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William Blackstone

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Sir William Blackstone (10 July 1723 – 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century. [1]

148 relations: A Discourse on the Study of the Law, Abraham Lincoln, Advowson, Age of Enlightenment, Alexander Hamilton, Alexander Popham (penal reformer), Alexis de Tocqueville, All Souls College, Oxford, American Bar Association, An Analysis of the Laws of England, Apothecary, Assizes, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Bachelor of Civil Law, Barrister, Benjamin Franklin, Berkshire, Bill of Rights 1689, Blackstone, Virginia, Burgess (title), Bursar, Call to the bar, Cesare Beccaria, Charles Dillon, 12th Viscount Dillon, Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden, Charles Viner (jurist), Charles Yorke, Charterhouse School, Chauncy Townsend, Cheapside, Chevalier d'Éon, Codrington Library, Commentaries on the Laws of England, Common law, Constitution Avenue, Constitutions of Clarendon, Convocation, Court of Chancery, Court of Common Pleas (England), Court of King's Bench (England), Diabetes mellitus type 2, Dizziness, Doctor of Civil Law, Earl of Abingdon, Edward Clive (judge), Edward Morant (politician), English law, Exchequer of Pleas, Frederick North, Lord North, George III of the United Kingdom, ..., George Steevens, Gout, Greek language, Henry Finch, Henry John Stephen, Hindon (UK Parliament constituency), Holy orders, Inner Temple, Institutes of the Lawes of England, James Calthorpe (Yeoman of the Removing Wardrobe), James Iredell, James Kent, James Wilson, Jeremy Bentham, John Adams, John Bacon (sculptor), John Fortescue (judge), John Heath (judge), John Jay, John Marshall, John Milton, John Morton (MP), John St Leger Douglas, John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, Jonathan Rashleigh (1693–1764), Joseph Yates (judge), Judge, Jurist, Justice of Chester, Justice of the Common Pleas, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, Lord Chancellor, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, Louis XV of France, Maimonides, Member of parliament, Mental breakdown, Mercery, Middle Temple, Middlesex, Montesquieu, New College, Oxford, Owen Ruffhead, Oxford University Press, Parliamentary sovereignty, Pasture, Patent of precedence, Paul Wayland Bartlett, Pembroke College, Oxford, Peregrine Bertie (of Low Leyton), Queens' College, Cambridge, Recorder (judge), Regius Professor of Civil Law (Oxford), River Thames, Robert Chambers (English judge), Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington, Robert Walpole, Roger Newdigate, Rotten and pocket boroughs, Royal Courts of Justice, Sardinia, Selden Society, Serjeant-at-law, Sir William Blackstone's Reports, Social class in the United Kingdom, Society of Antiquaries of London, Solicitor General for England and Wales, St Peter's Church, Wallingford, Stanley Nider Katz, Substantive law, Supreme Court of the United States, The Federalist Papers, Tom Denning, Baron Denning, Tories (British political party), Tractatus de legibus et consuetudinibus regni Anglie, United States Congress, United States Constitution, United States Declaration of Independence, University of Oxford, Vinerian Professor of English Law, Voltaire, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, Warden (college), Westbury (UK Parliament constituency), Will and testament, William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland, William Henry Ashurst (judge), William Hussey (died 1813), William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield, William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, William Searle Holdsworth, William Shakespeare, Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon, Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon, Wiltshire, World War II. Expand index (98 more) »

A Discourse on the Study of the Law

A Discourse on the Study of the Law is a treatise by Sir William Blackstone first published in 1758.

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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

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Advowson

Advowson (or "patronage") is the right in English law of a patron (avowee) to present to the diocesan bishop (or in some cases the ordinary if not the same person) a nominee for appointment to a vacant ecclesiastical benefice or church living, a process known as presentation (jus praesentandi, Latin: "the right of presenting").

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Age of Enlightenment

The Enlightenment (also known as the Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Reason; in lit in Aufklärung, "Enlightenment", in L’Illuminismo, “Enlightenment” and in Spanish: La Ilustración, "Enlightenment") was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, "The Century of Philosophy".

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Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was a statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

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Alexander Popham (penal reformer)

Alexander Popham (18 July 1729 – 13 October 1810) was a British penal reformer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1768 and 1796.

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Alexis de Tocqueville

Alexis Charles Henri Clérel, Viscount de Tocqueville (29 July 180516 April 1859) was a French diplomat, political scientist and historian.

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All Souls College, Oxford

All Souls College (official name: College of the souls of all the faithful departed) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England.

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American Bar Association

The American Bar Association (ABA), founded August 21, 1878, is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States.

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An Analysis of the Laws of England

An Analysis of the Laws of England is a legal treatise by British legal professor William Blackstone.

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Apothecary

Apothecary is one term for a medical professional who formulates and dispenses materia medica to physicians, surgeons, and patients.

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Assizes

The courts of assize, or assizes, were periodic courts held around England and Wales until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court.

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Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States.

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Bachelor of Civil Law

Bachelor of Civil Law (abbreviated BCL or B.C.L.; Baccalaureus Civilis Legis) is the name of various degrees in law conferred by English-language universities.

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Barrister

A barrister (also known as barrister-at-law or bar-at-law) is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions.

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Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin (April 17, 1790) was an American polymath and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

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Berkshire

Berkshire (abbreviated Berks, in the 17th century sometimes spelled Barkeshire as it is pronounced) is a county in south east England, west of London and is one of the home counties.

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Bill of Rights 1689

The Bill of Rights, also known as the English Bill of Rights, is an Act of the Parliament of England that deals with constitutional matters and sets out certain basic civil rights.

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Blackstone, Virginia

Blackstone, formerly named Blacks and White, and Bellefonte, is a town in Nottoway County, Virginia, United States.

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Burgess (title)

Burgess originally meant a freeman of a borough (England, Wales, Ireland) or burgh (Scotland).

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Bursar

A bursar (derived from "bursa", Latin for purse) is a professional financial administrator in a school or university.

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Call to the bar

The call to the bar is a legal term of art in most common law jurisdictions where persons must be qualified to be allowed to argue in court on behalf of another party and are then said to have been "called to the bar" or to have received a "call to the bar".

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Cesare Beccaria

Cesare Bonesana-Beccaria, Marquis of Gualdrasco and Villareggio (15 March 173828 November 1794) was an Italian criminologist, jurist, philosopher, and politician, who is widely considered as the most talented jurist and one of the greatest thinkers of the Age of Enlightenment.

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Charles Dillon, 12th Viscount Dillon

Charles Dillon-Lee, 12th Viscount Dillon, KP, PC (6 November 1745 – 9 November 1813) was Member of Parliament (MP) for the English borough of Westbury (1770).

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Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden, PC (baptised 21 March 1714 – 18 April 1794) was an English lawyer, judge and Whig politician who was first to hold the title of Earl Camden.

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Charles Viner (jurist)

Charles Viner (1678–1756) was an English jurist, known as the author of Viner's Abridgment, and the benefactor of the Vinerian chair and the Vinerian Scholarship at the University of Oxford.

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Charles Yorke

Charles Yorke PC (30 December 172220 January 1770) was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.

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Charterhouse School

Charterhouse is an independent day and boarding school in Godalming, Surrey.

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Chauncy Townsend

Chauncy Townsend (23 February 1708 – 28 March 1770) was a City of London merchant and a Member of Parliament in the Parliament of Great Britain.

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Cheapside

Cheapside is a street in the City of London, the historic and modern financial centre of London, which forms part of the A40 London to Fishguard road.

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Chevalier d'Éon

Charles-Geneviève-Louis-Auguste-André-Timothée d'Éon de Beaumont (5 October 1728 – 21 May 1810), usually known as the Chevalier d'Éon, was a French diplomat, spy, Freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Codrington Library

The Codrington Library is an academic library in the city of Oxford, England.

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Commentaries on the Laws of England

The Commentaries on the Laws of England are an influential 18th-century treatise on the common law of England by Sir William Blackstone, originally published by the Clarendon Press at Oxford, 1765–1769.

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Common law

Common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.

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Constitution Avenue

Constitution Avenue is a major east-west street in the northwest and northeast quadrants of the city of Washington, D.C., in the United States.

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Constitutions of Clarendon

The Constitutions of Clarendon were a set of legislative procedures passed by Henry II of England in 1164.

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Convocation

A convocation (from the Latin convocare meaning "to call/come together", a translation of the Greek ἐκκλησία ekklēsia) is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose, mostly ecclesiastical or academic.

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Court of Chancery

The Court of Chancery was a court of equity in England and Wales that followed a set of loose rules to avoid the slow pace of change and possible harshness (or "inequity") of the common law.

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Court of Common Pleas (England)

The Court of Common Pleas, or Common Bench, was a common law court in the English legal system that covered "common pleas"; actions between subject and subject, which did not concern the king.

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Court of King's Bench (England)

The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a female monarch), formally known as The Court of the King Before the King Himself, was an English court of common law in the English legal system.

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Diabetes mellitus type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.

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Dizziness

Dizziness is an impairment in spatial perception and stability.

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Doctor of Civil Law

Doctor of Civil Law (DCL; Doctor Civilis Legis) is a degree offered by some universities, such as the University of Oxford, instead of the more common Doctor of Laws (LLD) degrees.

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Earl of Abingdon

Earl of Abingdon is a title in the Peerage of England.

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Edward Clive (judge)

Sir Edward Clive (1704 – 16 April 1771) was a British politician and judge.

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Edward Morant (politician)

Edward Morant (1730–1791) was a British politician and plantation owner who sat in the House of Commons for 26 years from 1761 to 1787.

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English law

English law is the common law legal system of England and Wales, comprising mainly criminal law and civil law, each branch having its own courts and procedures.

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Exchequer of Pleas

The Exchequer of Pleas or Court of Exchequer was a court that dealt with matters of equity, a set of legal principles based on natural law and common law in England and Wales.

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Frederick North, Lord North

Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford, (13 April 17325 August 1792), better known by his courtesy title Lord North, which he used from 1752 to 1790 was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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George Steevens

George Steevens (10 May 1736 – 22 January 1800) was an English Shakespearean commentator.

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Gout

Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis characterized by recurrent attacks of a red, tender, hot, and swollen joint.

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Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

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Henry Finch

Sir Henry Finch (died 1625) was an English lawyer and politician, created serjeant-at-law and knighted, and remembered as a legal writer.

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Henry John Stephen

Henry John Stephen (1787–1864) was an English legal writer and serjeant-at-law.

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Hindon (UK Parliament constituency)

Hindon was a parliamentary borough consisting of the village of Hindon in Wiltshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1448 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

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Holy orders

In the Christian churches, Holy Orders are ordained ministries such as bishop, priest or deacon.

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Inner Temple

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court (professional associations for barristers and judges) in London.

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Institutes of the Lawes of England

The Institutes of the Lawes of England are a series of legal treatises written by Sir Edward Coke.

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James Calthorpe (Yeoman of the Removing Wardrobe)

James Calthorpe, DL (25 March 1699 – 11 March 1784) was a British politician and courtier.

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James Iredell

James Iredell (October 5, 1751 – October 20, 1799) was one of the first Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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James Kent

James Kent (July 31, 1763 in Fredericksburg, then Dutchess, now Putnam County, New York – December 12, 1847 in New York City) was an American jurist and legal scholar.

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James Wilson

James Wilson (September 14, 1742 – August 21, 1798) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution.

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Jeremy Bentham

Jeremy Bentham (15 February 1748 – 6 June 1832) was an English philosopher, jurist, and social reformer regarded as the founder of modern utilitarianism.

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John Adams

John Adams (October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the first Vice President (1789–1797) and second President of the United States (1797–1801).

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John Bacon (sculptor)

John Bacon (24 November 1740 – 7 August 1799) was a British sculptor who worked in the late 18th century.

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John Fortescue (judge)

Sir John Fortescue (1394 – December 1479) of Ebrington in Gloucestershire, was Chief Justice of the King's Bench and was the author of De Laudibus Legum Angliae (Commendation of the Laws of England), first published posthumously circa 1543), an influential treatise on English law. In the course of Henry VI's reign, Fortescue was appointed one of the governors of Lincoln's Inn three times and served as a Member of Parliament from 1421 to 1437. He became one of the King's Serjeants during the Easter term of 1441, and subsequently served as Chief Justice of the King's Bench from 25 January 1442 to Easter term 1460. During the Wars of the Roses, Henry VI was deposed in 1461 by Edward of York, who ascended the throne as Edward IV. Henry and his queen, Margaret of Anjou, later fled to Scotland. Fortescue remained loyal to Henry, and as a result was attainted of treason. He is believed to have been given the nominal title of Chancellor of England during Henry's exile. He accompanied Queen Margaret and her court while they remained on the Continent between 1463 and 1471, and wrote De Laudibus Legum Angliae for the instruction of young Prince Edward. After the defeat of the House of Lancaster, he submitted to Edward IV who reversed his attainder in October 1471.

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John Heath (judge)

John Heath (1736–1816) was a judge chiefly in criminal trials, in which he earned a reputation for severe sentencing.

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John Jay

John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).

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John Marshall

John James Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American politician and the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 to 1835.

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John Milton

John Milton (9 December 16088 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under its Council of State and later under Oliver Cromwell.

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John Morton (MP)

John Morton (c. 1716 – 25 July 1780) was an English lawyer and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1747 to 1780.

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John St Leger Douglas

John St.

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John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute

John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, (25 May 1713 – 10 March 1792) was a Scottish nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain (1762–1763) under George III.

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Jonathan Rashleigh (1693–1764)

Jonathan Rashleigh (19 January 1693 – 24 November 1764) was a British politician from Cornwall.

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Joseph Yates (judge)

Sir Joseph Yates (1722 – June 7, 1770) of Peel Hall, Little Hulton, Lancashire was an eminent English judge.

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Judge

A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges.

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Jurist

A jurist (from medieval Latin) is someone who researches and studies jurisprudence (theory of law).

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Justice of Chester

The Justice of Chester was the chief judicial authority for the county palatine of Chester, from the establishment of the county until the abolition of the Great Sessions in Wales and the palatine judicature in 1830.

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Justice of the Common Pleas

Justice of the Common Pleas was a puisne judicial position within the Court of Common Pleas of England and Wales, under the Chief Justice.

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Lincoln's Inn Fields

Lincoln's Inn Fields is the largest public square in London.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Lord Chancellor

The Lord Chancellor, formally the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, is the highest ranking among those Great Officers of State which are appointed regularly in the United Kingdom, nominally outranking even the Prime Minister.

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Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales

The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the head of the judiciary and President of the Courts of England and Wales.

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Lord Chief Justice of Ireland

The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a Queen) was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland.

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Louis XV of France

Louis XV (15 February 1710 – 10 May 1774), known as Louis the Beloved, was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1 September 1715 until his death in 1774.

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Maimonides

Moses ben Maimon (Mōšeh bēn-Maymūn; موسى بن ميمون Mūsā bin Maymūn), commonly known as Maimonides (Μαϊμωνίδης Maïmōnídēs; Moses Maimonides), and also referred to by the acronym Rambam (for Rabbeinu Mōšeh bēn Maimun, "Our Rabbi Moses son of Maimon"), was a medieval Sephardic Jewish philosopher who became one of the most prolific and influential Torah scholars of the Middle Ages.

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Member of parliament

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament.

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Mental breakdown

A mental breakdown (also known as a nervous breakdown) is an acute, time-limited mental disorder that manifests primarily as severe stress-induced depression, anxiety, Paranoia, or dissociation in a previously functional individual, to the extent that they are no longer able to function on a day-to-day basis until the disorder is resolved.

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Mercery

Mercery (from French mercerie, the notions trade) initially referred to silk, linen, and fustian textiles imported to England in the 12th century.

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Middle Temple

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn.

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Middlesex

Middlesex (abbreviation: Middx) is an historic county in south-east England.

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Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu (18 January 1689 – 10 February 1755), generally referred to as simply Montesquieu, was a French judge, man of letters, and political philosopher.

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New College, Oxford

New College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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Owen Ruffhead

Owen Ruffhead (1723 – 25 October 1769) was a miscellaneous writer, and the descendant of a Welsh family who were bakers to King George I of Great Britain.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Parliamentary sovereignty

Parliamentary sovereignty (also called parliamentary supremacy or legislative supremacy) is a concept in the constitutional law of some parliamentary democracies.

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Pasture

Pasture (from the Latin pastus, past participle of pascere, "to feed") is land used for grazing.

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Patent of precedence

A patent of precedence is a grant to an individual by letters patent of a higher social or professional position than the precedence to which his ordinary rank entitles him.

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Paul Wayland Bartlett

Paul Wayland Bartlett (January 24, 1865 – September 20, 1925) was an American sculptor working in the Beaux-Arts tradition of heroic realism.

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Pembroke College, Oxford

Pembroke College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England, located in Pembroke Square.

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Peregrine Bertie (of Low Leyton)

Peregrine Bertie (?1723 – 28 December 1786) was a Tory Member of Parliament.

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Queens' College, Cambridge

Queens' College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England.

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Recorder (judge)

A Recorder is a judicial officer in England and Wales and some other common law jurisdictions.

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Regius Professor of Civil Law (Oxford)

The Regius Chair of Civil Law, founded in the 1540s, is one of the oldest of the professorships at the University of Oxford.

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River Thames

The River Thames is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London.

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Robert Chambers (English judge)

Sir Robert Chambers (14 January 1737–9 May 1803), was a jurist, Vinerian Professor of English Law, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal.

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Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington

Sir Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington, PC (c. 1708 – 14 January 1772) was the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain. He was a member of the Whig Party in the parliament and was known for his wit and writing.

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Robert Walpole

Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745), known before 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

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Roger Newdigate

Sir Roger Newdigate, 5th Baronet (30 May 1719 – 23 November 1806) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1742 and 1780.

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Rotten and pocket boroughs

A rotten or pocket borough, more formally known as a nomination borough or proprietorial borough, was a parliamentary borough or constituency in England, Great Britain, or the United Kingdom before the Reform Act 1832, which had a very small electorate and could be used by a patron to gain unrepresentative influence within the unreformed House of Commons.

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Royal Courts of Justice

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales.

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Sardinia

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Selden Society

The Selden Society is a learned society and registered charity concerned with the study of English legal history.

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Serjeant-at-law

A Serjeant-at-Law (SL), commonly known simply as a Serjeant, was a member of an order of barristers at the English bar.

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Sir William Blackstone's Reports

Reports in K.B. and C.P., from 1746 to 1779 is the title of a collection of nominate reports, by Sir William Blackstone, of cases decided between approximately 1746 and 1780.

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Social class in the United Kingdom

The social structure of the United Kingdom has historically been highly influenced by the concept of social class, with the concept still affecting British society today.

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Society of Antiquaries of London

The Society of Antiquaries of London (SAL) is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'." It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London (a building owned by the UK government), and is a registered charity.

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Solicitor General for England and Wales

Her Majesty's Solicitor General for England and Wales, known informally as the Solicitor General, is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Attorney General, whose duty is to advise the Crown and Cabinet on the law.

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St Peter's Church, Wallingford

St Peter's Church is a redundant Anglican church in Wallingford, Oxfordshire, England.

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Stanley Nider Katz

Stanley Nider Katz (born April 23, 1934 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American historian specializing in American legal and constitutional history and the history of philanthropy.

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Substantive law

Substantive law is the set of laws that governs how members of a society are to behave.

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Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

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Tom Denning, Baron Denning

Alfred Thompson “Tom” Denning, Baron Denning, (23 January 1899 – 5 March 1999) was an English lawyer and judge.

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Tories (British political party)

The Tories were members of two political parties which existed sequentially in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and later the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from the 17th to the early 19th centuries.

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Tractatus de legibus et consuetudinibus regni Anglie

The Tractatus de legibus et consuetudinibus regni Anglie (Treatise on the Laws and Customs of the Kingdom of England), often called Glanvill, is the earliest treatise on English law.

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

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United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

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United States Declaration of Independence

The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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Vinerian Professor of English Law

The Vinerian Professorship of English Law, formerly Vinerian Professorship of Common Law, was established by Charles Viner who by his will, dated 29 December 1755, left about £12,000 to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford, to establish a Professorship of the Common Law in that University, as well as a number of Vinerian scholarships and readerships.

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Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on Christianity as a whole, especially the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state.

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Wallingford, Oxfordshire

Wallingford is an ancient market town and civil parish in the upper Thames Valley in England.

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Warden (college)

Warden is the title given to or adopted by the heads of some university colleges and other institutions.

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Westbury (UK Parliament constituency)

Westbury was a parliamentary constituency in Wiltshire from 1449 to 2010.

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Will and testament

A will or testament is a legal document by which a person, the testator, expresses their wishes as to how their property is to be distributed at death, and names one or more persons, the executor, to manage the estate until its final distribution.

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William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland

William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland, PC (Ire), FRS (3 April 174528 May 1814) was a British diplomat and politician who sat in the British House of Commons from 1774 to 1793.

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William Henry Ashurst (judge)

Sir William Henry Ashurst (or Ashhurst) (1725–1807) was an English judge.

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William Hussey (died 1813)

William Hussey (c.1724 – 26 January 1813) was an English businessman and politician who sat in the House of Commons for 48 years from 1765 to 1813.

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William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield

William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield, PC, SL (2 March 1705 – 20 March 1793) was a British barrister, politician and judge noted for his reform of English law.

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William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne

William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, (2 May 1737 – 7 May 1805), known as The Earl of Shelburne between 1761 and 1784, by which title he is generally known to history, was an Irish-born British Whig statesman who was the first Home Secretary in 1782 and then Prime Minister in 1782–83 during the final months of the American War of Independence.

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William Searle Holdsworth

Sir William Searle Holdsworth (7 May 1871 – 2 January 1944), was Vinerian Professor of English Law at Oxford University and a legal historian, amongst whose works is the 17 volume History of English Law.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon

Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon (28 November 1692 – 10 June 1760) was an English peer.

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Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon

Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon (16 January 1740 – 26 September 1799), styled Lord Norreys from 1745 to 1760, was an English peer and music patron.

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Wiltshire

Wiltshire is a county in South West England with an area of.

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World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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Redirects here:

Blackstone, William, Blackstonian, Sir Blackstone, Sir William Blackstone, W Blackstone, W. Blackstone, Wm. Blackstone.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Blackstone

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