Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Water wheel

+ Save concept

A water wheel is a machine for converting the energy of flowing or falling water into useful forms of power, often in a watermill. [1]

242 relations: Africa (Roman province), Ahmad Y. al-Hassan, Akkadian language, Al-Andalus, Alexandria, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Egyptian technology, Ancient Near East, Anthony Fitzherbert, Antipater of Thessalonica, Apollonius of Perga, Arabic, Aragon, Armillary sphere, Atlantic Seaboard fall line, Automaton, Axle, Baghdad, Barbegal aqueduct and mill, Belisarius, Bellows, Benoît Fourneyron, Bhāskara II, Bieudron Hydroelectric Power Station, Blade, Blast furnace, Book of Deuteronomy, Book of the Later Han, Bridge, Brill Publishers, British Library, Bucket, Byzantine Empire, Byzantium, Caesar's Civil War, Callixenus of Rhodes, Canal, Cao Rui, Cao Wei, Cast iron, Central Asia, Chain pump, Charter, Chicago Assyrian Dictionary, China, Cistercians, Claverton Pumping Station, Code of law, Copper, Crankshaft, ..., Cross section (geometry), Dam, De rebus bellicis, Density, Derby Silk Mill, Diameter, Dinorwic Quarry, Distance, Dolaucothi Gold Mines, Domesday Book, Dry dock, Du Shi, Dukinfield Junction, East Asia, Efficiency, Egypt, Egyptians, Elevation, Encyclopedia, England, Epicyclic gearing, Euphrates, Evangelista Torricelli, Factory, Faiyum, Feudalism, Finch Foundry, Floruit, Flow measurement, Flume, Flywheel, Free surface, Fresco, Fulling, Fuxi, Gear, George Kedrenos, Georgius Agricola, Gold mining, Granary, Gravity of Earth, Greco-Roman world, Gristmill, Hagiography, Hama, Han dynasty, Hellenistic period, History of India, History of the Mediterranean region, Huan Tan, Hydraulic head, Hydraulic ram, Hydraulics, Hydroelectricity, Hydrostatic head, Industrial Revolution, Industry, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Iron, Iron ore, Isle of Man, Ismail al-Jazari, John Peter Oleson, John Smeaton, Joseph Needham, Kinetic energy, Kingdom of Pontus, Latin, Laxey, Laxey Wheel, Leonardo da Vinci, Les Martres-de-Veyre, List of Chinese inventions, List of watermills in the United Kingdom, Little Island, Cork, Low head hydro power, Lucretius, Ma Jun, Machine, Manx National Heritage, MDPI, Mechanical engineering, Mesopotamia, Mexico, Micro hydro, Middle East, Mill pond, Mill race, Millwheel, Ming dynasty, Mining, Mithridates VI of Pontus, Monastery, Mooring (watercraft), Moors, Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi, Murcia, Musaeum, Nanyang (region), National Slate Museum, Nendrum Monastery mill, New World, Newton's laws of motion, Noria, Norias of Hama, North Africa, Northern Ireland, Odometer, Orontes River, Oxford University Press, Papermaking, Papyrus, Pelton wheel, Penstock, Perpetual motion, Persian language, Philo of Byzantium, Pier, Potential energy, Power (physics), Prefect, Pressure head, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, Quarry Bank Mill, Renewable energy, Rice huller, Rio Tinto (river), Roman Empire, Rome, Rueda Abbey, Sakia, Sawmill, Scandinavia, Scoop wheel, Scottish Highlands, Ship, Snaefell Wheel, Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, Song Yingxing, South America, Southern Europe, Spain, Spaniards, Spanish Empire, Stamp mill, Steam engine, Steel, Steel mill, Strabo, Sugar refinery, Sumatra, Switzerland, Syria, Taqi ad-Din Muhammad ibn Ma'ruf, Teak, Textile, Tiangong Kaiwu, Tidal power, Tide mill, Tigris, Time in physics, Ton, Trash rack, Trip hammer, Turbine, Turgo turbine, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, University of Manchester, University of Southampton, Velocity, Vitruvius, Volumetric flow rate, Wade–Giles, Wales, Wang Mang, Wars of Alexander the Great, Water, Water clock, Water turbine, Water wheel, Waterford, Watermill, William Armstrong Fairburn, William the Conqueror, Wire wheel, Wrought iron, Zhang Heng. Expand index (192 more) »

Africa (Roman province)

Africa Proconsularis was a Roman province on the north African coast that was established in 146 BC following the defeat of Carthage in the Third Punic War.

New!!: Water wheel and Africa (Roman province) · See more »

Ahmad Y. al-Hassan

Ahmad Yousef Al-Hassan (أحمد يوسف الحسن) (June 25, 1925 – April 28, 2012) was a Palestinian/Syrian/Canadian historian of Arabic and Islamic science and technology, educated in Jerusalem, Cairo, and London with a PhD in Mechanical engineering from University College London.

New!!: Water wheel and Ahmad Y. al-Hassan · See more »

Akkadian language

Akkadian (akkadû, ak-ka-du-u2; logogram: URIKI)John Huehnergard & Christopher Woods, "Akkadian and Eblaite", The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the World's Ancient Languages.

New!!: Water wheel and Akkadian language · See more »

Al-Andalus

Al-Andalus (الأنْدَلُس, trans.; al-Ándalus; al-Ândalus; al-Àndalus; Berber: Andalus), also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain occupying at its peak most of what are today Spain and Portugal.

New!!: Water wheel and Al-Andalus · See more »

Alexandria

Alexandria (or; Arabic: الإسكندرية; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية; Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ; Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ) is the second-largest city in Egypt and a major economic centre, extending about along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country.

New!!: Water wheel and Alexandria · See more »

Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River - geographically Lower Egypt and Upper Egypt, in the place that is now occupied by the countries of Egypt and Sudan.

New!!: Water wheel and Ancient Egypt · See more »

Ancient Egyptian technology

Ancient Egyptian technology describes devices and technologies invented or used in Ancient Egypt.

New!!: Water wheel and Ancient Egyptian technology · See more »

Ancient Near East

The ancient Near East was the home of early civilizations within a region roughly corresponding to the modern Middle East: Mesopotamia (modern Iraq, southeast Turkey, southwest Iran, northeastern Syria and Kuwait), ancient Egypt, ancient Iran (Elam, Media, Parthia and Persia), Anatolia/Asia Minor and Armenian Highlands (Turkey's Eastern Anatolia Region, Armenia, northwestern Iran, southern Georgia, and western Azerbaijan), the Levant (modern Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, and Jordan), Cyprus and the Arabian Peninsula.

New!!: Water wheel and Ancient Near East · See more »

Anthony Fitzherbert

Sir Anthony Fitzherbert (147027 May 1538) was an English judge, scholar and legal author, particularly known for his treatise on English law, New Natura Brevium (1534).

New!!: Water wheel and Anthony Fitzherbert · See more »

Antipater of Thessalonica

Antipater of Thessalonica (Ἀντίπατρος ὁ Θεσσαλονικεύς) was the author of over a hundred epigrams in the Greek Anthology.

New!!: Water wheel and Antipater of Thessalonica · See more »

Apollonius of Perga

Apollonius of Perga (Ἀπολλώνιος ὁ Περγαῖος; Apollonius Pergaeus; late 3rdearly 2nd centuries BC) was a Greek geometer and astronomer known for his theories on the topic of conic sections.

New!!: Water wheel and Apollonius of Perga · See more »

Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

New!!: Water wheel and Arabic · See more »

Aragon

Aragon (or, Spanish and Aragón, Aragó or) is an autonomous community in Spain, coextensive with the medieval Kingdom of Aragon.

New!!: Water wheel and Aragon · See more »

Armillary sphere

An armillary sphere (variations are known as spherical astrolabe, armilla, or armil) is a model of objects in the sky (on the celestial sphere), consisting of a spherical framework of rings, centred on Earth or the Sun, that represent lines of celestial longitude and latitude and other astronomically important features, such as the ecliptic.

New!!: Water wheel and Armillary sphere · See more »

Atlantic Seaboard fall line

The Atlantic Seaboard Fall Line, or Fall Zone, is a escarpment where the Piedmont and Atlantic coastal plain meet in the eastern United States.

New!!: Water wheel and Atlantic Seaboard fall line · See more »

Automaton

An automaton (plural: automata or automatons) is a self-operating machine, or a machine or control mechanism designed to automatically follow a predetermined sequence of operations, or respond to predetermined instructions.

New!!: Water wheel and Automaton · See more »

Axle

An axle is a central shaft for a rotating wheel or gear.

New!!: Water wheel and Axle · See more »

Baghdad

Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq.

New!!: Water wheel and Baghdad · See more »

Barbegal aqueduct and mill

The Barbegal aqueduct and mill is a Roman watermill complex located on the territory of the commune of Fontvieille, near the town of Arles, in southern France.

New!!: Water wheel and Barbegal aqueduct and mill · See more »

Belisarius

Flavius Belisarius (Φλάβιος Βελισάριος, c. 505 – 565) was a general of the Byzantine Empire.

New!!: Water wheel and Belisarius · See more »

Bellows

A bellows or pair of bellows is a device constructed to furnish a strong blast of air.

New!!: Water wheel and Bellows · See more »

Benoît Fourneyron

Benoît Fourneyron (October 31, 1802 – July 31, 1867) was a French engineer, born in Saint-Étienne, Loire.

New!!: Water wheel and Benoît Fourneyron · See more »

Bhāskara II

Bhāskara (also known as Bhāskarāchārya ("Bhāskara, the teacher"), and as Bhaskara II to avoid confusion with Bhāskara I) (1114–1185), was an Indian mathematician and astronomer.

New!!: Water wheel and Bhāskara II · See more »

Bieudron Hydroelectric Power Station

The Bieudron Hydroelectric Power Station is a hydroelectric power plant located in the Swiss Alps in the Canton of Valais in Switzerland.

New!!: Water wheel and Bieudron Hydroelectric Power Station · See more »

Blade

A blade is the portion of a tool, weapon, or machine with an edge that is designed to puncture, chop, slice or scrape surfaces or materials.

New!!: Water wheel and Blade · See more »

Blast furnace

A blast furnace is a type of metallurgical furnace used for smelting to produce industrial metals, generally pig iron, but also others such as lead or copper.

New!!: Water wheel and Blast furnace · See more »

Book of Deuteronomy

The Book of Deuteronomy (literally "second law," from Greek deuteros + nomos) is the fifth book of the Torah (a section of the Hebrew Bible) and the Christian Old Testament.

New!!: Water wheel and Book of Deuteronomy · See more »

Book of the Later Han

The Book of the Later Han, also known as the History of the Later Han and by its Chinese name Hou Hanshu, is one of the Twenty-Four Histories and covers the history of the Han dynasty from 6 to 189 CE, a period known as the Later or Eastern Han.

New!!: Water wheel and Book of the Later Han · See more »

Bridge

A bridge is a structure built to span physical obstacles without closing the way underneath such as a body of water, valley, or road, for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle.

New!!: Water wheel and Bridge · See more »

Brill Publishers

Brill (known as E. J. Brill, Koninklijke Brill, Brill Academic Publishers) is a Dutch international academic publisher founded in 1683 in Leiden, Netherlands.

New!!: Water wheel and Brill Publishers · See more »

British Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and the largest national library in the world by number of items catalogued.

New!!: Water wheel and British Library · See more »

Bucket

A bucket is typically a watertight, vertical cylinder or truncated cone or square, with an open top and a flat bottom, attached to a semicircular carrying handle called the bail.

New!!: Water wheel and Bucket · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Water wheel and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Byzantium

Byzantium or Byzantion (Ancient Greek: Βυζάντιον, Byzántion) was an ancient Greek colony in early antiquity that later became Constantinople, and later Istanbul.

New!!: Water wheel and Byzantium · See more »

Caesar's Civil War

The Great Roman Civil War (49–45 BC), also known as Caesar's Civil War, was one of the last politico-military conflicts in the Roman Republic before the establishment of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Water wheel and Caesar's Civil War · See more »

Callixenus of Rhodes

Callixenus of Rhodes was a Hellenistic author from Rhodes.

New!!: Water wheel and Callixenus of Rhodes · See more »

Canal

Canals, or navigations, are human-made channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles.

New!!: Water wheel and Canal · See more »

Cao Rui

Cao Rui (204 or 206 – 22 January 239), courtesy name Yuanzhong, was the second emperor of the state of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period.

New!!: Water wheel and Cao Rui · See more »

Cao Wei

Wei (220–266), also known as Cao Wei, was one of the three major states that competed for supremacy over China in the Three Kingdoms period (220–280).

New!!: Water wheel and Cao Wei · See more »

Cast iron

Cast iron is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.

New!!: Water wheel and Cast iron · See more »

Central Asia

Central Asia stretches from the Caspian Sea in the west to China in the east and from Afghanistan in the south to Russia in the north.

New!!: Water wheel and Central Asia · See more »

Chain pump

The chain pump is type of a water pump in which several circular discs are positioned on an endless chain.

New!!: Water wheel and Chain pump · See more »

Charter

A charter is the grant of authority or rights, stating that the granter formally recognizes the prerogative of the recipient to exercise the rights specified.

New!!: Water wheel and Charter · See more »

Chicago Assyrian Dictionary

The Chicago Assyrian Dictionary (CAD) or The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago is a nine-decade project at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute to compile a dictionary of the Akkadian language and its dialects.

New!!: Water wheel and Chicago Assyrian Dictionary · See more »

China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

New!!: Water wheel and China · See more »

Cistercians

A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (abbreviated as OCist, SOCist ((Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), or ‘’’OCSO’’’ (Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae), which are religious orders of monks and nuns. They are also known as “Trappists”; as Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux (though that term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland and Lithuania); or as White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales. Over the centuries, however, education and academic pursuits came to dominate the life of many monasteries. A reform movement seeking to restore the simpler lifestyle of the original Cistercians began in 17th-century France at La Trappe Abbey, leading eventually to the Holy See’s reorganization in 1892 of reformed houses into a single order Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO), commonly called the Trappists. Cistercians who did not observe these reforms became known as the Cistercians of the Original Observance. The term Cistercian (French Cistercien), derives from Cistercium, the Latin name for the village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. It was in this village that a group of Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098, with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. The best known of them were Robert of Molesme, Alberic of Cîteaux and the English monk Stephen Harding, who were the first three abbots. Bernard of Clairvaux entered the monastery in the early 1110s with 30 companions and helped the rapid proliferation of the order. By the end of the 12th century, the order had spread throughout France and into England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Eastern Europe. The keynote of Cistercian life was a return to literal observance of the Rule of St Benedict. Rejecting the developments the Benedictines had undergone, the monks tried to replicate monastic life exactly as it had been in Saint Benedict's time; indeed in various points they went beyond it in austerity. The most striking feature in the reform was the return to manual labour, especially agricultural work in the fields, a special characteristic of Cistercian life. Cistercian architecture is considered one of the most beautiful styles of medieval architecture. Additionally, in relation to fields such as agriculture, hydraulic engineering and metallurgy, the Cistercians became the main force of technological diffusion in medieval Europe. The Cistercians were adversely affected in England by the Protestant Reformation, the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII, the French Revolution in continental Europe, and the revolutions of the 18th century, but some survived and the order recovered in the 19th century.

New!!: Water wheel and Cistercians · See more »

Claverton Pumping Station

Claverton Pumping Station in the village of Claverton, in the English county of Somerset, pumps water from the River Avon to the Kennet and Avon Canal using power from the flow of the River Avon.

New!!: Water wheel and Claverton Pumping Station · See more »

Code of law

A code of law, also called a law code or legal code, is a type of legislation that purports to exhaustively cover a complete system of laws or a particular area of law as it existed at the time the code was enacted, by a process of codification.

New!!: Water wheel and Code of law · See more »

Copper

Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from cuprum) and atomic number 29.

New!!: Water wheel and Copper · See more »

Crankshaft

A crankshaft—related to crank—is a mechanical part able to perform a conversion between reciprocating motion and rotational motion.

New!!: Water wheel and Crankshaft · See more »

Cross section (geometry)

In geometry and science, a cross section is the non-empty intersection of a solid body in three-dimensional space with a plane, or the analog in higher-dimensional spaces.

New!!: Water wheel and Cross section (geometry) · See more »

Dam

A dam is a barrier that stops or restricts the flow of water or underground streams.

New!!: Water wheel and Dam · See more »

De rebus bellicis

De rebus bellicis ("On the Things of Wars") is an anonymous work of the 4th or 5th century which suggests remedies for the military and financial problems in the Roman Empire, including a number of fanciful war machines.

New!!: Water wheel and De rebus bellicis · See more »

Density

The density, or more precisely, the volumetric mass density, of a substance is its mass per unit volume.

New!!: Water wheel and Density · See more »

Derby Silk Mill

Derby Silk Mill, formerly known as Derby Industrial Museum, is a museum of industry and history in Derby, England.

New!!: Water wheel and Derby Silk Mill · See more »

Diameter

In geometry, a diameter of a circle is any straight line segment that passes through the center of the circle and whose endpoints lie on the circle.

New!!: Water wheel and Diameter · See more »

Dinorwic Quarry

The Dinorwic Slate Quarry is a large former slate quarry, now home to the Welsh National Slate Museum, located between the villages of Llanberis and Dinorwig in North Wales.

New!!: Water wheel and Dinorwic Quarry · See more »

Distance

Distance is a numerical measurement of how far apart objects are.

New!!: Water wheel and Distance · See more »

Dolaucothi Gold Mines

The Dolaucothi Gold Mines (Mwynfeydd Aur Dolaucothi), also known as the Ogofau Gold Mine, are ancient Roman surface and underground mines located in the valley of the River Cothi, near Pumsaint, Carmarthenshire, Wales.

New!!: Water wheel and Dolaucothi Gold Mines · See more »

Domesday Book

Domesday Book (or; Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror.

New!!: Water wheel and Domesday Book · See more »

Dry dock

A dry dock (sometimes dry-dock or drydock) is a narrow basin or vessel that can be flooded to allow a load to be floated in, then drained to allow that load to come to rest on a dry platform.

New!!: Water wheel and Dry dock · See more »

Du Shi

Du Shi (d. 38Crespigny, 183.) was a Chinese politician and mechanical engineer of the Eastern Han Dynasty in ancient China.

New!!: Water wheel and Du Shi · See more »

Dukinfield Junction

Dukinfield Junction is the name of the canal junction where the Peak Forest Canal, the Ashton Canal and the Huddersfield Narrow Canal meet near Ashton-under-Lyne, Greater Manchester, England.

New!!: Water wheel and Dukinfield Junction · See more »

East Asia

East Asia is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical or ethno-cultural "The East Asian cultural sphere evolves when Japan, Korea, and what is today Vietnam all share adapted elements of Chinese civilization of this period (that of the Tang dynasty), in particular Buddhism, Confucian social and political values, and literary Chinese and its writing system." terms.

New!!: Water wheel and East Asia · See more »

Efficiency

Efficiency is the (often measurable) ability to avoid wasting materials, energy, efforts, money, and time in doing something or in producing a desired result.

New!!: Water wheel and Efficiency · See more »

Egypt

Egypt (مِصر, مَصر, Khēmi), officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

New!!: Water wheel and Egypt · See more »

Egyptians

Egyptians (مَصريين;; مِصريّون; Ni/rem/en/kīmi) are an ethnic group native to Egypt and the citizens of that country sharing a common culture and a common dialect known as Egyptian Arabic.

New!!: Water wheel and Egyptians · See more »

Elevation

The elevation of a geographic location is its height above or below a fixed reference point, most commonly a reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface (see Geodetic datum § Vertical datum).

New!!: Water wheel and Elevation · See more »

Encyclopedia

An encyclopedia or encyclopaedia is a reference work or compendium providing summaries of information from either all branches of knowledge or from a particular field or discipline.

New!!: Water wheel and Encyclopedia · See more »

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.

New!!: Water wheel and England · See more »

Epicyclic gearing

An epicyclic gear train (also known as planetary gear) consists of two gears mounted so that the center of one gear revolves around the center of the other.

New!!: Water wheel and Epicyclic gearing · See more »

Euphrates

The Euphrates (Sumerian: Buranuna; 𒌓𒄒𒉣 Purattu; الفرات al-Furāt; ̇ܦܪܬ Pǝrāt; Եփրատ: Yeprat; פרת Perat; Fırat; Firat) is the longest and one of the most historically important rivers of Western Asia.

New!!: Water wheel and Euphrates · See more »

Evangelista Torricelli

Evangelista Torricelli; 15 October 1608 – 25 October 1647) was an Italian physicist and mathematician, best known for his invention of the barometer, but is also known for his advances in optics and work on the method of indivisibles.

New!!: Water wheel and Evangelista Torricelli · See more »

Factory

A factory or manufacturing plant is an industrial site, usually consisting of buildings and machinery, or more commonly a complex having several buildings, where workers manufacture goods or operate machines processing one product into another.

New!!: Water wheel and Factory · See more »

Faiyum

Faiyum (الفيوم; ̀Ⲫⲓⲟⲙ or Ⲫⲓⲱⲙ) is a city in Middle Egypt.

New!!: Water wheel and Faiyum · See more »

Feudalism

Feudalism was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries.

New!!: Water wheel and Feudalism · See more »

Finch Foundry

Finch Foundry is a 19th-century water-powered forge situated in the village of Sticklepath near Okehampton, Devon, England.

New!!: Water wheel and Finch Foundry · See more »

Floruit

Floruit, abbreviated fl. (or occasionally, flor.), Latin for "he/she flourished", denotes a date or period during which a person was known to have been alive or active.

New!!: Water wheel and Floruit · See more »

Flow measurement

Flow measurement is the quantification of bulk fluid movement.

New!!: Water wheel and Flow measurement · See more »

Flume

A flume is a human-made channel for water in the form of an open declined gravity chute whose walls are raised above the surrounding terrain, in contrast to a trench or ditch.

New!!: Water wheel and Flume · See more »

Flywheel

A flywheel is a mechanical device specifically designed to efficiently store rotational energy.

New!!: Water wheel and Flywheel · See more »

Free surface

In physics, a free surface is the surface of a fluid that is subject to zero parallel shear stress, such as the boundary between two homogeneous fluids, for example liquid water and the air in the Earth's atmosphere.

New!!: Water wheel and Free surface · See more »

Fresco

Fresco (plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster.

New!!: Water wheel and Fresco · See more »

Fulling

Fulling, also known as tucking or walking (spelt waulking in Scotland), is a step in woollen clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to eliminate oils, dirt, and other impurities, and making it thicker.

New!!: Water wheel and Fulling · See more »

Fuxi

Fuxi (Chinese: 伏羲), also romanized as Fu-hsi, is a culture hero in Chinese legend and mythology, credited (along with his sister Nüwa 女娲) with creating humanity and the invention of hunting, fishing and cooking as well as the Cangjie system of writing Chinese characters c. 2,000 BCE.

New!!: Water wheel and Fuxi · See more »

Gear

A gear or cogwheel is a rotating machine part having cut like teeth, or cogs, which mesh with another toothed part to transmit torque.

New!!: Water wheel and Gear · See more »

George Kedrenos

George Kedrenos or Cedrenus (Γεώργιος Κεδρηνός, fl. 11th century) was a Byzantine historian.

New!!: Water wheel and George Kedrenos · See more »

Georgius Agricola

Georgius Agricola (24 March 1494 – 21 November 1555) was a German mineralogist and metallurgist.

New!!: Water wheel and Georgius Agricola · See more »

Gold mining

Gold mining is the resource extraction of gold by mining.

New!!: Water wheel and Gold mining · See more »

Granary

A granary is a storehouse or room in a barn for threshed grain or animal feed.

New!!: Water wheel and Granary · See more »

Gravity of Earth

The gravity of Earth, which is denoted by, refers to the acceleration that is imparted to objects due to the distribution of mass within Earth.

New!!: Water wheel and Gravity of Earth · See more »

Greco-Roman world

The Greco-Roman world, Greco-Roman culture, or the term Greco-Roman; spelled Graeco-Roman in the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth), when used as an adjective, as understood by modern scholars and writers, refers to those geographical regions and countries that culturally (and so historically) were directly, long-term, and intimately influenced by the language, culture, government and religion of the ancient Greeks and Romans. It is also better known as the Classical Civilisation. In exact terms the area refers to the "Mediterranean world", the extensive tracts of land centered on the Mediterranean and Black Sea basins, the "swimming-pool and spa" of the Greeks and Romans, i.e. one wherein the cultural perceptions, ideas and sensitivities of these peoples were dominant. This process was aided by the universal adoption of Greek as the language of intellectual culture and commerce in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, and of Latin as the tongue for public management and forensic advocacy, especially in the Western Mediterranean. Though the Greek and the Latin never became the native idioms of the rural peasants who composed the great majority of the empire's population, they were the languages of the urbanites and cosmopolitan elites, and the lingua franca, even if only as corrupt or multifarious dialects to those who lived within the large territories and populations outside the Macedonian settlements and the Roman colonies. All Roman citizens of note and accomplishment regardless of their ethnic extractions, spoke and wrote in Greek and/or Latin, such as the Roman jurist and Imperial chancellor Ulpian who was of Phoenician origin, the mathematician and geographer Claudius Ptolemy who was of Greco-Egyptian origin and the famous post-Constantinian thinkers John Chrysostom and Augustine who were of Syrian and Berber origins, respectively, and the historian Josephus Flavius who was of Jewish origin and spoke and wrote in Greek.

New!!: Water wheel and Greco-Roman world · See more »

Gristmill

A gristmill (also: grist mill, corn mill or flour mill) grinds cereal grain into flour and middlings.

New!!: Water wheel and Gristmill · See more »

Hagiography

A hagiography is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader.

New!!: Water wheel and Hagiography · See more »

Hama

Hama (حماة,; ܚܡܬ Ḥmṭ, "fortress"; Biblical Hebrew: חֲמָת Ḥamāth) is a city on the banks of the Orontes River in west-central Syria.

New!!: Water wheel and Hama · See more »

Han dynasty

The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China (206 BC–220 AD), preceded by the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and succeeded by the Three Kingdoms period (220–280 AD). Spanning over four centuries, the Han period is considered a golden age in Chinese history. To this day, China's majority ethnic group refers to themselves as the "Han Chinese" and the Chinese script is referred to as "Han characters". It was founded by the rebel leader Liu Bang, known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu of Han, and briefly interrupted by the Xin dynasty (9–23 AD) of the former regent Wang Mang. This interregnum separates the Han dynasty into two periods: the Western Han or Former Han (206 BC–9 AD) and the Eastern Han or Later Han (25–220 AD). The emperor was at the pinnacle of Han society. He presided over the Han government but shared power with both the nobility and appointed ministers who came largely from the scholarly gentry class. The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government using an innovation inherited from the Qin known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following the Rebellion of the Seven States. From the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BC) onward, the Chinese court officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics, synthesized with the cosmology of later scholars such as Dong Zhongshu. This policy endured until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 AD. The Han dynasty saw an age of economic prosperity and witnessed a significant growth of the money economy first established during the Zhou dynasty (c. 1050–256 BC). The coinage issued by the central government mint in 119 BC remained the standard coinage of China until the Tang dynasty (618–907 AD). The period saw a number of limited institutional innovations. To finance its military campaigns and the settlement of newly conquered frontier territories, the Han government nationalized the private salt and iron industries in 117 BC, but these government monopolies were repealed during the Eastern Han dynasty. Science and technology during the Han period saw significant advances, including the process of papermaking, the nautical steering ship rudder, the use of negative numbers in mathematics, the raised-relief map, the hydraulic-powered armillary sphere for astronomy, and a seismometer for measuring earthquakes employing an inverted pendulum. The Xiongnu, a nomadic steppe confederation, defeated the Han in 200 BC and forced the Han to submit as a de facto inferior partner, but continued their raids on the Han borders. Emperor Wu launched several military campaigns against them. The ultimate Han victory in these wars eventually forced the Xiongnu to accept vassal status as Han tributaries. These campaigns expanded Han sovereignty into the Tarim Basin of Central Asia, divided the Xiongnu into two separate confederations, and helped establish the vast trade network known as the Silk Road, which reached as far as the Mediterranean world. The territories north of Han's borders were quickly overrun by the nomadic Xianbei confederation. Emperor Wu also launched successful military expeditions in the south, annexing Nanyue in 111 BC and Dian in 109 BC, and in the Korean Peninsula where the Xuantu and Lelang Commanderies were established in 108 BC. After 92 AD, the palace eunuchs increasingly involved themselves in court politics, engaging in violent power struggles between the various consort clans of the empresses and empresses dowager, causing the Han's ultimate downfall. Imperial authority was also seriously challenged by large Daoist religious societies which instigated the Yellow Turban Rebellion and the Five Pecks of Rice Rebellion. Following the death of Emperor Ling (r. 168–189 AD), the palace eunuchs suffered wholesale massacre by military officers, allowing members of the aristocracy and military governors to become warlords and divide the empire. When Cao Pi, King of Wei, usurped the throne from Emperor Xian, the Han dynasty would eventually collapse and ceased to exist.

New!!: Water wheel and Han dynasty · See more »

Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period covers the period of Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of Actium in 31 BC and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt the following year.

New!!: Water wheel and Hellenistic period · See more »

History of India

The history of India includes the prehistoric settlements and societies in the Indian subcontinent; the advancement of civilisation from the Indus Valley Civilisation to the eventual blending of the Indo-Aryan culture to form the Vedic Civilisation; the rise of Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism;Sanderson, Alexis (2009), "The Śaiva Age: The Rise and Dominance of Śaivism during the Early Medieval Period." In: Genesis and Development of Tantrism, edited by Shingo Einoo, Tokyo: Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo, 2009.

New!!: Water wheel and History of India · See more »

History of the Mediterranean region

The Mediterranean Sea was the central superhighway of transport, trade and cultural exchange between diverse peoples encompassing three continents: Western Asia, North Africa, and Southern Europe.

New!!: Water wheel and History of the Mediterranean region · See more »

Huan Tan

Huan Tan (– 28) was a Chinese philosopher, poet, and politician of the Han Dynasty and its short-lived interregnum between 9 and 23, known as the Xin Dynasty.

New!!: Water wheel and Huan Tan · See more »

Hydraulic head

Hydraulic head or piezometric head is a specific measurement of liquid pressure above a geodetic datum.

New!!: Water wheel and Hydraulic head · See more »

Hydraulic ram

A hydraulic ram, or hydram, is a cyclic water pump powered by hydropower.

New!!: Water wheel and Hydraulic ram · See more »

Hydraulics

Hydraulics (from Greek: Υδραυλική) is a technology and applied science using engineering, chemistry, and other sciences involving the mechanical properties and use of liquids.

New!!: Water wheel and Hydraulics · See more »

Hydroelectricity

Hydroelectricity is electricity produced from hydropower.

New!!: Water wheel and Hydroelectricity · See more »

Hydrostatic head

When generating hydropower, the head is the distance that a given water source has to fall before the point where power is generated.

New!!: Water wheel and Hydrostatic head · See more »

Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

New!!: Water wheel and Industrial Revolution · See more »

Industry

Industry is the production of goods or related services within an economy.

New!!: Water wheel and Industry · See more »

Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

New!!: Water wheel and Iran · See more »

Iraq

Iraq (or; العراق; عێراق), officially known as the Republic of Iraq (جُمُهورية العِراق; کۆماری عێراق), is a country in Western Asia, bordered by Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest and Syria to the west.

New!!: Water wheel and Iraq · See more »

Ireland

Ireland (Éire; Ulster-Scots: Airlann) is an island in the North Atlantic.

New!!: Water wheel and Ireland · See more »

Iron

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.

New!!: Water wheel and Iron · See more »

Iron ore

Iron ores are rocks and minerals from which metallic iron can be economically extracted.

New!!: Water wheel and Iron ore · See more »

Isle of Man

The Isle of Man (Ellan Vannin), also known simply as Mann (Mannin), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland.

New!!: Water wheel and Isle of Man · See more »

Ismail al-Jazari

Badīʿ az-Zaman Abū l-ʿIzz ibn Ismāʿīl ibn ar-Razāz al-Jazarī (1136–1206, بديع الزمان أَبُو اَلْعِزِ بْنُ إسْماعِيلِ بْنُ الرِّزاز الجزري) was a Muslim polymath: a scholar, inventor, mechanical engineer, artisan, artist and mathematician.

New!!: Water wheel and Ismail al-Jazari · See more »

John Peter Oleson

John Peter Oleson (born 1946) is a Canadian classical archaeologist and historian of ancient technology.

New!!: Water wheel and John Peter Oleson · See more »

John Smeaton

John Smeaton (8 June 1724 – 28 October 1792) was a British civil engineer responsible for the design of bridges, canals, harbours and lighthouses.

New!!: Water wheel and John Smeaton · See more »

Joseph Needham

Noel Joseph Terence Montgomery Needham (9 December 1900 – 24 March 1995) was a British biochemist, historian and sinologist known for his scientific research and writing on the history of Chinese science and technology.

New!!: Water wheel and Joseph Needham · See more »

Kinetic energy

In physics, the kinetic energy of an object is the energy that it possesses due to its motion.

New!!: Water wheel and Kinetic energy · See more »

Kingdom of Pontus

The Kingdom of Pontus or Pontic Empire was a state founded by the Persian Mithridatic dynasty,http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/pontus which may have been directly related to Darius the Great and the Achaemenid dynasty.

New!!: Water wheel and Kingdom of Pontus · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Water wheel and Latin · See more »

Laxey

Laxey (Laksaa) is a village on the east coast of the Isle of Man.

New!!: Water wheel and Laxey · See more »

Laxey Wheel

The Laxey Wheel (also known as Lady Isabella) is built into the hillside above the village of Laxey in the Isle of Man.

New!!: Water wheel and Laxey Wheel · See more »

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (15 April 14522 May 1519), more commonly Leonardo da Vinci or simply Leonardo, was an Italian polymath of the Renaissance, whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography.

New!!: Water wheel and Leonardo da Vinci · See more »

Les Martres-de-Veyre

Les Martres-de-Veyre (Las Martras de Veire) is a commune in the Puy-de-Dôme department in Auvergne in central France.

New!!: Water wheel and Les Martres-de-Veyre · See more »

List of Chinese inventions

China has been the source of many innovations, scientific discoveries and inventions.

New!!: Water wheel and List of Chinese inventions · See more »

List of watermills in the United Kingdom

The use of water power in Britain was at its peak just before the Industrial Revolution.

New!!: Water wheel and List of watermills in the United Kingdom · See more »

Little Island, Cork

Little Island, County Cork, is a civil parish and mainly industrial area to the east of Cork city in Ireland.

New!!: Water wheel and Little Island, Cork · See more »

Low head hydro power

Low head hydropower applications use tidal flows or rivers with a head of or less to produce energy.

New!!: Water wheel and Low head hydro power · See more »

Lucretius

Titus Lucretius Carus (15 October 99 BC – c. 55 BC) was a Roman poet and philosopher.

New!!: Water wheel and Lucretius · See more »

Ma Jun

Ma Jun (220–265), courtesy name Deheng, was a Chinese mechanical engineer and politician who lived in the state of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period of China.

New!!: Water wheel and Ma Jun · See more »

Machine

A machine uses power to apply forces and control movement to perform an intended action.

New!!: Water wheel and Machine · See more »

Manx National Heritage

Manx National Heritage (Eiraght Ashoonagh Vannin) is the national heritage organisation for the Isle of Man.

New!!: Water wheel and Manx National Heritage · See more »

MDPI

MDPI is an organisational acronym used by two related organisations, Molecular Diversity Preservation International and Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, which were both co-founded by Shu-Kun Lin.

New!!: Water wheel and MDPI · See more »

Mechanical engineering

Mechanical engineering is the discipline that applies engineering, physics, engineering mathematics, and materials science principles to design, analyze, manufacture, and maintain mechanical systems.

New!!: Water wheel and Mechanical engineering · See more »

Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia is a historical region in West Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

New!!: Water wheel and Mesopotamia · See more »

Mexico

Mexico (México; Mēxihco), officially called the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos) is a federal republic in the southern portion of North America.

New!!: Water wheel and Mexico · See more »

Micro hydro

Micro hydro is a type of hydroelectric power that typically produces from 5 kW to 100 kW of electricity using the natural flow of water.

New!!: Water wheel and Micro hydro · See more »

Middle East

The Middle Easttranslit-std; translit; Orta Şərq; Central Kurdish: ڕۆژھەڵاتی ناوین, Rojhelatî Nawîn; Moyen-Orient; translit; translit; translit; Rojhilata Navîn; translit; Bariga Dhexe; Orta Doğu; translit is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia, Turkey (both Asian and European), and Egypt (which is mostly in North Africa).

New!!: Water wheel and Middle East · See more »

Mill pond

A mill pond (or millpond) is a body of water used as a reservoir for a water-powered mill.

New!!: Water wheel and Mill pond · See more »

Mill race

A mill race, millrace or millrun is the current of water that turns a water wheel, or the channel (sluice) conducting water to or from a water wheel.

New!!: Water wheel and Mill race · See more »

Millwheel

Millwheel or water wheel are sometimes used as a charge in heraldic arms.

New!!: Water wheel and Millwheel · See more »

Ming dynasty

The Ming dynasty was the ruling dynasty of China – then known as the – for 276 years (1368–1644) following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty.

New!!: Water wheel and Ming dynasty · See more »

Mining

Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit.

New!!: Water wheel and Mining · See more »

Mithridates VI of Pontus

Mithridates VI or Mithradates VI (Μιθραδάτης, Μιθριδάτης), from Old Persian Miθradāta, "gift of Mithra"; 135–63 BC, also known as Mithradates the Great (Megas) and Eupator Dionysius, was king of Pontus and Armenia Minor in northern Anatolia (now Turkey) from about 120–63 BC.

New!!: Water wheel and Mithridates VI of Pontus · See more »

Monastery

A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits).

New!!: Water wheel and Monastery · See more »

Mooring (watercraft)

A mooring refers to any permanent structure to which a vessel may be secured.

New!!: Water wheel and Mooring (watercraft) · See more »

Moors

The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica, and Malta during the Middle Ages.

New!!: Water wheel and Moors · See more »

Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi

Abū Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyyā al-Rāzī (Abūbakr Mohammad-e Zakariyyā-ye Rāzī, also known by his Latinized name Rhazes or Rasis) (854–925 CE), was a Persian polymath, physician, alchemist, philosopher, and important figure in the history of medicine.

New!!: Water wheel and Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi · See more »

Murcia

Murcia is a city in south-eastern Spain, the capital and most populous city of the Autonomous Community of the Region of Murcia, and the seventh largest city in the country, with a population of 442,573 inhabitants in 2009 (about one third of the total population of the Region).

New!!: Water wheel and Murcia · See more »

Musaeum

The Musaeum or Mouseion at Alexandria (Μουσεῖον τῆς Ἀλεξανδρείας), which included the famous Library of Alexandria, was an institution founded by Ptolemy I Soter or, perhaps more likely, by his son Ptolemy II Philadelphus.

New!!: Water wheel and Musaeum · See more »

Nanyang (region)

Nanyang is a sinocentric Chinese term for the warmer and fertile geographical region south of China, otherwise known as the 'South Sea' or Southeast Asia.

New!!: Water wheel and Nanyang (region) · See more »

National Slate Museum

The National Slate Museum (previously known as the Welsh Slate Museum and the North Wales Quarrying Museum) is located at Gilfach Ddu in the 19th-century workshops of the now disused Dinorwic slate quarry, within the Padarn Country Park, Llanberis, Gwynedd.

New!!: Water wheel and National Slate Museum · See more »

Nendrum Monastery mill

The Nendrum Monastery mill was a tide mill on an island in Strangford Lough now in Northern Ireland.

New!!: Water wheel and Nendrum Monastery mill · See more »

New World

The New World is one of the names used for the majority of Earth's Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas (including nearby islands such as those of the Caribbean and Bermuda).

New!!: Water wheel and New World · See more »

Newton's laws of motion

Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that, together, laid the foundation for classical mechanics.

New!!: Water wheel and Newton's laws of motion · See more »

Noria

A noria (ناعورة, nā‘ūra, from ܢܥܘܪܐ, nā‘urā) is a machine activated by water power and used for lifting water into a small aqueduct, either for the purpose of irrigation or for the use in towns and villages.

New!!: Water wheel and Noria · See more »

Norias of Hama

The Norias of Hama are a number of norias ("wheels of pots") along the Orontes River in the city of Hama, Syria.

New!!: Water wheel and Norias of Hama · See more »

North Africa

North Africa is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries and territories situated in the northern-most region of the African continent.

New!!: Water wheel and North Africa · See more »

Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland (Tuaisceart Éireann; Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom in the north-east of the island of Ireland, variously described as a country, province or region.

New!!: Water wheel and Northern Ireland · See more »

Odometer

An odometer or odograph is an instrument used for measuring the distance travelled by a vehicle, such as a bicycle or car.

New!!: Water wheel and Odometer · See more »

Orontes River

The Orontes (Ὀρόντης) or Asi (العاصي, ‘Āṣī; Asi) is a northward-flowing river which begins in Lebanon and flows through Syria and Turkey before entering the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Water wheel and Orontes River · See more »

Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Water wheel and Oxford University Press · See more »

Papermaking

The art, science, and technology of papermaking addresses the methods, equipment, and materials used to make paper and cardboard, these being used widely for printing, writing, and packaging, among many other purposes and useful products.

New!!: Water wheel and Papermaking · See more »

Papyrus

Papyrus is a material similar to thick paper that was used in ancient times as a writing surface.

New!!: Water wheel and Papyrus · See more »

Pelton wheel

The Pelton wheel is an impulse-type water turbine.

New!!: Water wheel and Pelton wheel · See more »

Penstock

A penstock (fr. conduite forcée) is a sluice or gate or intake structure that controls water flow, or an enclosed pipe that delivers water to hydro turbines and sewerage systems.

New!!: Water wheel and Penstock · See more »

Perpetual motion

Perpetual motion is motion of bodies that continues indefinitely.

New!!: Water wheel and Perpetual motion · See more »

Persian language

Persian, also known by its endonym Farsi (فارسی), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Water wheel and Persian language · See more »

Philo of Byzantium

Philo of Byzantium (Φίλων ὁ Βυζάντιος, Philōn ho Byzantios, ca. 280 BC – ca. 220 BC), also known as Philo Mechanicus, was a Greek engineer, physicist and writer on mechanics, who lived during the latter half of the 3rd century BC.

New!!: Water wheel and Philo of Byzantium · See more »

Pier

Seaside pleasure pier in Brighton, England. The first seaside piers were built in England in the early 19th century. A pier is a raised structure in a body of water, typically supported by well-spaced piles or pillars.

New!!: Water wheel and Pier · See more »

Potential energy

In physics, potential energy is the energy possessed by an object because of its position relative to other objects, stresses within itself, its electric charge, or other factors.

New!!: Water wheel and Potential energy · See more »

Power (physics)

In physics, power is the rate of doing work, the amount of energy transferred per unit time.

New!!: Water wheel and Power (physics) · See more »

Prefect

Prefect (from the Latin praefectus, substantive adjectival form of praeficere: "put in front", i.e., in charge) is a magisterial title of varying definition, but which, basically, refers to the leader of an administrative area.

New!!: Water wheel and Prefect · See more »

Pressure head

In fluid mechanics, pressure head is the internal energy of a fluid due to the pressure exerted on its container.

New!!: Water wheel and Pressure head · See more »

Ptolemaic Kingdom

The Ptolemaic Kingdom (Πτολεμαϊκὴ βασιλεία, Ptolemaïkḕ basileía) was a Hellenistic kingdom based in Egypt.

New!!: Water wheel and Ptolemaic Kingdom · See more »

Ptolemy IV Philopator

Ptolemy IV Philopator (Πτολεμαῖος Φιλοπάτωρ, Ptolemaĩos Philopátōr "Ptolemy Beloved of his Father"; 245/4–204 BC), son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II, was the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt from 221 to 204 BC.

New!!: Water wheel and Ptolemy IV Philopator · See more »

Quarry Bank Mill

Quarry Bank Mill (also known as Styal Mill) in Styal, Cheshire, England, is one of the best preserved textile mills of the Industrial Revolution and is now a museum of the cotton industry.

New!!: Water wheel and Quarry Bank Mill · See more »

Renewable energy

Renewable energy is energy that is collected from renewable resources, which are naturally replenished on a human timescale, such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves, and geothermal heat.

New!!: Water wheel and Renewable energy · See more »

Rice huller

A rice huller or rice husker is an agricultural machine used to automate the process of removing the chaff (the outer husks) of grains of rice.

New!!: Water wheel and Rice huller · See more »

Rio Tinto (river)

The Río Tinto (red river) is a river in southwestern Spain that rises in the Sierra Morena mountains of Andalusia.

New!!: Water wheel and Rio Tinto (river) · See more »

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

New!!: Water wheel and Roman Empire · See more »

Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

New!!: Water wheel and Rome · See more »

Rueda Abbey

Rueda Abbey or Rueda de Ebro Abbey (Real Monasterio de Nuestra Señora de Rueda, or the "Royal Monastery of Our Lady of the Wheel") is a former Cistercian monastery in Sástago in the Ribera Baja del Ebro comarca, province of Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain, 74 kilometres to the south-east of Zaragoza on the left bank of the Ebro.

New!!: Water wheel and Rueda Abbey · See more »

Sakia

A sakia, alternative spelling sakieh or saqiya (from ساقية, sāqīya), also called Persian wheel, tablia, and in Latin tympanum is a mechanical water lifting device which uses buckets, jars, or scoops fastened either directly to a vertical wheel, or to an endless belt activated by such a wheel.

New!!: Water wheel and Sakia · See more »

Sawmill

A sawmill or lumber mill is a facility where logs are cut into lumber.

New!!: Water wheel and Sawmill · See more »

Scandinavia

Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe, with strong historical, cultural and linguistic ties.

New!!: Water wheel and Scandinavia · See more »

Scoop wheel

Rim driven Scoop wheel of the Stretham Old Engine, Cambridgeshire A scoop wheel may be a pump or an excavator.

New!!: Water wheel and Scoop wheel · See more »

Scottish Highlands

The Highlands (the Hielands; A’ Ghàidhealtachd, "the place of the Gaels") are a historic region of Scotland.

New!!: Water wheel and Scottish Highlands · See more »

Ship

A ship is a large watercraft that travels the world's oceans and other sufficiently deep waterways, carrying passengers or goods, or in support of specialized missions, such as defense, research and fishing.

New!!: Water wheel and Ship · See more »

Snaefell Wheel

The Snaefell Wheel (also known as Lady Evelyn) is a waterwheel in Laxey, Isle of Man.

New!!: Water wheel and Snaefell Wheel · See more »

Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies

The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies (The Roman Society) was founded in 1910 as the sister society to the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies.

New!!: Water wheel and Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies · See more »

Song Yingxing

Song Yingxing (Traditional Chinese: 宋應星; Simplified Chinese: 宋应星; Wade Giles: Sung Ying-Hsing; 1587-1666 AD) was a Chinese scientist and encyclopedist who lived during the late Ming Dynasty (1368–1644).

New!!: Water wheel and Song Yingxing · See more »

South America

South America is a continent in the Western Hemisphere, mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the Northern Hemisphere.

New!!: Water wheel and South America · See more »

Southern Europe

Southern Europe is the southern region of the European continent.

New!!: Water wheel and Southern Europe · See more »

Spain

Spain (España), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Reino de España), is a sovereign state mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe.

New!!: Water wheel and Spain · See more »

Spaniards

Spaniards are a Latin European ethnic group and nation.

New!!: Water wheel and Spaniards · See more »

Spanish Empire

The Spanish Empire (Imperio Español; Imperium Hispanicum), historically known as the Hispanic Monarchy (Monarquía Hispánica) and as the Catholic Monarchy (Monarquía Católica) was one of the largest empires in history.

New!!: Water wheel and Spanish Empire · See more »

Stamp mill

A stamp mill (or stamp battery or stamping mill) is a type of mill machine that crushes material by pounding rather than grinding, either for further processing or for extraction of metallic ores.

New!!: Water wheel and Stamp mill · See more »

Steam engine

A steam engine is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid.

New!!: Water wheel and Steam engine · See more »

Steel

Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon and other elements.

New!!: Water wheel and Steel · See more »

Steel mill

A steel mill or steelworks is an industrial plant for the manufacture of steel.

New!!: Water wheel and Steel mill · See more »

Strabo

Strabo (Στράβων Strábōn; 64 or 63 BC AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.

New!!: Water wheel and Strabo · See more »

Sugar refinery

A sugar refinery is a refinery which processes raw sugar into white refined sugar or that processes sugar beet to refined sugar.

New!!: Water wheel and Sugar refinery · See more »

Sumatra

Sumatra is an Indonesian island in Southeast Asia that is part of the Sunda Islands.

New!!: Water wheel and Sumatra · See more »

Switzerland

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Water wheel and Switzerland · See more »

Syria

Syria (سوريا), officially known as the Syrian Arab Republic (الجمهورية العربية السورية), is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest.

New!!: Water wheel and Syria · See more »

Taqi ad-Din Muhammad ibn Ma'ruf

Taqi al-Din Muhammad ibn Ma'ruf ash-Shami al-Asadi (Arabic: تقي الدين محمد بن معروف الشامي, Turkish: Takiyüddin or Taki) (1526–1585) was an Ottoman polymath active in Constantinople.

New!!: Water wheel and Taqi ad-Din Muhammad ibn Ma'ruf · See more »

Teak

Teak (Tectona grandis) is a tropical hardwood tree species placed in the flowering plant family Lamiaceae.

New!!: Water wheel and Teak · See more »

Textile

A textile is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread).

New!!: Water wheel and Textile · See more »

Tiangong Kaiwu

The Tiangong Kaiwu (天工開物), or The Exploitation of the Works of Nature was a Chinese encyclopedia compiled by Song Yingxing.

New!!: Water wheel and Tiangong Kaiwu · See more »

Tidal power

Tidal power or tidal energy is a form of hydropower that converts the energy obtained from tides into useful forms of power, mainly electricity.

New!!: Water wheel and Tidal power · See more »

Tide mill

A tide mill is a water mill driven by tidal rise and fall.

New!!: Water wheel and Tide mill · See more »

Tigris

Batman River The Tigris (Sumerian: Idigna or Idigina; Akkadian: 𒁇𒄘𒃼; دجلة Dijlah; ܕܹܩܠܵܬ.; Տիգրիս Tigris; Դգլաթ Dglatʿ;, biblical Hiddekel) is the eastern member of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia, the other being the Euphrates.

New!!: Water wheel and Tigris · See more »

Time in physics

Time in physics is defined by its measurement: time is what a clock reads.

New!!: Water wheel and Time in physics · See more »

Ton

The ton is a unit of measure.

New!!: Water wheel and Ton · See more »

Trash rack

A trash rack is a wooden or metal structure, frequently supported by masonry, that prevents water-borne debris (such as logs, boats, animals, masses of cut waterweed, etc.) from entering the intake of a water mill, pumping station or water conveyance.

New!!: Water wheel and Trash rack · See more »

Trip hammer

Saint-Hubert (Belgium). A trip hammer, also known as a tilt hammer or helve hammer, is a massive powered hammer used in.

New!!: Water wheel and Trip hammer · See more »

Turbine

A turbine (from the Latin turbo, a vortex, related to the Greek τύρβη, tyrbē, meaning "turbulence") is a rotary mechanical device that extracts energy from a fluid flow and converts it into useful work.

New!!: Water wheel and Turbine · See more »

Turgo turbine

The Turgo turbine is an impulse water turbine designed for medium head applications.

New!!: Water wheel and Turgo turbine · See more »

Ukraine

Ukraine (Ukrayina), sometimes called the Ukraine, is a sovereign state in Eastern Europe, bordered by Russia to the east and northeast; Belarus to the northwest; Poland, Hungary, and Slovakia to the west; Romania and Moldova to the southwest; and the Black Sea and Sea of Azov to the south and southeast, respectively.

New!!: Water wheel and Ukraine · See more »

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

New!!: Water wheel and United Kingdom · See more »

United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

New!!: Water wheel and United States · See more »

University of Manchester

The University of Manchester is a public research university in Manchester, England, formed in 2004 by the merger of the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology and the Victoria University of Manchester.

New!!: Water wheel and University of Manchester · See more »

University of Southampton

The University of Southampton (abbreviated as Soton in post-nominal letters) is a research university located in Southampton, England.

New!!: Water wheel and University of Southampton · See more »

Velocity

The velocity of an object is the rate of change of its position with respect to a frame of reference, and is a function of time.

New!!: Water wheel and Velocity · See more »

Vitruvius

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (c. 80–70 BC – after c. 15 BC), commonly known as Vitruvius, was a Roman author, architect, civil engineer and military engineer during the 1st century BC, known for his multi-volume work entitled De architectura.

New!!: Water wheel and Vitruvius · See more »

Volumetric flow rate

In physics and engineering, in particular fluid dynamics and hydrometry, the volumetric flow rate (also known as volume flow rate, rate of fluid flow or volume velocity) is the volume of fluid which passes per unit time; usually represented by the symbol (sometimes). The SI unit is m3/s (cubic metres per second).

New!!: Water wheel and Volumetric flow rate · See more »

Wade–Giles

Wade–Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization system for Mandarin Chinese.

New!!: Water wheel and Wade–Giles · See more »

Wales

Wales (Cymru) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain.

New!!: Water wheel and Wales · See more »

Wang Mang

Wang Mang (c. 45 – 6 October 23 AD), courtesy name Jujun, was a Han Dynasty official and consort kin who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin (or Hsin, meaning "renewed") Dynasty (新朝), ruling 9–23 AD.

New!!: Water wheel and Wang Mang · See more »

Wars of Alexander the Great

The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India.

New!!: Water wheel and Wars of Alexander the Great · See more »

Water

Water is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms.

New!!: Water wheel and Water · See more »

Water clock

A water clock or clepsydra (Greek κλεψύδρα from κλέπτειν kleptein, 'to steal'; ὕδωρ hydor, 'water') is any timepiece in which time is measured by the regulated flow of liquid into (inflow type) or out from (outflow type) a vessel where the amount is then measured.

New!!: Water wheel and Water clock · See more »

Water turbine

A water turbine is a rotary machine that converts kinetic energy and potential energy of water into mechanical work.

New!!: Water wheel and Water turbine · See more »

Water wheel

A water wheel is a machine for converting the energy of flowing or falling water into useful forms of power, often in a watermill.

New!!: Water wheel and Water wheel · See more »

Waterford

Waterford (from Old Norse Veðrafjǫrðr, meaning "ram (wether) fjord") is a city in Ireland.

New!!: Water wheel and Waterford · See more »

Watermill

A watermill or water mill is a mill that uses hydropower.

New!!: Water wheel and Watermill · See more »

William Armstrong Fairburn

William Armstrong Fairburn (12 October 1876 – 1 October 1947) was a noted American author, naval architect, marine engineer, industrial executive, and chemist.

New!!: Water wheel and William Armstrong Fairburn · See more »

William the Conqueror

William I (c. 1028Bates William the Conqueror p. 33 – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087.

New!!: Water wheel and William the Conqueror · See more »

Wire wheel

Wire wheels, wire-spoked wheels, tension-spoked wheels, or "suspension" wheels are wheels whose rims connect to their hubs by wire spokes.

New!!: Water wheel and Wire wheel · See more »

Wrought iron

puddled iron, a form of wrought iron Wrought iron is an iron alloy with a very low carbon (less than 0.08%) content in contrast to cast iron (2.1% to 4%).

New!!: Water wheel and Wrought iron · See more »

Zhang Heng

Zhang Heng (AD 78–139), formerly romanized as Chang Heng, was a Han Chinese polymath from Nanyang who lived during the Han dynasty.

New!!: Water wheel and Zhang Heng · See more »

Redirects here:

Backshot water wheel, Breast shot, Breastshot, Breastshot wheel, European water wheel, Headrace, History of the water wheel, History of water wheels, Hydraulic wheel, Kehrrad, Kehrräder, Mill wheel, Overshot, Overshot water wheel, Overshot waterwheel, Overshot wheel, Pitchback, Reversible water wheel, Reversible waterwheel, Reversible wheel, Scoop-wheel, Stream wheel, Stream wheels, Tailrace, Tailrace tunnels, The European Water Wheel, The European water wheel, Tub wheel, Under shot, Under shot water wheel, Under shot water wheels, Under shot wheel, Under shot wheels, Under shots, Under-shot, Under-shot water wheel, Under-shot water wheels, Under-shot wheel, Under-shot wheels, Under-shots, Undershot, Undershot water wheel, Undershot water wheels, Undershot wheel, Undershot wheels, Undershots, Water Wheel, Water wheels, Water-wheel, Waterwheel, Waterwheels.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_wheel

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »