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Victorian architecture

Index Victorian architecture

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. [1]

174 relations: Adelaide, Alameda, California, Alamo Square, San Francisco, Albany, New York, Albert Lévy (photographer), Alexander Marshall Mackenzie, Alexander Thomson, Alfred Waterhouse, Allegheny County Courthouse, Angelino Heights, Los Angeles, Archibald Simpson, Architectural style, Architecture of Aberdeen, Arts and Crafts movement, Aston Webb, Astoria, Oregon, Atlanta, Augustus Pugin, Balmoral Castle, Baltimore, Banff National Park, Banff Springs Hotel, Barclays Bank building, Sutton, Boston, British Empire, Brooklyn, Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Heights, Buffalo, New York, Building (magazine), Bury St Edmunds, Cabbagetown, Toronto, California Southern Railroad, Cape May Historic District, Cape May, New Jersey, Carson Mansion, Cast iron, Castro District, San Francisco, Charles Barry, Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, Ohio, Deal, New Jersey, Detroit, Distillery District, Dyker Heights, Brooklyn, Eclecticism in art, Edwardian architecture, Emlen Physick Estate, English Renaissance, ..., Eureka, California, Fan district, Farnam Mansion, Federation architecture, Folk Victorian, Fonthill Abbey, Ford Piquette Avenue Plant, Forth Bridge, France, Frank Furness, Galena, Illinois, Galle Face Hotel, Galveston, Texas, Gas holder, Gazebo, Georgian architecture, Glasgow, Glebe Point, Gloucestershire, Gold rush, Gothic Revival architecture, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Haight-Ashbury, Hardwick House, Suffolk, Henry Hobson Richardson, Hoboken, New Jersey, Hotel Windsor (Melbourne), Italianate architecture, Jacob Wrey Mould, Jacobethan, James J. Hill House, Jersey City, New Jersey, John Rylands Library, John Steinbeck, Joseph Paxton, Kelvingrove Park, Lincoln Park, Los Angeles, Louisville, Kentucky, Lower Haight, San Francisco, Manchester Town Hall, Martin Place, Mayfield, New South Wales, Melbourne, Mentmore Towers, Michigan, Middle Ages, Midtown Sacramento, Milwaukee, Mississippi, National Register of Historic Places, Neo-Grec, Neoclassical architecture, New Orleans, New York City, Nob Hill, San Francisco, Noe Valley, San Francisco, Oakland, California, Ohio, Old Louisville, Old West End District (Toledo, Ohio), Oneida, New York, Over-the-Rhine, Pacific Heights, San Francisco, Painted ladies, Palace of Westminster, Palladian architecture, Parkdale, Toronto, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Queen Anne style architecture, Queen Anne style architecture in the United States, Queen Victoria, Regency architecture, Renaissance Revival architecture, Rialto Towers, Richardsonian Romanesque, Richmond, Virginia, Rochester, New York, Romanesque Revival architecture, Rosedale, Toronto, Royal Albert Hall, Royal Exhibition Building, Sacramento, California, Saint Paul, Minnesota, Saitta House, Salinas, California, Scotland, Scottish baronial architecture, Second Empire architecture, Shingle style architecture, Somerville College, Oxford, South End, Boston, Sri Lanka Law College, St Peter's Cathedral, Adelaide, Steel, Stick style, Stroud, Suffolk, Summit Avenue (St. Paul), Symmetry, Technology, Tenement, The Annex, The Crystal Palace, The Oval, Toledo, Ohio, Toorak, Victoria, Troy, New York, University of Birmingham, University of Glasgow, University of Liverpool, Victoria Building, University of Liverpool, Victoria Law Courts, Victorian decorative arts, Victorian era, Victorian Flatbush, Victorian house, Victorian restoration, Victorian Society, Walsall, William Butterfield, 1899 in architecture. Expand index (124 more) »

Adelaide

Adelaide is the capital city of the state of South Australia, and the fifth-most populous city of Australia.

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Alameda, California

Alameda (Spanish) is a city in Alameda County, California, United States.

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Alamo Square, San Francisco

Alamo Square is a residential neighborhood and park in San Francisco, California, in the Western Addition.

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Albany, New York

Albany is the capital of the U.S. state of New York and the seat of Albany County.

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Albert Lévy (photographer)

Albert Levy (b. 1844–1847; d. 1907) was a French photographer active in Europe and the United States.

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Alexander Marshall Mackenzie

Alexander Marshall MacKenzie (1 January 1848 – 4 May 1933) was a Scottish architect responsible for prestigious projects including the headquarters of the Isle of Man Banking Company in Douglas, and Australia House and the Waldorf Hotel in London.

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Alexander Thomson

Alexander "Greek" Thomson (9 April 1817 – 22 March 1875) was an eminent Scottish architect and architectural theorist who was a pioneer in sustainable building.

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Alfred Waterhouse

Alfred Waterhouse (19 July 1830 – 22 August 1905) was an English architect, particularly associated with the Victorian Gothic Revival architecture.

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Allegheny County Courthouse

The Allegheny County Courthouse in downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is part of a complex (along with the old Allegheny County Jail) designed by H. H. Richardson.

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Angelino Heights, Los Angeles

Angelino Heights is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Los Angeles, California, situated within neighboring districts of Chinatown and Echo Park.

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Archibald Simpson

Archibald Simpson (4 May 1790 – 23 March 1847) was a Scottish architect, who along with his rival John Smith, is regarded as having fashioned the character of Aberdeen as "The Granite City".

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Architectural style

An architectural style is characterized by the features that make a building or other structure notable or historically identifiable.

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Architecture of Aberdeen

The Architecture of Aberdeen is known for the use of granite as the principal construction material.

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Arts and Crafts movement

The Arts and Crafts movement was an international movement in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between about 1880 and 1920, emerging in Japan (the Mingei movement) in the 1920s.

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Aston Webb

Sir Aston Webb (22 May 1849 – 21 August 1930) was an English architect who designed the principal facade of Buckingham Palace and the main building of the Victoria and Albert Museum, among other major works around England, many of them in partnership with Ingress Bell.

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Astoria, Oregon

Astoria is a port city and the seat of Clatsop County, Oregon, United States.

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Atlanta

Atlanta is the capital city and most populous municipality of the state of Georgia in the United States.

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Augustus Pugin

Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1 March 181214 September 1852) was an English architect, designer, artist, and critic who is principally remembered for his pioneering role in the Gothic Revival style of architecture.

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Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle is a large estate house in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, near the village of Crathie, west of Ballater and east of Braemar.

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Baltimore

Baltimore is the largest city in the U.S. state of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States.

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Banff National Park

Banff National Park is Canada's oldest national park and was established in 1885.

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Banff Springs Hotel

The Banff Springs Hotel is a luxury hotel that was built during the 19th century as one of Canada's grand railway hotels, being constructed in Scottish Baronial style and located in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

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Barclays Bank building, Sutton

The Barclays Bank building is a four-storey locally listed building overlooking the historic crossroads in the town centre of Sutton in the south London Borough of Sutton.

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Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

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British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

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Brooklyn

Brooklyn is the most populous borough of New York City, with a census-estimated 2,648,771 residents in 2017.

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Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge in New York City and is one of the oldest roadway bridges in the United States.

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Brooklyn Heights

Brooklyn Heights is an affluent residential neighborhood within the New York City borough of Brooklyn.

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Buffalo, New York

Buffalo is the second largest city in the state of New York and the 81st most populous city in the United States.

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Building (magazine)

Building is one of the United Kingdom’s oldest business-to-business magazines, launched as The Builder in 1843 by Joseph Aloysius Hansom – architect of Birmingham Town Hall and designer of the Hansom Cab.

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Bury St Edmunds

Bury St Edmunds is a historic market town and civil parish in the in St Edmundsbury district, in the county of Suffolk, England.

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Cabbagetown, Toronto

Cabbagetown is a neighbourhood in central Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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California Southern Railroad

The California Southern Railroad was a subsidiary railroad of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (Santa Fe) in Southern California.

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Cape May Historic District

The Cape May Historic District is an area of with over 600 buildings in the resort town of Cape May, Cape May County, New Jersey.

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Cape May, New Jersey

Cape May is a city at the southern tip of Cape May Peninsula in Cape May County, New Jersey, where the Delaware Bay meets the Atlantic Ocean.

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Carson Mansion

The Carson Mansion is a large Victorian house located in Old Town, Eureka, California.

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Cast iron

Cast iron is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.

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Castro District, San Francisco

The Castro District, commonly referenced as The Castro, is a neighborhood in Eureka Valley in San Francisco.

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Charles Barry

Sir Charles Barry (23 May 1795 – 12 May 1860) was an English architect, best known for his role in the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster (also known as the Houses of Parliament) in London during the mid-19th century, but also responsible for numerous other buildings and gardens.

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Chicago

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States, after New York City and Los Angeles.

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Cincinnati

No description.

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Columbus, Ohio

Columbus is the state capital and the most populous city in Ohio.

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Deal, New Jersey

Deal is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States, settled by European immigrants in the mid-1660s and named after an English carpenter from Deal, Kent.

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Detroit

Detroit is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County.

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Distillery District

The Distillery District is a commercial and residential district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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Dyker Heights, Brooklyn

Dyker Heights is an affluent residential neighborhood in the southwest corner of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City, US.

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Eclecticism in art

Eclecticism is a kind of mixed style in the fine arts: "the borrowing of a variety of styles from different sources and combining them".

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Edwardian architecture

Edwardian architecture is an architectural style popular during the reign of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom (1901 to 1910).

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Emlen Physick Estate

The Emlen Physick Estate is a Victorian house museum in Cape May, New Jersey.

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English Renaissance

The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the late 15th century to the early 17th century.

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Eureka, California

Eureka (Hupa: do'-wi-lotl-ding, Karuk: uuth) is the principal city and county seat of Humboldt County in the Redwood Empire region of California.

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Fan district

The Fan is a district of Richmond, Virginia, so named because of the "fan" shape of the array of streets that extend west from Belvidere Street, on the eastern edge of Monroe Park, westward to the Boulevard.

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Farnam Mansion

The Farnam Mansion is a 19th-century mansion in the city of Oneida, which is located in Central New York State midway between the cities of Syracuse and Utica.

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Federation architecture

Federation architecture is the architectural style in Australia that was prevalent from around 1890 to 1915.

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Folk Victorian

Folk Victorian is an architecture style employed for some homes in the United States between 1870 and 1910, though isolated examples continued to be built well into the 1930s.

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Fonthill Abbey

Fonthill Abbey—also known as Beckford's Folly—was a large Gothic revival country house built between 1796 and 1813 at Fonthill Gifford in Wiltshire, England, at the direction of William Thomas Beckford and architect James Wyatt.

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Ford Piquette Avenue Plant

The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant is a former factory located within the Milwaukee Junction area of Detroit, Michigan, in the United States.

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Forth Bridge

The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge across the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland, west of Edinburgh City Centre.

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France

France, officially the French Republic (République française), is a sovereign state whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.

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Frank Furness

Frank Heyling Furness (November 12, 1839 - June 27, 1912) was an American architect of the Victorian era.

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Galena, Illinois

Galena is the largest city in and the county seat of Jo Daviess County, Illinois, with a population of 3,429 at the 2010 census.

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Galle Face Hotel

The Galle Face Hotel, founded in Colombo, Sri Lanka in 1864, is one of the oldest hotels east of Suez.

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Galveston, Texas

Galveston is a coastal resort city on Galveston Island and Pelican Island in the U.S. state of Texas.

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Gas holder

A gas holder, or gasometer, is a large container in which natural gas or town gas is stored near atmospheric pressure at ambient temperatures.

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Gazebo

A gazebo is a pavilion structure, sometimes octagonal or turret-shaped, often built in a park, garden or spacious public area.

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Georgian architecture

Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830.

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Glasgow

Glasgow (Glesga; Glaschu) is the largest city in Scotland, and third most populous in the United Kingdom.

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Glebe Point

Glebe Point is a point on Sydney Harbour in the suburb of Glebe, in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia.

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Gloucestershire

Gloucestershire (formerly abbreviated as Gloucs. in print but now often as Glos.) is a county in South West England.

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Gold rush

A gold rush is a new discovery of gold—sometimes accompanied by other precious metals and rare earth minerals—that brings an onrush of miners seeking their fortune.

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Gothic Revival architecture

Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England.

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Grand Rapids, Michigan

Grand Rapids is the second-largest city in Michigan, and the largest city in West Michigan.

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Haight-Ashbury

Haight-Ashbury is a district of San Francisco, California, named for the intersection of Haight and Ashbury streets.

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Hardwick House, Suffolk

Hardwick House was a manor house near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, owned by Sir Robert Drury, Speaker of the House of Commons, of Hawstead Place.

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Henry Hobson Richardson

Henry Hobson Richardson (September 29, 1838 – April 27, 1886) was a prominent American architect who designed buildings in Albany, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Hartford, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and other cities.

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Hoboken, New Jersey

Hoboken (Unami: Hupokàn) is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States.

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Hotel Windsor (Melbourne)

The Hotel Windsor is a luxury hotel in Melbourne.

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Italianate architecture

The Italianate style of architecture was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture.

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Jacob Wrey Mould

Jacob Wrey Mould (August 7, 1825 – June 14, 1886) was a British architect, illustrator, linguist and musician, noted for his contributions to the design and construction of New York City's Central Park.

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Jacobethan

Jacobethan is the style designation coined in 1933 by John Betjeman to describe the mixed national Renaissance revival style that was made popular in England from the late 1820s, which derived most of its inspiration and its repertory from the English Renaissance (1550–1625), with elements of Elizabethan and Jacobean.

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James J. Hill House

The James J. Hill House in Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, was built by railroad magnate James J. Hill.

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Jersey City, New Jersey

Jersey City is the second-most-populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey, after Newark.

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John Rylands Library

The John Rylands Library is a late-Victorian neo-Gothic building on Deansgate in Manchester, England.

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John Steinbeck

John Ernst Steinbeck Jr. --> (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author.

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Joseph Paxton

Sir Joseph Paxton (3 August 1803 – 8 June 1865) was an English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing the Crystal Palace, and for cultivating the Cavendish banana, the most consumed banana in the Western world.

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Kelvingrove Park

Kelvingrove Park is a public park located on the River Kelvin in the West End of the city of Glasgow, Scotland, containing the famous Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum.

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Lincoln Park

Lincoln Park is a park situated along Lake Michigan on North Side in Chicago, Illinois.

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Los Angeles

Los Angeles (Spanish for "The Angels";; officially: the City of Los Angeles; colloquially: by its initials L.A.) is the second-most populous city in the United States, after New York City.

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Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 29th most-populous city in the United States.

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Lower Haight, San Francisco

The Lower Haight is a neighborhood, sometimes referred to as Haight-Fillmore, in San Francisco, California.

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Manchester Town Hall

Manchester Town Hall is a Victorian, Neo-gothic municipal building in Manchester, England.

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Martin Place

Martin Place is a pedestrian mall in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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Mayfield, New South Wales

Mayfield is a north-western suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales, which takes its name from Ada May (born 1874) a daughter of the landowner there, John Scholey.

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Melbourne

Melbourne is the state capital of Victoria and the second-most populous city in Australia and Oceania.

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Mentmore Towers

Mentmore Towers, historically known simply as "Mentmore", is a 19th-century English country house built between 1852 and 1854 for the Rothschild family in the village of Mentmore in Buckinghamshire.

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Michigan

Michigan is a state in the Great Lakes and Midwestern regions of the United States.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Midtown Sacramento

Midtown Sacramento (commonly known as Midtown) is a historical district and neighborhood just east of Downtown Sacramento.

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Milwaukee

Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin and the fifth-largest city in the Midwestern United States.

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Mississippi

Mississippi is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico.

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National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance.

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Neo-Grec

Néo-Grec was a Neoclassical revival style of the mid-to-late 19th century that was popularized in architecture, the decorative arts, and in painting during France's Second Empire, or the reign of Napoleon III (1852–1870).

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Neoclassical architecture

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century.

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New Orleans

New Orleans (. Merriam-Webster.; La Nouvelle-Orléans) is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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Nob Hill, San Francisco

Nob Hill is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, centered on the intersection of California Street and Powell Street.

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Noe Valley, San Francisco

Noe Valley is an affluent neighborhood in the central part of San Francisco, California.

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Oakland, California

Oakland is the largest city and the county seat of Alameda County, California, United States.

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Ohio

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States.

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Old Louisville

Old Louisville is a historic district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

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Old West End District (Toledo, Ohio)

The Old West End is a historic neighborhood in Toledo, Ohio and is considered to be "the largest neighborhood of late Victorian, Edwardian, and Arts & Crafts homes east of the Mississippi.""The Historic Old West End of Toledo": Brooks and Hail Inc.; retrieved November 16, 2007 from the World Wide Web: http://www.oldwestendtoledo.com/ The south end of the neighborhood is bounded by the Toledo Museum of Art and the eastern edge by churches of many denominations on Collingwood Boulevard.

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Oneida, New York

Oneida is a city in Madison County located west of Oneida Castle (in Oneida County) and east of Canastota, New York, United States.

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Over-the-Rhine

Over-the-Rhine is a neighborhood in Cincinnati.

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Pacific Heights, San Francisco

Pacific Heights is an affluent neighborhood of San Francisco, California, which is known for the notable people who reside in the area.

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Painted ladies

In American architecture, painted ladies are Victorian and Edwardian houses and buildings repainted, starting in the 1960s, in three or more colors that embellish or enhance their architectural details.

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Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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Palladian architecture

Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from and inspired by the designs of the Venetian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580).

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Parkdale, Toronto

Parkdale is a neighbourhood and former village in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, west of downtown.

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Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is a museum and art school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

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Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh is a city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and is the county seat of Allegheny County.

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Queen Anne style architecture

The Queen Anne style in Britain refers to either the English Baroque architectural style approximately of the reign of Queen Anne (reigned 1702–1714), or a revived form that was popular in the last quarter of the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century (when it is also known as Queen Anne revival).

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Queen Anne style architecture in the United States

In the United States, Queen Anne-style architecture was popular from roughly 1880 to 1910.

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Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death.

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Regency architecture

Regency architecture refers to classical buildings built in Britain during the Regency era in the early 19th century when George IV was Prince Regent, and also to earlier and later buildings following the same style.

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Renaissance Revival architecture

Renaissance Revival (sometimes referred to as "Neo-Renaissance") is a broad designation that covers many 19th century architectural revival styles which were neither Grecian (see Greek Revival) nor Gothic (see Gothic Revival) but which instead drew inspiration from a wide range of classicizing Italian modes.

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Rialto Towers

Rialto (often The Rialto, or Rialto Towers) is a skyscraper located at 525 Collins Street, in the western side of the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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Richardsonian Romanesque

Richardsonian Romanesque is a style of Romanesque Revival architecture named after architect Henry Hobson Richardson (1838–1886), whose masterpiece is Trinity Church, Boston (1872–1877), designated a National Historic Landmark.

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Richmond, Virginia

Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Rochester, New York

Rochester is a city on the southern shore of Lake Ontario in western New York.

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Romanesque Revival architecture

Romanesque Revival (or Neo-Romanesque) is a style of building employed beginning in the mid-19th century inspired by the 11th- and 12th-century Romanesque architecture.

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Rosedale, Toronto

Rosedale is a neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, which was formerly the estate of William Botsford Jarvis, and so named by his wife, granddaughter of William Dummer Powell, for the wild roses that grew there in abundance.

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Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall on the northern edge of South Kensington, London, which has held the Proms concerts annually each summer since 1941.

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Royal Exhibition Building

The Royal Exhibition Building is a World Heritage Site-listed building in Melbourne, Australia, completed in 1880.

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Sacramento, California

Sacramento is the capital city of the U.S. state of California and the seat of Sacramento County.

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Saint Paul, Minnesota

Saint Paul (abbreviated St. Paul) is the capital and second-most populous city of the U.S. state of Minnesota.

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Saitta House

The Saitta House is a two-and-a-half-story, single-family Queen Anne dwelling in the Dyker Heights section of Brooklyn, New York, United States.

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Salinas, California

Salinas is the county seat and largest municipality of Monterey County, California.

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Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

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Scottish baronial architecture

Scottish Baronial architecture (often Scots Baronial and sometimes Baronial style) is a style of architecture with its origins in the sixteenth century.

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Second Empire architecture

Second Empire is an architectural style, most popular in the latter half of the 19th century and early years of the 20th century.

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Shingle style architecture

The Shingle style is an American architectural style made popular by the rise of the New England school of architecture, which eschewed the highly ornamented patterns of the Eastlake style in Queen Anne architecture.

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Somerville College, Oxford

Somerville College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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South End, Boston

The South End is a neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts.

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Sri Lanka Law College

Sri Lanka Law College was established as the Ceylon Law College under the Council of Legal Education (itself established in 1873) in 1874 in order to impart a formal legal education to those who wished to be lawyers in Ceylon.

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St Peter's Cathedral, Adelaide

St Peter's Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in the South Australian capital of Adelaide.

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Steel

Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon and other elements.

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Stick style

The Stick style was a late-19th-century American architectural style, transitional between the Carpenter Gothic style of the mid-19th century, and the Queen Anne style that it had evolved into by the 1890s.

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Stroud

Stroud is a market town and civil parish in the centre of Gloucestershire, England.

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Suffolk

Suffolk is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England.

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Summit Avenue (St. Paul)

Summit Avenue is a street in Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, known for being the longest avenue of Victorian homes in the country, having a number of historic houses, churches, synagogues, and schools.

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Symmetry

Symmetry (from Greek συμμετρία symmetria "agreement in dimensions, due proportion, arrangement") in everyday language refers to a sense of harmonious and beautiful proportion and balance.

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Technology

Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia) is first robustly defined by Jacob Bigelow in 1829 as: "...principles, processes, and nomenclatures of the more conspicuous arts, particularly those which involve applications of science, and which may be considered useful, by promoting the benefit of society, together with the emolument of those who pursue them".

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Tenement

A tenement is a multi-occupancy building of any sort.

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The Annex

The Annex is a neighbourhood in Downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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The Crystal Palace

The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851.

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The Oval

The Oval, currently known for sponsorship reasons as the Kia Oval, is an international cricket ground in Kennington, in the London Borough of Lambeth, South London.

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Toledo, Ohio

Toledo is a city in and the county seat of Lucas County, Ohio, United States.

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Toorak, Victoria

Toorak is an affluent inner suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 5 km south-east of Melbourne's Central Business District, located within the City of Stonnington local government area.

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Troy, New York

Troy is a city in the U.S. state of New York and the seat of Rensselaer County.

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University of Birmingham

The University of Birmingham (informally Birmingham University) is a public research university located in Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

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University of Glasgow

The University of Glasgow (Oilthigh Ghlaschu; Universitas Glasguensis; abbreviated as Glas. in post-nominals) is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities.

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University of Liverpool

The University of Liverpool is a public university based in the city of Liverpool, England.

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Victoria Building, University of Liverpool

The Victoria Building of the University of Liverpool, is on the corner of Brownlow Hill and Ashton Street, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.

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Victoria Law Courts

The Victoria Law Courts on Corporation Street, Birmingham, England is a Grade I listed red brick and terracotta building that now houses Birmingham Magistrates' Court.

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Victorian decorative arts

Victorian decorative arts refers to the style of decorative arts during the Victorian era.

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Victorian era

In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901.

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Victorian Flatbush

Victorian Flatbush is the western section of the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York, bordering Midwood, that is characterized by Victorian houses.

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Victorian house

In Great Britain and former British colonies, a Victorian generally means any house built during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901).

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Victorian restoration

The Victorian restoration was the widespread and extensive refurbishment and rebuilding of Church of England churches and cathedrals that took place in England and Wales during the 19th-century reign of Queen Victoria.

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Victorian Society

The Victorian Society is a UK charity, the national authority on Victorian and Edwardian architecture built between 1837 and 1914 in England and Wales.

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Walsall

Walsall is an industrial town in the West Midlands of England.

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William Butterfield

William Butterfield (7 September 1814 – 23 February 1900) was a Gothic Revival architect and associated with the Oxford Movement (or Tractarian Movement).

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1899 in architecture

The year 1899 in architecture involved some significant events.

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Redirects here:

American Victorian, British Victorian, Gingerbread cottage, Late Victorian, Late Victorian architecture, Late Victorian style, Late-Victorian, Victorian Architecture, Victorian Mansion, Victorian archictecture, Victorian architectural style, Victorian building.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victorian_architecture

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