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William Shakespeare

Index William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. [1]

329 relations: A Dictionary of the English Language, A Lover's Complaint, A Midsummer Night's Dream, A. C. Bradley, A. L. Rowse, Academy of American Poets, Adonis, African-American studies, Alderman, Alfred W. Pollard, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, All's Well That Ends Well, Allen Lane, Anglican Diocese of Worcester, Anne Hathaway (wife of Shakespeare), Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, Associated University Presses, August Wilhelm Schlegel, Avant-garde, Bad quarto, Banns of marriage, Baptism, Bardolatry, Basic Books, BBC News, Bellott v Mountjoy, Ben Jonson, Bertolt Brecht, Bishopsgate, Black Death, Blackfriars Theatre, Blackfriars, London, Blank verse, Book size, Bookbinding, Bubonic plague, Cambridge University Press, Chancel, Chancellor, Chandos portrait, Characterization, Charles Dickens, Charles Kegan Paul, Charles Knight (publisher), Charles Scribner's Sons, Christopher Marlowe, Chronology of Shakespeare's plays, Church of England, Church of the Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon, ..., Classics, Consistory court, Coriolanus, Cornell University Press, Cromwell (play), Curtain Theatre, Cuthbert Burbage, Cymbeline, D. Appleton & Company, Dark Lady (Shakespeare), David Garrick, Dogberry, Droeshout portrait, Duckworth Overlook, Edmond Malone, Edmund Spenser, Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, Edward Dowden, Elizabeth I of England, Elizabethan era, End-stopping, English literature, English Renaissance, English Renaissance theatre, Enjambment, Epic theatre, Eucharist, European turtle dove, Every Man in His Humour, Faber and Faber, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, Falstaff (opera), First Folio, Folger Shakespeare Library, Foul papers, Francis Bacon, Francis Meres, Frederick S. Boas, Freedom of the City, Futurism, G. Wilson Knight, Gatehouse, Geoffrey Chaucer, George Bernard Shaw, George Steiner, German Expressionism, German Romanticism, Giuseppe Verdi, Globe Theatre, Grammar school, Greene's Groats-Worth of Wit, Gregorian calendar, Hamlet, Hamnet Shakespeare, Harper (publisher), Henrik Ibsen, Henry Condell, Henry Evans (theatre), Henry Fuseli, Henry IV, Part 1, Henry IV, Part 2, Henry V (play), Henry VI, Part 1, Henry VI, Part 3, Henry VIII (play), Henry Wotton, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, Herman Melville, History (theatrical genre), Hogarth Press, Holinshed's Chronicles, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, House of Tudor, Huguenots, Iago, Iambic pentameter, Infobase Publishing, Jack of all trades, master of none, Jacobean era, James Fraser (publisher), James Mabbe, James VI and I, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Aubrey, John Davies of Hereford, John Dryden, John Fletcher (playwright), John Gower, John Hall (physician), John Heminges, John Shakespeare, John Ward (vicar), JSTOR, Judith Quiney, Julian calendar, Julius Caesar (play), Jupiter (mythology), King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon, King Lear, King's Men (playing company), Kingdom of England, Lady Macbeth, Lancashire, Language, Latin, Leonard Digges (writer), Letters on the English, Lord Chamberlain's Men, Lucretia, Macbeth, Macmillan Publishers, Manchester University Press, Mary Shakespeare, Masque, Measure for Measure, Memorials to William Shakespeare, Metamorphoses, Methuen Publishing, Miami University, Michael Drayton, Michaelmas term, Moby-Dick, Modern language, Much Ado About Nothing, Narrative poetry, National poet, National Portrait Gallery, London, Naturalism (theatre), Nestor (mythology), New Cambridge Shakespeare, New Criticism, New Historicism, New Place, New York Post, New York University Press, Nicholas Rowe (writer), Old Style and New Style dates, On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History, Otello, Othello, Outline of William Shakespeare, Ovid, Oxford University Press, Oxfordian theory of Shakespeare authorship, Pantheon Books, Parallel Lives, Penguin Group, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Phoenix (mythology), Playing company, Plutarch, Poaching, Poets' Corner, Portraits of Shakespeare, Postmodernism, Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Psychoanalysis, Queer studies, Random House, Raphael Holinshed, Religious views of William Shakespeare, Restoration (England), Richard Burbage, Richard II (play), Richard III (play), River Thames, Riverhead Books, Robert Armin, Robert Greene (dramatist), Romanticism, Romeo and Juliet, Routledge, Saint George's Day, Samuel Johnson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Sejanus His Fall, Seneca the Younger, Sextus Tarquinius, Sexuality of William Shakespeare, Shakespeare apocrypha, Shakespeare authorship question, Shakespeare's funerary monument, Shakespeare's late romances, Shakespeare's life, Shakespeare's plays, Shakespeare's reputation, Shakespeare's sonnets, Shakespeare's will, Shakespearean comedy, Shakespearean history, Shakespearean problem play, Shakespearean tragedy, Shoreditch, Shylock, Sigmund Freud, Simon & Schuster, Smith, Elder & Co., Snitterfield, Socrates, Soliloquy, Sonnet 18, Southwark, Southwark Cathedral, Spelling of Shakespeare's name, St John's College, Cambridge, St Paul's Cathedral, St. Martin's Press, Stendhal, Stratford-upon-Avon, Structuralism, Susanna Hall, T. S. Eliot, The Athenaeum (British magazine), The Comedy of Errors, The History of Cardenio, The Merchant of Venice, The National Archives (United Kingdom), The New York Times, The Passionate Pilgrim, The Phoenix and the Turtle, The Rape of Lucrece, The Review of English Studies, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, The Theatre, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Two Noble Kinsmen, The Winter's Tale, TheFreeDictionary.com, Thomas Carlyle, Thomas Hardy, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Lucy, Thomas Nashe, Thomas North, Thomas Quiney, Thomas Rymer, Thomas Thorpe, Thorn (letter), Tithe, Title page, Titus Andronicus, To be, or not to be, Touchstone (As You Like It), Tragic hero, Tragicomedy, Troilus and Cressida, Twelfth Night, University of Chicago Press, University of Illinois Press, University of North Carolina Press, University of Pennsylvania Press, University of Toronto Press, University Wits, Venus (mythology), Venus and Adonis (Shakespeare poem), Vice (character), Victor Hugo, Victorian era, Viking Press, Virgil, Volpone, Voltaire, W. W. Norton & Company, Warwickshire, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, Westminster Abbey, Wiley-Blackwell, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, William Blake, William Faulkner, William Kempe, William Shakespeare (essay), William Shakespeare's collaborations, William Wordsworth, Winemaker, Wordsworth Editions, World Shakespeare Bibliography, Yale University Press. Expand index (279 more) »

A Dictionary of the English Language

Published on 4 April 1755 and written by Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, sometimes published as Johnson's Dictionary, is among the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language.

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A Lover's Complaint

"A Lover's Complaint" is a narrative poem written by William Shakespeare, and published as part of the 1609 quarto of Shakespeare's Sonnets.

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A Midsummer Night's Dream

A Midsummer Night's Dream is a comedy written by William Shakespeare in 1595/96.

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A. C. Bradley

Andrew Cecil Bradley, FBA (26 March 1851 – 2 September 1935) was an English literary scholar, best remembered for his work on Shakespeare.

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A. L. Rowse

Alfred Leslie Rowse (4 December 1903 – 3 October 1997) was a British author and historian from Cornwall.

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Academy of American Poets

The Academy of American Poets is a national, member-supported organization that promotes poets and the art of poetry.

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Adonis

Adonis was the mortal lover of the goddess Aphrodite in Greek mythology.

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African-American studies

African-American studies is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of Black Americans.

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Alderman

An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions founded upon English law.

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Alfred W. Pollard

Alfred William Pollard (14 August 1859 – 8 March 1944) was an English bibliographer, widely credited for bringing a higher level of scholarly rigor to the study of Shakespearean texts.

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Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets.

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All's Well That Ends Well

All's Well That Ends Well is a play by William Shakespeare.

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Allen Lane

Sir Allen Lane (born Allen Lane Williams; 21 September 1902 – 7 July 1970) was a British publisher who together with his brothers Richard and John Lane founded Penguin Books in 1935, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.

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Anglican Diocese of Worcester

The Diocese of Worcester forms part of the Church of England (Anglican) Province of Canterbury in England.

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Anne Hathaway (wife of Shakespeare)

Anne Hathaway (1556 – 6 August 1623) was the wife of William Shakespeare, the English poet, playwright and actor.

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Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare.

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As You Like It

As You Like It is a pastoral comedy by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in 1599 and first published in the First Folio in 1623.

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Associated University Presses

Associated University Presses (AUP) is a publishing company based in the United States, formed and operated as a consortium of several American university presses.

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August Wilhelm Schlegel

August Wilhelm (after 1812: von) Schlegel (8 September 176712 May 1845), usually cited as August Schlegel, was a German poet, translator and critic, and with his brother Friedrich Schlegel the leading influence within Jena Romanticism.

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Avant-garde

The avant-garde (from French, "advance guard" or "vanguard", literally "fore-guard") are people or works that are experimental, radical, or unorthodox with respect to art, culture, or society.

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Bad quarto

A bad quarto, in Shakespearean scholarship, is a quarto-sized publication of one of Shakespeare's plays that is considered spurious, pirated from a theatre without permission by someone in the audience writing it down as it was spoken or written down later by an actor or group of actors, which, according to a theory, has been termed "memorial reconstruction".

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Banns of marriage

The banns of marriage, commonly known simply as the "banns" or "bans" /bænz/ (from a Middle English word meaning "proclamation", rooted in Frankish and from there to Old French), are the public announcement in a Christian parish church or in the town council of an impending marriage between two specified persons.

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Baptism

Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.

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Bardolatry

Bardolatry is the worship, particularly when considered excessive, of William Shakespeare.

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Basic Books

Basic Books is a book publisher founded in 1952 and located in New York, now an imprint of Hachette Books.

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BBC News

BBC News is an operational business division of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs.

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Bellott v Mountjoy

Bellott v. Mountjoy was a lawsuit heard at the Court of Requests in Westminster on 11 May 1612 that involved William Shakespeare in a minor role.

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Ben Jonson

Benjamin Jonson (c. 11 June 1572 – 6 August 1637) was an English playwright, poet, actor, and literary critic, whose artistry exerted a lasting impact upon English poetry and stage comedy.

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Bertolt Brecht

Eugen Berthold Friedrich Brecht (10 February 1898 – 14 August 1956), known professionally as Bertolt Brecht, was a German theatre practitioner, playwright, and poet.

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Bishopsgate

Bishopsgate is one of the 25 wards of the City of London and also the name of a major road (part of the A10) between Gracechurch Street and Norton Folgate in the northeast corner of London's main financial district.

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Black Death

The Black Death, also known as the Great Plague, the Black Plague, or simply the Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1347 to 1351.

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Blackfriars Theatre

Blackfriars Theatre was the name given to two separate theatres located in the former Blackfriars Dominican priory in the City of London during the Renaissance.

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Blackfriars, London

Blackfriars is an area of central London, which lies in the south-west corner of the City of London.

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Blank verse

Blank verse is poetry written with regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always in iambic pentameter.

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Book size

The size of a book is generally measured by the height against the width of a leaf, or sometimes the height and width of its cover.

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Bookbinding

Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book of codex format from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets.

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Bubonic plague

Bubonic plague is one of three types of plague caused by bacterium Yersinia pestis.

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Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

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Chancel

In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar, including the choir and the sanctuary (sometimes called the presbytery), at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building.

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Chancellor

Chancellor (cancellarius) is a title of various official positions in the governments of many nations.

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Chandos portrait

The "Chandos" portrait is the most famous of the portraits that may depict William Shakespeare (1564–1616).

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Characterization

Characterization or characterisation is the representation of persons (or other beings or creatures) in narrative and dramatic works of art.

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Charles Dickens

Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic.

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Charles Kegan Paul

Charles Kegan Paul (1828 – 19 July 1902) was an English publisher and author.

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Charles Knight (publisher)

Charles Knight (15 March 1791 – 9 March 1873) was an English publisher, editor and author.

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Charles Scribner's Sons

Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton.

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Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe, also known as Kit Marlowe (baptised 26 February 156430 May 1593), was an English playwright, poet and translator of the Elizabethan era.

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Chronology of Shakespeare's plays

This article presents a possible chronological listing of the composition of the plays of William Shakespeare.

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Church of England

The Church of England (C of E) is the state church of England.

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Church of the Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a Grade I listed parish church of the Church of England in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England.

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Classics

Classics or classical studies is the study of classical antiquity.

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Consistory court

A consistory court is a type of ecclesiastical court, especially within the Church of England where they were originally established pursuant to a charter of King William the Conqueror, and still exist today, although since about the middle of the 19th century consistory courts have lost much of their subject-matter jurisdiction.

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Coriolanus

Coriolanus is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1605 and 1608.

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Cornell University Press

The Cornell University Press is a division of Cornell University housed in Sage House, the former residence of Henry William Sage.

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Cromwell (play)

Cromwell is a play by Victor Hugo, written in 1827.

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Curtain Theatre

The Curtain Theatre was an Elizabethan playhouse located in Hewett Street, Shoreditch (part of the modern London Borough of Hackney), just outside the City of London.

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Cuthbert Burbage

Cuthbert Burbage (c. 15 June 1565 – 15 September 1636) was an English theatrical figure, son of James Burbage, builder of the Theatre in Shoreditch and elder brother of the actor Richard Burbage.

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Cymbeline

Cymbeline, also known as Cymbeline, King of Britain, is a play by William Shakespeare set in Ancient Britain and based on legends that formed part of the Matter of Britain concerning the early Celtic British King Cunobeline.

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D. Appleton & Company

D.

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Dark Lady (Shakespeare)

The Dark Lady is a woman described in Shakespeare's sonnets (sonnets 127–154) and so called because the poems make it clear that she has black hair and dun coloured skin.

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David Garrick

David Garrick (19 February 1717 – 20 January 1779) was an English actor, playwright, theatre manager and producer who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century, and was a pupil and friend of Dr Samuel Johnson.

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Dogberry

Dogberry is a character created by William Shakespeare for his play, Much Ado About Nothing.

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Droeshout portrait

The Droeshout portrait or Droeshout engraving is a portrait of William Shakespeare engraved by Martin Droeshout as the frontispiece for the title page of the First Folio collection of Shakespeare's plays, published in 1623.

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Duckworth Overlook

Duckworth Overlook, originally Gerald Duckworth and Company, founded in 1898 by Gerald Duckworth, is an independent British publisher.

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Edmond Malone

Edmond Malone (4 October 1741 – 25 May 1812) was an Irish Shakespearean scholar and editor of the works of William Shakespeare.

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Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser (1552/1553 – 13 January 1599) was an English poet best known for The Faerie Queene, an epic poem and fantastical allegory celebrating the Tudor dynasty and Elizabeth I. He is recognized as one of the premier craftsmen of nascent Modern English verse, and is often considered one of the greatest poets in the English language.

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Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford

Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford (12 April 155024 June 1604) was an English peer and courtier of the Elizabethan era.

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Edward Dowden

Edward Dowden (3 May 1843 – 4 April 1913), was an Irish critic and poet.

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Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603.

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Elizabethan era

The Elizabethan era is the epoch in the Tudor period of the history of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603).

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End-stopping

An end-stopped line is a feature in poetry in which the syntactic unit (phrase, clause, or sentence) corresponds in length to the line.

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English literature

This article is focused on English-language literature rather than the literature of England, so that it includes writers from Scotland, Wales, and the whole of Ireland, as well as literature in English from countries of the former British Empire, including the United States.

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English Renaissance

The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the late 15th century to the early 17th century.

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English Renaissance theatre

English Renaissance theatre—also known as early modern English theatre and Elizabethan theatre—refers to the theatre of England between 1562 and 1642.

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Enjambment

In poetry, enjambment (or; from the French enjambement) is incomplete syntax at the end of a line; the meaning runs over from one poetic line to the next, without terminal punctuation.

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Epic theatre

Epic theatre (episches Theater) is a theatrical movement arising in the early to mid-20th century from the theories and practice of a number of theatre practitioners who responded to the political climate of the time through the creation of a new political theatre.

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Eucharist

The Eucharist (also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others.

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European turtle dove

The European turtle dove (Streptopelia turtur) is a member of the bird family Columbidae, the doves and pigeons.

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Every Man in His Humour

Every Man in His Humour is a 1598 play by the English playwright Ben Jonson.

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Faber and Faber

Faber and Faber Limited, often abbreviated to Faber, is an independent publishing house in the United Kingdom.

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Fairleigh Dickinson University Press

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press (FDU Press) is a publishing house under the operation and oversight of Fairleigh Dickinson University, the largest private university in New Jersey with international campuses in Vancouver, British Columbia and Wroxton, Oxfordshire.

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Falstaff (opera)

Falstaff is a comic opera in three acts by the Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi.

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First Folio

Mr.

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Folger Shakespeare Library

The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in the United States.

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Foul papers

Foul papers are an author's working drafts.

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Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, (22 January 15619 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, and author.

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Francis Meres

Francis Meres (1565/6 – 29 January 1647) was an English churchman and author.

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Frederick S. Boas

Frederick Samuel Boas, (1862–1957) was an English scholar of early modern drama.

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Freedom of the City

The Freedom of the City is an honour bestowed by a municipality upon a valued member of the community, or upon a visiting celebrity or dignitary.

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Futurism

Futurism (Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century.

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G. Wilson Knight

George Richard Wilson Knight (1897–1985) was an English literary critic and academic, known particularly for his interpretation of mythic content in literature, and The Wheel of Fire, a collection of essays on Shakespeare's plays.

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Gatehouse

A gatehouse is a building enclosing or accompanying a gateway for a town, religious house, castle, manor house, or other buildings of importance.

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Geoffrey Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages.

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George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist.

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George Steiner

Francis George Steiner, FBA (born April 23, 1929) is a French-born American literary critic, essayist, philosopher, novelist, and educator.

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German Expressionism

German Expressionism consisted of a number of related creative movements in Germany before the First World War that reached a peak in Berlin during the 1920s.

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German Romanticism

German Romanticism was the dominant intellectual movement of German-speaking countries in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, influencing philosophy, aesthetics, literature and criticism.

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Giuseppe Verdi

Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (9 or 10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901) was an Italian opera composer.

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Globe Theatre

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare.

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Grammar school

A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school, differentiated in recent years from less academic Secondary Modern Schools.

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Greene's Groats-Worth of Wit

Greenes, Groats-worth of Witte, bought with a million of Repentance (1592) is a tract published as the work of the deceased playwright Robert Greene.

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Gregorian calendar

The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used civil calendar in the world.

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Hamlet

The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, often shortened to Hamlet, is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare at an uncertain date between 1599 and 1602.

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Hamnet Shakespeare

Hamnet Shakespeare (baptised 2 February 1585 – buried 11 August 1596) was the only son of William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway, and the fraternal twin of Judith Shakespeare.

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Harper (publisher)

Harper is an American publishing house, currently the flagship imprint of global publisher HarperCollins.

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Henrik Ibsen

Henrik Johan Ibsen (20 March 1828 – 23 May 1906) was a Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet.

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Henry Condell

Henry Condell (5 September 1576 (baptised) – December 1627) was an actor in the King's Men, the playing company for which William Shakespeare wrote.

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Henry Evans (theatre)

Henry Evans (c. 1543 – after 1612) was the Welsh scrivener.

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Henry Fuseli

Henry Fuseli (German: Johann Heinrich Füssli; 7 February 1741 – 17 April 1825) was a Swiss painter, draughtsman and writer on art who spent much of his life in Britain.

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Henry IV, Part 1

Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written no later than 1597.

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Henry IV, Part 2

Henry IV, Part 2 is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written between 1596 and 1599.

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Henry V (play)

Henry V is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written near 1599.

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Henry VI, Part 1

Henry VI, Part 1, often referred to as 1 Henry VI, is a history play by William Shakespeare, possibly in collaboration with Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Nashe, believed to have been written in 1591 and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England.

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Henry VI, Part 3

Henry VI, Part 3 (often written as 3 Henry VI) is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in 1591 and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England.

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Henry VIII (play)

Henry VIII is a collaborative history play, written by William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, based on the life of King Henry VIII of England.

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Henry Wotton

Sir Henry Wotton (30 March 1568 – December 1639) was an English author, diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1614 and 1625.

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Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton

Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton (6 October 1573 – 10 November 1624), (pronunciation uncertain: "Rezley", "Rizely" (archaic), (present-day) and have been suggested), was the only son of Henry Wriothesley, 2nd Earl of Southampton, and Mary Browne, daughter of Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montagu.

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Herman Melville

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period.

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History (theatrical genre)

History is one of the three main genres in Western theatre alongside tragedy and comedy, although it originated, in its modern form, thousands of years later than the other primary genres.

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Hogarth Press

The Hogarth Press was a British publishing house founded in 1917 by Leonard Woolf and Virginia Woolf.

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Holinshed's Chronicles

Holinshed's Chronicles, also known as Holinshed's Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland, is a collaborative work published in several volumes and two editions, the first in 1577, and the second in 1587.

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) is an educational and trade publisher in the United States.

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House of Tudor

The House of Tudor was an English royal house of Welsh origin, descended in the male line from the Tudors of Penmynydd.

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Huguenots

Huguenots (Les huguenots) are an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants who follow the Reformed tradition.

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Iago

Iago is a fictional character in Shakespeare's Othello (c. 1601–1604).

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Iambic pentameter

Iambic pentameter is a type of metrical line used in traditional English poetry and verse drama.

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Infobase Publishing

Infobase Publishing is an American publisher of reference book titles and textbooks geared towards the North American library, secondary school, and university-level curriculum markets.

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Jack of all trades, master of none

"Jack of all trades, master of none" is a figure of speech used in reference to a person who has dabbled in many skills, rather than gaining expertise by focusing on one.

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Jacobean era

The Jacobean era refers to the period in English and Scottish history that coincides with the reign of James VI of Scotland (1567–1625), who also inherited the crown of England in 1603 as James I. The Jacobean era succeeds the Elizabethan era and precedes the Caroline era, and is often used for the distinctive styles of Jacobean architecture, visual arts, decorative arts, and literature which characterized that period.

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James Fraser (publisher)

James Fraser (died 1841) was a Scottish publisher, now known particularly for his association with Thomas Carlyle.

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James Mabbe

James Mabbe or Mab (1572–1642) was an English scholar and poet, and a Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford.

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James VI and I

James VI and I (James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625.

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman.

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John Aubrey

John Aubrey (12 March 1626 – 7 June 1697) was an English antiquary, natural philosopher and writer.

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John Davies of Hereford

John Davies of Hereford (c. 1565 – July 1618) was a writing-master and an Anglo-Welsh poet.

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John Dryden

John Dryden (–) was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was made England's first Poet Laureate in 1668.

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John Fletcher (playwright)

John Fletcher (1579–1625) was a Jacobean playwright.

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John Gower

John Gower (c. 1330 – October 1408) was an English poet, a contemporary of William Langland and the Pearl Poet, and a personal friend of Geoffrey Chaucer.

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John Hall (physician)

John Hall (1575 – 25 November 1635) was a physician and son-in-law of William Shakespeare.

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John Heminges

John Heminges (sometimes spelled Heming or Heminge) (bapt. 25 November 1566 – 10 October 1630) was an actor in the King's Men, the playing company for which William Shakespeare wrote.

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John Shakespeare

John Shakespeare (c. 1531 – 7 September 1601) was the father of William Shakespeare.

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John Ward (vicar)

John Ward (1629–1681) was vicar of Stratford-upon-Avon from 1662 to 1681.

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JSTOR

JSTOR (short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995.

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Judith Quiney

Judith Quiney (baptised 2 February 1585 – 9 February 1662),, was the younger daughter of William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway and the fraternal twin of their only son Hamnet Shakespeare.

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Julian calendar

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.

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Julius Caesar (play)

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is a history play and tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599.

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Jupiter (mythology)

Jupiter (from Iūpiter or Iuppiter, *djous “day, sky” + *patēr “father," thus "heavenly father"), also known as Jove gen.

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King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon

The Grammar School of King Edward VI at Stratford-upon-Avon (commonly referred to as King Edward VI School or shortened to K.E.S.) is a grammar school and academy in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England, traditionally for boys only.

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King Lear

King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare.

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King's Men (playing company)

The King's Men was the acting company to which William Shakespeare (1564–1616) belonged for most of his career.

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Kingdom of England

The Kingdom of England (French: Royaume d'Angleterre; Danish: Kongeriget England; German: Königreich England) was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from the 10th century—when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms—until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

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Lady Macbeth

Lady Macbeth is a leading character in William Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth (c.1603–1607).

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Lancashire

Lancashire (abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England.

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Language

Language is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Leonard Digges (writer)

Leonard Digges (1588 – 7 April 1635) was an accomplished Hispanist and minor poet, a younger son of the astronomer Thomas Digges (1545–95, and younger brother of Sir Dudley Digges (1583–1639). After his father's death in 1595, his mother married Thomas Russell of Alderminster, who was named by William Shakespeare as one of the two overseers of his will. There are varying opinions about the extent to which the young Leonard Digges might have been influenced in his choice of profession by his stepfather's association with Shakespeare; disagreements about whether he was or was not personally acquainted with the playwright have in recent years eclipsed discussion of the work of Digges himself.

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Letters on the English

Letters on the English (or Letters Concerning the English Nation; French: Lettres philosophiques) is a series of essays written by Voltaire based on his experiences living in England between 1726 and 1729 (though from 1707 the country was part of the Kingdom of Great Britain).

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Lord Chamberlain's Men

The Lord Chamberlain's Men was a company of actors, or a "playing company" as it would have been known, for which Shakespeare wrote for most of his career.

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Lucretia

According to Roman tradition, Lucretia or Lucrece (Lucretia; died) was a noblewoman in ancient Rome whose rape by Sextus Tarquinius (Tarquin), an Etruscan king's son, was the cause of a rebellion that overthrew the Roman monarchy and led to the transition of Roman government from a kingdom to a republic.

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Macbeth

Macbeth (full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.

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Macmillan Publishers

Macmillan Publishers Ltd (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group) is an international publishing company owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group.

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Manchester University Press

Manchester University Press is the university press of the University of Manchester, England and a publisher of academic books and journals.

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Mary Shakespeare

Mary Shakespeare, née Arden, (c. 1537–1608) was the mother of William Shakespeare.

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Masque

The masque was a form of festive courtly entertainment that flourished in 16th- and early 17th-century Europe, though it was developed earlier in Italy, in forms including the intermedio (a public version of the masque was the pageant).

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Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1603 or 1604.

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Memorials to William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare has been commemorated in a number of different statues and memorials around the world, notably his funerary monument in Stratford-upon-Avon (c.1623); a statue in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, London, designed by William Kent and executed by Peter Scheemakers (1740); and a statue in New York's Central Park by John Quincy Adams Ward (1872).

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Metamorphoses

The Metamorphoses (Metamorphōseōn librī: "Books of Transformations") is a Latin narrative poem by the Roman poet Ovid, considered his magnum opus.

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Methuen Publishing

Methuen Publishing Ltd is an English publishing house.

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Miami University

Miami University (also referred to as Miami of Ohio or simply Miami) is a public research university on a 2,138-acre campus in Oxford, Ohio, 35 miles north of Cincinnati.

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Michael Drayton

Michael Drayton (1563 – 23 December 1631) was an English poet who came to prominence in the Elizabethan era.

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Michaelmas term

Michaelmas term is the first academic term of the academic year in a number of English-speaking universities and schools in the northern hemisphere, especially in the United Kingdom.

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Moby-Dick

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville.

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Modern language

A modern language is any human language that is currently in use.

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Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare thought to have been written in 1598 and 1599, as Shakespeare was approaching the middle of his career.

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Narrative poetry

Narrative poetry is a form of poetry that tells a story, often making the voices of a narrator and characters as well; the entire story is usually written in metered verse.

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National poet

A national poet or national bard is a poet held by tradition and popular acclaim to represent the identity, beliefs and principles of a particular national culture.

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National Portrait Gallery, London

The National Portrait Gallery (NPG) is an art gallery in London housing a collection of portraits of historically important and famous British people.

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Naturalism (theatre)

Naturalism is a movement in European drama and theatre that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Nestor (mythology)

Nestor of Gerenia (Νέστωρ Γερήνιος, Nestōr Gerēnios) was the wise King of Pylos described in Homer's Odyssey.

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New Cambridge Shakespeare

The New Cambridge Shakespeare is a series of critical editions of the plays of William Shakespeare published by Cambridge University Press.

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New Criticism

New Criticism was a formalist movement in literary theory that dominated American literary criticism in the middle decades of the 20th century.

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New Historicism

New Historicism is a form of literary theory whose goal is to understand intellectual history through literature, and literature through its cultural context, which follows the 1950s field of history of ideas and refers to itself as a form of "Cultural Poetics".

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New Place

New Place was William Shakespeare's final place of residence in Stratford-upon-Avon.

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New York Post

The New York Post is the fourth-largest newspaper in the United States and a leading digital media publisher that reached more than 57 million unique visitors in the U.S. in January 2017.

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New York University Press

New York University Press (or NYU Press) is a university press that is part of New York University.

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Nicholas Rowe (writer)

Nicholas Rowe (20 June 1674 – 6 December 1718), English dramatist, poet and miscellaneous writer, was appointed Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom in 1715.

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Old Style and New Style dates

Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written.

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On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History

On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History is a book by Thomas Carlyle, published by James Fraser, London, in 1841.

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Otello

Otello is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Arrigo Boito, based on Shakespeare's play Othello.

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Othello

Othello (The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1603.

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Outline of William Shakespeare

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the life and legacy of William Shakespeare: William Shakespeare – English poet, playwright, and actor who lived during the 17th century.

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Ovid

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – 17/18 AD), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Oxfordian theory of Shakespeare authorship

The Oxfordian theory of Shakespeare authorship contends that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, wrote the plays and poems traditionally attributed to William Shakespeare.

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Pantheon Books

Pantheon Books is an American book publishing imprint with editorial independence.

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Parallel Lives

Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, commonly called Parallel Lives or Plutarch's Lives, is a series of biographies of famous men, arranged in tandem to illuminate their common moral virtues or failings, probably written at the beginning of the second century AD.

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Penguin Group

The Penguin Group is a trade book publisher and part of Penguin Random House.

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Pericles, Prince of Tyre

Pericles, Prince of Tyre is a Jacobean play written at least in part by William Shakespeare and included in modern editions of his collected works despite questions over its authorship, as it was not included in the First Folio.

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Phoenix (mythology)

In Greek mythology, a phoenix (φοῖνιξ, phoînix) is a long-lived bird that cyclically regenerates or is otherwise born again.

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Playing company

In Renaissance London, playing company was the usual term for a company of actors.

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Plutarch

Plutarch (Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos,; c. CE 46 – CE 120), later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος) was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia.

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Poaching

Poaching has been defined as the illegal hunting or capturing of wild animals, usually associated with land use rights.

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Poets' Corner

Poets' Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey because of the high number of poets, playwrights, and writers buried and commemorated there.

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Portraits of Shakespeare

Within four decades of its foundation in 1856, upwards of 60 portraits were offered for sale to the National Portrait Gallery purporting to be of William Shakespeare, but there are only two definitively accepted as portraying him, both of which are posthumous.

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Postmodernism

Postmodernism is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.

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Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (later known as the Pre-Raphaelites) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, founded in 1848 by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

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Psychoanalysis

Psychoanalysis is a set of theories and therapeutic techniques related to the study of the unconscious mind, which together form a method of treatment for mental-health disorders.

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Queer studies

Queer studies, sexual diversity studies, or LGBT studies is the study of issues relating to sexual orientation and gender identity usually focusing on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and intersex people and cultures.

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Random House

Random House is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world.

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Raphael Holinshed

Raphael Holinshed (1529–1580) was an English chronicler, whose work, commonly known as Holinshed's Chronicles, was one of the major sources used by William Shakespeare for a number of his plays.

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Religious views of William Shakespeare

The religious views of William Shakespeare are the subject of an ongoing scholarly debate dating back more than 150 years.

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Restoration (England)

The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period.

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Richard Burbage

Richard Burbage (6 January 1567 – 12 March 1619) was an English stage actor, widely considered to have been one of the most famous actors of the Globe Theatre and of his time.

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Richard II (play)

King Richard the Second is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in approximately 1595.

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Richard III (play)

Richard III is a historical play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written around 1593.

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River Thames

The River Thames is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London.

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Riverhead Books

Riverhead Books is a division of Penguin Group (USA) founded in 1993 by Susan Petersen Kennedy.

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Robert Armin

Robert Armin (c. 1563 – 1615) was an English actor, a member of the Lord Chamberlain's Men.

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Robert Greene (dramatist)

Robert Greene (baptised 11 July 1558, died 3 September 1592) was an English author popular in his day, and now best known for a posthumous pamphlet attributed to him, Greenes, Groats-worth of Witte, bought with a million of Repentance, widely believed to contain an attack on William Shakespeare.

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Romanticism

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850.

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Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families.

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Routledge

Routledge is a British multinational publisher.

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Saint George's Day

Saint George's Day, also known as the Feast of Saint George, is the feast day of Saint George as celebrated by various Christian Churches and by the several nations, kingdoms, countries, and cities of which Saint George is the patron saint.

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Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson LL.D. (18 September 1709 – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr.

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 177225 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets.

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Sejanus His Fall

Sejanus His Fall, a 1603 play by Ben Jonson, is a tragedy about Lucius Aelius Sejanus, the favourite of the Roman emperor Tiberius.

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Seneca the Younger

Seneca the Younger AD65), fully Lucius Annaeus Seneca and also known simply as Seneca, was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and—in one work—satirist of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

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Sextus Tarquinius

Sextus Tarquinius (known as Tarquin) was the third and youngest son of the last king of Rome, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, according to Livy, but by Dionysius of Halicarnassus he was the oldest of the three.

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Sexuality of William Shakespeare

The sexuality of English playwright William Shakespeare has been the subject of recurring debate.

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Shakespeare apocrypha

The Shakespeare apocrypha is a group of plays and poems that have sometimes been attributed to William Shakespeare, but whose attribution is questionable for various reasons.

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Shakespeare authorship question

The Shakespeare authorship question is the argument that someone other than William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon wrote the works attributed to him.

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Shakespeare's funerary monument

The Shakespeare funerary monument is a memorial to William Shakespeare located inside Holy Trinity Church at Stratford-upon-Avon, the church in which Shakespeare was baptised and where he was buried in the chancel two days after his death.

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Shakespeare's late romances

The late romances, often simply called the romances, are a grouping of William Shakespeare's last plays, comprising Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Cymbeline; The Winter's Tale; and The Tempest.

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Shakespeare's life

William Shakespeare was an actor, playwright, poet, and theatre entrepreneur in London during the late Elizabethan and early Jacobean eras.

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Shakespeare's plays

The plays written by English poet, playwright, and actor William Shakespeare have the reputation of being among the greatest in the English language and in Western literature.

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Shakespeare's reputation

In his own time, William Shakespeare (1564–1616) was rated as merely one among many talented playwrights and poets, but since the late 17th century he has been considered the supreme playwright and poet of the English language.

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Shakespeare's sonnets

Shakespeare's sonnets are poems that William Shakespeare wrote on a variety of themes.

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Shakespeare's will

William Shakespeare's last will and testament was signed on 25 March 1616, just under a month before his death.

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Shakespearean comedy

In the First Folio, the plays of William Shakespeare were grouped into three categories: comedies, histories, and tragedies, though today many scholars recognize a fourth category, romance, to describe the specific types of comedies that appear as Shakespeare's later works.

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Shakespearean history

In the First Folio, the plays of William Shakespeare were grouped into three categories: comedies, histories, and tragedies.

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Shakespearean problem play

In Shakespeare studies, the problem plays are three plays that William Shakespeare wrote between the late 1590s and the first years of the seventeenth century: All's Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure and Troilus and Cressida.

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Shakespearean tragedy

Shakespearean tragedy is the designation given to most tragedies written by playwright William Shakespeare.

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Shoreditch

Shoreditch is a district and Church of England parish in the borough of Hackney in Greater London, England and is part of both Central London and the East End.

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Shylock

Shylock is a character in William Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice.

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Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud (born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.

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Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster, Inc., a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, is an American publishing company founded in New York City in 1924 by Richard Simon and Max Schuster.

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Smith, Elder & Co.

Smith, Elder & Co. or Smith, Elder, and Co. or Smith, Elder and Co. was a British publishing company who were most noted for the works they published in the 19th century.

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Snitterfield

Snitterfield is a village and civil parish in the Stratford on Avon district of Warwickshire, England, less than to the north of the A46 road, from Stratford upon Avon, from Warwick and from Coventry.

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Socrates

Socrates (Sōkrátēs,; – 399 BC) was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher, of the Western ethical tradition of thought.

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Soliloquy

A soliloquy (from Latin solo "to oneself" + loquor "I talk") is a device often used in drama when a character speaks to oneself, relating thoughts and feelings, thereby also sharing them with the audience, giving off the illusion of being a series of unspoken reflections.

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Sonnet 18

Sonnet 18, sometimes titled Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?, is one of the best-known of 154 sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare.

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Southwark

Southwark is a district of Central London and part of the London Borough of Southwark.

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Southwark Cathedral

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge.

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Spelling of Shakespeare's name

The spelling of William Shakespeare's name has varied over time.

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St John's College, Cambridge

St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge (the full, formal name of the college is The Master, Fellows and Scholars of the College of St John the Evangelist in the University of Cambridge).

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St Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London.

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St. Martin's Press

St.

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Stendhal

Marie-Henri Beyle (23 January 1783 – 23 March 1842), better known by his pen name Stendhal, was a 19th-century French writer.

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Stratford-upon-Avon

Stratford-upon-Avon is a market town and civil parish in the Stratford-on-Avon District, in the county of Warwickshire, England, on the River Avon, north west of London, south east of Birmingham, and south west of Warwick.

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Structuralism

In sociology, anthropology, and linguistics, structuralism is the methodology that implies elements of human culture must be understood by way of their relationship to a larger, overarching system or structure.

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Susanna Hall

Susanna Hall (née Shakespeare; baptised 26 May 1583 – 11 July 1649) was the oldest child of William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway, and the older sister of Judith Quiney and Hamnet Shakespeare.

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T. S. Eliot

Thomas Stearns Eliot, (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965), was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and "one of the twentieth century's major poets".

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The Athenaeum (British magazine)

The Athenaeum was a literary magazine published in London, England from 1828 to 1921.

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The Comedy of Errors

The Comedy of Errors is one of William Shakespeare's early plays.

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The History of Cardenio

The History of Cardenio, often referred to as merely Cardenio, is a lost play, known to have been performed by the King's Men, a London theatre company, in 1613.

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The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice is a 16th-century play written by William Shakespeare in which a merchant in Venice must default on a large loan provided by a Jewish moneylender.

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The National Archives (United Kingdom)

The National Archives (TNA) is a non-ministerial government department.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Passionate Pilgrim

The Passionate Pilgrim (1599) is an anthology of 20 poems collected and published by William Jaggard that were attributed to "W. Shakespeare" on the title page, only five of which are considered authentically Shakespearean.

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The Phoenix and the Turtle

The Phoenix and the Turtle (also spelled The Phœnix and the Turtle) is an allegorical poem about the death of ideal love by William Shakespeare.

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The Rape of Lucrece

The Rape of Lucrece (1594) is a narrative poem by William Shakespeare about the legendary Lucretia.

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The Review of English Studies

The Review of English Studies is an academic journal published by Oxford University Press covering English literature and the English language from the earliest period to the present.

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The Taming of the Shrew

The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1590 and 1592.

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The Tempest

The Tempest is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1610–1611, and thought by many critics to be the last play that Shakespeare wrote alone.

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The Theatre

The Theatre was an Elizabethan playhouse in Shoreditch (in Curtain Road, part of the modern London Borough of Hackney), just outside the City of London.

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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1589 and 1593.

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The Two Noble Kinsmen

The Two Noble Kinsmen is a Jacobean tragicomedy, first published in 1634 and attributed to John Fletcher and William Shakespeare.

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The Winter's Tale

The Winter's Tale is a play by William Shakespeare originally published in the First Folio of 1623.

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TheFreeDictionary.com

TheFreeDictionary.com is an American online dictionary and encyclopedia that gathers information from a variety of sources.

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Thomas Carlyle

Thomas Carlyle (4 December 17955 February 1881) was a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, translator, historian, mathematician, and teacher.

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Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet.

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Thomas Kyd

Thomas Kyd (baptised 6 November 1558; buried 15 August 1594) was an English playwright, the author of The Spanish Tragedy, and one of the most important figures in the development of Elizabethan drama.

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Thomas Lucy

Sir Thomas Lucy (24 April 1532 – 7 July 1600) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1571 and 1585.

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Thomas Nashe

Thomas Nashe (baptised November 1567 – c. 1601) is considered the greatest of the English Elizabethan pamphleteers.

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Thomas North

Sir Thomas North (1535–1604) was an English justice of the peace, military officer and translator.

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Thomas Quiney

Thomas Quiney (baptised 26 February 1589 – c. 1662 or 1663) was the husband of William Shakespeare's daughter Judith Shakespeare, and a vintner and tobacconist in Stratford-upon-Avon.

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Thomas Rymer

Thomas Rymer (c. 1643 – 14 December 1713) was an English antiquary and historian.

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Thomas Thorpe

Thomas Thorpe (c. 1569c. 1625) was an English publisher, most famous for publishing Shakespeare's sonnets and several works by Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson.

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Thorn (letter)

Thorn or þorn (Þ, þ) is a letter in the Old English, Gothic, Old Norse and modern Icelandic alphabets, as well as some dialects of Middle English.

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Tithe

A tithe (from Old English: teogoþa "tenth") is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a contribution to a religious organization or compulsory tax to government.

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Title page

The title page of a book, thesis or other written work is the page at or near the front which displays its title, subtitle, author, publisher, and edition.

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Titus Andronicus

Titus Andronicus is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1588 and 1593, probably in collaboration with George Peele.

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To be, or not to be

"To be, or not to be" is the opening phrase of a soliloquy spoken by Prince Hamlet in the so-called "nunnery scene" of William Shakespeare's play Hamlet.

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Touchstone (As You Like It)

Touchstone is a fictional character in Shakespeare's play As You Like It.

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Tragic hero

A tragic hero is the protagonist of a tragedy in drama.

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Tragicomedy

Tragicomedy is a literary genre that blends aspects of both tragic and comic forms.

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Troilus and Cressida

Troilus and Cressida is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1602.

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Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night, or What You WillUse of spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in the First Folio: "Twelfe Night, Or what you will" is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written around 1601–1602 as a Twelfth Night's entertainment for the close of the Christmas season.

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University of Chicago Press

The University of Chicago Press is the largest and one of the oldest university presses in the United States.

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University of Illinois Press

The University of Illinois Press (UIP) is a major American university press and is part of the University of Illinois system.

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University of North Carolina Press

The University of North Carolina Press (or UNC Press), founded in 1922, is a university press that is part of the University of North Carolina.

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University of Pennsylvania Press

The University of Pennsylvania Press (or Penn Press) is a university press affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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University of Toronto Press

The University of Toronto Press is a Canadian scholarly publisher and book distributor founded in 1901.

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University Wits

The University Wits is a phrase used to name a group of late 16th-century English playwrights and pamphleteers who were educated at the universities (Oxford or Cambridge) and who became popular secular writers.

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Venus (mythology)

Venus (Classical Latin) is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, desire, sex, fertility, prosperity and victory.

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Venus and Adonis (Shakespeare poem)

Venus and Adonis is a narrative poem by William Shakespeare published in 1593.

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Vice (character)

Vice is a stock character of the medieval morality plays.

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Victor Hugo

Victor Marie Hugo (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement.

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Victorian era

In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901.

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Viking Press

Viking Press is an American publishing company now owned by Penguin Random House.

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Virgil

Publius Vergilius Maro (traditional dates October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), usually called Virgil or Vergil in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period.

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Volpone

Volpone (Italian for "sly fox") is a comedy play by English playwright Ben Jonson first produced in 1605–06, drawing on elements of city comedy and beast fable.

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Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on Christianity as a whole, especially the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state.

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W. W. Norton & Company

W.

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Warwickshire

Warwickshire (abbreviated Warks) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England.

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Weidenfeld & Nicolson

Weidenfeld & Nicolson Ltd (established 1948), often shortened to W&N or Weidenfeld, is a British publisher of fiction and reference books.

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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster.

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Wiley-Blackwell

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons.

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Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship

Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship (Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre) is the second novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, published in 1795–96.

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William Blake

William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker.

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William Faulkner

William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American writer and Nobel Prize laureate from Oxford, Mississippi.

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William Kempe

William Kempe (died 1603), commonly referred to as Will Kemp, was an English actor and dancer specialising in comic roles and best known for having been one of the original players in early dramas by William Shakespeare.

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William Shakespeare (essay)

William Shakespeare is an 1864 work by Victor Hugo, written in his 13th year of exile.

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William Shakespeare's collaborations

Like most playwrights of his period, William Shakespeare did not always write alone.

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William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their joint publication Lyrical Ballads (1798).

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Winemaker

A winemaker or vintner is a person engaged in winemaking.

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Wordsworth Editions

Wordsworth Editions is a British publisher known for their low cost editions of classic literature and non-fiction works.

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World Shakespeare Bibliography

World Shakespeare Bibliography Online is a searchable electronic database consisting of the most comprehensive record of Shakespeare-related scholarship and theatrical productions published or produced worldwide between 1960 and the present.

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Yale University Press

Yale University Press is a university press associated with Yale University.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shakespeare

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