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Walker Lewis

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Kwaku Walker Lewis (August 3, 1798 – October 26, 1856) was an early African-American abolitionist, Freemason, and Mormon elder from Massachusetts. [1]

63 relations: Abolitionism in the United States, Act in Relation to Service, Affinity (law), Akan names, Akan people, Anti-miscegenation laws, Baptism, Barber, Barre, Massachusetts, Black Mormons, Black people and early Mormonism, Boston, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Church of Christ (Latter Day Saints), Connecticut, David Walker (abolitionist), Doctrine and Covenants, Elder (Latter Day Saints), Elijah Abel, Endowment (Latter Day Saints), Episcopal Church (United States), Fatigue, Freemasonry, Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, Fugitive slaves in the United States, Ghana, Industrial Revolution, Jane Manning James, John Smith (uncle of Joseph Smith), Joseph Smith, Latter Day Saint movement, Liberia, Lowell Cemetery, Lowell, Massachusetts, Massachusetts, Massachusetts General Colored Association, Mormonism and polygamy, Multiracial, Northeastern United States, Parley P. Pratt, Patriarchal blessing, President of the Church (LDS Church), Presiding Patriarch, Priesthood (Latter Day Saints), Prince Hall, Prince Hall Freemasonry, Providence, Rhode Island, Quock Walker, Salt Lake City, Sealing (Mormonism), ..., Sexual intercourse, Slavery in the United States, Spencer W. Kimball, Textile manufacturing, Thomas Dalton (abolitionist), Tuberculosis, Underground Railroad, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Utah State Legislature, White people, William Smith (Latter Day Saints), Worcester, Massachusetts, 1978 Revelation on Priesthood. Expand index (13 more) »

Abolitionism in the United States

Abolitionism in the United States was the movement before and during the American Civil War to end slavery in the United States.

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Act in Relation to Service

The Act in Relation to Service, which was passed on Feb 4, 1852 in the Utah Territory, made slavery legal in the territory.

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Affinity (law)

In law and in cultural anthropology, affinity, as distinguished from consanguinity (blood relationship), is the kinship relationship that is created or exists between two or more people as a result of someone's marriage.

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Akan names

The Akan people of Togo, Ghana and the Ivory Coast frequently name their children after the day of the week they were born and the order in which they were born.

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Akan people

The Akan are a meta-ethnicity predominantly speaking Central Tano languages and residing in the southern regions of the former Gold Coast region in what is today the nation of Ghana.

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Anti-miscegenation laws

Anti-miscegenation laws or miscegenation laws are laws that enforce racial segregation at the level of marriage and intimate relationships by criminalizing interracial marriage and sometimes also sex between members of different races.

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Baptism

Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.

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Barber

A barber (from the Latin barba, "beard") is a person whose occupation is mainly to cut, dress, groom, style and shave men’s and boys' hair.

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Barre, Massachusetts

Barre is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States.

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Black Mormons

Most Mormons are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

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Black people and early Mormonism

Early Mormonism had a range of doctrines related to race with regards to black people of African descent.

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Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

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Cambridge, Massachusetts

Cambridge is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and part of the Boston metropolitan area.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Church of Christ (Latter Day Saints)

The Church of Christ was the original name of the Latter Day Saint church founded by Joseph Smith.

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Connecticut

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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David Walker (abolitionist)

David Walker (September 28, 1796August 6, 1830) was an African-American abolitionist, writer and anti-slavery activist.

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Doctrine and Covenants

The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C or D. and C.) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement.

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Elder (Latter Day Saints)

Elder is a priesthood office in the Melchizedek priesthood of denominations within the Latter Day Saint movement, including The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

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Elijah Abel

Elijah Abel (July 25, 1808 – December 25, 1884) was one of the earliest African-American members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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Endowment (Latter Day Saints)

In the theology of the Latter Day Saint movement, an endowment refers to a gift of "power from on high", typically associated with Latter Day Saint temples.

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Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church is the United States-based member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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Fatigue

Fatigue is a subjective feeling of tiredness that has a gradual onset.

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Freemasonry

Freemasonry or Masonry consists of fraternal organisations that trace their origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of stonemasons and their interaction with authorities and clients.

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Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

The Fugitive Slave Law or Fugitive Slave Act was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850, as part of the Compromise of 1850 between Southern slave-holding interests and Northern Free-Soilers.

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Fugitive slaves in the United States

The phenomenon of slaves running away and seeking to gain freedom is as old as the institution of slavery itself.

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Ghana

Ghana, officially the Republic of Ghana, is a unitary presidential constitutional democracy, located along the Gulf of Guinea and Atlantic Ocean, in the subregion of West Africa.

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Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

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Jane Manning James

Jane Elizabeth Manning James (May 11, 1813 – April 16, 1908), fondly known as "Aunt Jane", was one of the first recorded African-American women to enter Utah.

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John Smith (uncle of Joseph Smith)

John Smith (July 16, 1781 – May 23, 1854), known as Uncle John, was an early leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

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Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith Jr. (December 23, 1805 – June 27, 1844) was an American religious leader and founder of Mormonism and the Latter Day Saint movement.

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Latter Day Saint movement

The Latter Day Saint movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement) is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian primitivist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s.

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Liberia

Liberia, officially the Republic of Liberia, is a country on the West African coast.

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Lowell Cemetery

Lowell Cemetery is a cemetery located in Lowell, Massachusetts.

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Lowell, Massachusetts

Lowell is a city in the U.S. Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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Massachusetts

Massachusetts, officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Massachusetts General Colored Association

The Massachusetts General Colored Association was organized in Boston in 1826 to combat slavery and racism.

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Mormonism and polygamy

Polygamy (most often polygyny, called plural marriage by Mormons in the 19th century or the Principle by modern fundamentalist practitioners of polygamy) was practiced by leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) for more than half of the 19th century, and practiced publicly from 1852 to 1890 by between 20 and 30 percent of Latter-day Saint families.

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Multiracial

Multiracial is defined as made up of or relating to people of many races.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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Northeastern United States

The Northeastern United States, also referred to as the American Northeast or simply the Northeast, is a geographical region of the United States bordered to the north by Canada, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Southern United States, and to the west by the Midwestern United States.

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Parley P. Pratt

Parley Parker Pratt Sr. (April 12, 1807 – May 13, 1857) was an early leader of the Latter Day Saint movement whose writings became a significant early nineteenth-century exposition of the Latter Day Saint faith.

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Patriarchal blessing

In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), a patriarchal blessing (also called an evangelist's blessing) is a blessing or ordinance given by a patriarch (evangelist) to a church member.

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President of the Church (LDS Church)

In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), the President of the Church is the highest office of the church.

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Presiding Patriarch

In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Presiding Patriarch (also called Presiding Evangelist, Patriarch over the Church, Patriarch of the Church, or Patriarch to the Church) is a church-wide leadership office within the priesthood.

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Priesthood (Latter Day Saints)

In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is the power and authority of God given to man, including the authority to perform ordinances and to act as a leader in the church.

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Prince Hall

Prince Hall (1807) was an African American noted as an abolitionist for his leadership in the free black community in Boston and as the founder of Prince Hall Freemasonry.

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Prince Hall Freemasonry

Prince Hall Freemasonry is a branch of North American Freemasonry founded by Prince Hall on September 29, 1784 and composed predominantly of African Americans.

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Providence, Rhode Island

Providence is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island and is one of the oldest cities in the United States.

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Quock Walker

Quock Walker, also known as Kwaku or Quok Walker (b. 1753 - d. unknown), was an American slave who sued for and won his freedom in June 1781 in a case citing language in the new Massachusetts Constitution (1780) that declared all men to be born free and equal.

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Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City (often shortened to Salt Lake and abbreviated as SLC) is the capital and the most populous municipality of the U.S. state of Utah.

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Sealing (Mormonism)

Sealing is an ordinance (ritual) performed in Latter Day Saint temples by a person holding the sealing authority.

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Sexual intercourse

Sexual intercourse (or coitus or copulation) is principally the insertion and thrusting of the penis, usually when erect, into the vagina for sexual pleasure, reproduction, or both.

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Slavery in the United States

Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of human chattel enslavement, primarily of Africans and African Americans, that existed in the United States of America in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Spencer W. Kimball

Spencer Woolley Kimball (March 28, 1895 – November 5, 1985) was an American business, civic, and religious leader, and was the 12th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

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Textile manufacturing

Textile manufacturing is a major industry.

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Thomas Dalton (abolitionist)

Thomas Dalton (1794–1883) was a free African American raised in Massachusetts who was dedicated to improving the lives of people of color.

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Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB).

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Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.

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University of Massachusetts Lowell

The University of Massachusetts Lowell (also known as UMass Lowell) is a nationally ranked, public research institution located in Lowell, Massachusetts with a small satellite campus in Haverhill, Massachusetts.

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Utah State Legislature

The Utah State Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Utah.

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White people

White people is a racial classification specifier, used mostly for people of European descent; depending on context, nationality, and point of view, the term has at times been expanded to encompass certain persons of North African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian descent, persons who are often considered non-white in other contexts.

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William Smith (Latter Day Saints)

William Smith (also found as William B. Smith) (March 13, 1811 – November 13, 1893) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the original members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

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Worcester, Massachusetts

Worcester is a city and the county seat of Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States.

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1978 Revelation on Priesthood

The 1978 Revelation on Priesthood was a revelation announced by leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) that reversed a long-standing policy excluding men of black African descent from the priesthood.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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Redirects here:

K Walker Lewis, K. Walker Lewis, Kwaku Walker Lewis, Q Walker Lewis, Q. Walker Lewis, Quacko Walker Lewis, Quaku Walker Lewis, Walker lewis.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walker_Lewis

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