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W (named double-u,Pronounced,,, or plural double-ues) is the 23rd letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. [1]

96 relations: Abecedarium, Acronym, Acute accent, Ampersand, Arabic, ASCII, Ł, Belarusian language, Breton language, Circumflex, Classical Latin, Cornish language, Cyrillic script, Czech language, Danish orthography, Deutsches Wörterbuch, Diaeresis (diacritic), Digraph (orthography), Dot (diacritic), Dutch language, Early modern period, EBCDIC, English alphabet, Finnish language, Finnish orthography, Flanders, Frisian languages, George W. Bush, German dialects, German language, Germanic languages, Gothic alphabet, Grave accent, H, Icelandic language, International System of Units, ISO basic Latin alphabet, Italian orthography, Kashubian language, Labio-velar approximant, Labiodental approximant, Latin alphabet, Latin America, Letter (alphabet), List of Latin-script digraphs, Low German, Medieval Latin, Middle English, Middle High German, Middle Low German, ..., Norman conquest of England, Norwegian orthography, Old English, Old High German, Omega, Polish language, Pronunciation respelling, Proto-Germanic language, Resian dialect, Runes, Scottish English, Silent letter, Sorbian languages, Sound, Suriname, Swedish orthography, Tungsten, U, University of the Western Cape, University of Washington, University of Waterloo, University of Western Australia, University of Wisconsin–Madison, University of Wyoming, Upsilon, V, Valentin Ickelshamer, Vietnamese alphabet, Vietnamese language, VnExpress, Voiced bilabial fricative, Voiced bilabial stop, Voiced labiodental fricative, Volkswagen, Vowel, Vulgar Latin, Walloon language, Wamba (king), Watt, Waw (letter), Welsh language, Won sign, Work (physics), World Wide Web, Wynn, Z. Expand index (46 more) »

An abecedarium (or abecedary) is an inscription consisting of the letters of an alphabet, almost always listed in order.

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An acronym is an abbreviation, used as a word, which is formed from the initial components in a phrase or a word.

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The acute accent (´) is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.

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An ampersand is a logogram "&" representing the conjunction word "and", though to save confusion it is called a symbol.

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Arabic (العَرَبِية, or عربي,عربى) is the Classical Arabic language of the 6th century and its modern descendants excluding Maltese.

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ASCII, abbreviated from American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a character-encoding scheme (the IANA prefers the name US-ASCII).

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Ł or ł, described in English as L with stroke, is a letter of the Polish, Kashubian, Sorbian, Łacinka (Latin Belarusian), Łatynka (Latin Ukrainian), Wymysorys, Navajo, Dene Suline, Inupiaq, Zuni, Hupa, and Dogrib alphabets, several proposed alphabets for the Venetian language, and the ISO 11940 romanization of the Thai alphabet.

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Belarusian (беларуская мова) is an official language of Belarus, along with Russian, and is spoken abroad, chiefly in Russia, Ukraine, and Poland.

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Breton (Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken in Brittany (Breton: Breizh; Bretagne), France.

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The circumflex is a diacritic in the Latin, Greek and Cyrillic scripts that is used in the written forms of many languages and in various romanization and transcription schemes.

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Classical Latin is the modern term used to describe the form of the Latin language recognized as standard by writers of the late Roman Republic and the Roman Empire.

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Cornish (Kernowek or Kernewek) is a Southwestern Brittonic Celtic language historically spoken by the Cornish people.

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The Cyrillic script is an alphabetic writing system employed across Eastern Europe and north and central Asia.

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Czech (čeština), formerly known as Bohemian (lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language spoken by over 10 million people.

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Danish orthography is the system used to write the Danish language.

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The Deutsches Wörterbuch (The German Dictionary), abbreviated DWB, is the largest and most comprehensive dictionary of the German language in existence.

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The diaeresis (plural: diaereses), also spelled diæresis or dieresis and also known as the trema or the umlaut, is a diacritical mark that consists of two dots placed over a letter, usually a vowel.

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A digraph or digram (from the δίς dís, "double" and γράφω gráphō, "to write") is a pair of characters used to write one phoneme (distinct sound) or a sequence of phonemes that does not correspond to the normal values of the two characters combined.

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When used as a diacritic mark, the term dot is usually reserved for the Interpunct (·), or to the glyphs 'combining dot above' and 'combining dot below' which may be combined with some letters of the extended Latin alphabets in use in Central European languages and Vietnamese.

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Dutch is a West Germanic language that is spoken in the European Union by about 23 million people as a first language—including most of the population of the Netherlands and about sixty percent of that of Belgium—and by another 5 million as a second language.

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In history, the early modern period of modern history follows the late Middle Ages of the post-classical era.

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Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) is an 8-bit character encoding used mainly on IBM mainframe and IBM midrange computer operating systems.

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The modern English alphabet is a Latin alphabet consisting of 26 letters (each having an uppercase and a lowercase form) – the same letters that are found in the ISO basic Latin alphabet: The exact shape of printed letters varies depending on the typeface.

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Finnish (or suomen kieli) is the language spoken by the majority of the population in Finland and by ethnic Finns outside Finland.

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Finnish orthography is based on the Latin script, and uses an alphabet derived from the Swedish alphabet, officially comprising 28 letters.

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Flanders (Dutch: Vlaanderen, Flandre) today normally refers to the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium.

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The Frisian languages are a closely related group of Germanic languages, spoken by about 500,000 Frisian people, who live on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands, Germany, and Denmark.

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George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and businessman who served as the 43rd President of the United States from 2001 to 2009, and the 46th Governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000.

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German dialect is dominated by the geographical spread of the High German consonant shift, and the dialect continua that connect German to some neighboring languages, e.g. the Dutch and Luxembourgish languages.

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German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language that derives most of its vocabulary from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family.

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The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken natively by a population of approximately 500 million people mainly in North America, Oceania, Central Europe, Western and Northern Europe.

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The Gothic alphabet is an alphabet for writing the Gothic language, created in the 4th century by Ulfilas (or Wulfila) for the purpose of translating the Bible.

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The grave accent (`) is a diacritical mark used in many written languages, including Breton, Catalan, Corsican, Dutch, French, Greek (until 1982; see polytonic orthography), Haitian Creole, Italian, Macedonian, Mohawk, Norwegian, Occitan, Portuguese, Ligurian, Scottish Gaelic, Vietnamese, Welsh, Romansh and Yoruba.

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H (named aitch or haitch in Ireland and parts of Australasia and the United Kingdom; plural aitches or haitches)"H" Oxford English Dictionary, 2nOd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "aitch", op.

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Icelandic is a North Germanic language, the language of Iceland.

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The International System of Units (Système International d'Unités, SI) is the modern form of the metric system, and is the most widely used system of measurement.

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The ISO Basic Latin alphabet is a Latin-script alphabet and consists of two sets of 26 letters, codified in various national and international standards and used widely in international communication.

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Italian orthography uses a variant of the Latin alphabet consisting of 21 letters to write the Italian language.

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Kashubian or Cassubian (Kashubian: kaszëbsczi jãzëk, pòmòrsczi jãzëk, kaszëbskò-słowińskô mòwa; język kaszubski, język pomorski, język kaszubsko-słowiński) is a language variety of the Lechitic group, of the Slavic languages.

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The voiced labio-velar approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in certain spoken languages, including English.

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The labiodental approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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The classical Latin alphabet, also known as the Roman alphabet, is a writing system that evolved from the visually similar Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet.

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Latin America is a region of the Americas that comprises countries where Romance languages are predominant; primarily Spanish and Portuguese, but also French.

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A letter is a grapheme (written character) in an alphabetic system of writing, such as the Greek alphabet and its descendants.

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This is a list of digraphs used in various Latin alphabets.

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Low German or Low Saxon (Plattdüütsch, Nedderdüütsch, Platduuts, Nedderduuts; Standard German: Plattdeutsch or Niederdeutsch; Dutch: Nederduits in the wider sense, see Nomenclature below) is an Ingvaeonic West Germanic language spoken mainly in northern Germany and the eastern part of the Netherlands.

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Medieval Latin was the form of Latin used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange and as the liturgical language of Chalcedonian Christianity and the Roman Catholic Church, but also as a language of science, literature, law, and administration.

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Middle English (ME) refers to the dialects of the English language spoken in parts of the British Isles after the Norman conquest (1066) until the late 15th century.

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Middle High German (Mittelhochdeutsch), abbreviated MHG (Mhd.), is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350.

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Middle Low German or Middle Saxon (ISO 639-3 code gml) is a language that is the descendant of Old Saxon and the ancestor of modern Low German.

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The Norman conquest of England was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton, and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled as William the Conqueror.

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Norwegian orthography is the method of writing the Norwegian language, of which there are two written standards: Bokmål and Nynorsk.

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Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc) or Anglo-Saxon is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

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Old High German (OHG, German: Althochdeutsch, German abbr. Ahd.) is the earliest stage of the German language, conventionally covering the period from around 700 to 1050 AD.

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Omega (capital: Ω, lowercase: ω; Greek Ωμέγα) is the 24th and last letter of the Greek alphabet.

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Polish (język polski, polszczyzna) is a Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland and the native language of the Poles.

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A pronunciation respelling is a regular phonetic respelling of a word that does have a standard spelling, so as to indicate the pronunciation.

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Proto-Germanic (PGmc; German Urgermanisch; also called Common Germanic, German Gemeingermanisch) is the reconstructed proto-language of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European family of languages.

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The Resian dialect (self-designation Rozajanski langač, or lengač, rezijansko narečje, rezijanščina) is a distinct dialect of Slovene spoken in the Resia Valley, Province of Udine, Italy, close to the border with Slovenia.

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Runes (Proto-Norse: (runo), Old Norse: rún) are the letters in a set of related alphabets known as runic alphabets, which were used to write various Germanic languages before the adoption of the Latin alphabet and for specialised purposes thereafter.

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Scottish English refers to the varieties of English spoken in Scotland.

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In an alphabetic writing system, a silent letter is a letter that, in a particular word, does not correspond to any sound in the word's pronunciation.

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The Sorbian languages (Serbsce, Serbski) are two closely related languages spoken by the Sorbs, a Slavic minority in the Lusatia region of eastern Germany.

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In physics, sound is a vibration that propagates as a typically audible mechanical wave of pressure and displacement, through a medium such as air or water.

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Suriname (or, also spelled Surinam), officially known as the Republic of Suriname (Republiek Suriname), is a sovereign state on the northeastern Atlantic coast of South America.

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Swedish orthography is the system used to write the Swedish language.

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Tungsten, also known as wolfram, is a chemical element with symbol W and atomic number 74.

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U (named u, plural ues) is the 21st letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet and the fifth and last vowel in the English alphabet (if W and Y are not counted as vowels).

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The University of the Western Cape is a public university located in the Bellville suburb of Cape Town, South Africa.

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The University of Washington, commonly referred to as Washington or informally U-Dub, or locally as UW is a public flagship research university in Seattle, Washington, United States.

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The University of Waterloo (commonly referred to as Waterloo, UW or UWaterloo) is a public research university with a main campus located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

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The University of Western Australia (UWA) is a research-intensive university in Perth, Australia that was established by an act of the Western Australian Parliament in February 1911, and began teaching students for the first time in 1913.

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The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, "UW", or regionally as, UW–Madison, or simply Madison) is a public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin, United States.

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The University of Wyoming is a land-grant university located in Laramie, Wyoming, situated on Wyoming's high Laramie Plains, at an elevation of 7,220 feet (2194 m), between the Laramie and Snowy Range mountains.

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Upsilon (uppercase Υ, lowercase υ; ύψιλον, ýpsilon,; or, or) is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet.

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V (named vee) is the 22nd letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Valentin Ickelshamer (also spelled Ikelschamer, Ikelsheimer, Eckelsheimer, Ikkersamer, Becklersheimer, Zangsthamer; c.1500–1547), was a German grammarian.

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The Vietnamese alphabet (chữ Quốc ngữ; literally national language script) is the modern writing system for the Vietnamese language.

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Vietnamese (tiếng Việt) is an Austroasiatic language that originated in the north of Vietnam and is the national and official language of the country.

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VnExpress is a Vietnamese online newspaper, run by FPT Corporation.

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The voiced bilabial fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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The voiced bilabial stop is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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The voiced labiodental fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

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Volkswagen (VW) is a German car manufacturer headquartered in Wolfsburg, Lower Saxony, Germany.

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In phonetics, a vowel is a sound in spoken language, such as an English "ah!" or "oh!", pronounced with an open vocal tract so that there is no build-up of air pressure at any point above the glottis.

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Vulgar Latin is a generic term for the nonstandard (as opposed to classical) sociolects of Latin from which the Romance languages developed.

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Walloon (Walon in Walloon) is a Romance language that was spoken as a primary language in large portions (70%) of Wallonia in Belgium, in some villages of Northern France (near Givet) and in the northeast part of WisconsinUniversité du Wisconsin: collection de documents sur l'immigration wallonne au Wisconsin, enregistrements de témoignages oraux en anglais et wallon, 1976 until the mid 20th century.

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Wamba (died 687) was the king of the Visigoths from 672 to 680.

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The watt (symbol: W) is a derived unit of power in the International System of Units (SI), named after the Scottish engineer James Watt (1736–1819).

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Waw ("hook") is the sixth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician wāw, Aramaic waw, Hebrew vav (also vau) ו, Syriac waw and Arabic wāw و (sixth in abjadi order; 27th in modern Arabic order).

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Welsh (Cymraeg or y Gymraeg, pronounced) is a member of the Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages spoken natively in Wales, by some along the Welsh border in England, and in Y Wladfa (the Welsh colony in Chubut Province, Argentina).

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The won sign (₩) is a currency symbol that represents.

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In physics, a force is said to do work if, when acting on a body, there is a displacement of the point of application in the direction of the force.

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The World Wide Web (www, W3) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by URLs, interlinked by hypertext links, and can be accessed via the Internet.

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Wynn (Ƿ ƿ) (also spelled wen, ƿynn, or ƿen) is a letter of the Old English alphabet, where it is used to represent the sound.

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Z (named zed ' or zee "Z", Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "zee", op. cit.) is the 26th and final letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Redirects here:

Double U, Double u, Double v, Double-U, Double-u, Double-ues, Double-you, W (letter), , , , , 🄦, 🅆, 🅦, 🆆.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W

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