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Corn Laws

Index Corn Laws

The Corn Laws were tariffs and other trade restrictions on imported food and grain ("corn") enforced in Great Britain between 1815 and 1846. [1]

361 relations: Abraham Walter Paulton, Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601, Adam Smith, Affair of the Spanish Marriages, Agricultural policy, Agriculture in Canada, Agriculture in the United Kingdom, Albert, Prince Consort, Alexander Dirom, Andrew Rutherfurd, Lord Rutherfurd, Annexation movements of Canada, Anti-Corn Law League, Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, Aubrey Beauclerk (politician), Banagher, Battle for Grain, Battle of Mapperley Hills, Benjamin Disraeli, Benjamin Hawes, Benjamin Parsons, Black-Eyed Susan, Blanketeers, Bloody Men, Bread in culture, Brewood, British Agricultural Revolution, Bull's Head Inn, Poole, Bury, Calverton, Nottinghamshire, Canada Corn Act, Canadian–American Reciprocity Treaty, Capitalism, Carlton Club meeting, Carr's, Causes of the French Revolution, Cavalier Parliament, Central Agricultural Protection Society, Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot, Charles Gilpin (politician), Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond, Charles Pelham Villiers, Charles Sibthorp, Chat Moss, Chronology of the Great Famine, Chummy Fleming, Classical liberalism, Cobdenism, Colombe's Birthday, Commercial treaty, Conservatism in the United Kingdom, ..., Corinne Stubbs Brown, Corn Exchanges in England, David Ricardo, Decline and modernization of the Ottoman Empire, Demographic history of Scotland, Denby Dale, Denby Dale Pies, Derby Dilly, Development of Darwin's theory, Diana of the Crossways, Dorset dialect, Douglas William Jerrold, Dronfield, Dudmaston Hall, Duncan McLaren, Earl Peel, Ebenezer Elliott, Economic history of Canada, Economic history of Scotland, Economic history of the Ottoman Empire, Economic history of the United Kingdom, Edmond Malone, Edmund Burke, Edward Baines (1800–1890), Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell, Edward Eliot, 3rd Earl of St Germans, Edward Littleton, 1st Baron Hatherton, Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, Ely and Littleport riots of 1816, English Poor Laws, English Rebel Songs 1381–1984, Erie Canal, F. J. Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich, Factories Act 1847, Factory Acts, False friend, Famine, Farmers Guardian, First Russell ministry, Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere, Francis Horner, Francis Place, Francis Place Collection, Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle, Frederick Villiers Meynell, Free trade, Free Trade Hall, Geoff Gallop, George Calvert Holland, George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen, George Harris (Unitarian), George Hudson, George Kitson Clark, George Thompson (shipowner), George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon, George Wilson (reformer), Gian Rinaldo Carli, Glasgow Argus, Glasgow Green, Godfrey Higgins, Grain trade, Great Depression of British Agriculture, Great Divergence, Great Famine (Ireland), Great Recoinage of 1816, Hawarden Kite, Henry Ashworth (nonconformist), Henry Baillie, Henry Goulburn, Henry Grey, 3rd Earl Grey, Henry Hunt (politician), Henry Reynolds-Moreton, 2nd Earl of Ducie, Henry Solly, History of agriculture in Scotland, History of capitalism, History of cities in Canada, History of liberalism, History of Penkridge, History of Scotland, History of the Conservative Party (UK), History of Workington, Homerton College, Cambridge, Housebreaker (business), Howard Douglas, Hugh Clifford, 7th Baron Clifford of Chudleigh, Hugh Mason, Hunger in the United Kingdom, Importation Act, Industrial Revolution, International relations of the Great Powers (1814–1919), Internationalism (politics), Iraq War, Irish Conservative Party, Irish diaspora, Irish whiskey, Isaac Buchanan, Jacob's Island, James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie, James Emerson Tennent, James K. Polk, James Silk Buckingham, James Smith Turner, James Steuart (economist), James Wilson (businessman), Jane Cobden, John Barton (economist), John Biggs (MP), John Bright, John Burnet (abolitionist), John Charles Herries, John Cook (regicide), John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst, John Crawfurd, John Crichton-Stuart, 2nd Marquess of Bute, John Easthope, John Epps, John Ffolliott, John Howell & Son, John MacGregor (Glasgow MP), John Neilson Gladstone, John Passmore Edwards, John Richard Robinson, John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, John Scarlett (Toronto), John Stuart (judge), John Stuart McCaig, John Temple Leader, John Thadeus Delane, John Wilson Croker, John Wodehouse, 2nd Baron Wodehouse, Joseph Chamberlain, Joseph Livesey, Joseph Lowe (economist), Joseph Pease (India reformer), Joseph Shield Nicholson, Josephine Butler, July Monarchy, Kings Head Hotel, Monmouth, Laissez-faire, Leighton Hall, Powys, Liberal Party (UK), List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1801–1819, List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1820–1839, List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1840–1859, List of historical acts of tax resistance, List of In Our Time programmes, List of poets, List of Rees's Cyclopædia articles, List of Stewards of the Manor of Hempholme, List of tariffs in the United Kingdom, List of votes of no confidence in British governments, London, Lord George Bentinck, Manchester Liberalism, Margaret Bright Lucas, Masbrough, Maynooth Grant, Mercantilism, Michael Thomas Sadler, Milnrow, Modern history of Durrus and District, Montague Gore, Montreal Annexation Manifesto, Navigation Acts, New Imperialism, Newark-on-Trent, Northern England, Old Burlington Street, Oliver Smedley, Ontario, Open–closed political spectrum, Opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Oregon boundary dispute, Ottoman Empire, Past and Present (book), Patrick Brewster, Paul Bairoch, Peelite, Penkridge, Pentrich rising, People's Budget, Peter Hesketh-Fleetwood, Peter King, 7th Baron King, Peterloo Massacre, Popanilla, Post-Napoleonic depression, Presidency of James K. Polk, Protectionism, Proto-globalization, Queen Victoria, Radical War, Radicalism (historical), Reform movement, Regency era, Repeal, Resignation speech, Revolutions of 1848, Richard Cobden, Richard Monckton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton, Richard Preston (MP), Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley, Robert Clive (1789–1854), Robert Gardiner (British Army officer), Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, Robert Hibbert (Anti-Trinitarian), Robert Hyde Greg, Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool, Robert Peel, Robert Ross Rowan Moore, Robert Westley Hall-Dare, Rochdale, Rochdale Town Hall, Romanticism, Rowland Hill, Royal Commission on Hand-Loom Weavers, Rump party, Rural Rides, Samuel Bamford, Samuel Birch (Lord Mayor of London), Samuel Bowly, Samuel Roberts (writer), Scotland in the modern era, Scottish Agricultural Revolution, Second Peel ministry, Sheffield Trades and Labour Council, Sir Alexander Matheson, 1st Baronet, Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet, Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 11th Baronet, Sir Thomas Lethbridge, 2nd Baronet, Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 2nd Baronet, of Brayton, Sir William Hayter, 1st Baronet, Sir William Miles, 1st Baronet, Society of the Friends of the People, Sociology of Manchester, Steady-state economy, Stoney Middleton, Sugar Duties Act 1846, Tariffs in United States history, Taylor, Wordsworth and Co, The Cobden Centre, The Economist, The Times, The Wealth of Nations, Thomas Ballantyne (journalist), Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester (seventh creation), Thomas Gardiner Bramston, Thomas Hodgskin, Thomas Moore, Thomas Robert Malthus, Thomas Thomasson, Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, Timeline of British diplomatic history, Timeline of English history, Timeline of European imperialism, Timeline of international trade, Timeline of Jane Austen, Timeline of Manchester history, Timeline of Ontario history, Tories (British political party), Tory, Ultra-Tories, United Kingdom general election, 1818, United Kingdom general election, 1852, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Victoria (UK TV series), Victoria the Great, Victorian era, Wadham Wyndham (political supporter), Walker tariff, Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch, Whigs (British political party), Who? Who? ministry, William Beresford, William Bodham Donne, William Cobbett, William Cooke Taylor, William Courtenay, 11th Earl of Devon, William Crawford (London MP), William Edmondstoune Aytoun, William Edward Baxter, William Ewart Gladstone, William Forbes Mackenzie, William Gamble (business), William Garrow, William Gerard Hamilton, William Gilbert (politician), William Huskisson, William Jacob, William Johnson Fox, William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, William Paley, William Seymour Blackstone, William Wolryche-Whitmore, Wynne Ellis, Youghal, Young England, Zollverein, 1781 in poetry, 1815 in the United Kingdom, 1842 in the United Kingdom, 1845 in Ireland, 1845 in the United Kingdom, 1846, 1846 in Canada, 1846 in the United Kingdom, 1849, 1849 in poetry, 1849 in the United Kingdom, 2003 invasion of Iraq, 7th Queen's Own Hussars. Expand index (311 more) »

Abraham Walter Paulton

Abraham Walter Paulton (1812–1876) was an English politician and journalist.

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Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601

The Poor Relief Act 1601 (43 Eliz 1 c 2) was an Act of the Parliament of England.

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Adam Smith

Adam Smith (16 June 1723 NS (5 June 1723 OS) – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish economist, philosopher and author as well as a moral philosopher, a pioneer of political economy and a key figure during the Scottish Enlightenment era.

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Affair of the Spanish Marriages

The Affair of the Spanish Marriages was a series of intrigues between France, Spain, and the United Kingdom relating to the marriages of Queen Isabella II of Spain and her sister the infanta Luisa Fernanda in 1846.

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Agricultural policy

Agricultural policy describes a set of laws relating to domestic agriculture and imports of foreign agricultural products.

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Agriculture in Canada

Canada is one of the largest agricultural producers and exporters in the world.

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Agriculture in the United Kingdom

Agriculture in the United Kingdom uses 69% of the country's land area, employs 1.5% of its workforce (476,000 people) and contributes 0.62% of its gross value added (£9.9 billion).

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Albert, Prince Consort

Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel; 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria.

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Alexander Dirom

Lieutenant General Alexander Dirom of Luce and Mount Annan FRS FRSE (21May 17576October 1830) was a British military commander who saw overseas service in Barbados, Jamaica and India.

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Andrew Rutherfurd, Lord Rutherfurd

The Right Hon.

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Annexation movements of Canada

From the independence of the United States until today, various movements within Canada have campaigned in favour of U.S. annexation of parts or all of Canada.

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Anti-Corn Law League

The Anti-Corn Law League was a successful political movement in Great Britain aimed at the abolition of the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread at a time when factory-owners were trying to cut wages.

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Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister.

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Aubrey Beauclerk (politician)

Aubrey William de Vere Beauclerk (20 February 1801 – 1 February 1854) was a British politician.

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Banagher

Banagher (Beannchar na Sionna in Irish) is a town in Republic of Ireland, located in the midlands, on the western edge of County Offaly in the province of Leinster, on the banks of the River Shannon.

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Battle for Grain

The Battle for Grain was an economic policy undertaken by the Fascists in Italy during the 1920s as a move toward autarky.

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Battle of Mapperley Hills

The Battle of Mapperley Hills was the mocking term given to an incident on Tuesday 23 August 1842, which marked the culmination of several days of Chartist disturbances in the Nottingham area.

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Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British statesman of the Conservative Party who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

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Benjamin Hawes

Sir Benjamin Hawes (1797 – 15 May 1862) was a British Whig politician.

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Benjamin Parsons

Benjamin Parsons (1797–1855) was an English congregational minister.

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Black-Eyed Susan

Black-Eyed Susan; or, All in the Downs is a comic play in three acts by Douglas Jerrold.

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Blanketeers

The Blanketeers or Blanket March was a demonstration organised in Manchester in March 1817.

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Bloody Men

Bloody Men is the 20th studio album by British folk rock band Steeleye Span.

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Bread in culture

Bread has a significance beyond mere nutrition in many cultures in the West and Near and Middle East because of its history and contemporary importance.

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Brewood

Brewood refers both to a settlement, which was once a town but is now a village, in South Staffordshire, England, and to the civil parish of which it is the centre.

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British Agricultural Revolution

The British Agricultural Revolution, or Second Agricultural Revolution, was the unprecedented increase in agricultural production in Britain due to increases in labour and land productivity between the mid-17th and late 19th centuries.

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Bull's Head Inn, Poole

The Bull's Head Inn was located at 73-75 High Street in Poole, Dorset, England.

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Bury

Bury is a town in Greater Manchester, England, on the River Irwell east of Bolton, southwest of Rochdale and northwest of Manchester.

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Calverton, Nottinghamshire

Calverton is a Nottinghamshire parish, of some, about seven miles north-east of Nottingham, England, and situated, like nearby Woodborough and Lambley, on one of the small tributaries of the Dover Beck.

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Canada Corn Act

The Canada Corn Act was passed in 1843 by the British Parliament and allowed Canadian grains to enter the British market at reduced duties.

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Canadian–American Reciprocity Treaty

The Canadian–American Reciprocity Treaty of 1854, also known as the Elgin-Marcy Treaty, was a trade treaty between the United Kingdom and the United States, applying to British possessions in North America including the Province of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland Colony.

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Capitalism

Capitalism is an economic system based upon private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit.

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Carlton Club meeting

The Carlton Club meeting, on 19 October 1922, was a formal meeting of Members of Parliament who belonged to the Conservative Party, called to discuss whether the party should remain in government in coalition with a section of the Liberal Party under the leadership of Liberal Prime Minister David Lloyd George.

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Carr's

Carr's is the name of foodstuff and agricultural brands historically derived from founder Jonathan Dodgson Carr, but now owned and marketed by more than one separate company.

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Causes of the French Revolution

The causes of the French Revolution can be attributed to several intertwining factors.

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Cavalier Parliament

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679.

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Central Agricultural Protection Society

The Central Agricultural Protection Society was a British pressure group formed in February 1844 under the leadership of the Duke of Richmond (president) and the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos (vice-president) in order to campaign in favour of the retention of the Corn Laws.

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Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot

Charles Chetwynd Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot KG, PC, FRS (25 April 1777 – 10 January 1849), styled Viscount Ingestre between 1784 and 1793, was a British politician.

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Charles Gilpin (politician)

Charles Gilpin (31 March 1815 – 8 September 1874) was a Quaker, orator, politician, publisher and railway director.

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Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond

Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond and 5th Duke of Lennox, 5th Duke of Aubigny, (3 August 1791 – 21 October 1860), styled Earl of March until 1819, was a British peer, soldier, politician, and a prominent Conservative.

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Charles Pelham Villiers

Charles Pelham Villiers (3 January 1802 – 16 January 1898) was a British lawyer and politician from the aristocratic Villiers family who sat in the House of Commons from 1835 to 1898, making him the longest-serving Member of Parliament (MP).

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Charles Sibthorp

Charles de Laet Waldo Sibthorp (14 February 1783 – 14 December 1855), popularly known as Colonel Sibthorp, was a widely caricatured British Ultra-Tory politician in the early 19th century.

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Chat Moss

Chat Moss is a large area of peat bog that makes up 30 per cent of the City of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England.

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Chronology of the Great Famine

The Chronology of the Great Famine (An Gorta Mór or An Drochshaol, litt: The Bad Life) documents a period of Irish history between 1845 and 1852 during which time the population of Ireland was reduced by 20 to 25 percent.

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Chummy Fleming

John William 'Chummy' Fleming (1863 – 25 January 1950) was a pioneer unionist, agitator for the unemployed, and anarchist in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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Classical liberalism

Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom.

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Cobdenism

Cobdenism refers to an economic ideology (and the associated popular movement) which perceives international free trade and a non-interventionist foreign policy as the key requirements for prosperity and world peace.

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Colombe's Birthday

Colombe's Birthday is a play written by Robert Browning.

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Commercial treaty

A commercial treaty is a formal agreement between states for the purpose of establishing mutual rights and regulating conditions of trade.

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Conservatism in the United Kingdom

Conservatism in the United Kingdom is related to its counterparts in other Western nations, but has a distinct tradition and has encompassed a wide range of theories over the decades.

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Corinne Stubbs Brown

Corinne Stubbs Brown (1849 – 1914) was an American Marxist social activist.

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Corn Exchanges in England

In England, Corn Exchanges are distinct buildings which were originally created as a venue for Corn merchants to meet and arrange pricing with farmers for the sale of wheat, barley and other corn crops.

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David Ricardo

David Ricardo (18 April 1772 – 11 September 1823) was a British political economist, one of the most influential of the classical economists along with Thomas Malthus, Adam Smith and James Mill.

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Decline and modernization of the Ottoman Empire

Beginning from the late eighteenth century, the Ottoman Empire faced challenges defending itself against foreign invasion and occupation.

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Demographic history of Scotland

The demographic history of Scotland includes all aspects of population history in what is now Scotland.

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Denby Dale

Denby Dale is a village and civil parish in the metropolitan borough of Kirklees in West Yorkshire, England, to the south east of Huddersfield.

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Denby Dale Pies

Denby Dale Pies is a manufacturer of pies founded in the 'Pie Village' of Denby Dale.

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Derby Dilly

The Derby Dilly was a name given to a group of dissident Whigs and others in the United Kingdom and was led by the former Cabinet minister Edward, Lord Stanley, who later became the 14th Earl of Derby.

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Development of Darwin's theory

Following the inception of Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection in 1838, the development of Darwin's theory to explain the "mystery of mysteries" of how new species originated was his "prime hobby" in the background to his main occupation of publishing the scientific results of the ''Beagle'' voyage.

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Diana of the Crossways

Diana of the Crossways is a novel by George Meredith which was published in 1885.

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Dorset dialect

The Dorset dialect stems from the ancient Norse and Saxon and is the dialect spoken in Dorset, a county in the West Country of England.

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Douglas William Jerrold

Douglas William Jerrold (London 3 January 18038 June 1857 London) was an English dramatist and writer.

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Dronfield

Dronfield is a town in North East Derbyshire in the East Midlands region of England.

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Dudmaston Hall

Dudmaston Hall is a 17th-century country house in the care of the National Trust in the Severn Valley, Shropshire, England.

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Duncan McLaren

Duncan McLaren (12 January 1800 – 26 April 1886) was a Scottish Liberal Party politician and political writer.

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Earl Peel

Earl Peel is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

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Ebenezer Elliott

Ebenezer Elliott (17 March 1781 – 1 December 1849) was an English poet, known as the Corn Law rhymer for his leading the fight to repeal the Corn Laws which were causing hardship and starvation among the poor.

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Economic history of Canada

Canadian historians until the 1980s tended to focus on economic history, including labour history.

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Economic history of Scotland

The economic history of Scotland charts economic development in the history of Scotland from earliest times, through seven centuries as an independent state and following Union with England, three centuries as a country of the United Kingdom.

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Economic history of the Ottoman Empire

Economic history of the Ottoman Empire covers the period 1299–1923.

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Economic history of the United Kingdom

The economic history of the United Kingdom deals with the economic history of England and Great Britain from 1500 to the early 21st century.

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Edmond Malone

Edmond Malone (4 October 1741 – 25 May 1812) was an Irish Shakespearean scholar and editor of the works of William Shakespeare.

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Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke (12 January 17309 July 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman born in Dublin, as well as an author, orator, political theorist and philosopher, who after moving to London in 1750 served as a member of parliament (MP) between 1766 and 1794 in the House of Commons with the Whig Party.

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Edward Baines (1800–1890)

Sir Edward Baines, also known as Edward Baines junior (1800–1890) was a nonconformist English newspaper editor and Member of Parliament.

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Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, PC (25 May 1803 – 18 January 1873) was an English novelist, poet, playwright and politician.

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Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell

Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell, PC, PC (Ire), FRS (24 July 1813 – 15 February 1886) was a prominent British politician in the Peelite and Liberal parties during the middle of the 19th century.

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Edward Eliot, 3rd Earl of St Germans

Edward Granville Eliot, 3rd Earl of St Germans (29 August 1798 – 7 October 1877), styled Lord Elliot from 1823 to 1845, was a British politician and diplomat.

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Edward Littleton, 1st Baron Hatherton

Edward John Littleton, 1st Baron Hatherton PC, FRS (18 March 1791 – 4 May 1863), was a British politician from the extended Littleton/Lyttelton family, of first the Canningite Tories and later the Whigs.

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Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby

Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, (29 March 1799 – 23 October 1869) was a British statesman, three-time Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and, to date, the longest-serving leader of the Conservative Party.

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Ely and Littleport riots of 1816

The Ely and Littleport riots of 1816, also known as the Ely riots or Littleport riots, occurred between 22 and 24 May 1816 in Littleport, Cambridgeshire.

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English Poor Laws

The English Poor Laws were a system of poor relief which existed in England and Wales that developed out of late-medieval and Tudor-era laws being codified in 1587–98.

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English Rebel Songs 1381–1984

English Rebel Songs 1381–1984 is the third studio album by English band Chumbawamba.

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Erie Canal

The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System (formerly known as the New York State Barge Canal).

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F. J. Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich

Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon, (1 November 1782 – 28 January 1859), styled The Honourable F. J. Robinson until 1827 and known as The Viscount Goderich between 1827 and 1833, the name by which he is best known to history, was a British politician of the Regency era.

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Factories Act 1847

The Factory Act of 1847, also known as the Ten Hours Act was a United Kingdom Act of Parliament which restricted the working hours of women and young persons (13-18) in textile mills to 10 hours per day.

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Factory Acts

The Factory Acts were a series of UK labour law Acts passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom to regulate the conditions of industrial employment.

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False friend

False friends are words in two languages that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning.

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Famine

A famine is a widespread scarcity of food, caused by several factors including war, inflation, crop failure, population imbalance, or government policies.

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Farmers Guardian

Farmers Guardian is a weekly newspaper aimed at the British farming industry.

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First Russell ministry

Whig Lord John Russell led the government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1846 to 1852.

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Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere

Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere KG, PC (1 January 1800 – 18 February 1857), known as Lord Francis Leveson-Gower until 1833, was a British politician, writer, traveller and patron of the arts.

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Francis Horner

Francis Horner FRSE (12 August 1778 – 8 February 1817) was a Scottish Whig politician, journalist, lawyer and political economist.

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Francis Place

Francis Place (3 November 1771 in London – 1 January 1854 in London) was an English social reformer.

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Francis Place Collection

The Francis Place Collection is an important British Library collection of press cuttings, leaflets, and ephemera about British politics and economics between 1770 and 1853 with some earlier material.

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Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle

Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle (28 May 1748 – 4 September 1825) was a British peer, statesman, diplomat, and author.

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Frederick Villiers Meynell

Frederick Villiers Meynell (24 March 1801 – 27 May 1872), known as Frederick Villiers during his political career, was a British Whig politician.

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Free trade

Free trade is a free market policy followed by some international markets in which countries' governments do not restrict imports from, or exports to, other countries.

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Free Trade Hall

The Free Trade Hall in Peter Street, Manchester, England, was a public hall constructed in 1853–56 on St Peter's Fields, the site of the Peterloo Massacre and is now a Radisson hotel.

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Geoff Gallop

Geoffrey Ian Gallop AC (born 27 September 1951) is Professor and Director of the Graduate School of Government at the University of Sydney and former chairman of the Australian Republican Movement.

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George Calvert Holland

George Calvert Holland (1801–1865) was an English physician, phrenologist, mesmerist and homeopath.

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George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen

George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen, (28 January 178414 December 1860), styled Lord Haddo from 1791 to 1801, was a British politician, diplomat and landowner, successively a Tory, Conservative and Peelite, who served as Prime Minister from 1852 until 1855 in a coalition between the Whigs and Peelites, with Radical and Irish support.

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George Harris (Unitarian)

George Harris (15 May 1794 – 24 December 1859) was a British Unitarian minister, polemicist and editor.

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George Hudson

George Hudson (probably 10 March 1800 – 14 December 1871) was an English railway financier and politician who, because he controlled a significant part of the railway network in the 1840s, became known as "The Railway King" – a title conferred on him by Sydney Smith in 1844.

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George Kitson Clark

George Sidney Roberts Kitson Clark (1900–1975) was an English historian, specialising in the nineteenth century.

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George Thompson (shipowner)

George Thompson (1804–1895) was a Scottish Liberal politician who was The Lord Provost of Aberdeen and MP for city.

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George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon

George William Frederick Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon, (12 January 180027 June 1870) was an English diplomat and statesman from the Villiers family.

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George Wilson (reformer)

George Wilson (1808–1870) was an English political activist, known as chairman of the Anti-Cornlaw League.

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Gian Rinaldo Carli

Gian Rinaldo Carli (1720–1795), also known by other names, was an Italian economist, historian, and antiquarian.

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Glasgow Argus

The Glasgow Argus was a Scottish newspaper, published biweekly from 1833 to 1847.

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Glasgow Green

Glasgow Green is a park in the east end of Glasgow, Scotland on the north bank of the River Clyde.

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Godfrey Higgins

Godfrey Higgins (30 January 1772 in Owston, Yorkshire – 9 August 1833 in Cambridge) was an English magistrate and landowner, a prominent advocate for social reform, historian, and antiquarian.

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Grain trade

The grain trade refers to the local and international trade in cereals and other food grains such as wheat, maize, and rice.

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Great Depression of British Agriculture

The Great Depression of British Agriculture occurred during the late nineteenth century and is usually dated from 1873 to 1896.

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Great Divergence

The Great Divergence is a term made popular by Kenneth Pomeranz's book by that title, (also known as the European miracle, a term coined by Eric Jones in 1981) referring to the process by which the Western world (i.e. Western Europe and the parts of the New World where its people became the dominant populations) overcame pre-modern growth constraints and emerged during the 19th century as the most powerful and wealthy world civilization, eclipsing Medieval India, Qing China, the Islamic World, and Tokugawa Japan.

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Great Famine (Ireland)

The Great Famine (an Gorta Mór) or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland between 1845 and 1849.

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Great Recoinage of 1816

The Great Recoinage of 1816 was an attempt by the British Government to re-stabilise the currency of Great Britain following economic difficulties precipitated by the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars.

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Hawarden Kite

The Hawarden Kite was a famous British scoop of 1885, an apparent instance of flying a kite, when Herbert Gladstone, son of the then Leader of the Opposition William Ewart Gladstone revealed to Edmund Rogers of the National Press Agency in London that his father now supported home rule for Ireland.

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Henry Ashworth (nonconformist)

Henry Ashworth (4 September 1794 – 17 May 1880) was an English cotton manufacturer, friend of Richard Cobden, and vigorous supporter of the Anti-Corn Law League.

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Henry Baillie

Colonel Henry James Baillie PC (1803 – 16 December 1885), was a British Conservative politician.

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Henry Goulburn

Henry Goulburn PC FRS (19 March 1784 – 12 January 1856) was an English Conservative statesman and a member of the Peelite faction after 1846.

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Henry Grey, 3rd Earl Grey

Henry George Grey, 3rd Earl Grey (28 December 18029 October 1894), known as Viscount Howick from 1807 until 1845, was an English statesman.

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Henry Hunt (politician)

Henry "Orator" Hunt (6 November 1773 – 15 February 1835) was a British radical speaker and agitator remembered as a pioneer of working-class radicalism and an important influence on the later Chartist movement.

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Henry Reynolds-Moreton, 2nd Earl of Ducie

Henry George Francis Reynolds-Moreton, 2nd Earl of Ducie (8 May 1802 – 2 June 1853), styled the Hon.

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Henry Solly

Henry Solly (17 November 1813 – 27 February 1903) was an English social reformer.

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History of agriculture in Scotland

The history of agriculture in Scotland includes all forms of farm production in the modern boundaries of Scotland, from the prehistoric era to the present day.

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History of capitalism

The history of capitalism has diverse and much debated roots, but fully-fledged capitalism is generally thought to have emerged in north-west Europe, especially in the Low Countries (mainly present-day Flanders and Netherlands) and Britain, in the sixteenth to seventeenth centuries.

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History of cities in Canada

Canada's cities span the continent of North America from east to west, with many major cities located relatively close to the border with the United States.

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History of liberalism

Liberalism, the belief in freedom and human rights, is historically associated with thinkers such as John Locke and Montesquieu.

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History of Penkridge

Penkridge is a market town and parish in Staffordshire with a history stretching back to the Anglo-Saxon period.

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History of Scotland

The is known to have begun by the end of the last glacial period (in the paleolithic), roughly 10,000 years ago.

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History of the Conservative Party (UK)

The Conservative Party (also known as Tories) is the oldest political party in the United Kingdom and arguably the world.

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History of Workington

Workington was historically a part of Cumberland now Cumbria, a historic county in North West England; the area around Workington has long been a producer of coal, steel and high-grade iron ore.

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Homerton College, Cambridge

Homerton College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England.

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Housebreaker (business)

A housebreaker is an organisation that specialises in the disposition of large, old residential buildings.

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Howard Douglas

General Sir Howard Douglas, 3rd Baronet (23 January 1776 – 9 November 1861) was a British military officer born in Gosport, England, the younger son of Admiral Sir Charles Douglas, and a descendant of the Earls of Morton.

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Hugh Clifford, 7th Baron Clifford of Chudleigh

Hugh Charles Clifford, 7th Baron Clifford of Chudleigh (29 May 1790 – 28 February 1858) was a British peer.

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Hugh Mason

Hugh Mason (30 January 1817 – 2 February 1886) was an English mill owner, social reformer and Liberal politician.

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Hunger in the United Kingdom

Chronic hunger has affected a sizable proportion of the UK's population throughout its history.

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Importation Act

Importation Act may refer to.

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Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

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International relations of the Great Powers (1814–1919)

This article covers worldwide diplomacy and, more generally, the international relations of the major powers from 1814 to 1919, particularly the "Big Four".

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Internationalism (politics)

Internationalism is a political principle which transcends nationalism and advocates a greater political or economic cooperation among nations and people.

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Iraq War

The Iraq WarThe conflict is also known as the War in Iraq, the Occupation of Iraq, the Second Gulf War, and Gulf War II.

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Irish Conservative Party

The Irish Conservative Party, often called the Irish Tories, was one of the dominant Irish political parties in Ireland in the 19th century.

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Irish diaspora

The Irish diaspora (Diaspóra na nGael) refers to Irish people and their descendants who live outside Ireland.

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Irish whiskey

Irish whiskey (Fuisce or uisce beatha) is whiskey made on the island of Ireland.

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Isaac Buchanan

Isaac Buchanan (July 21, 1810 – October 1, 1883) was a businessman and political figure in Canada West.

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Jacob's Island

Jacob's Island was a notorious slum in Bermondsey, London, in the 19th century.

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James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie

James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie (22 April 1812 – 19 December 1860), styled Lord Ramsay until 1838 and known as The Earl of Dalhousie between 1838 and 1849, was a Scottish statesman, and a colonial administrator in British India.

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James Emerson Tennent

Sir James Emerson Tennent, 1st Baronet FRS (7 April 1804 – 6 March 1869), born James Emerson, was a British politician and traveller born in Ireland.

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James K. Polk

James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was an American politician who served as the 11th President of the United States (1845–1849).

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James Silk Buckingham

James Silk Buckingham (25 August 1786 – 30 June 1855) was a Cornish-born author, journalist and traveller, known for his contributions to Indian journalism.

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James Smith Turner

James Smith Turner (27 May 1832 – 22 February 1904) was a Scottish dentist, known for his role in dental surgery regulation.

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James Steuart (economist)

Sir James Steuart, 3rd Baronet of Goodtrees and eventually 7th Baronet of Coltness; late in life Sir James Steuart Denham, also called Sir James Denham Steuart (8 October 1707, Edinburgh – 26 November 1780, Coltness, Lanarkshire) was a prominent Scottish Jacobite and author of "probably the first systematic treatise written in English about economics" and the first book in English with 'political economy' in the title.

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James Wilson (businessman)

James Wilson (3 June 1805 – 11 August 1860) was a Scottish businessman, economist, and Liberal politician who founded The Economist weekly and the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, which merged with Standard Bank in 1969 to form Standard Chartered.

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Jane Cobden

Emma Jane Catherine Cobden (28 April 1851 – 7 July 1947), known as Jane Cobden, was a British Liberal politician who was active in many radical causes.

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John Barton (economist)

John Barton (11 June 1789 – 10 March 1852) was an English economist.

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John Biggs (MP)

John Biggs (1801 – 4 June 1871) was a British hosier and Liberal and Radical politician.

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John Bright

John Bright (16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies.

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John Burnet (abolitionist)

John Burnet (1789–1862) was a pastor in Cork in Ireland before taking up the same position at the Mansion House Chapel in Camberwell.

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John Charles Herries

John Charles Herries PC (November 1778 – 24 April 1855), known as J. C. Herries, was a British politician and financier and a frequent member of Tory and Conservative cabinets in the early to mid-19th century.

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John Cook (regicide)

John Cook (1608 – 16 October 1660) was the first Solicitor General of the English Commonwealth and led the prosecution of Charles I. Following the English Restoration, Cook was convicted of regicide and hanged, drawn and quartered on 16 October 1660.

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John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst

John Singleton Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst, (21 May 1772 – 12 October 1863) was a British lawyer and politician.

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John Crawfurd

John Crawfurd (13 August 1783 – 11 May 1868) was a Scottish physician, colonial administrator and diplomat, and author.

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John Crichton-Stuart, 2nd Marquess of Bute

John Crichton-Stuart, 2nd Marquess of Bute, KT, FRS (10 August 1793 – 18 March 1848), styled Lord Mount Stuart between 1794 and 1814, was a wealthy aristocrat and industrialist in Georgian and early Victorian Britain.

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John Easthope

Sir John Easthope, 1st Baronet MP (29 October 1784 – 11 December 1865) was a politician and journalist.

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John Epps

Dr John Epps (1805–1869) was an English physician, phrenologist and homeopath.

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John Ffolliott

John Ffolliott (28 December 1798 – 11 February 1868) was an Irish landowner and Member of Parliament.

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John Howell & Son

John Howell & Son, known as John Howell, was the leading building and engineering company in Hastings, Sussex in the 1860s.

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John MacGregor (Glasgow MP)

John MacGregor (1797–1857) was a Scottish statistician and politician.

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John Neilson Gladstone

Captain John Neilson Gladstone, (18 January 1807 – 7 February 1863) was a British Conservative politician and an officer in the Royal Navy.

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John Passmore Edwards

John Passmore Edwards (24 March 1823 – 22 April 1911)ODNB article by A. J. A. Morris, ‘Edwards, John Passmore (1823–1911)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006, accessed 15 Nov 2007.

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John Richard Robinson

Sir John Richard Robinson (2 November 1828–30 November 1903) was an English journalist.

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John Russell, 1st Earl Russell

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, (18 August 1792 – 28 May 1878), known by his courtesy title Lord John Russell before 1861, was a leading Whig and Liberal politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on two occasions during the early Victorian era.

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John Scarlett (Toronto)

John Scarlett (1777–1865) was a merchant-miller who played a significant role in the development of the part of the historic York Township that later became the Junction neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario.

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John Stuart (judge)

Sir John Stuart (1793 – 29 October 1876) was a British Conservative Party politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1846 to 1852, before becoming a judge.

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John Stuart McCaig

John Stuart McCaig (sometimes styled as John Stuart McCaig of Muckairn and Soroba) was the second son of Malcom McCaig (a farmer) and Margaret Stewart and was born at Clachan, Isle of Lismore, Argyll, Scotland on 11 July 1823 and baptised at St Moluag's Cathedral, Lismore.

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John Temple Leader

John Temple Leader (7 May 1810 – 1 March 1903) was an English politician and connoisseur.

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John Thadeus Delane

John Thadeus Delane (11 October 1817 – 22 November 1879), editor of The Times (London), was born in London.

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John Wilson Croker

John Wilson Croker (20 December 178010 August 1857) was an Irish statesman and author.

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John Wodehouse, 2nd Baron Wodehouse

John Wodehouse, 2nd Baron Wodehouse (11 January 1771 – 31 May 1846), styled The Honourable John Wodehouse from 1797 to 1834, was a British peer and Member of Parliament.

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Joseph Chamberlain

Joseph Chamberlain (8 July 1836 – 2 July 1914) was a British statesman who was first a radical Liberal, then, after opposing home rule for Ireland, a Liberal Unionist, and eventually served as a leading imperialist in coalition with the Conservatives.

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Joseph Livesey

Joseph William Livesey (5 March 1794 – 2 September 1884) was an English temperance campaigner, social reformer, local politician, writer, publisher, newspaper proprietor and philanthropist.

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Joseph Lowe (economist)

Joseph Lowe (died 1831) was a Scottish journalist and political economist.

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Joseph Pease (India reformer)

Joseph Pease (1772–1846) was an English Quaker activist.

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Joseph Shield Nicholson

Joseph Shield Nicholson, FBA, FRSE (9 November 1850 – 12 May 1927) was an English economist.

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Josephine Butler

Josephine Elizabeth Butler (Grey; 13 April 1828 – 30 December 1906) was an English feminist and social reformer in the Victorian era.

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July Monarchy

The July Monarchy (Monarchie de Juillet) was a liberal constitutional monarchy in France under Louis Philippe I, starting with the July Revolution of 1830 and ending with the Revolution of 1848.

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Kings Head Hotel, Monmouth

The King's Head Hotel is a hotel standing opposite the Shire Hall in Glyndŵr Street, Agincourt Square, Monmouth, Wales.

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Laissez-faire

Laissez-faire (from) is an economic system in which transactions between private parties are free from government intervention such as regulation, privileges, tariffs and subsidies.

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Leighton Hall, Powys

Leighton Hall is an estate located to the east of Welshpool in the historic county of Montgomeryshire, now Powys, in Wales.

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Liberal Party (UK)

The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom – with the opposing Conservative Party – in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1801–1819

This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1801–1819.

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List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1820–1839

This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1820–1839.

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List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 1840–1859

This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1840–1859.

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List of historical acts of tax resistance

Tax resistance has probably existed ever since rulers began imposing taxes on their subjects.

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List of In Our Time programmes

In Our Time is a discussion programme on the history of ideas; it has been hosted since 1998 by Melvyn Bragg on BBC Radio 4 in the United Kingdom.

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List of poets

This is an alphabetical list of internationally notable poets.

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List of Rees's Cyclopædia articles

The Cyclopædia; or, Universal Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Literature is an important 19th century British encyclopædia edited by Rev.

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List of Stewards of the Manor of Hempholme

This is a list of the Members of Parliament appointed as Steward of the Manor of Hempholme, a notional 'office of profit under the crown' which was used to resign from the House of Commons.

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List of tariffs in the United Kingdom

This is a list of British tariffs.

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List of votes of no confidence in British governments

This a list of votes of no confidence in British governments led by Prime Ministers of the former Kingdom of Great Britain and the United Kingdom.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Lord George Bentinck

Lord William George Frederick Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (27 February 1802 – 21 September 1848), better known as Lord George Bentinck, was an English Conservative politician and racehorse owner, noted for his role (with Benjamin Disraeli) in unseating Sir Robert Peel over the Corn Laws.

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Manchester Liberalism

Manchester Liberalism, Manchester School, Manchester Capitalism and Manchesterism are terms for the political, economic and social movements of the 19th century that originated in Manchester, England.

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Margaret Bright Lucas

Margaret Bright Lucas (14 July 1818 – 4 February 1890) was a British temperance activist and suffragist.

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Masbrough

Masbrough is a suburb of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England.

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Maynooth Grant

The Maynooth Grant was a cash grant from the British government to a Catholic seminary in Ireland.

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Mercantilism

Mercantilism is a national economic policy designed to maximize the trade of a nation and, historically, to maximize the accumulation of gold and silver (as well as crops).

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Michael Thomas Sadler

Michael Thomas Sadler (3 January 1780 – 29 July 1835) was a British Tory Member of Parliament (MP) whose Evangelical Anglicanism and prior experience as a Poor Law administrator in Leeds led him to oppose Malthusian theories of population and their use to decry state provision for the poor.

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Milnrow

Milnrow (pop. 13,062 (2011)) is a suburban town within the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, in Greater Manchester, England.

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Modern history of Durrus and District

Durrus is an area of West Cork, Ireland.

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Montague Gore

Montague Gore (1800-8 September 1864), was a British politician and author.

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Montreal Annexation Manifesto

The Montreal Annexation Manifesto was a political document dated September 14, 1849 and signed in Montreal, Quebec, calling for Canada's annexation by the United States.

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Navigation Acts

The Navigation Acts were a series of English laws that restricted colonial trade to England.

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New Imperialism

In historical contexts, New Imperialism characterizes a period of colonial expansion by European powers, the United States, and Japan during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Newark-on-Trent

Newark-on-Trent or Newark is a market town and civil parish in the Newark and Sherwood district of the county of Nottinghamshire, in the East Midlands of England.

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Northern England

Northern England, also known simply as the North, is the northern part of England, considered as a single cultural area.

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Old Burlington Street

Old Burlington Street is a street in central London that is on land that was once part of the Burlington Estate.

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Oliver Smedley

Major William Oliver Smedley MC (19 February 1911–16 November 1989) was an English businessman involved in classical liberal politics and pirate radio.

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Ontario

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada.

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Open–closed political spectrum

The open–closed political spectrum is an alternative to the standard left–right system, especially used to describe the cleavage in political systems in Europe and North America in the 21st century.

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Opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway

The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&M) opened on 15 September 1830.

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Oregon boundary dispute

The Oregon boundary dispute or the Oregon Question was a controversy over the political division of the Pacific Northwest of North America between several nations that had competing territorial and commercial aspirations over the region.

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Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire (دولت عليه عثمانیه,, literally The Exalted Ottoman State; Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu or Osmanlı Devleti), also historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire"The Ottoman Empire-also known in Europe as the Turkish Empire" or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries.

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Past and Present (book)

Past and Present is a book by Thomas Carlyle.

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Patrick Brewster

Patrick Brewster (20 December 1788 - 26 March 1859), was a Scottish minister largely based in Paisley.

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Paul Bairoch

Paul Bairoch (24 July 1930 in Antwerp – 12 February 1999 in Geneva) was one of the great post-war economic historians who specialised in global economic history, urban history and historical demography.

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Peelite

The Peelites were a breakaway faction of the British Conservative Party from 1846 to 1859 who joined with the Whigs and Radicals to form the Liberal Party.

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Penkridge

Penkridge is a market town and civil parish in Staffordshire, England, which since the 17th century has been an industrial and commercial centre for neighbouring villages and the agricultural produce of Cannock Chase.

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Pentrich rising

The Pentrich rising was an armed uprising in 1817 that began around the village of Pentrich, Derbyshire, in the United Kingdom.

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People's Budget

The 1909/1910 People's Budget was a proposal of the Liberal government that introduced unprecedented taxes on the lands and high incomes of Britain's wealthy to fund new social welfare programmes.

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Peter Hesketh-Fleetwood

Sir Peter Hesketh-Fleetwood, 1st Baronet, (9 May 1801 – 12 April 1866) was an English landowner, developer and Member of Parliament, who founded the town of Fleetwood, in Lancashire, England.

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Peter King, 7th Baron King

Peter King, 7th Baron King of Ockham, Surrey (1776–1833) was an English aristocrat, politician and economic writer.

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Peterloo Massacre

The Peterloo Massacre occurred at St Peter's Field, Manchester, England, on 16 August 1819, when cavalry charged into a crowd of 60,000–80,000 who had gathered to demand the reform of parliamentary representation.

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Popanilla

The Voyage of Captain Popanilla is the second novel written by Benjamin Disraeli who would later become a Prime Minister of Great Britain.

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Post-Napoleonic depression

The post-Napoleonic depression was an economic depression in Europe after the end of the Napoleonic wars.

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Presidency of James K. Polk

The presidency of James K. Polk began on March 4, 1845, when James K. Polk was inaugurated as President of the United States, and ended on March 4, 1849.

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Protectionism

Protectionism is the economic policy of restricting imports from other countries through methods such as tariffs on imported goods, import quotas, and a variety of other government regulations.

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Proto-globalization

Proto-globalization or early modern globalization is a period of the history of globalization roughly spanning the years between 1600 and 1800, following the period of archaic globalization.

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Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death.

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Radical War

The Radical War or also known as the Scottish Insurrection of 1820, was a week of strikes and unrest, a culmination of Radical demands for reform in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland which had become prominent in the early years of the French Revolution, but had then been repressed during the long Napoleonic Wars.

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Radicalism (historical)

The term "Radical" (from the Latin radix meaning root) during the late 18th-century and early 19th-century identified proponents of democratic reform, in what subsequently became the parliamentary Radical Movement.

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Reform movement

A reform movement is a type of social movement that aims to bring a social or political system closer to the community's ideal.

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Regency era

The Regency in Great Britain was a period when King George III was deemed unfit to rule and his son ruled as his proxy as Prince Regent.

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Repeal

A repeal is the removal or reversal of a law.

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Resignation speech

A resignation speech is a speech made by a public figure upon resigning from office.

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Revolutions of 1848

The Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations, People's Spring, Springtime of the Peoples, or the Year of Revolution, were a series of political upheavals throughout Europe in 1848.

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Richard Cobden

Richard Cobden (3 June 1804 – 2 April 1865) was an English manufacturer and Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with two major free trade campaigns, the Anti-Corn Law League and the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty.

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Richard Monckton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton

Richard Monckton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton, FRS (19 June 1809 – 11 August 1885) was an English poet, patron of literature and politician.

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Richard Preston (MP)

Richard Preston (1768–1850) was an English legal author and politician.

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Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley

Richard Colley Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley (20 June 1760 – 26 September 1842) was an Irish and British politician and colonial administrator.

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Robert Clive (1789–1854)

The Hon.

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Robert Gardiner (British Army officer)

General Sir Robert William Gardiner (2 May 1781 – 26 June 1864) was Master Gunner, St James's Park, the most senior Ceremonial Post in the Royal Artillery after the Sovereign.

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Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster

Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, (22 March 1767 – 17 February 1845) was the son of the 1st Earl Grosvenor, whom he succeeded in 1802 as 2nd Earl Grosvenor.

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Robert Hibbert (Anti-Trinitarian)

Robert Hibbert (25 October 1769 – 23 September 1849) was the founder of the Hibbert Trust.

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Robert Hyde Greg

Robert Hyde Greg (24 September 1795 – 21 February 1875), was an English industrialist, economist, antiquary, and - briefly - a Member of Parliament.

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Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool

Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool, (7 June 1770 – 4 December 1828) was a British statesman and Prime Minister (1812–27).

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Robert Peel

Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, (5 February 17882 July 1850) was a British statesman of the Conservative Party who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1834–35 and 1841–46) and twice as Home Secretary (1822–27 and 1828–30).

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Robert Ross Rowan Moore

Robert Ross Rowan Moore (23 December 1811 – 6 August 1864) was an Irish political economist.

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Robert Westley Hall-Dare

Robert Westley Hall-Dare (3 March 1789 – 20 May 1836) was a British Conservative politician who was Member of Parliament for South Essex from 1832, as a Tory, until his death in 1836.

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Rochdale

Rochdale is a town in Greater Manchester, England, at the foothills of the South Pennines on the River Roch, northwest of Oldham and northeast of Manchester.

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Rochdale Town Hall

Rochdale Town Hall is a Victorian-era municipal building in Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England.

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Romanticism

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850.

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Rowland Hill

Sir Rowland Hill, KCB, FRS (3 December 1795 – 27 August 1879) was an English teacher, inventor and social reformer.

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Royal Commission on Hand-Loom Weavers

The Royal Commission on Hand-Loom Weavers was an enquiry in the United Kingdom into unemployment and poverty in the textile industry.

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Rump party

A rump party is a political party that is formed by the remaining body of supporters and leaders who do not support a breakaway group who merge with or form another new party.

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Rural Rides

Rural Rides is the book for which the English journalist, agriculturist and political reformer William Cobbett is best known.

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Samuel Bamford

Samuel Bamford (28 February 1788 – 13 April 1872), was an English radical and writer, who was born in Middleton, Lancashire.

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Samuel Birch (Lord Mayor of London)

Samuel Birch (1757–1841) was Lord Mayor of London, England.

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Samuel Bowly

Samuel Bowly (1802–1884) was an English slavery abolitionist and temperance advocate.

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Samuel Roberts (writer)

Samuel Roberts (6 March 1800 – 24 September 1885), or simply "S.R.", was a Welsh minister, known also as a political and economic writer.

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Scotland in the modern era

Scotland in the modern era, from the end of the Jacobite risings and beginnings of industrialisation in the 18th century to the present day, has played a major part in the economic, military and political history of the United Kingdom, British Empire and Europe, while recurring issues over the status of Scotland, its status and identity have dominated political debate.

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Scottish Agricultural Revolution

The Agricultural Revolution in Scotland was a series of changes in agricultural practice that began in the seventeenth century and continued in the nineteenth century.

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Second Peel ministry

The second Peel ministry was formed by Sir Robert Peel in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1841.

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Sheffield Trades and Labour Council

The Sheffield Trades and Labour Council, usually known as the Sheffield Trades Council, is a labour organisation uniting trade unionists in Sheffield.

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Sir Alexander Matheson, 1st Baronet

Sir Alexander Matheson, 1st Baronet MP JP DL (16 January 1805 – 26 July 1886), China merchant, Liberal Member of Parliament, and railway entrepreneur.

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Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet

Sir James Robert George Graham, 2nd Baronet GCB PC (1 June 1792 – 25 October 1861) was a British statesman.

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Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 11th Baronet

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 11th Baronet, FRS (25 May 1809 – 29 May 1898) was a British educational reformer and a politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1837 and 1886 initially as a Tory and later, after an eighteen-year gap, as a Liberal.

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Sir Thomas Lethbridge, 2nd Baronet

Sir Thomas Buckler Lethbridge (1778–1849) was an English politician, the second of the Lethbridge baronets.

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Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 2nd Baronet, of Brayton

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 2nd Baronet (4 September 1829 – 1 July 1906) was an English temperance campaigner and radical, anti-imperialist Liberal Party politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1859 and 1906.

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Sir William Hayter, 1st Baronet

Sir William Goodenough Hayter, 1st Baronet PC, QC (28 January 1792 – 26 December 1878) was a British barrister and Whig politician.

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Sir William Miles, 1st Baronet

Sir William Miles, 1st Baronet (13 May 1797 – 17 June 1878), was an English politician, agriculturalist and landowner.

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Society of the Friends of the People

The Society of the Friends of the People was an organization in Great Britain that was focused on advocating for Parliamentary Reform.

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Sociology of Manchester

Manchester in the United Kingdom is a city which was built by the Industrial Revolution, and has ultimately influenced political and social thinking in Britain and beyond.

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Steady-state economy

A steady-state economy is an economy consisting of a constant stock of physical wealth (capital) and a constant population size.

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Stoney Middleton

Stoney Middleton is a village and civil parish in the Derbyshire Dales district of Derbyshire, England.

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Sugar Duties Act 1846

The Sugar Duties Act 1846 (9 & 10 Vict) was a statute of the United Kingdom which equalized import duties for sugar from British colonies.

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Tariffs in United States history

The tariff history of the United States spans from colonial times to present.

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Taylor, Wordsworth and Co

Taylor Wordsworth and Co was one of the leading producers of machinery for the flax, wool and worsted industries in Leeds, Yorkshire during the British Industrial Revolution.

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The Cobden Centre

The Cobden Centre is a British economics think tank founded by Member of Parliament Steve Baker and entrepreneur Toby Baxendale.

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The Economist

The Economist is an English-language weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist Group and edited at offices in London.

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The Times

The Times is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England.

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The Wealth of Nations

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, generally referred to by its shortened title The Wealth of Nations, is the magnum opus of the Scottish economist and moral philosopher Adam Smith.

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Thomas Ballantyne (journalist)

Thomas Ballantyne (1806–1871), was a Scottish journalist.

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Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester (seventh creation)

Thomas William Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester (6 May 1754 – 30 June 1842), known as Coke of Norfolk or Coke of Holkham, was a British politician and agricultural reformer.

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Thomas Gardiner Bramston

Thomas Gardiner Bramston (1770–1831) was an English politician.

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Thomas Hodgskin

Thomas Hodgskin (born 12 December 1787, Chatham, Kent; d. 21 August 1869, Feltham, Middlesex) was an English socialist writer on political economy, critic of capitalism and defender of free trade and early trade unions.

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Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore (28 May 1779 – 25 February 1852) was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of "The Minstrel Boy" and "The Last Rose of Summer".

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Thomas Robert Malthus

Thomas Robert Malthus (13 February 1766 – 23 December 1834) was an English cleric and scholar, influential in the fields of political economy and demography.

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Thomas Thomasson

Thomas Thomasson (18081876) was a political economist and a campaigner for the repeal of the Corn Laws who was one of Bolton's greatest benefactors.

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Thoughts and Details on Scarcity

Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, Originally Presented to the Right Hon.

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Timeline of British diplomatic history

This timeline covers the main points of British (and English) foreign policy from 1485 to the early 21st century.

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Timeline of English history

This is a timeline of English history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in England and its predecessor states.

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Timeline of European imperialism

This Timeline of European imperialism covers episodes of imperialism by western nations since 1400 but does not taken account of imperialism by other nations such as the Inca, the Chinese Empire or Japanese Imperialism, to give a few only of many examples.

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Timeline of international trade

The history of international trade chronicles notable events that have affected the trade between various countries.

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Timeline of Jane Austen

Jane Austen lived her entire life as part of a family located socially and economically on the lower fringes of the English gentry.

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Timeline of Manchester history

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Manchester in north west England.

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Timeline of Ontario history

Ontario came into being as a province of Canada in 1867 but historians use the term to cover its entire history.

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Tories (British political party)

The Tories were members of two political parties which existed sequentially in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and later the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from the 17th to the early 19th centuries.

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Tory

A Tory is a person who holds a political philosophy, known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history.

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Ultra-Tories

The Ultra-Tories were an Anglican faction of British and Irish politics that appeared in the 1820s in opposition to Catholic emancipation.

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United Kingdom general election, 1818

The 1818 United Kingdom general election saw the Whigs gain a few seats, but the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool retained a majority of around 90 seats.

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United Kingdom general election, 1852

The 1852 United Kingdom general election was a watershed in the formation of the modern political parties of Britain.

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland.

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Victoria (UK TV series)

Victoria is a television drama series created and principally written by Daisy Goodwin and stars Jenna Coleman as Queen Victoria.

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Victoria the Great

Victoria the Great is a 1937 British historical film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Neagle, Anton Walbrook and Walter Rilla.

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Victorian era

In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901.

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Wadham Wyndham (political supporter)

Wadham Wyndham (1793-1849) DL JP was the eldest son of Colonel Wadham Wyndham and an influential figure in Tory politics in the first half of 19th century Britain.

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Walker tariff

The Walker Tariff was a set of tariff rates adopted by the United States in 1846.

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Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch

Walter Francis Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch, 7th Duke of Queensberry KG, PC FRS FRSE (25 November 1806 – 16 April 1884), styled The Honourable Charles Montagu-Scott between 1806 and 1808, Lord Eskdail between 1808 and 1812 and Earl of Dalkeith between 1812 and 1819, was a British politician and nobleman.

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Whigs (British political party)

The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

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Who? Who? ministry

Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby led the "Who? Who?" ministry, a short-lived British Conservative government which was in power for a matter of months in 1852.

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William Beresford

William Beresford (17 April 1797 – 6 October 1883) was a British Conservative politician.

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William Bodham Donne

William Bodham Donne (1807–1882) was an English journalist, known also as a librarian and theatrical censor.

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William Cobbett

William Cobbett (9 March 1763 – 18 June 1835) was an English pamphleteer, farmer, journalist and member of parliament, who was born in Farnham, Surrey.

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William Cooke Taylor

William Cooke Taylor (1800–1849) was an Irish writer, known as a journalist, historian and Anti-Corn Law propagandist.

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William Courtenay, 11th Earl of Devon

William Reginald Courtenay, 11th Earl of Devon PC (14 April 1807 – 18 November 1888), styled Lord Courtenay between 1835 and 1859, was a British politician who served as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster from 1866 to 1867 and as President of the Poor Law Board from 1867 to 1868.

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William Crawford (London MP)

Wiliam Crawford (5 May 1780 – 27 April 1843) was a British Liberal Party politician who represented the City of London in the 19th century.

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William Edmondstoune Aytoun

William Edmondstoune Aytoun FRSE (21 June 1813 – 4 August 1865) was a Scottish poet, lawyer by training, and professor of rhetoric and belles lettres at the University of Edinburgh.

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William Edward Baxter

William Edward Baxter (1825 – 10 August 1890) was a Scottish businessman, Liberal politician and travel writer.

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William Ewart Gladstone

William Ewart Gladstone, (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British statesman of the Liberal Party.

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William Forbes Mackenzie

William Forbes Mackenzie (18 April 1807 – 24 September 1862) was a Scottish Conservative politician and temperance reformer.

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William Gamble (business)

William Gamble (5 August 1805 – 20 March 1881) was a Canadian businessman and pioneer.

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William Garrow

Sir William Garrow (13 April 1760 – 24 September 1840) was an English barrister, politician and judge known for his indirect reform of the advocacy system, which helped usher in the adversarial court system used in most common law nations today.

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William Gerard Hamilton

William Gerard Hamilton (28 January 1729 – 16 July 1796), was English statesman and Irish politician, popularly known as "Single Speech Hamilton".

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William Gilbert (politician)

William Gilbert (23 February 1829 – 4 February 1919) was a politician and philanthropist in South Australia.

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William Huskisson

William Huskisson PC (11 March 1770 – 15 September 1830) was a British statesman, financier, and Member of Parliament for several constituencies, including Liverpool.

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William Jacob

William Jacob (c. 1761 – 17 December 1851) was an English merchant, shipowner, scientist, parliamentarian, public official and advocate for expanded British trade.

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William Johnson Fox

William Johnson Fox (1 March 1786 – 3 June 1864) was an English religious and political orator.

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William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne

William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, (15 March 1779 – 24 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830–1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835–1841).

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William Paley

William Paley (July 1743 – 25 May 1805) was an English clergyman, Christian apologist, philosopher, and utilitarian.

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William Seymour Blackstone

William Seymour Blackstone (1809–1881) was an English MP in the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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William Wolryche-Whitmore

William Wolryche-Whitmore (16 September 1787 – 11 August 1858) was a Shropshire landowner and British Whig politician.

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Wynne Ellis

Wynne Ellis (1790–1875) was a wealthy British haberdasher, politician and art collector.

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Youghal

Youghal is a seaside resort town in County Cork, Ireland.

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Young England

Young England was a Victorian era political group born on the playing fields of Cambridge, Oxford and Eton.

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Zollverein

The Zollverein or German Customs Union was a coalition of German states formed to manage tariffs and economic policies within their territories.

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1781 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

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1815 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1815 in the United Kingdom.

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1842 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1842 in the United Kingdom.

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1845 in Ireland

Events from the year 1845 in Ireland.

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1845 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1845 in the United Kingdom.

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1846

No description.

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1846 in Canada

Events from the year 1846 in Canada.

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1846 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1846 in the United Kingdom.

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1849

No description.

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1849 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

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1849 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1849 in the United Kingdom.

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2003 invasion of Iraq

The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War (also called Operation Iraqi Freedom).

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7th Queen's Own Hussars

The 7th Queen's Own Hussars was a cavalry regiment in the British Army, first formed in 1690.

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Redirects here:

British Corn Laws, Corn Law, Corn Laws Debate, Corn law, Corn laws, Corn-Laws, Importation Act 1815, Importation Act 1822, Importation Act 1846, Importation of Corn Act 1828, Repeal of the Corn Laws, Repeal of the corn laws.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws

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