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The Journal of African American History

Index The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History, formerly The Journal of Negro History (1916–2001), is a quarterly academic journal covering African American life and history. [1]

107 relations: Abram Petrovich Gannibal, African Americans in California, African-American studies, Africatown, Afrocentric education, Alberto Zayas, Alice Dunbar Nelson, Am I Black Enough for You? (song), Antoine Dubuclet, Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Association of Black Women Historians, Battle of Bamber Bridge, Beverly Jenkins, Bilali Document, Black Metropolis, Black Refugee (War of 1812), Black Women Oral History Project, Carpetbagger, Carter G. Woodson, Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site, Charles A. Beard, Charles H. Wesley, Clement G. Morgan, Compromise of 1877, Darnell Hunt, David Ruggles, David Wright (writer), Diego de Avendaño, Elizabeth Keckley, Esther Popel, Florida Ruffin Ridley, Gamble and Huff, Henry E. Baker, Hip hop music, Historiography, History journal, History of Washington, D.C., Ibram X. Kendi, Index of articles related to African Americans, Irving Mills, J. R. E. Lee, Jacqueline Anne Rouse, James H. Dillard, James Milton Turner, Jefferson–Hemings controversy, Joel Augustus Rogers, John H. Paynter, John Ireland (bishop), John Mercer Langston, ..., John R. Lynch, Jonathan Jasper Wright, Let the People Decide, Lincoln Memorial, List of history journals, List of University of Chicago Press journals, Lynching of Ell Persons, Martha Settle Putney, Mary Church Terrell, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, Matthew Elliott (loyalist), Michael Omolewa, Middle Passage, Morris Bishop, Mythology and legacy of Benjamin Banneker, National Cyclopedia of the Colored Race, Negro, Niagara Movement, Palmares (quilombo), Pan-African Congress, Pauline A. Young, Peniel E. Joseph, Ralph Luker, Rayford Logan, Reconstruction era, René Maran, Richard R. Wright, Robert M. Farnsworth, Sir George Williams affair, Slave Narrative Collection, Slavery among Native Americans in the United States, Slavery in Canada, Slavery in the United States, Social history, Southern Baptist Convention, Stephen Henderson (literary scholar), Sterling Stuckey, The Black Jacobins, The Black Scholar, The Crisis, The Elusive Ideal, The Negro and Fusion Politics in North Carolina, 1894–1901, The Protest Psychosis, The Shifting Grounds of Race, The Slave Community, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Timeline of African-American history, Timeline of Knoxville, Tennessee, Timeline of Port-au-Prince, Treaty of Ghent, We Will Shoot Back, William Jernagin, Z. Alexander Looby, Zelia Ball Page, Zora Neale Hurston, 1916 in literature, 1916 in the United States. Expand index (57 more) »

Abram Petrovich Gannibal

Abram Petrovich Gannibal, also Hannibal or Ganibal, or Abram Hannibal or Abram Petrov (Абра́м Петро́вич Ганниба́л; 1696 – 14 May 1781), was a Russian military engineer, general, and nobleman of African origin.

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African Americans in California

African-American Californians or Black Californians are residents of the state of California who are of African ancestry.

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African-American studies

African-American studies is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of Black Americans.

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Africatown

Africatown, also known as AfricaTown USA and Plateau, is a historic community located three miles (5 km) north of downtown Mobile, Alabama.

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Afrocentric education

Afrocentric education is designed to empower peoples of the African diaspora.

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Alberto Zayas

Alberto Zayas Govín (February 14, 1908 – 1983) was a Cuban rumba singer and songwriter who founded one of the first recorded rumba ensembles, Grupo Afrocubano Lulú Yonkori.

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Alice Dunbar Nelson

Alice Ruth Moore Dunbar Nelson (July 19, 1875 – September 18, 1935) was an American poet, journalist, and political activist.

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Am I Black Enough for You? (song)

"Am I Black Enough for You?" is a 1972 soul song written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and recorded by Billy Paul for his album 360 Degrees of Billy Paul on Philadelphia International Records.

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Antoine Dubuclet

Antoine Dubuclet, Jr. (1810 – December 18, 1887), was the Republican state treasurer of Louisiana from 1868 to 1878. Before the American Civil War, Dubuclet was one of the wealthiest African Americans in the nation. After the war, he was the first person of African descent to hold the office of Louisiana treasurer.

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Arturo Alfonso Schomburg

Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, also Arthur Schomburg (January 24, 1874 – June 10, 1938), was a historian, writer, and activist.

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Association for the Study of African American Life and History

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is an organization dedicated to the study and appreciation of African-American History.

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Association of Black Women Historians

The Association of Black Women Historians (ABWH) is a non-profit professional association based in Silver Spring, Maryland in the United States.

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Battle of Bamber Bridge

The Battle of Bamber Bridge was an outbreak of racial violence and mutiny that began in the evening of 24 June 1943 among American servicemen stationed in the British village of Bamber Bridge, Lancashire.

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Beverly Jenkins

Beverly Jenkins (born 1951, Detroit) is an American author of historical and contemporary romance novels with a particular focus on 19th century African-American life.

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Bilali Document

The Bilali Muhammad Document is a handwritten, Arabic manuscript on West African Islamic law.

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Black Metropolis

Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City, authored by St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton, Jr., is an anthropological and sociological study of the African-American urban experience in the first half of the 20th century.

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Black Refugee (War of 1812)

Black Refugees were African Americans who escaped slavery in the United States during the War of 1812 and settled in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Trinidad.

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Black Women Oral History Project

The Black Women Oral History Project consists of interviews with 72 African American women from 1976 to 1981, conducted under the auspices of the Schlesinger Library of Radcliffe College, now Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

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Carpetbagger

In the history of the United States, a carpetbagger was any person from the Northern United States who came to the Southern states after the American Civil War and was perceived to be exploiting the local populace for their own purposes.

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Carter G. Woodson

Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875April 3, 1950) was an American historian, author, journalist and the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

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Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site

Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site at 1538 9th Street NW, in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C., preserves the home of Carter G. Woodson (1875–1950).

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Charles A. Beard

Charles Austin Beard (November 27, 1874 – September 1, 1948) was, with Frederick Jackson Turner, one of the most influential American historians of the first half of the 20th century.

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Charles H. Wesley

Charles Harris Wesley (December 2, 1891 – August 16, 1987) was an American historian, educator, minister, and author.

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Clement G. Morgan

Clement Garnett Morgan (1859-1929) was an American attorney, civil rights activist, and city official of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Compromise of 1877

The Compromise of 1877 was an informal, unwritten deal that settled the intensely disputed 1876 U.S. presidential election.

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Darnell Hunt

Darnell Hunt (born 1962) is an American sociologist and academic administrator.

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David Ruggles

David Ruggles (March 15, 1810 – December 16, 1849) was an African-American abolitionist in Manhattan, New York who resisted slavery by his participation in a Committee of Vigilance and the Underground Railroad to aid fugitive slaves reach free states.

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David Wright (writer)

David Wright (born 1964) is an American writer who grew up in Borger, Texas.

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Diego de Avendaño

Diego de Avendaño (1594 in Segovia – 1698), was a Spanish-Peruvian Jesuit, a theologian, jurist and moral philosopher.

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Elizabeth Keckley

Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley (sometimes spelled Keckly; February 1818 – May 1907) was a former slave who became a successful seamstress, civil activist, and author in Washington, DC. She was best known as the personal modiste and confidante of Mary Todd Lincoln, the First Lady.

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Esther Popel

Esther Popel (1896–1958; also known as Esther Popel Shaw) was an African-American poet of the Harlem Renaissance and an activist and educator.

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Florida Ruffin Ridley

Florida Ruffin Ridley (January 29, 1861 – February 25, 1943) was an African-American civil rights activist, suffragist, teacher, writer, and editor from Boston, Massachusetts.

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Gamble and Huff

Kenneth Gamble (born August 11, 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and Leon A. Huff (born April 8, 1942, Camden, New Jersey) are an American songwriting and production team credited for developing the Philadelphia soul music genre (also known as Philly sound) of the 1970s.

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Henry E. Baker

Henry Edwin Baker Jr. (September 1, 1857 – April 27, 1928) was the third African American to enter the United States Naval Academy.

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Hip hop music

Hip hop music, also called hip-hopMerriam-Webster Dictionary entry on hip-hop, retrieved from: A subculture especially of inner-city black youths who are typically devotees of rap music; the stylized rhythmic music that commonly accompanies rap; also rap together with this music.

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Historiography

Historiography is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject.

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History journal

A history journal is an academic serial publication designed to present new scholarship on a historical subject, usually a subfield of history, with articles generally being subjected to peer review.

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History of Washington, D.C.

The history of Washington, D.C. is tied to its role as the capital of the United States.

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Ibram X. Kendi

Ibram X. Kendi (born 1982) is an American author and historian located at American University.

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Index of articles related to African Americans

An African American is a citizen or resident of the United States who has origins in any of the black populations of Africa.

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Irving Mills

Irving Harold Mills (né Isadore Minsky; 16 January 1894 in Odessa, Ukraine – 21 April 1985 in Palm Springs, California) was an American music publisher, musician, lyricist, and jazz artist promoter.

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J. R. E. Lee

John Robert Edward Lee, Sr. (January 26, 1864 – April 6, 1944) was an early leader in African-American education.

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Jacqueline Anne Rouse

Jacqueline Anne Rouse is an American academic specializing in African-American history and American Studies.

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James H. Dillard

James Hardy Dillard (October 24, 1856 – August 2, 1940), also known as J. H. Dillard, was an educator from Virginia.

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James Milton Turner

James Milton Turner (1840 – November 1, 1915) was a post Civil War political leader, activist, educator, and diplomat.

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Jefferson–Hemings controversy

The Jefferson–Hemings controversy is a historical debate over whether a sexual relationship between U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and his slave, Sally Hemings resulted in his fathering some or all of her six recorded children.

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Joel Augustus Rogers

Joel Augustus Rogers (September 6, 1880 – March 26, 1966) was a Jamaican-American author, journalist, and historian who contributed to the history of Africa and the African diaspora.

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John H. Paynter

John H. Paynter (1862-1947) was an African American writer of poetry and nonfiction who wrote the book Fugitives of the Pearl (1930), a popular history of the largest known mass escape attempt of enslaved people in the United States.

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John Ireland (bishop)

John Ireland (September 11, 1838 – September 25, 1918) was the third Roman Catholic bishop and first Roman Catholic archbishop of Saint Paul, Minnesota (1888–1918).

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John Mercer Langston

John Mercer Langston (December 14, 1829 – November 15, 1897) was an abolitionist, attorney, educator, activist, diplomat, and politician in the United States.

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John R. Lynch

John Roy Lynch (September 10, 1847 – November 2, 1939) was an African-American Republican politician, writer, attorney and military officer.

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Jonathan Jasper Wright

Jonathan Jasper Wright was an African-American lawyer who served as a judge on the Supreme Court of the State of South Carolina during Reconstruction from 1870 to 1877.

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Let the People Decide

Let the People Decide: Black Freedom and White Resistance Movements in Sunflower County, Mississippi, 1945–1986 is a 2004 book written by J. Todd Moye and published by the University of North Carolina Press.

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Lincoln Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

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List of history journals

This list of history journals presents representative academic journals pertaining to the field of history and historiography.

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List of University of Chicago Press journals

The Journals Division of the University of Chicago Press, in partnership with 27 learned and professional societies and associations, foundations, museums, and other not-for-profit organizations, currently publishes and distributes 68 peer-reviewed academic journal titles.

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Lynching of Ell Persons

Ell Persons was an African-American man who was lynched on 22 May 1917, after he was accused of having raped and decapitated a 16-year-old white girl, Antoinette Rappel, in Memphis, Tennessee, United States.

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Martha Settle Putney

Martha Settle Putney (November 9, 1916 – December 11, 2008) was an American educator and historian who chronicled the roles of African Americans in the armed forces.

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Mary Church Terrell

Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954) was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree, and became known as a national activist for civil rights and suffrage.

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Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society

The Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society headquartered in Boston was organized as an auxiliary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1835.

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Matthew Elliott (loyalist)

Matthew Elliott (c. 1739 – May 7, 1814) was born in County Donegal, Ireland in 1739 and died on May 7, 1814 in Burlington, Ontario.

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Michael Omolewa

Michael Abiola Omolewa is a Nigerian diplomat, scholar, education historian, and civil servant.

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Middle Passage

The Middle Passage was the stage of the triangular trade in which millions of Africans were shipped to the New World as part of the Atlantic slave trade.

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Morris Bishop

Morris Gilbert Bishop (April 15, 1893 – November 20, 1973) was an American scholar, historian, biographer, essayist, translator, anthologist and versifier.

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Mythology and legacy of Benjamin Banneker

According to accounts that began to appear during the 1960s or earlier, a substantial mythology exaggerating Benjamin Banneker's accomplishments has developed during the two centuries that have elapsed since he lived (1731-1806).

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National Cyclopedia of the Colored Race

The National Cyclopedia of the Colored Race (also known as the Cyclopedia of the Colored Race) was an encyclopedia about subjects of interest to African Americans published in 1919.

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Negro

Negro (plural Negroes) is an archaic term traditionally used to denote persons considered to be of Negroid heritage.

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Niagara Movement

The Niagara Movement was a black civil rights organization founded in 1905 by a group led by W. E. B. Du Bois and William Monroe Trotter.

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Palmares (quilombo)

Palmares, or Quilombo dos Palmares, was a quilombo, a fugitive community of escaped slaves and others, in colonial Brazil that developed from 1605 until its suppression in 1694.

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Pan-African Congress

The Pan-African Congress — following on from the first Pan-African Conference of 1900 in London — was a series of seven meetings, held in 1919 in Paris (1st Pan-African Congress), 1921 in London (2nd Pan-African Congress), 1923 in London (3rd Pan-African Congress), 1927 New York City (4th Pan-African Congress), 1945 Manchester (5th Pan-African Congress), 1974 Dar es Salaam (6th Pan-African Congress), 1994 Kampala (7th Pan-African Congress), and 2014 Accra that were intended to address the issues facing Africa as a result of European colonization of most of the continent.

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Pauline A. Young

Pauline Alice Young (August 17, 1900 – June 26, 1991) was an African-American teacher, librarian, historian, lecturer, community activist, humanitarian, and individualist.

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Peniel E. Joseph

Peniel E. Joseph is a renowned scholar, teacher and a leading public voice on race issues holds a joint professorship appointment at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the History Department in the College of Liberal Arts at The University of Texas at Austin.

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Ralph Luker

Ralph E. Luker (March 1, 1940 - August 8, 2015) was an American historian, teacher, and the author of several books about race, religion and the Civil Rights Movement.

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Rayford Logan

Rayford Whittingham Logan (January 7, 1897 – November 4, 1982) was an African-American historian and Pan-African activist.

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Reconstruction era

The Reconstruction era was the period from 1863 (the Presidential Proclamation of December 8, 1863) to 1877.

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René Maran

René Maran (Fort-de-France, Martinique, 8 November 1887 – 9 May 1960) was a French Guyanese poet and novelist, and the first black writer to win the French Prix Goncourt (in 1921).

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Richard R. Wright

Richard Robert Wright Sr. (May 16, 1855 – July 2, 1947) was an American military officer, educator and college president, politician, civil rights advocate and banking entrepreneur.

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Robert M. Farnsworth

Robert M. Farnsworth is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Missouri, Kansas City and an author in the genres of biography and literary criticism.

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Sir George Williams affair

The Sir George Williams affair (also referred to as "The Sir George Williams Computer Incident") was a 1969 event at Sir George Williams University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, now a part of Concordia University.

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Slave Narrative Collection

Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States (often referred to as the WPA Slave Narrative Collection) was a massive compilation of histories by former slaves undertaken by the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration from 1936 to 1938.

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Slavery among Native Americans in the United States

Slavery among Native Americans in the United States includes slavery by Native Americans as well as slavery of Native Americans roughly within the present-day United States.

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Slavery in Canada

Slavery in Canada includes both that practised by First Nations from earliest times and that under European colonization.

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Slavery in the United States

Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of human chattel enslavement, primarily of Africans and African Americans, that existed in the United States of America in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Social history

Social history, often called the new social history, is a field of history that looks at the lived experience of the past.

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Southern Baptist Convention

The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a Christian denomination based in the United States.

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Stephen Henderson (literary scholar)

Stephen E. Henderson (October 13, 1925 – January 7, 1997) was a professor of African-American literature and culture.

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Sterling Stuckey

P.

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The Black Jacobins

The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution is a 1938 book by Afro-Trinidadian historian C. L. R. James, a history of the Haitian Revolution of 1791–1804.

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The Black Scholar

The Black Scholar (TBS), the third-oldest journal of Black culture and political thought in the United States, was founded in 1969 near San Francisco, California, by Robert Chrisman, Nathan Hare, and Allan Ross.

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The Crisis

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

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The Elusive Ideal

The Elusive Ideal: Equal Educational Opportunity and the Federal Role in Boston's Public Schools, 1950–1985 is a social history book written by Adam R. Nelson on the relationship between the Boston public schools and local, state, and federal public policy in the mid-20th century.

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The Negro and Fusion Politics in North Carolina, 1894–1901

The Negro and Fusion Politics in North Carolina, 1894–1901 is a 1951 book by African American scholar Helen G. Edmonds.

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The Protest Psychosis

The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease is a 2010 book by the psychiatrist Jonathan Metzl (who also has a Ph.D. in American studies), and published by Beacon Press, covering the history of the 1960s Ionia State Hospital—located in Ionia, Michigan and converted into the Ionia Correctional Facility in 1986.

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The Shifting Grounds of Race

The Shifting Grounds of Race: Black and Japanese Americans in the Making of Multiethnic Los Angeles is a nonfiction book by Scott Kurashige, published in 2008 by Princeton University Press.

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The Slave Community

The Slave Community: Plantation Life in the Antebellum South is a book written by American historian John W. Blassingame.

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Their Eyes Were Watching God

Their Eyes Were Watching God is a 1937 novel and the best known work by African-American writer Zora Neale Hurston.

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Timeline of African-American history

This is a timeline of the African-American history in what is now the United States, from 1565 to the present.

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Timeline of Knoxville, Tennessee

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee, USA.

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Timeline of Port-au-Prince

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

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Treaty of Ghent

The Treaty of Ghent was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

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We Will Shoot Back

We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement is a non-fiction book written by Akinyele Umoja, an American author and educator.

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William Jernagin

Reverend D.D. William Henry Jernagin (1869–1958) was an African-American Baptist pastor, an important figure in the African-American Civil Rights Movement (1896–1954), and Pan-African activist.

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Z. Alexander Looby

Zephaniah Alexander Looby (April 8, 1899 – March 24, 1972) was a lawyer in Nashville, Tennessee who was active in the Civil Rights Movement.

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Zelia Ball Page

Zelia Ball Page (1850-1937) was a freeborn African-American teacher who spent her career teaching black youths in Missouri, Oklahoma and Tennessee.

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Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an influential author of African-American literature and anthropologist, who portrayed racial struggles in the early 20th century American South, and published research on Haitian voodoo.

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1916 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1916.

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1916 in the United States

Events from the year 1916 in the United States.

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Redirects here:

J Afr Am Hist, J. Afr. Am. Hist., Journal of African American History, Journal of Negro History, The Journal of Negro History.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Journal_of_African_American_History

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