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Union (American Civil War)

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During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the Union, also known as the North, referred to the United States of America and specifically to the national government of President Abraham Lincoln and the 20 free states, as well as 4 border and slave states (some with split governments and troops sent both north and south) that supported it. [1]

217 relations: Abraham Lincoln, Admission to the Union, Allan Nevins, American Civil War, American Civil War prison camps, American Missionary Association, Amos Whitney, Andrew Carnegie, Andrew Johnson, Arizona Territory, Army of the Potomac, Articles of Confederation, Asa Packer, Atlanta, August Belmont, Bald Knobbers, Baltimore riot of 1861, Battle Cry of Freedom (book), Battle of Shiloh, Benedict Lapham, Benjamin Bates IV, Benjamin Knight, Benjamin Tyler Henry, Border states (American Civil War), Cabinet (government), California in the American Civil War, Charles I. du Pont, Charles Sumner, Chickenpox, Christian Sharps, Christopher Miner Spencer, Cincinnati in the American Civil War, Clement Vallandigham, Cleveland in the American Civil War, Colorado Territory, Confederate States of America, Connecticut in the American Civil War, Copperhead (politics), Cornelius Vanderbilt, Dakota Territory, Daniel B. Wesson, Daniel Pratt (industrialist), David Leavitt (banker), David Sinton, David Tod, Democratic Party (United States), Diarrhea, Dorothea Dix, Dysentery, Edwin Stanton, ..., Emancipation Proclamation, Erastus Corning, Excise tax in the United States, Ezekiel A. Straw, Ezra Warner (inventor), Fort Sumter, Frederick Law Olmsted, Gardner Colby, General Order No. 11 (1862), General Order No. 11 (1863), George B. McClellan, George Henry Corliss, George Luther Stearns, George Pullman, George Worthington (businessman), Gettysburg Address, Glanders, Gouverneur Kemble, Guerrilla warfare, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in the American Civil War, Harry S. Truman, Henry J. Steere, Henry Lomb, Henry Whitney Bellows, Herman Hollerith, Historical rankings of presidents of the United States, History of Delaware, History of Minnesota, History of New Hampshire, History of the United States Democratic Party, History of the United States Republican Party, Holmes County, Ohio, Homestead Acts, Horace Smith (inventor), Horatio Seymour, IBM, Idaho Territory, Illinois in the American Civil War, Indian Territory, Indiana in the American Civil War, Indianapolis in the American Civil War, Iowa in the American Civil War, J. Matthew Gallman, Jacksonian democracy, James Buchanan Eads, James M. McPherson, Jay Cooke, Jesse James, John Crerar (industrialist), John Edgar Thomson, John Ericsson, John F. Winslow, John Jacob Bausch, John Lenthall (shipbuilder), John Shaw Billings, Justin Smith Morrill, Kansas in the American Civil War, Kentucky in the American Civil War, Lexington, Kentucky, in the American Civil War, Library of the Surgeon General's Office, Louisville, Kentucky, in the American Civil War, Lyman Trumbull, Maine in the American Civil War, Malaria, Martial law, Mary Livermore, Maryland in the American Civil War, Massachusetts in the American Civil War, Matthias W. Baldwin, Measles, Methodist Episcopal Church, Michigan in the American Civil War, Missouri in the American Civil War, Modernization theory, Montana Territory, Morrill Tariff, Mumps, National Bank Act, National Union Party (United States), Nebraska Territory, Nevada in the American Civil War, Nevada Territory, New Jersey in the American Civil War, New Mexico Territory, New York (state), New York City, New York City draft riots, New York City in the American Civil War, New York in the American Civil War, New York Public Library, Ohio, Ohio in the American Civil War, Oliver P. Morton, Oliver Winchester, Ordeal of the Union, Oregon in the American Civil War, Pacific Railroad Acts, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Dutch, Pennsylvania in the American Civil War, Philadelphia in the American Civil War, Pittsburgh in the American Civil War, Prisoner of war, Punched card, Quantrill's Raiders, Radical Republican, Republican Party (United States), Republicanism in the United States, Rhode Island in the American Civil War, Richmond, Virginia, Robert Knight (industrialist), Robert Parker Parrott, Rollin White, Salmon P. Chase, Samuel Colt, Samuel Morse, Scalawag, Second Great Awakening, Simon Cameron, Slave Power, Slave states and free states, Southern Unionist, Southern United States, St. Joseph, Missouri, St. Louis in the American Civil War, Stephen G. Burbridge, Thaddeus Stevens, Thomas E. Bramlette, Typhoid fever, U.S. state, Union Army, United States, United States Army, United States Christian Commission, United States Congress Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, United States Constitution, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State, United States Department of the Treasury, United States Department of War, United States House of Representatives elections, 1862 and 1863, United States Military Railroad, United States National Library of Medicine, United States Note, United States Sanitary Commission, Utah Territory, Value-added tax, Vermont in the American Civil War, Virginia in the American Civil War, Walt Whitman, War Democrat, Ward (United States), Washington Territory, Washington, D.C., Washington, D.C., in the American Civil War, West Virginia in the American Civil War, Whooping cough, William Gannaway Brownlow, William H. Seward, William Mason (locomotive builder), William Metcalf (manufacturer), William P. Fessenden, William P. Halliday, William T. Anderson, William Wesley Cornell, Wisconsin in the American Civil War, Women's suffrage. Expand index (167 more) »

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

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Admission to the Union

The Admission to the Union Clause of the United States Constitution, oftentimes called the New States Clause, and found at Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1, authorizes the Congress to admit new states into the United States beyond the thirteen already in existence at the time the Constitution went into effect.

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Allan Nevins

Joseph Allan Nevins (May 20, 1890 – March 5, 1971) was an American historian and journalist, known for his extensive work on the history of the Civil War and his biographies of such figures as Grover Cleveland, Hamilton Fish, Henry Ford, and John D. Rockefeller, as well as his public service.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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American Civil War prison camps

American Civil War Prison Camps were operated by both the Union and the Confederacy to handle the 409,000 soldiers captured during the war from 1861 to 1865.

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American Missionary Association

The American Missionary Association (AMA) was a Protestant-based abolitionist group founded on September 3, 1846, in Albany, New York.

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Amos Whitney

Amos Whitney (October 8, 1832 – August 5, 1920) was a mechanical engineer and Connecticut inventor born in Biddeford, Maine.

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Andrew Carnegie

Andrew Carnegie (but commonly or;MacKay, p. 29. November 25, 1835August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist.

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Andrew Johnson

Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 July 31, 1875) was the 17th President of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869.

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Arizona Territory

The Territory of Arizona (also known as Arizona Territory) was a territory of the United States that existed from February 24, 1863 until February 14, 1912, when the remaining extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the state of Arizona.

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Army of the Potomac

The Army of the Potomac was the principal Union Army in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War.

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Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution.

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Asa Packer

Asa Packer (December 29, 1805May 17, 1879) was an American businessman who pioneered railroad construction, was active in Pennsylvania politics, and founded Lehigh University.

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Atlanta

Atlanta is the capital city and most populous municipality of the state of Georgia in the United States.

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August Belmont

August Belmont Sr. (December 8, 1813November 24, 1890) was a German Jewish-American politician, financier, foreign diplomat, and party chairman of the Democratic National Committee during the 1860s, and later a horse-breeder and racehorse owner.

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Bald Knobbers

The Bald Knobbers were a group of vigilantes in the Ozark region of southwest Missouri from 1883 to 1889.

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Baltimore riot of 1861

The Baltimore riot of 1861 (also called the "Pratt Street Riots" and the "Pratt Street Massacre") was a civil conflict on Friday, April 19, 1861, on Pratt Street, in Baltimore, Maryland, between antiwar "Copperhead" Democrats (the largest party in Maryland) and other Southern/Confederate sympathizers on one side, and members of the primarily Massachusetts and some Pennsylvania state militia regiments en route to the national capital at Washington called up for federal service, on the other.

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Battle Cry of Freedom (book)

Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era is a Pulitzer Prize-winning work on the American Civil War, published in 1988, by James M. McPherson.

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Battle of Shiloh

The Battle of Shiloh (also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing) was a battle in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, fought April 6–7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee.

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Benedict Lapham

Benedict Lapham (June 26, 1816 – June 16, 1883) was a New England industrialist and philanthropist.

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Benjamin Bates IV

Benjamin Edward Bates IV (July 12, 1808 – January 14, 1878) was an American rail industrialist, textile tycoon and philanthropist.

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Benjamin Knight

Benjamin Brayton Knight (1813–1898) was a New England industrialist and philanthropist, who was a partner with his brother Robert Knight in the B. B. & R. Knight Company and was one of the largest textile manufacturers in the world when he died in 1898.

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Benjamin Tyler Henry

Benjamin Tyler Henry (March 22, 1821–June 8, 1898) was an American gunsmith and manufacturer.

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Border states (American Civil War)

In the context of the American Civil War (1861–65), the border states were slave states that did not declare a secession from the Union and did not join the Confederacy.

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Cabinet (government)

A cabinet is a body of high-ranking state officials, typically consisting of the top leaders of the executive branch.

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California in the American Civil War

California's involvement in the American Civil War included sending gold east, recruiting volunteer combat units to replace regular forces in territories of the Western United States, maintaining and building numerous camps and fortifications, suppressing secessionist activity (many of these secessionists went east to fight for the Confederacy) and securing the New Mexico Territory against the Confederacy.

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Charles I. du Pont

Charles Irénée du Pont (March 29, 1797 – January 31, 1869) was an American manufacturer and politician, and an early member of the prominent du Pont family business.

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Charles Sumner

Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811 – March 11, 1874) was an American politician and United States Senator from Massachusetts.

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Chickenpox

Chickenpox, also known as varicella, is a highly contagious disease caused by the initial infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV).

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Christian Sharps

Christian Sharps (January 2, 1810 – March 12, 1874) was the inventor of the Sharps rifle, the first commercially successful breech-loading rifle and the 4 barrel Sharps Derringer.

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Christopher Miner Spencer

Christopher Miner Spencer (June 20, 1833 – January 14, 1922) was an American inventor, from Manchester, Connecticut, who invented the Spencer repeating rifle, one of the earliest models of lever-action rifle, a steam powered "horseless carriage", and several other inventions.

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Cincinnati in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the Ohio River port city of Cincinnati, Ohio, played a key role as a major source of supplies and troops for the Union Army.

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Clement Vallandigham

Clement Laird Vallandigham (July 29, 1820June 17, 1871) was an Ohio politician and leader of the Copperhead faction of anti-war Democrats during the American Civil War.

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Cleveland in the American Civil War

Cleveland, Ohio, was an important Northern city during the American Civil War.

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Colorado Territory

The Territory of Colorado was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from February 28, 1861, until August 1, 1876, when it was admitted to the Union as the State of Colorado.

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Confederate States of America

The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865.

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Connecticut in the American Civil War

The New England state of Connecticut played a relatively small, but important role in the American Civil War, providing arms, equipment, money, supplies, and manpower for the Union Army, as well as the Union Navy.

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Copperhead (politics)

In the 1860s, the Copperheads were a vocal faction of Democrats in the Northern United States of the Union who opposed the American Civil War and wanted an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates.

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Cornelius Vanderbilt

Cornelius Vanderbilt (May 27, 1794 – January 4, 1877) was an American business magnate and philanthropist who built his wealth in railroads and shipping.

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Dakota Territory

The Territory of Dakota was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1861, until November 2, 1889, when the final extent of the reduced territory was split and admitted to the Union as the states of North and South Dakota.

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Daniel B. Wesson

Daniel Baird Wesson (May 18, 1825 – August 4, 1906) was a firearms designer from the United States.

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Daniel Pratt (industrialist)

Daniel Pratt (July 20, 1799 – May 13, 1873) was an American industrialist who pioneered ventures that opened the door for industry in the U.S. state of Alabama.

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David Leavitt (banker)

David Leavitt (August 29, 1791 – December 30, 1879) was an early New York City banker and financier.

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David Sinton

David Sinton (26 June 1808 – 31 August 1900) was a pig-iron industrialist, born in County Armagh, Ireland, who became one of the wealthiest people in America.

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David Tod

David Tod (February 21, 1805 – November 13, 1868) was an American politician and industrialist from the U.S. state of Ohio.

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Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (nicknamed the GOP for Grand Old Party).

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Diarrhea

Diarrhea, also spelled diarrhoea, is the condition of having at least three loose or liquid bowel movements each day.

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Dorothea Dix

Dorothea Lynde Dix (April 4, 1802July 17, 1887) was an American activist on behalf of the indigent mentally ill who, through a vigorous program of lobbying state legislatures and the United States Congress, created the first generation of American mental asylums.

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Dysentery

Dysentery is an inflammatory disease of the intestine, especially of the colon, which always results in severe diarrhea and abdominal pains.

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Edwin Stanton

Edwin McMasters Stanton (December 19, 1814December 24, 1869) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Secretary of War under the Lincoln Administration during most of the American Civil War.

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Emancipation Proclamation

The Emancipation Proclamation, or Proclamation 95, was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863.

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Erastus Corning

Erastus Corning I (December 14, 1794 – April 9, 1872) was an American businessman and politician.

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Excise tax in the United States

Excise tax in the United States is an indirect tax on listed items.

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Ezekiel A. Straw

Ezekiel Albert Straw (December 30, 1819 – October 23, 1882), was an engineer, businessman, and politician from Manchester, New Hampshire.

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Ezra Warner (inventor)

Ezra J. Warner of Waterbury, Connecticut was an American inventor, who patented his design of a can opener in 1858.

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Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter is a sea fort in Charleston, South Carolina, notable for two battles of the American Civil War.

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Frederick Law Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was an American landscape architect, journalist, social critic, and public administrator.

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Gardner Colby

Gardner Colby (1810–1879) was a prominent businessman and Christian philanthropist.

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General Order No. 11 (1862)

General Order No.

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General Order No. 11 (1863)

General Order No.

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George B. McClellan

George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826October 29, 1885) was an American soldier, civil engineer, railroad executive, and politician.

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George Henry Corliss

George Henry Corliss (June 2, 1817 – February 21, 1888) was an American mechanical engineer and inventor, who developed the Corliss steam engine, which was a great improvement over any other stationary steam engine of its time.

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George Luther Stearns

George Luther Stearns (January 8, 1809 – April 9, 1867) was an American industrialist and merchant, as well as an abolitionist and a noted recruiter of black soldiers for the Union Army during the American Civil War.

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George Pullman

George Mortimer Pullman (March 3, 1831 – October 19, 1897) was an American engineer and industrialist.

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George Worthington (businessman)

George Worthington (September 21, 1813 – November 9, 1871) was a 19th-century merchant and banker in Cleveland, Ohio, who founded the Geo.

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Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, and one of the best-known speeches in American history.

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Glanders

Glanders (from Middle English glaundres or Old French glandres, both meaning glands; malleus, Rotz; also known as "equinia", "farcy", and "malleus") is an infectious disease that occurs primarily in horses, mules, and donkeys.

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Gouverneur Kemble

Gouverneur Kemble (January 25, 1786 – September 18, 1875) was a two-term United States Congressman, diplomat and industrialist.

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Guerrilla warfare

Guerrilla warfare is a form of irregular warfare in which a small group of combatants, such as paramilitary personnel, armed civilians, or irregulars, use military tactics including ambushes, sabotage, raids, petty warfare, hit-and-run tactics, and mobility to fight a larger and less-mobile traditional military.

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Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in the American Civil War

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War was the capital of the second largest state in the Union.

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Harry S. Truman

Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953), taking office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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Henry J. Steere

Henry Jonah Steere (1830–1889) was a prominent American philanthropist and industrialist from Rhode Island.

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Henry Lomb

Henry Lomb (–) was an American optician who co-founded Bausch & Lomb (with John Jacob Bausch) and led a group of businessmen to found The Mechanics Institute, the forerunner of Rochester Institute of Technology.

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Henry Whitney Bellows

Henry Whitney Bellows (June 11, 1814 – January 30, 1882) was an American clergyman, and the planner and president of the United States Sanitary Commission, the leading soldiers' aid society, during the American Civil War.

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Herman Hollerith

Herman Hollerith (February 29, 1860 – November 17, 1929) was an American inventor who developed an electromechanical punched card tabulator to assist in summarizing information and, later, accounting.

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Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

In political studies, surveys have been conducted in order to construct historical rankings of the success of individuals who have served as President of the United States.

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History of Delaware

The history of Delaware as a political entity dates back to the early colonization of North America by European-American settlers.

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History of Minnesota

The history of the U.S. state of Minnesota is shaped by its original Native American residents, European exploration and settlement, and the emergence of industries made possible by the state's natural resources.

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History of New Hampshire

New Hampshire is a state located in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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History of the United States Democratic Party

The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s.

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History of the United States Republican Party

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the world's oldest extant political parties.

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Holmes County, Ohio

Holmes County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio.

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Homestead Acts

The Homestead Acts were several United States federal laws under which an applicant, upon the satisfaction of certain conditions, could acquire ownership of land, typically called a "homestead.” In all, more than 270 million acres of public land, or nearly 10% of the total area of the U.S., was transferred to 1.6 million homesteaders; most of the homesteads were west of the Mississippi River.

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Horace Smith (inventor)

Horace Smith (October 28, 1808 – January 15, 1893) was an American gunsmith, inventor, and businessman.

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Horatio Seymour

Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810February 12, 1886) was an American politician.

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IBM

The International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries.

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Idaho Territory

The Territory of Idaho was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 3, 1863, until July 3, 1890, when the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as Idaho.

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Illinois in the American Civil War

The U.S. state of Illinois during the American Civil War was a major source of troops for the Union Army (particularly for those armies serving in the Western Theater of the Civil War), and of military supplies, food, and clothing.

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Indian Territory

As general terms, Indian Territory, the Indian Territories, or Indian country describe an evolving land area set aside by the United States Government for the relocation of Native Americans who held aboriginal title to their land.

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Indiana in the American Civil War

Indiana, a state in the Midwest, played an important role in supporting the Union during the American Civil War.

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Indianapolis in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, Indianapolis, the state capital of Indiana, was a major base of supplies During the war, the city's population increased with the arrival of new businesses and industries that offered additional employment opportunities, spurred real estate development, and ushered in the beginning of the city's urban, industrial development.

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Iowa in the American Civil War

The state of Iowa played a role during the American Civil War in providing food, supplies, and troops for the Union army, though its contributions were overshadowed by larger and more populated eastern states.

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J. Matthew Gallman

J.

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Jacksonian democracy

Jacksonian democracy is a 19th-century political philosophy in the United States that espoused greater democracy for the common man as that term was then defined.

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James Buchanan Eads

Captain James Buchanan Eads (May 23, 1820 – March 8, 1887) was a world-renowned American civil engineer and inventor, holding more than 50 patents.

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James M. McPherson

James M. "Jim" McPherson (born October 11, 1936) is an American Civil War historian, and is the George Henry Davis '86 Professor Emeritus of United States History at Princeton University.

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Jay Cooke

Jay Cooke (August 12, 1821 – February 16, 1905) was an American financier who helped finance the Union war effort during the American Civil War and the postwar development of railroads in the northwestern United States.

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Jesse James

Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, bank and train robber, guerrilla, and leader of the James–Younger Gang.

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John Crerar (industrialist)

John Chippewa Crerar (8 March 1827 – 19 October 1889) was a wealthy American industrialist and businessman from Chicago whose investments were primarily in the railroad industry.

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John Edgar Thomson

John Edgar Thomson (February 10, 1808 – May 27, 1874) was an American civil engineer and industrialist.

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John Ericsson

John Ericsson (born Johan) (July 31, 1803 – March 8, 1889) was a Swedish-American inventor, active in England and the United States, and regarded as one of the most influential mechanical engineers ever.

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John F. Winslow

John Flack Winslow (November 10, 1810 – March 10, 1892) was an American businessman and iron manufacturer who was the fifth president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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John Jacob Bausch

Johan (John) Jacob Bausch (July 25, 1830 – February 14, 1926) was an American maker of optical instruments who co-founded Bausch & Lomb (with Henry Lomb).

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John Lenthall (shipbuilder)

John Lenthall (16 September 1807 – 11 April 1882) was an important American shipbuilder and naval architect.

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John Shaw Billings

John Shaw Billings (April 12, 1838 – March 11, 1913) was an American librarian, building designer, and surgeon.

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Justin Smith Morrill

Justin Smith Morrill (April 14, 1810December 28, 1898) was a Representative (1855–1867) and a Senator (1867–1898) from Vermont, most widely remembered today for the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act that established federal funding for establishing many of the United States' public colleges and universities.

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Kansas in the American Civil War

At the outbreak of the American Civil War in April 1861, Kansas was the newest U.S. state, admitted just months earlier in January.

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Kentucky in the American Civil War

Kentucky was a border state of key importance in the American Civil War.

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Lexington, Kentucky, in the American Civil War

Lexington, Kentucky was a city of importance during the American Civil War, with notable residents participating on both sides of the conflict.

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Library of the Surgeon General's Office

The Library of the Surgeon General's Office, later called the Army Medical Library, was the institutional medical literature repository of the U.S. Army Surgeon General from 1836 to 1956 when it was transformed into the National Library of Medicine.

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Louisville, Kentucky, in the American Civil War

Louisville in the American Civil War was a major stronghold of Union forces, which kept Kentucky firmly in the Union.

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Lyman Trumbull

Lyman Trumbull (October 12, 1813 – June 25, 1896) was a United States Senator from Illinois and the co-author of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

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Maine in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the U.S. state of Maine was a source of military manpower, supplies, ships, arms, and political support for the U.S. Army.

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Malaria

Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease affecting humans and other animals caused by parasitic protozoans (a group of single-celled microorganisms) belonging to the Plasmodium type.

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Martial law

Martial law is the imposition of direct military control of normal civilian functions of government, especially in response to a temporary emergency such as invasion or major disaster, or in an occupied territory. Martial law can be used by governments to enforce their rule over the public.

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Mary Livermore

Mary Livermore, born Mary Ashton Rice, (December 19, 1820 – May 23, 1905) was an American journalist, abolitionist, and advocate of women's rights.

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Maryland in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, Maryland, a slave state, was one of the border states, straddling the South and North.

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Massachusetts in the American Civil War

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts played a significant role in national events prior to and during the American Civil War.

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Matthias W. Baldwin

Matthias William Baldwin (December 10, 1795 – September 7, 1866) was an American inventor and machinery manufacturer, specializing in the production of steam locomotives.

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Measles

Measles is a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the measles virus.

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Methodist Episcopal Church

The Methodist Episcopal Church (MEC) was the oldest and largest Methodist denomination in the United States from its founding in 1784 until 1939.

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Michigan in the American Civil War

Michigan made a substantial contribution to the Union during the American Civil War.

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Missouri in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, Missouri was a hotly contested border state populated by both Union and Confederate sympathizers.

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Modernization theory

Modernization theory is used to explain the process of modernization within societies.

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Montana Territory

The Territory of Montana was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from May 26, 1864, until November 8, 1889, when it was admitted as the 41st state in the Union as the State of Montana.

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Morrill Tariff

The Morrill Tariff of 1861 was an increased import tariff in the United States, adopted on March 2, 1861, during the administration of President James Buchanan, a Democrat.

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Mumps

Mumps is a viral disease caused by the mumps virus.

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National Bank Act

The National Banking Acts of 1863 and 1864 were two United States federal banking acts that established a system of national banks, and created the United States National Banking System.

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National Union Party (United States)

The National Union Party was the temporary name used by the Republican Party for the national ticket in the 1864 presidential election which was held during the Civil War.

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Nebraska Territory

The Territory of Nebraska was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from May 30, 1854, until March 1, 1867, when the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Nebraska.

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Nevada in the American Civil War

Nevada's entry into statehood in the United States on October 31, 1864, in the midst of the American Civil War, was expedited by Union sympathizers in order to ensure the state's participation in the 1864 presidential election in support of President Abraham Lincoln.

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Nevada Territory

The Territory of Nevada was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1861, until October 31, 1864, when it was admitted to the Union as the State of Nevada.

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New Jersey in the American Civil War

The state of New Jersey in the United States provided a source of troops, equipment and leaders for the Union during the American Civil War.

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New Mexico Territory

The Territory of New Mexico was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed (with varying boundaries) from September 9, 1850, until January 6, 1912, when the remaining extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of New Mexico, making it the longest-lived organized incorporated territory of the United States, lasting approximately 62 years.

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New York (state)

New York is a state in the northeastern United States.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City draft riots

The New York City draft riots (July 13–16, 1863), known at the time as Draft Week, were violent disturbances in Lower Manhattan, widely regarded as the culmination of working-class discontent with new laws passed by Congress that year to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War.

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New York City in the American Civil War

New York City during the American Civil War (1861–1865) was a bustling American city that provided a major source of troops, supplies, equipment and financing for the Union Army.

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New York in the American Civil War

The state of New York during the American Civil War was a major influence in national politics, the Union war effort, and the media coverage of the war.

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New York Public Library

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City.

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Ohio

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States.

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Ohio in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the State of '''Ohio''' played a key role in providing troops, military officers, and supplies to the Union army.

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Oliver P. Morton

Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (August 4, 1823 – November 1, 1877), commonly known as Oliver P. Morton, was a U.S. Republican Party politician from Indiana.

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Oliver Winchester

Oliver Fisher Winchester (November 30, 1810 – December 11, 1880) was an American businessman and politician.

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Ordeal of the Union

Ordeal of the Union, an eight-volume set (published 1947–1971) on the American Civil War by Allan Nevins, is one of the author's greatest works, ending only with his death.

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Oregon in the American Civil War

At the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, regular U.S. Army troops in the District of Oregon were withdrawn from posts in Oregon and Washington Territory and sent east.

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Pacific Railroad Acts

The Pacific Railroad Acts were a series of acts of Congress that promoted the construction of a "transcontinental railroad" (the Pacific Railroad) in the United States through authorizing the issuance of government bonds and the grants of land to railroad companies.

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Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

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Pennsylvania Dutch

The Pennsylvania Dutch (Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch) are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania and their descendants.

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Pennsylvania in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the commonwealth of Pennsylvania played a critical role in the Union, providing a huge supply of military manpower, equipment, and leadership to the Federal government.

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Philadelphia in the American Civil War

Philadelphia during the American Civil War was an important source of troops, money, weapons, medical care, and supplies for the Union.

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Pittsburgh in the American Civil War

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania was a thriving and important city during the American Civil War, and provided a significant source of personnel, war materiel, armament, ammunition, and supplies to the Union Army.

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Prisoner of war

A prisoner of war (POW) is a person, whether combatant or non-combatant, who is held in custody by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict.

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Punched card

A punched card or punch card is a piece of stiff paper that can be used to contain digital data represented by the presence or absence of holes in predefined positions.

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Quantrill's Raiders

Quantrill's Raiders were the best-known of the pro-Confederate partisan guerrillas (also known as "bushwhackers") who fought in the American Civil War.

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Radical Republican

The Radical Republicans were a faction of American politicians within the Republican Party of the United States from around 1854 (before the American Civil War) until the end of Reconstruction in 1877.

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Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

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Republicanism in the United States

Modern republicanism is a guiding political philosophy of the United States that has been a major part of American civic thought since its founding.

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Rhode Island in the American Civil War

The state of Rhode Island during the American Civil War, as with all of New England, remained loyal to the Union.

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Richmond, Virginia

Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Robert Knight (industrialist)

Robert Knight (8 January 1826 – 26 November 1912) was a New England industrialist and philanthropist, who was a partner with his brother Benjamin Knight in B. B. & R. Knight and was one of the largest textile manufacturers in the world when he died in 1912.

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Robert Parker Parrott

Robert Parker Parrott (October 5, 1804 – December 24, 1877) was an American soldier and inventor of military ordnance.

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Rollin White

Rollin White (June 6, 1817 – March 22, 1892) was an American gunsmith who invented a bored-through revolver cylinder that allowed metallic cartridges to be loaded from the rear of a revolver's cylinder.

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Salmon P. Chase

Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808May 7, 1873) was a U.S. politician and jurist who served as the sixth Chief Justice of the United States.

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Samuel Colt

Samuel Colt (July 19, 1814 – January 10, 1862) was an American inventor, industrialist, businessman, and hunter.

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Samuel Morse

Samuel Finley Breese Morse (April 27, 1791 – April 2, 1872) was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.

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Scalawag

In United States history, scalawags were white Southerners who supported Reconstruction and the Republican Party, after the American Civil War.

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Second Great Awakening

The Second Great Awakening was a Protestant religious revival during the early 19th century in the United States.

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Simon Cameron

Simon Cameron (March 8, 1799June 26, 1889) was an influential American businessman and politician who served as United States Secretary of War for Abraham Lincoln at the start of the American Civil War.

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Slave Power

The Slave Power or Slaveocracy was the perceived political power in the U.S. federal government held by slave owners during the 1840s and 1850s, prior to the Civil War.

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Slave states and free states

In the history of the United States, a slave state was a U.S. state in which the practice of slavery was legal, and a free state was one in which slavery was prohibited or being legally phased out.

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Southern Unionist

In the United States, Southern Unionists were White Southerners living in the Confederate States of America, opposed to secession, and against the Civil War.

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Southern United States

The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America.

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St. Joseph, Missouri

St.

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St. Louis in the American Civil War

The city of St. Louis, Missouri was a strategic location during the American Civil War which held significant value for both Union and Confederate forces.

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Stephen G. Burbridge

Stephen Gano Burbridge (August 19, 1831 – December 2, 1894), also known as "Butcher" Burbridge or the "Butcher of Kentucky", was a controversial Union major general during the American Civil War.

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Thaddeus Stevens

Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792 – August 11, 1868) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Pennsylvania and one of the leaders of the Radical Republican faction of the Republican Party during the 1860s.

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Thomas E. Bramlette

Thomas Elliott Bramlette (January 3, 1817 – January 12, 1875) was the 23rd Governor of Kentucky.

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Typhoid fever

Typhoid fever, also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to ''Salmonella'' typhi that causes symptoms.

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U.S. state

A state is a constituent political entity of the United States.

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Union Army

During the American Civil War, the Union Army referred to the United States Army, the land force that fought to preserve the Union of the collective states.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Army

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces.

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United States Christian Commission

The United States Christian Commission (USCC) was an organization that furnished supplies, medical services, and religious literature to Union troops during the American Civil War.

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United States Congress Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War

The Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War was a government panel in Washington during the American Civil War whose most controversial function was to investigate the cause of Union battle losses.

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United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

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United States Department of Agriculture

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, forestry, and food.

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United States Department of State

The United States Department of State (DOS), often referred to as the State Department, is the United States federal executive department that advises the President and represents the country in international affairs and foreign policy issues.

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United States Department of the Treasury

The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government.

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United States Department of War

The United States Department of War, also called the War Department (and occasionally War Office in the early years), was the United States Cabinet department originally responsible for the operation and maintenance of the United States Army, also bearing responsibility for naval affairs until the establishment of the Navy Department in 1798, and for most land-based air forces until the creation of the Department of the Air Force on September 18, 1947.

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United States House of Representatives elections, 1862 and 1863

Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in mostly in November 1862, in the middle of President Abraham Lincoln's first term.

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United States Military Railroad

The U.S. Military Railroad (USMRR) was established by the United States War Department as a separate agency to operate any rail lines seized by the government during the American Civil War.

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United States National Library of Medicine

The United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), operated by the United States federal government, is the world's largest medical library.

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United States Note

A United States Note, also known as a Legal Tender Note, is a type of paper money that was issued from 1862 to 1971 in the U.S. Having been current for more than 100 years, they were issued for longer than any other form of U.S. paper money.

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United States Sanitary Commission

The United States Sanitary Commission (USSC) was a private relief agency created by federal legislation on June 18, 1861, to support sick and wounded soldiers of the United States Army (Federal /Northern / Union Army) during the American Civil War.

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Utah Territory

The Territory of Utah was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from September 9, 1850, until January 4, 1896, when the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Utah, the 45th state.

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Value-added tax

A value-added tax (VAT), known in some countries as a goods and services tax (GST), is a type of tax that is assessed incrementally, based on the increase in value of a product or service at each stage of production or distribution.

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Vermont in the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the State of Vermont continued the military tradition started by the Green Mountain Boys of American Revolutionary War fame, contributing a significant portion of its eligible men to the war effort.

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Virginia in the American Civil War

The Commonwealth of Virginia became a prominent part of the Confederate States of America when it joined the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

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Walt Whitman

Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist.

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War Democrat

War Democrats in American politics of the 1860s were members of the Democratic Party who supported the Union and rejected the policies of the Copperheads (or Peace Democrats).

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Ward (United States)

In the United States, a ward is an optional division of a city or town for administrative and representative purposes, especially for purposes of an election.

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Washington Territory

The Territory of Washington was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1853, until November 11, 1889, when the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Washington.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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Washington, D.C., in the American Civil War

Washington, D.C., during the American Civil War was a significant civilian leadership, military headquarters, and logistics center.

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West Virginia in the American Civil War

The U.S. state of West Virginia was formed out of western Virginia and added to the Union as a direct result of the American Civil War (see History of West Virginia), in which it became the only state to declare its independence from the Confederacy.

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Whooping cough

Whooping cough (also known as pertussis or 100-day cough) is a highly contagious bacterial disease.

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William Gannaway Brownlow

William Gannaway "Parson" Brownlow (August 29, 1805April 29, 1877) was an American newspaper publisher, Methodist minister, book author, prisoner of war, lecturer, and politician.

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William H. Seward

William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801 – October 10, 1872) was United States Secretary of State from 1861 to 1869, and earlier served as Governor of New York and United States Senator.

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William Mason (locomotive builder)

William Mason (September 2, 1808 – May 21, 1883) was a master mechanical engineer and builder of textile machinery and railroad steam locomotives.

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William Metcalf (manufacturer)

William Metcalf (3 September 1838 – 5 December 1909) was an American steel manufacturer.

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William P. Fessenden

William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine.

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William P. Halliday

William Parker Halliday (July 21, 1827 – September 22, 1899) was an American steamboat captain, banker, printer, hotel owner, vast land owner and businessman.

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William T. Anderson

William T. Anderson (1840 – October 26, 1864), known by the nickname "Bloody Bill" Anderson, was one of the deadliest and most notorious pro-Confederate guerrilla leaders in the American Civil War.

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William Wesley Cornell

William Wesley Cornell (1823–1870) was an industrialist and philanthropist from New York and the namesake of Cornell College in Iowa.

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Wisconsin in the American Civil War

With the outbreak of the American Civil War, the northwestern state of Wisconsin raised 91,379 soldiers for the Union Army, organized into 53 infantry regiments, 4 cavalry regiments, a company of Berdan's sharpshooters, 13 light artillery batteries and 1 unit of heavy artillery.

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Women's suffrage

Women's suffrage (colloquial: female suffrage, woman suffrage or women's right to vote) --> is the right of women to vote in elections; a person who advocates the extension of suffrage, particularly to women, is called a suffragist.

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Redirects here:

American Civil War homefront, Homefront American Civil War, North (American Civil War), North in the American Civil War, The Union Soldier, Union (ACW), Union (American Civil War, Union (Civil War), Union (U.S. Civil War), Union (U.S.), Union (US), Union 1861-1865, Union American Civil War, Union States, Union homefront, Union in the American Civil War, Unionist (United States), Unionists (American), United States Union.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_(American_Civil_War)

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