

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State court (United States)

In the United States, a state court has jurisdiction over disputes with some connection to a U.S. state, as opposed to the federal government.

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State governments of the United States

State governments of the United States are institutional units in the United States exercising some of the functions of government at a level below that of the federal government.

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State legislature (United States)

A state legislature in the United States is the legislative body of any of the 50 U.S. states.

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State of Deseret

The State of Deseret was a provisional state of the United States, proposed in 1849 by settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Salt Lake City.

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State of Franklin

The State of Franklin (also the Free Republic of Franklin or the State of Frankland)Landrum, refers to the proposed state as "the proposed republic of Franklin; while Wheeler has it as Frankland." In That's Not in My American History Book, Thomas Ayres maintains that the official title was "Free Republic of Franklin".

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State of Sequoyah

The State of Sequoyah was a proposed state to be established from the Indian Territory in the eastern part of present-day Oklahoma.

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State ratifying conventions

State ratifying conventions are one of the two methods established by Article V of the United States Constitution for ratifying proposed constitutional amendments.

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State supreme court

In the United States, a state supreme court (known by other names in some states) is the ultimate judicial tribunal in the court system of a particular state (i.e., that state's court of last resort).

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States' rights

In American political discourse, states' rights are political powers held for the state governments rather than the federal government according to the United States Constitution, reflecting especially the enumerated powers of Congress and the Tenth Amendment.

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Status (law)

Legal status is the position held by something or someone with regard to law.

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Superior court

In common law systems, a superior court is a court of general competence which typically has unlimited jurisdiction with regard to civil and criminal legal cases.

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Supermajority

A supermajority or supra-majority or a qualified majority, is a requirement for a proposal to gain a specified level of support which is greater than the threshold of one-half used for majority.

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Supremacy Clause

The Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution (Article VI, Clause 2) establishes that the Constitution, federal laws made pursuant to it, and treaties made under its authority, constitute the supreme law of the land.

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Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States.

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Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Tenth Amendment (Amendment X) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, was ratified on December 15, 1791.

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Texas v. White

Texas v. White, was a case argued before the United States Supreme Court in 1869.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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Thirteen Colonies

The Thirteen Colonies were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States of America.

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Toledo War

The Toledo War (1835–36), also known as the Michigan–Ohio War, was an almost bloodless boundary dispute between the U.S. state of Ohio and the adjoining territory of Michigan.

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Transportation in the United States

Transportation in the United States is facilitated by road, air, rail, and waterways (via boats).

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Treaty

A treaty is an agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely sovereign states and international organizations.

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Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (Tratado de Guadalupe Hidalgo in Spanish), officially titled the Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits and Settlement between the United States of America and the Mexican Republic, is the peace treaty signed on February 2, 1848, in the Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo (now a neighborhood of Mexico City) between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

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Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Twelfth Amendment (Amendment XII) to the United States Constitution provides the procedure for electing the President and Vice President.

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Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Twenty-third Amendment (Amendment XXIII) to the United States Constitution extends the right to vote in the presidential election to citizens residing in the District of Columbia by granting the District electors in the Electoral College, as if it was a state.

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Unicameralism

In government, unicameralism (Latin uni, one + camera, chamber) is the practice of having one legislative or parliamentary chamber.

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Unincorporated territories of the United States

Under United States law, an unincorporated territory is an area controlled by the United States government which is not part of (i.e., "incorporated" in) the United States.

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Unitary executive theory

The unitary executive theory is a theory of American constitutional law holding that the President possesses the power to control the entire executive branch.

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Unitary state

A unitary state is a state governed as a single power in which the central government is ultimately supreme and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) exercise only the powers that the central government chooses to delegate.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Census

The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States...

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

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United States congressional apportionment

United States congressional apportionment is the process by which seats in the United States House of Representatives are distributed among the 50 states according to the most recent constitutionally mandated decennial census.

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United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

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United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber.

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United States Numbered Highway System

The United States Numbered Highway System (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated network of roads and highways numbered within a nationwide grid in the contiguous United States.

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United States presidential election

The election of President and Vice President of the United States is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or in Washington, D.C. cast ballots not directly for those offices, but instead for members of the U.S. Electoral College, known as electors.

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United States presidential election, 2016

The United States presidential election of 2016 was the 58th quadrennial American presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

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United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprise the legislature of the United States.

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United States v. Lopez

United States v. Alfonso D. Lopez, Jr., was the first United States Supreme Court case since the New Deal to set limits to Congress' power under the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution.

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United States v. Morrison

United States v. Morrison,, is a United States Supreme Court decision which held that parts of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 were unconstitutional because they exceeded congressional power under the Commerce Clause and under section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution.

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United States Virgin Islands

The United States Virgin Islands (USVI; also called the American Virgin Islands), officially the Virgin Islands of the United States, is a group of islands in the Caribbean that is an insular area of the United States located east of Puerto Rico.

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Unorganized territory

In the United States, an unorganized territory is a region of land without a "normally" constituted system of government.

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Uto-Aztecan languages

Uto-Aztecan or Uto-Aztekan is a family of Indigenous languages of the Americas, consisting of over 30 languages.

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Vermont Republic

Vermont Republic is a term used by historians to refer to the government of Vermont that existed from 1777 to 1791.

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Veto

A veto – Latin for "I forbid" – is the power (used by an officer of the state, for example) to unilaterally stop an official action, especially the enactment of legislation.

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Vice President of the United States

The Vice President of the United States (informally referred to as VPOTUS, or Veep) is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States as the President of the Senate under Article I, Section 3, Clause 4, of the United States Constitution, as well as the second highest executive branch officer, after the President of the United States.

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Voting rights in the United States

The issue of voting rights in the United States, specifically the enfranchisement and disenfranchisement of different groups, has been contested throughout United States history.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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Washington, D.C. statehood referendum, 2016

A referendum on statehood for Washington, D.C. was held on November 8, 2016.

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White House

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States.

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Wickard v. Filburn

Wickard v. Filburn, 317 U.S. 111 (1942), was a United States Supreme Court decision that dramatically increased the regulatory power of the federal government.

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Wyoming

Wyoming is a state in the mountain region of the western United States.

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1967 Detroit riot

The 1967 Detroit riot, also known as the 12th Street riot was the bloodiest race riot in the "Long, hot summer of 1967".

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Redirects here:

Rectangular states, State (U.S.), State (US), State (USA), State (United States of America), State (United States), State of the United States, States Of The United States, States in the United States, States of US, States of USA, States of United States, States of the U.S., States of the US, States of the USA, The 50 States, The 50 States of America, The 50 states, U S state, U. S. State, U. S. state, U. S. states, U. s. state, U.S state, U.S. State, U.S. States, U.S. states, U.S.A. state, U.S.A. states, U.s. state, US State, US States, US state, US states, USA state, USA states, Uas states, United States State, United States state, United States states, United States/States, Us state, Us states, Usa state.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._state

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