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Tokugawa Tsunayoshi

Index Tokugawa Tsunayoshi

was the fifth shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty of Japan. [1]

74 relations: Akō Domain, Asano Naganori, Beatrice Bodart-Bailey, Buddhism, Bunraku, Chūshingura, Classic of Filial Piety, Daimyō, Dejima, Dutch missions to Edo, Edo, Edo Castle, Emperor Go-Sai, Emperor Higashiyama, Emperor Reigen, Engelbert Kaempfer, Enpō, Forty-seven rōnin, Fuji TV, Genroku, Gokoku-ji, Great Learning, Hōei, Homosexuality, Hotta Masatoshi, Isaac Titsingh, Japanese era name, Jōkyō, Kabuki, Kamakura shogunate, Kan'ei-ji, Kōfu, Kira Yoshinaka, Kishū Domain, Koku, Kyoto, Laid-Back Camp, Laura Joh Rowland, Maeda Yoshinori, Matsudaira clan, Mount Fuji, Muramasa: The Demon Blade, Nagasaki, Neo-Confucianism, Nihon Ōdai Ichiran, Noh, Osaka, Powerpuff Girls Z, Reborn!, Sakai Tadakiyo, ..., Satsuma Domain, Shōgun, Shinjū (novel), Shinto, Tairō, Takada Domain, Takatsukasa Sukenobu, Tatebayashi Domain, Tenna, Timon Screech, Tokugawa (surname), Tokugawa Hidetada, Tokugawa Iemitsu, Tokugawa Ienobu, Tokugawa Ietsuna, Tokugawa Ieyasu, Tokugawa Munetaka, Tokugawa shogunate, Tokugawa Tsunanari, Tokugawa Tsunashige, Tokugawa Yoshimune, Tsuna Sawada, Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu, Zhu Xi. Expand index (24 more) »

Akō Domain

The was a domain in feudal Japan.

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Asano Naganori

was the daimyō of the Akō Domain in Japan (1675–1701).

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Beatrice Bodart-Bailey

Beatrice Bodart-Bailey (born 1942WorldCat (date unknown). Beatrice M. Bodart-Bailey. Retrieved from http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/person/data/2632104239.) is a German Australian academic, author, and Japanologist.

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Buddhism

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.

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Bunraku

, also known as Ningyō jōruri (人形浄瑠璃), is a form of traditional Japanese puppet theatre, founded in Osaka in the beginning of 17th century.

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Chūshingura

is the title given to fictionalized accounts in Japanese literature, theatre, and film that relate to the historical incident involving the Forty-seven ''rōnin'' and their mission to avenge the death of their master, Asano Naganori.

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Classic of Filial Piety

The Classic of Filial Piety, also known by its Chinese name as the Xiaojing, is a Confucian classic treatise giving advice on filial piety: that is, how to behave towards a senior such as a father, an elder brother, or ruler.

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Daimyō

The were powerful Japanese feudal lords who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings.

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Dejima

, in old Western documents Latinised as Deshima, Decima, Desjima, Dezima, Disma, or Disima, was a Dutch trading post notable for being the single place of direct trade and exchange between Japan and the outside world during the Edo period. It was a small fan-shaped artificial island formed by digging a canal through a small peninsula in the bay of Nagasaki in 1634 by local merchants. Dejima was built to constrain foreign traders. Originally built to house Portuguese traders, it was used by the Dutch as a trading post from 1641 until 1853. Covering an area of or, it was later integrated into the city through the process of land reclamation. In 1922, the "Dejima Dutch Trading Post" was designated a Japanese national historic site.

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Dutch missions to Edo

The Dutch East India Company missions to Edo were regular tribute missions to the court of the Tokugawa shōgun in Edo (modern Tokyo) to reassure the ties between the Bakufu and the Opperhoofd.

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Edo

, also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.

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Edo Castle

, also known as, is a flatland castle that was built in 1457 by Ōta Dōkan.

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Emperor Go-Sai

, also known as, was the 111th emperor of Japan,Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō): according to the traditional order of succession.

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Emperor Higashiyama

was the 113th emperor of Japan,Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō): according to the traditional order of succession.

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Emperor Reigen

was the 112th emperor of Japan,Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō): according to the traditional order of succession.

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Engelbert Kaempfer

Engelbert Kaempfer (German Engelbert Kämpfer, Latin Engelbertus Kaempferus; September 16, 1651 – November 2, 1716) was a German naturalist, physician, and explorer writer known for his tour of Russia, Persia, India, South-East Asia, and Japan between 1683 and 1693.

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Enpō

(contemporarily written as 延寳) is the after Kanbun and before Tenna. This period spanned the years from September 1673 to September 1681.

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Forty-seven rōnin

The revenge of the, also known as the or Akō vendetta, is an 18th-century historical event in Japan in which a band of rōnin (leaderless samurai) avenged the death of their master.

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Fuji TV

is a Japanese television station based in Odaiba, Minato, Tokyo, Japan, also known as or CX, based on the station's call sign "JOCX-DTV".

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Genroku

was a after Jōkyō and before Hōei. This period spanned the years from ninth month of 1688 through third month of 1704.

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Gokoku-ji

is a Shingon Buddhist temple in Tokyo's Bunkyō.

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Great Learning

The Great Learning or Daxue was one of the "Four Books" in Confucianism.

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Hōei

was a after Genroku and before Shōtoku. This period spanned the years from March 1704 through April 1711.

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Homosexuality

Homosexuality is romantic attraction, sexual attraction or sexual behavior between members of the same sex or gender.

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Hotta Masatoshi

was a daimyō (feudal lord) in Shimōsa Province, and top government advisor and official in the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan.

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Isaac Titsingh

Isaac Titsingh FRS (10 January 1745 in Amsterdam – 2 February 1812 in Paris) was a Dutch scholar, merchant-trader and ambassador.

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Japanese era name

The, also known as, is the first of the two elements that identify years in the Japanese era calendar scheme.

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Jōkyō

was a after Tenna and before Genroku. This period spanned the years from February 1684 through September 1688.

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Kabuki

is a classical Japanese dance-drama.

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Kamakura shogunate

The Kamakura shogunate (Japanese: 鎌倉幕府, Kamakura bakufu) was a Japanese feudal military governmentNussbaum, Louis-Frédéric.

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Kan'ei-ji

(also spelled Kan'eiji or Kaneiji) is a Tendai Buddhist temple in Tokyo, Japan, founded in 1625 during the Kan'ei era by Tenkai, in an attempt to emulate the powerful religious center Enryaku-ji, in Kyoto.

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Kōfu

is the capital city of Yamanashi Prefecture in Japan.

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Kira Yoshinaka

was a kōke (master of ceremonies).

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Kishū Domain

The, also known as or, was a han or Japanese feudal domain in Kii Province.

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Koku

The is a Japanese unit of volume, equal to ten cubic shaku.

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Kyoto

, officially, is the capital city of Kyoto Prefecture, located in the Kansai region of Japan.

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Laid-Back Camp

is a Japanese manga series by Afro, serialized in Houbunsha's ''seinen'' manga magazine Manga Time Kirara Forward since July 2015.

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Laura Joh Rowland

Laura Joh Rowland is a detective/mystery author best known for her series of historical mystery novels set in the late days of feudal Japan, mostly in Edo during the late 17th century.

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Maeda Yoshinori

was an Edo period Japanese samurai, and the 5th daimyō of Kaga Domain in the Hokuriku region of Japan.

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Matsudaira clan

The was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Minamoto clan.

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Mount Fuji

, located on Honshū, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft), 2nd-highest peak of an island (volcanic) in Asia, and 7th-highest peak of an island in the world.

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Muramasa: The Demon Blade

Muramasa: The Demon Blade, known in Japan as, is an action role-playing game developed by Vanillaware for the Wii, and later the PlayStation Vita.

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Nagasaki

() is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan.

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Neo-Confucianism

Neo-Confucianism (often shortened to lixue 理學) is a moral, ethical, and metaphysical Chinese philosophy influenced by Confucianism, and originated with Han Yu and Li Ao (772–841) in the Tang Dynasty, and became prominent during the Song and Ming dynasties.

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Nihon Ōdai Ichiran

, The Table of the Rulers of Japan, is a 17th-century chronicle of the serial reigns of Japanese emperors with brief notes about some of the noteworthy events or other happenings.

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Noh

, derived from the Sino-Japanese word for "skill" or "talent", is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century.

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Osaka

() is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan.

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Powerpuff Girls Z

is a Japanese magical girl anime series directed by Megumu Ishiguro, based on the American animated television series The Powerpuff Girls.

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Reborn!

Reborn!, known in Japan as, is a Japanese manga written and illustrated by Akira Amano.

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Sakai Tadakiyo

, also known as Uta-no-kami,Bodart-Bailey, Beatrice.

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Satsuma Domain

, also known as Kagoshima Domain, was a Japanese domain of the Edo period.

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Shōgun

The was the military dictator of Japan during the period from 1185 to 1868 (with exceptions).

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Shinjū (novel)

Shinjū (1994) is the title of the debut novel by American writer Laura Joh Rowland, a historical mystery set in 1689 Genroku-era Japan.

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Shinto

or kami-no-michi (among other names) is the traditional religion of Japan that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient past.

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Tairō

Tairō (大老, "great elder") was a high-ranking official position in the Tokugawa shogunate government of Japan, roughly comparable to the office of prime minister.

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Takada Domain

, was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate of Edo period Japan.

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Takatsukasa Sukenobu

, son of regent Fusasuke, was a kugyo or Japanese court noble of the Edo period (1603–1868).

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Tatebayashi Domain

was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate of Edo period Japan, located in Kōzuke Province (modern-day Gunma Prefecture), Japan.

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Tenna

was a after Enpō and before Jōkyō. This period spanned the years from September 1681 through February 1684.

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Timon Screech

Timon Screech (born 28 September 1961 in Birmingham) is a professor of the history of art at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London.

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Tokugawa (surname)

Tokugawa (Shinjitai (modern Japanese) spelling: 徳川; Kyūjitai (historical Japanese) spelling: 德川) is a surname in Japan.

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Tokugawa Hidetada

was the second shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623.

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Tokugawa Iemitsu

Tokugawa Iemitsu (徳川 家光 August 12, 1604 – June 8, 1651) was the third shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty.

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Tokugawa Ienobu

(June 11, 1662 – November 12, 1712) was the sixth shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty of Japan.

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Tokugawa Ietsuna

was the fourth shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty of Japan who was in office from 1651 to 1680.

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Tokugawa Ieyasu

was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.

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Tokugawa Munetaka

was a Japanese daimyō of the mid-Edo period, who ruled the Mito Domain.

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Tokugawa shogunate

The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the and the, was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868.

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Tokugawa Tsunanari

was daimyō of Owari Domain during early-Edo period Japan.

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Tokugawa Tsunashige

was the second son of Tokugawa Iemitsu.

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Tokugawa Yoshimune

was the eighth shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, ruling from 1716 until his abdication in 1745.

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Tsuna Sawada

, commonly nicknamed, is a fictional character and the protagonist of the manga and anime series Reborn! created by Akira Amano.

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Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu

was a Japanese samurai of the Edo period.

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Zhu Xi

Zhu Xi (October 18, 1130 – April 23, 1200), also known by his courtesy name Yuanhui (or Zhonghui), and self-titled Hui'an, was a Chinese philosopher, politician, and writer of the Song dynasty.

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Redirects here:

Tokugawa Tunayosi, Tsunayoshi, Tsunayoshi Tokugawa, Tunayosi, Tunayosi Tokugawa.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokugawa_Tsunayoshi

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