Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

D33 road (Croatia)

Index D33 road (Croatia)

D33 connects Šibenik to Drniš and Knin. [1]

32 relations: A1 (Croatia), Annual average daily traffic, Đevrske, Šibenik, Šibenik-Knin County, Biograd na Moru, Bosnia and Herzegovina, D1 road (Croatia), D533 road, D56 road, D59 road, D8 road (Croatia), Drniš, Drvar, Gospić, Gračac, Highways in Croatia, Hrvatske autoceste, Hrvatske ceste, Knin, Ministry of Maritime Affairs, Transport and Infrastructure, Narodne novine, Oklaj, OpenStreetMap, Otavice, Croatia, Ploče, Sinj, Siverić, Split, Croatia, Strmica, Croatia, Trogir, Vrlika.

A1 (Croatia)

The A1 motorway (Autocesta A1) is the longest motorway in Croatia, spanning.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and A1 (Croatia) · See more »

Annual average daily traffic

Annual average daily traffic, abbreviated AADT, is a measure used primarily in transportation planning and transportation engineering.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Annual average daily traffic · See more »

Đevrske

Đevrske (Ђеврске) is a village located in Kistanje municipality, 10 km southwest of Kistanje, in the continental part of Šibenik-Knin County, Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Đevrske · See more »

Šibenik

Šibenik (Sebenico) is a historic city in Croatia, located in central Dalmatia where the river Krka flows into the Adriatic Sea.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Šibenik · See more »

Šibenik-Knin County

Šibenik-Knin County (Croatian Šibensko-kninska županija) is a county in southern Croatia, located in the north-central part of Dalmatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Šibenik-Knin County · See more »

Biograd na Moru

Biograd na Moru is a city and municipality in northern Dalmatia, Croatia and is significant for being the former capital of the medieval Croatian Kingdom.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Biograd na Moru · See more »

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina (or; abbreviated B&H; Bosnian and Serbian: Bosna i Hercegovina (BiH) / Боснa и Херцеговина (БиХ), Croatian: Bosna i Hercegovina (BiH)), sometimes called Bosnia-Herzegovina, and often known informally as Bosnia, is a country in Southeastern Europe located on the Balkan Peninsula.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Bosnia and Herzegovina · See more »

D1 road (Croatia)

The state road D1 (Državna cesta D1) is a national highway in Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and D1 road (Croatia) · See more »

D533 road

D533 is a state road connecting the city of Šibenik and A1 motorway in Šibenik interchange to D33 state road.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and D533 road · See more »

D56 road

D56 runs parallel to a segment of A1 motorway between Zadar and Split areas.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and D56 road · See more »

D59 road

D59 is a state road connecting the city of Knin with D8 state road near Pirovac.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and D59 road · See more »

D8 road (Croatia)

The D8 state road is the Croatian section of the Adriatic Highway, running from the Slovenian border at Pasjak via Rijeka, Senj, Zadar, Šibenik, Split, Opuzen and Dubrovnik to the border with Montenegro at Karasovići.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and D8 road (Croatia) · See more »

Drniš

Drniš is a town in Croatia, located in inland Dalmatia, about halfway between Šibenik and Knin.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Drniš · See more »

Drvar

Drvar (Cyrillic: Дрвар) is a town and municipality located in Canton 10 of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Drvar · See more »

Gospić

Gospić is a town and municipality in the mountainous and sparsely populated region of Lika, Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Gospić · See more »

Gračac

Gračac (Грачац) is a town and a municipality in the southern part of Lika, Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Gračac · See more »

Highways in Croatia

Highways in Croatia are the main transport network in Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Highways in Croatia · See more »

Hrvatske autoceste

Hrvatske autoceste (HAC) or Croatian Motorways Ltd is a Croatian state-owned limited liability company tasked with management, construction and maintenance of motorways in Croatia pursuant to provisions of the Croatian Public Roads Act (Zakon o javnim cestama enacted by the Parliament of the Republic of Croatia. Tasks of the company are defined by Public Roads Act and its Founding Declaration, and the principal task of the company is management, construction and maintenance of the motorways. In practice, Hrvatske autoceste is responsible for management or development the following motorway sections: The company is currently administered by a two-person managing board consisting of Davor Mihovilić (chairman) and Marijan Sente; and five-member supervisory board. It was established on April 6, 2001, under the law promulgated on April 5, 2001, with the share capital of the company worth 131,140,100.00 Croatian kuna. Hrvatske autoceste is organized in four business sectors: Design, Construction, Financial and Economic Affairs, and Legal and General Affairs. All profits generated by Hrvatske autoceste are used for construction and maintenance of the roads the company manages.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Hrvatske autoceste · See more »

Hrvatske ceste

Hrvatske ceste (lit. Croatian roads) is a Croatian state-owned company pursuant to provisions of the Croatian Public Roads Act (Zakon o javnim cestama enacted by the Parliament of the Republic of Croatia. Tasks of the company are defined by Public Roads Act and its Founding Declaration, and the principal task of the company is management, construction and maintenance of public roads. In practice, Hrvatske ceste are responsible for the State roads in Croatia (designated with D), the county (Ž) and local (L) roads are managed by county authorities, while the motorways (A) are managed by Hrvatske autoceste and other concessionaires. The company is currently administered by a three-person managing board consisting of Jakov Krešić (chairman) and five-member supervisory board. The company was first established on April 6, 2001, under the law promulgated on April 5, 2001, with the share capital of the company worth 128,898,200.00 Croatian kuna. Hrvatske ceste are organized in six business sectors: Studies and design, Construction, Maintenance, Procurement, Financial and business operations and Legal, personnel and general sectors. All profits generated by Hrvatske ceste are used for construction and maintenance of the roads the company manages.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Hrvatske ceste · See more »

Knin

Knin is a city in the Šibenik-Knin County of Croatia, located in the Dalmatian hinterland near the source of the river Krka, an important traffic junction on the rail and road routes between Zagreb and Split.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Knin · See more »

Ministry of Maritime Affairs, Transport and Infrastructure

The Ministry of Maritime Affairs, Transport and Infrastructure of the Republic of Croatia (Ministarstvo pomorstva, prometa i infrastrukture Republike Hrvatske, MPPI RH) is a ministry in the Government of Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Ministry of Maritime Affairs, Transport and Infrastructure · See more »

Narodne novine

Narodne novine (The People's Newspaper) is the official gazette (or newspaper of public record) of the Republic of Croatia which publishes laws, regulations, appointments and official decisions and releases them in the public domain.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Narodne novine · See more »

Oklaj

Oklaj is a village in the Šibenik-Knin County of Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Oklaj · See more »

OpenStreetMap

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and OpenStreetMap · See more »

Otavice, Croatia

Otavice is a small village in Dalmatian hinterland in Croatia, located on edge of Petrovo field, approximately 35 km away from the city of Šibenik.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Otavice, Croatia · See more »

Ploče

Ploče (Porto Tolero) is a town and a notable seaport in the Dubrovnik-Neretva County of Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Ploče · See more »

Sinj

Sinj (Signo, Zein) is a town in the continental part of Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Sinj · See more »

Siverić

Siverić is a village in Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Siverić · See more »

Split, Croatia

Split (see other names) is the second-largest city of Croatia and the largest city of the region of Dalmatia. It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea and is spread over a central peninsula and its surroundings. An intraregional transport hub and popular tourist destination, the city is linked to the Adriatic islands and the Apennine peninsula. Home to Diocletian's Palace, built for the Roman emperor in 305 CE, the city was founded as the Greek colony of Aspálathos (Aσπάλαθος) in the 3rd or 2nd century BC. It became a prominent settlement around 650 CE when it succeeded the ancient capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia, Salona. After the Sack of Salona by the Avars and Slavs, the fortified Palace of Diocletian was settled by the Roman refugees. Split became a Byzantine city, to later gradually drift into the sphere of the Republic of Venice and the Kingdom of Croatia, with the Byzantines retaining nominal suzerainty. For much of the High and Late Middle Ages, Split enjoyed autonomy as a free city, caught in the middle of a struggle between Venice and the King of Hungary for control over the Dalmatian cities. Venice eventually prevailed and during the early modern period Split remained a Venetian city, a heavily fortified outpost surrounded by Ottoman territory. Its hinterland was won from the Ottomans in the Morean War of 1699, and in 1797, as Venice fell to Napoleon, the Treaty of Campo Formio rendered the city to the Habsburg Monarchy. In 1805, the Peace of Pressburg added it to the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy and in 1806 it was included in the French Empire, becoming part of the Illyrian Provinces in 1809. After being occupied in 1813, it was eventually granted to the Austrian Empire following the Congress of Vienna, where the city remained a part of the Austrian Kingdom of Dalmatia until the fall of Austria-Hungary in 1918 and the formation of Yugoslavia. In World War II, the city was annexed by Italy, then liberated by the Partisans after the Italian capitulation in 1943. It was then re-occupied by Germany, which granted it to its puppet Independent State of Croatia. The city was liberated again by the Partisans in 1944, and was included in the post-war Socialist Yugoslavia, as part of its republic of Croatia. In 1991, Croatia seceded from Yugoslavia amid the Croatian War of Independence.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Split, Croatia · See more »

Strmica, Croatia

Strmica is a small village in the Knin Municipality.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Strmica, Croatia · See more »

Trogir

Trogir (Tragurium; Traù; Ancient Greek: Τραγύριον, Tragyrion or Τραγούριον, Tragourion Trogkir) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia, with a population of 10,818 (2011) and a total municipality population of 13,260 (2011).

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Trogir · See more »

Vrlika

Vrlika is a small town and municipality in inland Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia.

New!!: D33 road (Croatia) and Vrlika · See more »

Redirects here:

D33 (Croatia).

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D33_road_(Croatia)

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »