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Biasing

Index Biasing

Biasing in electronics means establishing predetermined voltages or currents at various points of an electronic circuit for the purpose of establishing proper operating conditions in electronic components. [1]

53 relations: Alternating current, Amplifier, Audio power amplifier, Audio signal, Biasing, Bipolar junction transistor, Bipolar transistor biasing, Cathode bias, Clipping (signal processing), Coulomb's law, Diode, Direct current, Distortion, Electret microphone, Electric current, Electrical network, Electronic circuit, Electronic component, Electronic engineering, Electronics, Gain (electronics), International Electrotechnical Commission, JFET, Leakage (electronics), Load line (electronics), Lorentz force, Magnetic tape, McGraw-Hill Education, Modulation, MOSFET, Operating point, Phantom power, Power amplifier classes, RCA, Recording head, Sams Publishing, Set (mathematics), Signal, Signal processing, Signaling (telecommunications), Small-signal model, Standby power, Superposition theorem, Tape bias, Telegraphy, Telephone line, Thermal runaway, Transconductance, Transistor, United States Government Publishing Office, ..., Vacuum tube, Vector field, Voltage. Expand index (3 more) »

Alternating current

Alternating current (AC) is an electric current which periodically reverses direction, in contrast to direct current (DC) which flows only in one direction.

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Amplifier

An amplifier, electronic amplifier or (informally) amp is an electronic device that can increase the power of a signal (a time-varying voltage or current).

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Audio power amplifier

An audio power amplifier (or power amp) is an electronic amplifier that reproduces low-power electronic audio signals such as the signal from radio receiver or electric guitar pickup at a level that is strong enough for driving (or powering) loudspeakers or headphones.

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Audio signal

An audio signal is a representation of sound, typically as an electrical voltage for analog signals and a binary number for digital signals.

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Biasing

Biasing in electronics means establishing predetermined voltages or currents at various points of an electronic circuit for the purpose of establishing proper operating conditions in electronic components.

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Bipolar junction transistor

|- align.

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Bipolar transistor biasing

Bipolar transistor amplifiers must be properly biased to operate correctly.

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Cathode bias

In electronics, cathode bias (self-bias, automatic bias) is a technique used with vacuum tubes to make the direct current (dc) cathode voltage positive in relation to the negative side of the plate voltage supply by an amount equal to the magnitude of the desired grid bias voltage.

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Clipping (signal processing)

Clipping is a form of distortion that limits a signal once it exceeds a threshold.

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Coulomb's law

Coulomb's law, or Coulomb's inverse-square law, is a law of physics for quantifying the amount of force with which stationary electrically charged particles repel or attract each other.

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Diode

A diode is a two-terminal electronic component that conducts current primarily in one direction (asymmetric conductance); it has low (ideally zero) resistance in one direction, and high (ideally infinite) resistance in the other.

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Direct current

Direct current (DC) is the unidirectional flow of electric charge.

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Distortion

Distortion is the alteration of the original shape (or other characteristic) of something.

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Electret microphone

An electret microphone is a type of electrostatic capacitor-based microphone, which eliminates the need for a polarizing power supply by using a permanently charged material.

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Electric current

An electric current is a flow of electric charge.

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Electrical network

An electrical network is an interconnection of electrical components (e.g. batteries, resistors, inductors, capacitors, switches) or a model of such an interconnection, consisting of electrical elements (e.g. voltage sources, current sources, resistances, inductances, capacitances).

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Electronic circuit

An electronic circuit is composed of individual electronic components, such as resistors, transistors, capacitors, inductors and diodes, connected by conductive wires or traces through which electric current can flow.

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Electronic component

An electronic component is any basic discrete device or physical entity in an electronic system used to affect electrons or their associated fields.

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Electronic engineering

Electronic engineering (also called electronics and communications engineering) is an electrical engineering discipline which utilizes nonlinear and active electrical components (such as semiconductor devices, especially transistors, diodes and integrated circuits) to design electronic circuits, devices, VLSI devices and their systems.

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Electronics

Electronics is the discipline dealing with the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons in a vacuum, in gaseous media, and in semiconductors.

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Gain (electronics)

In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a two-port circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal from the input to the output port by adding energy converted from some power supply to the signal.

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International Electrotechnical Commission

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC; in French: Commission électrotechnique internationale) is an international standards organization that prepares and publishes International Standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies – collectively known as "electrotechnology".

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JFET

The junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET or JUGFET) is the simplest type of field-effect transistor.

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Leakage (electronics)

In electronics, leakage may refer to a gradual loss of energy from a charged capacitor.

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Load line (electronics)

In graphical analysis of nonlinear electronic circuits, a load line is a line drawn on the characteristic curve, a graph of the current vs the voltage in a nonlinear device like a diode or transistor.

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Lorentz force

In physics (particularly in electromagnetism) the Lorentz force is the combination of electric and magnetic force on a point charge due to electromagnetic fields.

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Magnetic tape

Magnetic tape is a medium for magnetic recording, made of a thin, magnetizable coating on a long, narrow strip of plastic film.

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McGraw-Hill Education

McGraw-Hill Education (MHE) is a learning science company and one of the "big three" educational publishers that provides customized educational content, software, and services for pre-K through postgraduate education.

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Modulation

In electronics and telecommunications, modulation is the process of varying one or more properties of a periodic waveform, called the carrier signal, with a modulating signal that typically contains information to be transmitted.

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MOSFET

MOSFET showing gate (G), body (B), source (S) and drain (D) terminals. The gate is separated from the body by an insulating layer (white). surface-mount packages. Operating as switches, each of these components can sustain a blocking voltage of 120nbspvolts in the ''off'' state, and can conduct a continuous current of 30 amperes in the ''on'' state, dissipating up to about 100 watts and controlling a load of over 2000 watts. A matchstick is pictured for scale. A cross-section through an nMOSFET when the gate voltage ''V''GS is below the threshold for making a conductive channel; there is little or no conduction between the terminals drain and source; the switch is off. When the gate is more positive, it attracts electrons, inducing an ''n''-type conductive channel in the substrate below the oxide, which allows electrons to flow between the ''n''-doped terminals; the switch is on. Simulation result for formation of inversion channel (electron density) and attainment of threshold voltage (IV) in a nanowire MOSFET. Note that the threshold voltage for this device lies around 0.45 V The metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET, MOS-FET, or MOS FET) is a type of field-effect transistor (FET), most commonly fabricated by the controlled oxidation of silicon.

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Operating point

The operating point is a specific point within the operation characteristic of a technical device.

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Phantom power

Phantom power, in the context of professional audio equipment, is DC electric power transmitted through microphone cables to operate microphones that contain active electronic circuitry.

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Power amplifier classes

Power amplifier classes are, in electronics, letter symbols applied to different power amplifier types.

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RCA

The RCA Corporation was a major American electronics company, which was founded as the Radio Corporation of America in 1919.

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Recording head

A recording head is the physical interface between a recording apparatus and a moving recording medium.

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Sams Publishing

Sams Publishing is dedicated to the publishing of technical training manuals and is an imprint of Pearson plc, the global publishing and education company.

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Set (mathematics)

In mathematics, a set is a collection of distinct objects, considered as an object in its own right.

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Signal

A signal as referred to in communication systems, signal processing, and electrical engineering is a function that "conveys information about the behavior or attributes of some phenomenon".

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Signal processing

Signal processing concerns the analysis, synthesis, and modification of signals, which are broadly defined as functions conveying "information about the behavior or attributes of some phenomenon", such as sound, images, and biological measurements.

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Signaling (telecommunications)

In telecommunication, signaling has the following meanings.

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Small-signal model

Small-signal modeling is a common analysis technique in electronics engineering which is used to approximate the behavior of electronic circuits containing nonlinear devices with linear equations.

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Standby power

Standby power, also called vampire power, vampire draw, phantom load, ghost load or leaking electricity ("phantom load" and "leaking electricity" are defined technical terms with other meanings, adopted for this different purpose), refers to the way electric power is consumed by electronic and electrical appliances while they are switched off (but are designed to draw some power) or in a standby mode.

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Superposition theorem

The superposition theorem for electrical circuits states that for a linear system the response (voltage or current) in any branch of a bilateral linear circuit having more than one independent source equals the algebraic sum of the responses caused by each independent source acting alone, where all the other independent sources are replaced by their internal impedances.

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Tape bias

Tape bias is the term for two techniques, AC bias and DC bias, that improve the fidelity of analogue tape recorders.

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Telegraphy

Telegraphy (from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message.

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Telephone line

A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system.

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Thermal runaway

Thermal runaway occurs in situations where an increase in temperature changes the conditions in a way that causes a further increase in temperature, often leading to a destructive result.

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Transconductance

Transconductance (for transfer conductance), also infrequently called mutual conductance, is the electrical characteristic relating the current through the output of a device to the voltage across the input of a device.

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Transistor

A transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify or switch electronic signals and electrical power.

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United States Government Publishing Office

The United States Government Publishing Office (GPO) (formerly the Government Printing Office) is an agency of the legislative branch of the United States federal government.

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Vacuum tube

In electronics, a vacuum tube, an electron tube, or just a tube (North America), or valve (Britain and some other regions) is a device that controls electric current between electrodes in an evacuated container.

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Vector field

In vector calculus and physics, a vector field is an assignment of a vector to each point in a subset of space.

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Voltage

Voltage, electric potential difference, electric pressure or electric tension (formally denoted or, but more often simply as V or U, for instance in the context of Ohm's or Kirchhoff's circuit laws) is the difference in electric potential between two points.

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Redirects here:

Bias (electrical engineering), Bias (electricity), Bias (electronics), Bias circuit, Bias current, Bias point, Bias voltage, Biasing (electronics), Bleeder bias, Contact bias, Current Bias, Current bias, Electrical bias, Fixed bias, Grid bias, Grid leak bias, Initial velocity bias, Q point, Q-point, Quiescent current, Quiescent point, Voltage Bias, Voltage bias.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biasing

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