Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Voiced palatal stop

+ Save concept

The voiced palatal stop, or voiced palatal plosive, is a type of consonantal sound in some vocal languages. [1]

94 relations: Albanian alphabet, Albanian language, Arabic, Arabic alphabet, Arabic phonology, Auvergnat (language), Balearic dialect, Basque alphabet, Basque language, Catalan language, Catalan orthography, Catalan phonology, Chinese characters, Chinese language, Consonant, Corsican alphabet, Corsican language, Czech language, Czech orthography, Czech phonology, Dinka alphabet, Dinka language, Ega language, English language, English orthography, English phonology, French language, French orthography, French phonology, Friulian language, Front vowel, Gheg Albanian, Greek alphabet, Greek language, Hungarian language, Hungarian orthography, Hungarian phonology, Index of phonetics articles, Indo-Aryan languages, International Phonetic Alphabet, Irish language, Irish orthography, Irish phonology, Italian language, Italian orthography, Italian phonology, Latvian language, Latvian orthography, Latvian phonology, Limousin dialect, ..., Luganda, Macedonian alphabet, Macedonian language, Macedonian phonology, Modern Greek phonology, Norwegian dialects, Norwegian language, Norwegian orthography, Norwegian phonology, Occitan language, Occitan phonology, Palatalization (phonetics), Phonetic transcription, Portuguese language, Portuguese orthography, Portuguese phonology, Prenasalized consonant, Romanian alphabet, Romanian language, Romanian phonology, Romanization of Greek, Russian alphabet, Russian language, Russian phonology, Slovak language, Slovak orthography, Slovak phonology, Spanish language, Spanish orthography, Spanish phonology, Sudanese Arabic, Taiwanese Hokkien, Taiwanese Romanization System, Taizhou dialect, Turkish alphabet, Turkish language, Turkish phonology, Vietnamese alphabet, Vietnamese language, Vietnamese phonology, Voiced velar stop, X-SAMPA, Yanyuwa language, Yemeni Arabic. Expand index (44 more) »

Albanian alphabet

The Albanian alphabet (alfabeti shqip) is a variant of the Latin alphabet used to write the Albanian language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Albanian alphabet · See more »

Albanian language

Albanian (shqip, or gjuha shqipe) is a language of the Indo-European family, in which it occupies an independent branch.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Albanian language · See more »

Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Arabic · See more »

Arabic alphabet

The Arabic alphabet (الأَبْجَدِيَّة العَرَبِيَّة, or الحُرُوف العَرَبِيَّة) or Arabic abjad is the Arabic script as it is codified for writing Arabic.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Arabic alphabet · See more »

Arabic phonology

While many languages have numerous dialects that differ in phonology, the contemporary spoken Arabic language is more properly described as a continuum of varieties.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Arabic phonology · See more »

Auvergnat (language)

Auvergnat or Auvergnat language (endonym: auvernhat) is an idiom spoken in France in part of the Massif Central and in particular, in most of Auvergne, province that gives it its name.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Auvergnat (language) · See more »

Balearic dialect

Balearic (balear) is the collective name for the dialects of Catalan spoken in the Balearic Islands: mallorquí in Majorca, eivissenc in Ibiza, and menorquí in Menorca.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Balearic dialect · See more »

Basque alphabet

The Basque alphabet is a Latin alphabet used to write the Basque language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Basque alphabet · See more »

Basque language

Basque (euskara) is a language spoken in the Basque country and Navarre. Linguistically, Basque is unrelated to the other languages of Europe and, as a language isolate, to any other known living language. The Basques are indigenous to, and primarily inhabit, the Basque Country, a region that straddles the westernmost Pyrenees in adjacent parts of northern Spain and southwestern France. The Basque language is spoken by 28.4% of Basques in all territories (751,500). Of these, 93.2% (700,300) are in the Spanish area of the Basque Country and the remaining 6.8% (51,200) are in the French portion. Native speakers live in a contiguous area that includes parts of four Spanish provinces and the three "ancient provinces" in France. Gipuzkoa, most of Biscay, a few municipalities of Álava, and the northern area of Navarre formed the core of the remaining Basque-speaking area before measures were introduced in the 1980s to strengthen the language. By contrast, most of Álava, the western part of Biscay and central and southern areas of Navarre are predominantly populated by native speakers of Spanish, either because Basque was replaced by Spanish over the centuries, in some areas (most of Álava and central Navarre), or because it was possibly never spoken there, in other areas (Enkarterri and southeastern Navarre). Under Restorationist and Francoist Spain, public use of Basque was frowned upon, often regarded as a sign of separatism; this applied especially to those regions that did not support Franco's uprising (such as Biscay or Gipuzkoa). However, in those Basque-speaking regions that supported the uprising (such as Navarre or Álava) the Basque language was more than merely tolerated. Overall, in the 1960s and later, the trend reversed and education and publishing in Basque began to flourish. As a part of this process, a standardised form of the Basque language, called Euskara Batua, was developed by the Euskaltzaindia in the late 1960s. Besides its standardised version, the five historic Basque dialects are Biscayan, Gipuzkoan, and Upper Navarrese in Spain, and Navarrese–Lapurdian and Souletin in France. They take their names from the historic Basque provinces, but the dialect boundaries are not congruent with province boundaries. Euskara Batua was created so that Basque language could be used—and easily understood by all Basque speakers—in formal situations (education, mass media, literature), and this is its main use today. In both Spain and France, the use of Basque for education varies from region to region and from school to school. A language isolate, Basque is believed to be one of the few surviving pre-Indo-European languages in Europe, and the only one in Western Europe. The origin of the Basques and of their languages is not conclusively known, though the most accepted current theory is that early forms of Basque developed prior to the arrival of Indo-European languages in the area, including the Romance languages that geographically surround the Basque-speaking region. Basque has adopted a good deal of its vocabulary from the Romance languages, and Basque speakers have in turn lent their own words to Romance speakers. The Basque alphabet uses the Latin script.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Basque language · See more »

Catalan language

Catalan (autonym: català) is a Western Romance language derived from Vulgar Latin and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Catalan language · See more »

Catalan orthography

Like those of many other Romance languages, the Catalan alphabet derives from the Latin alphabet and is largely based on the language’s phonology.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Catalan orthography · See more »

Catalan phonology

The phonology of Catalan, a Romance language, has a certain degree of dialectal variation.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Catalan phonology · See more »

Chinese characters

Chinese characters are logograms primarily used in the writing of Chinese and Japanese.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Chinese characters · See more »

Chinese language

Chinese is a group of related, but in many cases mutually unintelligible, language varieties, forming a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Chinese language · See more »

Consonant

In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Consonant · See more »

Corsican alphabet

The modern Corsican alphabet (Corsican u santacroce or u salteriu) uses 22 basic letters taken from the Latin alphabet with some changes, plus some multigraphs.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Corsican alphabet · See more »

Corsican language

Corsican (corsu or lingua corsa) is a Romance language within the Italo-Dalmatian subfamily.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Corsican language · See more »

Czech language

Czech (čeština), historically also Bohemian (lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language of the Czech–Slovak group.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Czech language · See more »

Czech orthography

Czech orthography is a system of rules for correct writing (orthography) in the Czech language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Czech orthography · See more »

Czech phonology

This article discusses the phonological system of the Czech language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Czech phonology · See more »

Dinka alphabet

The Dinka alphabet is used by South Sudanese Dinka people.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Dinka alphabet · See more »

Dinka language

Dinka (natively Thuɔŋjäŋ, Thuɔŋ ee Jieng or simply Jieng) is a Nilotic dialect cluster spoken by the Dinka people, the major ethnic group of South Sudan.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Dinka language · See more »

Ega language

Ega, also known as Egwa and Diés, is a language of uncertain affiliation within the Niger–Congo language family spoken in Ivory Coast.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Ega language · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and English language · See more »

English orthography

English orthography is the system of writing conventions used to represent spoken English in written form that allows readers to connect spelling to sound to meaning.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and English orthography · See more »

English phonology

Like many other languages, English has wide variation in pronunciation, both historically and from dialect to dialect.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and English phonology · See more »

French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and French language · See more »

French orthography

French orthography encompasses the spelling and punctuation of the French language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and French orthography · See more »

French phonology

French phonology is the sound system of French.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and French phonology · See more »

Friulian language

Friulian or Friulan (or, affectionately, marilenghe in Friulian, friulano in Italian, Furlanisch in German, furlanščina in Slovene; also Friulian) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaeto-Romance family, spoken in the Friuli region of northeastern Italy.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Friulian language · See more »

Front vowel

A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages, its defining characteristic being that the highest point of the tongue is positioned relatively in front in the mouth without creating a constriction that would make it a consonant.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Front vowel · See more »

Gheg Albanian

Gheg (or Geg; Gheg Albanian: gegnisht, Standard Albanian: gegë or gegërisht) is one of the two major varieties of Albanian.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Gheg Albanian · See more »

Greek alphabet

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BC.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Greek alphabet · See more »

Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Greek language · See more »

Hungarian language

Hungarian is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary and several neighbouring countries. It is the official language of Hungary and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union. Outside Hungary it is also spoken by communities of Hungarians in the countries that today make up Slovakia, western Ukraine, central and western Romania (Transylvania and Partium), northern Serbia (Vojvodina), northern Croatia, and northern Slovenia due to the effects of the Treaty of Trianon, which resulted in many ethnic Hungarians being displaced from their homes and communities in the former territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It is also spoken by Hungarian diaspora communities worldwide, especially in North America (particularly the United States). Like Finnish and Estonian, Hungarian belongs to the Uralic language family branch, its closest relatives being Mansi and Khanty.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Hungarian language · See more »

Hungarian orthography

Hungarian orthography (Hungarian: helyesírás, lit. ‘correct writing’) consists of rules defining the standard written form of the Hungarian language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Hungarian orthography · See more »

Hungarian phonology

The phonology of the Hungarian language is notable for its process of vowel harmony, the frequent occurrence of geminate consonants and the presence of otherwise uncommon palatal stops.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Hungarian phonology · See more »

Index of phonetics articles

No description.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Index of phonetics articles · See more »

Indo-Aryan languages

The Indo-Aryan or Indic languages are the dominant language family of the Indian subcontinent.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Indo-Aryan languages · See more »

International Phonetic Alphabet

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and International Phonetic Alphabet · See more »

Irish language

The Irish language (Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language, is a Goidelic language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland and historically spoken by the Irish people.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Irish language · See more »

Irish orthography

Irish orthography has evolved over many centuries, since Old Irish was first written down in the Latin alphabet in about the 8th century AD.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Irish orthography · See more »

Irish phonology

The phonology of the Irish language varies from dialect to dialect; there is no standard pronunciation of Irish.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Irish phonology · See more »

Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Italian language · See more »

Italian orthography

Italian orthography uses a variant of the Latin alphabet consisting of 21 letters to write the Italian language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Italian orthography · See more »

Italian phonology

The phonology of Italian describes the sound system—the phonology and phonetics—of Standard Italian and its geographical variants.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Italian phonology · See more »

Latvian language

Latvian (latviešu valoda) is a Baltic language spoken in the Baltic region.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Latvian language · See more »

Latvian orthography

Latvian orthography, historically, has used a system based upon German phonetic principles and the Latgalian dialect was written using Polish orthographic principles.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Latvian orthography · See more »

Latvian phonology

This article is about the phonology of the Latvian language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Latvian phonology · See more »

Limousin dialect

Limousin (Lemosin) is a dialect of the Occitan language, spoken in the three departments of Limousin, parts of Charente and the Dordogne in the southwest of France.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Limousin dialect · See more »

Luganda

Luganda, or Ganda (Oluganda), is one of the major languages in Uganda and is spoken by more than five million Baganda and other people principally in central Uganda, including the capital Kampala of Uganda.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Luganda · See more »

Macedonian alphabet

The orthography of Macedonian includes an alphabet (Македонска азбука, Makedonska azbuka), which is an adaptation of the Cyrillic script, as well as language-specific conventions of spelling and punctuation.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Macedonian alphabet · See more »

Macedonian language

Macedonian (македонски, tr. makedonski) is a South Slavic language spoken as a first language by around two million people, principally in the Republic of Macedonia and the Macedonian diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Macedonian language · See more »

Macedonian phonology

This article discusses the phonological system of Standard Macedonian (unless otherwise noted) based on the Prilep-Bitola dialect.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Macedonian phonology · See more »

Modern Greek phonology

This article deals with the phonology and phonetics of Standard Modern Greek.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Modern Greek phonology · See more »

Norwegian dialects

The Norwegian dialects are commonly divided into 4 main groups, 'Northern Norwegian' (nordnorsk), 'Central Norwegian' (trøndersk), 'Western Norwegian' (vestlandsk), and 'Eastern Norwegian' (østnorsk).

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Norwegian dialects · See more »

Norwegian language

Norwegian (norsk) is a North Germanic language spoken mainly in Norway, where it is the official language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Norwegian language · See more »

Norwegian orthography

Norwegian orthography is the method of writing the Norwegian language, of which there are two written standards: Bokmål and Nynorsk.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Norwegian orthography · See more »

Norwegian phonology

The sound system of Norwegian resembles that of Swedish.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Norwegian phonology · See more »

Occitan language

Occitan, also known as lenga d'òc (langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Occitan language · See more »

Occitan phonology

This article describes the phonology of the Occitan language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Occitan phonology · See more »

Palatalization (phonetics)

In phonetics, palatalization (also) or palatization refers to a way of pronouncing a consonant in which part of the tongue is moved close to the hard palate.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Palatalization (phonetics) · See more »

Phonetic transcription

Phonetic transcription (also known as phonetic script or phonetic notation) is the visual representation of speech sounds (or phones).

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Phonetic transcription · See more »

Portuguese language

Portuguese (português or, in full, língua portuguesa) is a Western Romance language originating from the regions of Galicia and northern Portugal in the 9th century.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Portuguese language · See more »

Portuguese orthography

Portuguese orthography is based on the Latin alphabet and makes use of the acute accent, the circumflex accent, the grave accent, the tilde, and the cedilla to denote stress, vowel height, nasalization, and other sound changes.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Portuguese orthography · See more »

Portuguese phonology

The phonology of Portuguese can vary between dialects, in extreme cases leading to some difficulties in intelligibility.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Portuguese phonology · See more »

Prenasalized consonant

Prenasalized consonants are phonetic sequences of a nasal and an obstruent (or occasionally a non-nasal sonorant such as) that behave phonologically like single consonants.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Prenasalized consonant · See more »

Romanian alphabet

The Romanian alphabet is a variant of the Latin alphabet used by the Romanian language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Romanian alphabet · See more »

Romanian language

Romanian (obsolete spellings Rumanian, Roumanian; autonym: limba română, "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is an East Romance language spoken by approximately 24–26 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Romanian language · See more »

Romanian phonology

In the phonology of the Romanian language, the phoneme inventory consists of seven vowels, two or four semivowels (different views exist), and twenty consonants.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Romanian phonology · See more »

Romanization of Greek

Romanization of Greek is the transliteration (letter-mapping) or transcription (sound-mapping) of text from the Greek alphabet into the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Romanization of Greek · See more »

Russian alphabet

The Russian alphabet (ˈruskʲɪj ɐɫfɐˈvʲit̪) uses letters from the Cyrillic script.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Russian alphabet · See more »

Russian language

Russian (rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language, which is official in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely spoken throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Russian language · See more »

Russian phonology

This article discusses the phonological system of standard Russian based on the Moscow dialect (unless otherwise noted).

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Russian phonology · See more »

Slovak language

Slovak is an Indo-European language that belongs to the West Slavic languages (together with Czech, Polish, and Sorbian).

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Slovak language · See more »

Slovak orthography

The first Slovak orthography was proposed by Anton Bernolák (1762–1813) in his Dissertatio philologico-critica de litteris Slavorum, used in the six-volume Slovak-Czech-Latin-German-Hungarian Dictionary (1825–1927) and used pmarily by Slovak Catholics.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Slovak orthography · See more »

Slovak phonology

This article is about the phonology and phonetics of the Slovak language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Slovak phonology · See more »

Spanish language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin America and Spain.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Spanish language · See more »

Spanish orthography

Spanish orthography is the orthography used in the Spanish language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Spanish orthography · See more »

Spanish phonology

This article is about the phonology and phonetics of the Spanish language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Spanish phonology · See more »

Sudanese Arabic

Sudanese Arabic is the variety of Arabic spoken throughout Sudan.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Sudanese Arabic · See more »

Taiwanese Hokkien

Taiwanese Hokkien (translated as Taiwanese Min Nan), also known as Taiwanese/Taiwanese language in Taiwan (/), is a branched-off variant of Hokkien spoken natively by about 70% of the population of Taiwan.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Taiwanese Hokkien · See more »

Taiwanese Romanization System

The Taiwanese Romanization System (Taiwanese Romanization: Tâi-uân Lô-má-jī Phing-im Hong-àn,; often referred to as Tâi-lô) is a transcription system for Taiwanese Hokkien.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Taiwanese Romanization System · See more »

Taizhou dialect

Taizhou dialect (Tai-chow dialect:T'e-tsiu wa) is a dialect of Wu Chinese.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Taizhou dialect · See more »

Turkish alphabet

The Turkish alphabet (Türk alfabesi) is a Latin-script alphabet used for writing the Turkish language, consisting of 29 letters, seven of which (Ç, Ş, Ğ, I, İ, Ö, Ü) have been modified from their Latin originals for the phonetic requirements of the language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Turkish alphabet · See more »

Turkish language

Turkish, also referred to as Istanbul Turkish, is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around 10–15 million native speakers in Southeast Europe (mostly in East and Western Thrace) and 60–65 million native speakers in Western Asia (mostly in Anatolia).

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Turkish language · See more »

Turkish phonology

A notable feature of Turkish phonology is a system of vowel harmony that causes vowels in most words to be either front or back and either rounded or unrounded.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Turkish phonology · See more »

Vietnamese alphabet

The Vietnamese alphabet (chữ Quốc ngữ; literally "national language script") is the modern writing system for the Vietnamese language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Vietnamese alphabet · See more »

Vietnamese language

Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) is an Austroasiatic language that originated in Vietnam, where it is the national and official language.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Vietnamese language · See more »

Vietnamese phonology

This article is a technical description of the sound system of the Vietnamese language, including phonetics and phonology.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Vietnamese phonology · See more »

Voiced velar stop

The voiced velar stop is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Voiced velar stop · See more »

X-SAMPA

The Extended Speech Assessment Methods Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA;, /%Eks"s.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and X-SAMPA · See more »

Yanyuwa language

Yanyuwa is the language of the Yanyuwa people of the Sir Edward Pellew Group of Islands in the Gulf of Carpentaria outside Borroloola.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Yanyuwa language · See more »

Yemeni Arabic

Yemeni Arabic is a cluster of varieties of Arabic spoken in Yemen, southwestern Saudi Arabia, Somalia, and Djibouti.

New!!: Voiced palatal stop and Yemeni Arabic · See more »

Redirects here:

/ɟ/, /ɡ̟/, , Voiced palatal plosive, Voiced post-palatal stop, ɟ, ɟ (IPA).

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiced_palatal_stop

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »