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Seven Bishops

Index Seven Bishops

The Seven Bishops of the Church of England were those imprisoned and tried for seditious libel related to their opposition to the second Declaration of Indulgence, issued by James II in 1688. [1]

51 relations: Agnes Strickland, Archbishop of Canterbury, Bill of Rights 1689, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Chichester, Bishop of Ely, Bishop of Peterborough, Bishop of St Asaph, Catholic Church, Church of England, Creswell Levinz, Declaration of Indulgence, Edward Herbert (judge), First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Francis Pemberton, Francis Turner (bishop), George D'Oyly, George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys, Glorious Revolution, Hilaire Belloc, James II of England, John Lake (bishop), John Powell (judge), John Somers, 1st Baron Somers, Lambeth Palace, Longman, Lord Chancellor, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, M.A. Donohue & Co., Magna Carta, Mary II of England, Nonjuring schism, Project Canterbury, Queen's Bench, Recognizance, Richard Allibond, Robert Sawyer (Attorney General), Robert Wright (judge), Seditious libel, Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet, Sir William Williams, 1st Baronet, of Gray's Inn, The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, Thomas Babington Macaulay, Thomas Ken, Thomas Powys (judge), Thomas White (bishop), Tower of London, William III of England, William Lloyd (bishop of Worcester), ..., William Sancroft. Expand index (1 more) »

Agnes Strickland

Agnes Strickland (18 July 1796 – 8 July 1874) was an English historical writer and poet.

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Archbishop of Canterbury

The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury.

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Bill of Rights 1689

The Bill of Rights, also known as the English Bill of Rights, is an Act of the Parliament of England that deals with constitutional matters and sets out certain basic civil rights.

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Bishop of Bath and Wells

The Bishop of Bath and Wells heads the Church of England Diocese of Bath and Wells in the Province of Canterbury in England.

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Bishop of Bristol

The Bishop of Bristol heads the Church of England Diocese of Bristol in the Province of Canterbury, in England.

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Bishop of Chichester

The Bishop of Chichester is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chichester in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers the counties of East and West Sussex. The see is based in the City of Chichester where the bishop's seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity. On 3 May 2012 the appointment was announced of Martin Warner, Bishop of Whitby, as the next Bishop of Chichester. His enthronement took place on 25 November 2012 in Chichester Cathedral. The bishop's residence is The Palace, Chichester. Since 2015, Warner has also fulfilled the diocesan-wide role of alternative episcopal oversight, following the decision by Mark Sowerby, Bishop of Horsham, to recognise the orders of priests and bishops who are women.

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Bishop of Ely

The Bishop of Ely is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Ely in the Province of Canterbury.

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Bishop of Peterborough

The Bishop of Peterborough is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Peterborough in the Province of Canterbury.

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Bishop of St Asaph

The Bishop of St Asaph heads the Church in Wales diocese of St Asaph.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Church of England

The Church of England (C of E) is the state church of England.

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Creswell Levinz

Sir Creswell Levinz (1627–1701), judge, was the second son of William Levinz, the elder, of Evenley, Northamptonshire, by Mary, second daughter of Richard Creswell of Purston in the same county.

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Declaration of Indulgence

The Declaration of Indulgence or Declaration for Liberty of Conscience was a pair of proclamations made by James II of England and VII of Scotland in 1687.

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Edward Herbert (judge)

Sir Edward Herbert (c. 1648 – November 1698), titular Earl of Portland, was an English judge who served as Chief Justice of the King’s Bench during the reign of James II.

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First Amendment to the United States Constitution

The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances.

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Francis Pemberton

Sir Francis Pemberton (18 July 1624 – 10 June 1697) was an English judge and briefly Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench in the course of a turbulent career.

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Francis Turner (bishop)

Francis Turner D.D. (23 August, 1637 – 2 November, 1700) was Bishop of Ely, one of the seven bishops who petitioned against the Declaration of Indulgence and one of the nine bishops who refused to take the oath of allegiance to William III.

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George D'Oyly

George D'Oyly (1778–1846) was an English cleric and academic, theologian and biographer.

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George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys

George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys of Wem, PC (15 May 1645 – 18 April 1689), also known as "The Hanging Judge", was a Welsh judge.

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Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

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Hilaire Belloc

Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (27 July 187016 July 1953) was an Anglo-French writer and historian.

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James II of England

James II and VII (14 October 1633O.S. – 16 September 1701An assertion found in many sources that James II died 6 September 1701 (17 September 1701 New Style) may result from a miscalculation done by an author of anonymous "An Exact Account of the Sickness and Death of the Late King James II, as also of the Proceedings at St. Germains thereupon, 1701, in a letter from an English gentleman in France to his friend in London" (Somers Tracts, ed. 1809–1815, XI, pp. 339–342). The account reads: "And on Friday the 17th instant, about three in the afternoon, the king died, the day he always fasted in memory of our blessed Saviour's passion, the day he ever desired to die on, and the ninth hour, according to the Jewish account, when our Saviour was crucified." As 17 September 1701 New Style falls on a Saturday and the author insists that James died on Friday, "the day he ever desired to die on", an inevitable conclusion is that the author miscalculated the date, which later made it to various reference works. See "English Historical Documents 1660–1714", ed. by Andrew Browning (London and New York: Routledge, 2001), 136–138.) was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

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John Lake (bishop)

John Lake (1624 – 30 August 1689) was a 17th-century Bishop of Sodor and Man, Bishop of Bristol and Bishop of Chichester in the British Isles.

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John Powell (judge)

Sir John Powell (1632 or 1633 – 7 September, 1696) was a Welsh judge, who was a judge of the Court of Common Pleas and of the Court of King's Bench.

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John Somers, 1st Baron Somers

John Somers, 1st Baron Somers, (4 March 1651 – 26 April 1716) was an English Whig jurist and statesman.

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Lambeth Palace

Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury in England, in north Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames, 400 yards south-east of the Palace of Westminster, which houses the Houses of Parliament, on the opposite bank.

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Longman

Longman, commonly known as Pearson Longman, is a publishing company founded in London, England, in 1724 and is owned by Pearson PLC.

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Lord Chancellor

The Lord Chancellor, formally the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, is the highest ranking among those Great Officers of State which are appointed regularly in the United Kingdom, nominally outranking even the Prime Minister.

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Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales

The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the head of the judiciary and President of the Courts of England and Wales.

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M.A. Donohue & Co.

M.

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Magna Carta

Magna Carta Libertatum (Medieval Latin for "the Great Charter of the Liberties"), commonly called Magna Carta (also Magna Charta; "Great Charter"), is a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.

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Mary II of England

Mary II (30 April 1662 – 28 December 1694) was Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland, co-reigning with her husband and first cousin, King William III and II, from 1689 until her death; popular histories usually refer to their joint reign as that of William and Mary.

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Nonjuring schism

The nonjuring schism was a split in the Anglican churches of England, Scotland, and Ireland in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution of 1688, over whether William III and Mary II could legally be recognised as sovereigns.

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Project Canterbury

Project Canterbury (sometimes abbreviated as PC) is an online archive of material related to the history of Anglicanism.

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Queen's Bench

The Queen's Bench (or, during the reign of a male monarch, the King's Bench, Cour du banc du Roi) is the superior court in a number of jurisdictions within some of the Commonwealth realms.

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Recognizance

In some common law nations, a recognizance is a conditional obligation undertaken by a person before a court.

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Richard Allibond

Sir Richard Allibond or Allibone (1636–1688) was an English judge and justice of the King's Bench.

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Robert Sawyer (Attorney General)

Sir Robert Sawyer, of Highclere (1633–1692) was the Attorney General for England and Wales (1681–1687) and, briefly, Speaker of the English House of Commons.

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Robert Wright (judge)

Sir Robert Wright (c. 1634 – 1689) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the King’s Bench 1687–89.

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Seditious libel

Sedition and seditious libel were criminal offences under English common law, and are still criminal offences in Canada.

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Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet

Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet (24 March 1650 – 19 July 1721) was a British Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester.

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Sir William Williams, 1st Baronet, of Gray's Inn

Sir William Williams, 1st Baronet (1634 – 11 July 1700) was a Welsh lawyer and politician.

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The History of England from the Accession of James the Second

The History of England from the Accession of James the Second (1848) is the full title of the five-volume work by Lord Macaulay (1800–1859) more generally known as The History of England.

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Thomas Babington Macaulay

Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay, FRS FRSE PC (25 October 1800 – 28 December 1859) was a British historian and Whig politician.

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Thomas Ken

Thomas Ken (July 1637 – 19 March 1711) was an English cleric who was considered the most eminent of the English non-juring bishops, and one of the fathers of modern English hymnody.

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Thomas Powys (judge)

Sir Thomas Powys (1649 – 4 April 1719), MP, was Attorney General to King James II.

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Thomas White (bishop)

Thomas White (1628–1698) was Bishop of Peterborough from 1685 to 1690.

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Tower of London

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London.

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William III of England

William III (Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702.

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William Lloyd (bishop of Worcester)

William Lloyd (18 August 1627 – 30 August 1717) was an English divine who served successively as bishop of St Asaph, of Lichfield and Coventry and of Worcester.

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William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693) was the 79th Archbishop of Canterbury, and was one of the Seven Bishops imprisoned in 1688 for seditious libel against King James II, over his opposition to the king's Declaration of Indulgence.

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Redirects here:

7 bishops, Seven bishops, The Seven Bishops, Trial of the Seven Bishops.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Bishops

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