Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Yaodong

Index Yaodong

A yaodong or "house cave" is a particular form of earth shelter dwelling common in the Loess Plateau in China's north. [1]

29 relations: Bronze Age, China, Communist Party of China, Earth house, Earth sheltering, Edgar Snow, Facade, Gansu, Green building, Han dynasty, Henan, John Lloyd (producer), John Mitchinson (researcher), Loess Plateau, Mao Zedong, Ming dynasty, Ningxia, Qing dynasty, Qingyang, Red Star Over China, Shanxi, Sui dynasty, Tang dynasty, The Book of General Ignorance, Underground living, Xia dynasty, Yan'an, 1556 Shaanxi earthquake, 2nd millennium BC.

Bronze Age

The Bronze Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, and in some areas proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization.

New!!: Yaodong and Bronze Age · See more »

China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

New!!: Yaodong and China · See more »

Communist Party of China

The Communist Party of China (CPC), also referred to as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the founding and ruling political party of the People's Republic of China.

New!!: Yaodong and Communist Party of China · See more »

Earth house

An earth house (also known as an earth berm, an earth sheltered home, or an eco-house) is an architectural style characterized by the use of natural terrain to help form the walls of a house.

New!!: Yaodong and Earth house · See more »

Earth sheltering

Earth sheltering is the architectural practice of using earth against building walls for external thermal mass, to reduce heat loss, and to easily maintain a steady indoor air temperature.

New!!: Yaodong and Earth sheltering · See more »

Edgar Snow

Edgar Parks Snow (17 July 1905 – 15 February 1972) was an American journalist known for his books and articles on Communism in China and the Chinese Communist revolution.

New!!: Yaodong and Edgar Snow · See more »

Facade

A facade (also façade) is generally one exterior side of a building, usually, but not always, the front.

New!!: Yaodong and Facade · See more »

Gansu

Gansu (Tibetan: ཀན་སུའུ་ Kan su'u) is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the northwest of the country.

New!!: Yaodong and Gansu · See more »

Green building

Green building (also known as green construction or sustainable building) refers to both a structure and the application of processes that are environmentally responsible and resource-efficient throughout a building's life-cycle: from planning to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation, and demolition.

New!!: Yaodong and Green building · See more »

Han dynasty

The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China (206 BC–220 AD), preceded by the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and succeeded by the Three Kingdoms period (220–280 AD). Spanning over four centuries, the Han period is considered a golden age in Chinese history. To this day, China's majority ethnic group refers to themselves as the "Han Chinese" and the Chinese script is referred to as "Han characters". It was founded by the rebel leader Liu Bang, known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu of Han, and briefly interrupted by the Xin dynasty (9–23 AD) of the former regent Wang Mang. This interregnum separates the Han dynasty into two periods: the Western Han or Former Han (206 BC–9 AD) and the Eastern Han or Later Han (25–220 AD). The emperor was at the pinnacle of Han society. He presided over the Han government but shared power with both the nobility and appointed ministers who came largely from the scholarly gentry class. The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government using an innovation inherited from the Qin known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following the Rebellion of the Seven States. From the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BC) onward, the Chinese court officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics, synthesized with the cosmology of later scholars such as Dong Zhongshu. This policy endured until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 AD. The Han dynasty saw an age of economic prosperity and witnessed a significant growth of the money economy first established during the Zhou dynasty (c. 1050–256 BC). The coinage issued by the central government mint in 119 BC remained the standard coinage of China until the Tang dynasty (618–907 AD). The period saw a number of limited institutional innovations. To finance its military campaigns and the settlement of newly conquered frontier territories, the Han government nationalized the private salt and iron industries in 117 BC, but these government monopolies were repealed during the Eastern Han dynasty. Science and technology during the Han period saw significant advances, including the process of papermaking, the nautical steering ship rudder, the use of negative numbers in mathematics, the raised-relief map, the hydraulic-powered armillary sphere for astronomy, and a seismometer for measuring earthquakes employing an inverted pendulum. The Xiongnu, a nomadic steppe confederation, defeated the Han in 200 BC and forced the Han to submit as a de facto inferior partner, but continued their raids on the Han borders. Emperor Wu launched several military campaigns against them. The ultimate Han victory in these wars eventually forced the Xiongnu to accept vassal status as Han tributaries. These campaigns expanded Han sovereignty into the Tarim Basin of Central Asia, divided the Xiongnu into two separate confederations, and helped establish the vast trade network known as the Silk Road, which reached as far as the Mediterranean world. The territories north of Han's borders were quickly overrun by the nomadic Xianbei confederation. Emperor Wu also launched successful military expeditions in the south, annexing Nanyue in 111 BC and Dian in 109 BC, and in the Korean Peninsula where the Xuantu and Lelang Commanderies were established in 108 BC. After 92 AD, the palace eunuchs increasingly involved themselves in court politics, engaging in violent power struggles between the various consort clans of the empresses and empresses dowager, causing the Han's ultimate downfall. Imperial authority was also seriously challenged by large Daoist religious societies which instigated the Yellow Turban Rebellion and the Five Pecks of Rice Rebellion. Following the death of Emperor Ling (r. 168–189 AD), the palace eunuchs suffered wholesale massacre by military officers, allowing members of the aristocracy and military governors to become warlords and divide the empire. When Cao Pi, King of Wei, usurped the throne from Emperor Xian, the Han dynasty would eventually collapse and ceased to exist.

New!!: Yaodong and Han dynasty · See more »

Henan

Henan is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the central part of the country.

New!!: Yaodong and Henan · See more »

John Lloyd (producer)

John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd (born 30 September 1951) is an English television producer and writer best known for his work on such comedy television programmes as Not the Nine O'Clock News, Spitting Image, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Blackadder and QI.

New!!: Yaodong and John Lloyd (producer) · See more »

John Mitchinson (researcher)

John Mitchinson is the head of research for the British television panel game QI, and is also the managing director of Quite Interesting Limited.

New!!: Yaodong and John Mitchinson (researcher) · See more »

Loess Plateau

The Loess Plateau, also known as the Huangtu Plateau, is a plateau located around the Wei River valley and the southern half of the Ordos Loop of the Yellow River in central China.

New!!: Yaodong and Loess Plateau · See more »

Mao Zedong

Mao Zedong (December 26, 1893September 9, 1976), commonly known as Chairman Mao, was a Chinese communist revolutionary who became the founding father of the People's Republic of China, which he ruled as the Chairman of the Communist Party of China from its establishment in 1949 until his death in 1976.

New!!: Yaodong and Mao Zedong · See more »

Ming dynasty

The Ming dynasty was the ruling dynasty of China – then known as the – for 276 years (1368–1644) following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty.

New!!: Yaodong and Ming dynasty · See more »

Ningxia

Ningxia (pronounced), officially the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (NHAR), is an autonomous region of the People's Republic of China located in the northwest part of the country.

New!!: Yaodong and Ningxia · See more »

Qing dynasty

The Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing, was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912.

New!!: Yaodong and Qing dynasty · See more »

Qingyang

Qingyang is a prefecture-level city in eastern Gansu province, China.

New!!: Yaodong and Qingyang · See more »

Red Star Over China

Red Star Over China, a 1937 book by Edgar Snow, is an account of the Communist Party of China that was written when it was a guerrilla army and still obscure to Westerners.

New!!: Yaodong and Red Star Over China · See more »

Shanxi

Shanxi (postal: Shansi) is a province of China, located in the North China region.

New!!: Yaodong and Shanxi · See more »

Sui dynasty

The Sui Dynasty was a short-lived imperial dynasty of China of pivotal significance.

New!!: Yaodong and Sui dynasty · See more »

Tang dynasty

The Tang dynasty or the Tang Empire was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period.

New!!: Yaodong and Tang dynasty · See more »

The Book of General Ignorance

The Book of General Ignorance is the first in a series of books based on the final round in the intellectual British panel game QI, written by series-creator John Lloyd and head-researcher John Mitchinson,.

New!!: Yaodong and The Book of General Ignorance · See more »

Underground living

Underground living refers to living below the ground's surface, whether in naturally occurring caves or in built structures.

New!!: Yaodong and Underground living · See more »

Xia dynasty

The Xia dynasty is the legendary, possibly apocryphal first dynasty in traditional Chinese history.

New!!: Yaodong and Xia dynasty · See more »

Yan'an

Yan'an is a prefecture-level city in the Shanbei region of Shaanxi province, China, bordering Shanxi to the east and Gansu to the west.

New!!: Yaodong and Yan'an · See more »

1556 Shaanxi earthquake

The 1556 Shaanxi earthquake or Huaxian earthquake or Jiajing earthquake was a catastrophic earthquake and is also the deadliest earthquake on record, killing approximately 830,000 people.

New!!: Yaodong and 1556 Shaanxi earthquake · See more »

2nd millennium BC

The 2nd millennium BC spanned the years 2000 through 1001 BC.

New!!: Yaodong and 2nd millennium BC · See more »

Redirects here:

Chinese cave house, Chinese house cave, Yao-tung.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaodong

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »