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Light curve

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In astronomy, a light curve is a graph of light intensity of a celestial object or region, as a function of time. [1]

41 relations: Amplitude, Andromeda Galaxy, Apparent magnitude, Astronomical object, Astronomy, Binary asteroid, Binary star, Cataclysmic variable star, Cepheid variable, Chord (astronomy), Comet, Double star, Earth, Exoplanet, Frequency band, General relativity, Global Positioning System, Gravitational lens, Gravitational microlensing, Maxima and minima, Minor planet, Mira variable, Mount John University Observatory, Natural satellite, Nova, Occultation, Orbital eccentricity, PA-99-N2, Periodic function, Planetary science, Rotating ellipsoidal variable, Rotation period, Semiregular variable star, Solar System, Starspot, Supernova, Telescope, Titan (moon), Type II supernova, Video, VizieR.

Amplitude

The amplitude of a periodic variable is a measure of its change over a single period (such as time or spatial period).

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Andromeda Galaxy

The Andromeda Galaxy, also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, is a spiral galaxy approximately 780 kiloparsecs (2.5 million light-years) from Earth, and the nearest major galaxy to the Milky Way.

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Apparent magnitude

The apparent magnitude of a celestial object is a number that is a measure of its brightness as seen by an observer on Earth.

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Astronomical object

An astronomical object or celestial object is a naturally occurring physical entity, association, or structure that exists in the observable universe.

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Astronomy

Astronomy (from ἀστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena.

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Binary asteroid

A binary asteroid is a system of two asteroids orbiting their common barycenter.

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Binary star

A binary star is a star system consisting of two stars orbiting around their common barycenter.

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Cataclysmic variable star

Cataclysmic variable stars (CV) are stars which irregularly increase in brightness by a large factor, then drop back down to a quiescent state.

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Cepheid variable

A Cepheid variable is a type of star that pulsates radially, varying in both diameter and temperature and producing changes in brightness with a well-defined stable period and amplitude.

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Chord (astronomy)

In the field of astronomy the term chord typically refers to a line crossing an object which is formed during an occultation event.

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Comet

A comet is an icy small Solar System body that, when passing close to the Sun, warms and begins to release gases, a process called outgassing.

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Double star

In observational astronomy, a double star or visual double is a pair of stars that appear close to each other in the sky as seen from Earth when viewed through an optical telescope.

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Earth

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

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Exoplanet

An exoplanet or extrasolar planet is a planet outside our solar system.

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Frequency band

A frequency band is an interval in the frequency domain, delimited by a lower frequency and an upper frequency.

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General relativity

General relativity (GR, also known as the general theory of relativity or GTR) is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915 and the current description of gravitation in modern physics.

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Global Positioning System

The Global Positioning System (GPS), originally Navstar GPS, is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States Air Force.

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Gravitational lens

A gravitational lens is a distribution of matter (such as a cluster of galaxies) between a distant light source and an observer, that is capable of bending the light from the source as the light travels towards the observer.

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Gravitational microlensing

Gravitational microlensing is an astronomical phenomenon due to the gravitational lens effect.

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Maxima and minima

In mathematical analysis, the maxima and minima (the respective plurals of maximum and minimum) of a function, known collectively as extrema (the plural of extremum), are the largest and smallest value of the function, either within a given range (the local or relative extrema) or on the entire domain of a function (the global or absolute extrema).

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Minor planet

A minor planet is an astronomical object in direct orbit around the Sun (or more broadly, any star with a planetary system) that is neither a planet nor exclusively classified as a comet.

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Mira variable

Mira variables ("Mira", Latin, adj. - feminine form of adjective "wonderful"), named for the prototype star Mira, are a class of pulsating variable stars characterized by very red colours, pulsation periods longer than 100 days, and amplitudes greater than one magnitude in infrared and 2.5 magnitude at visual wavelengths.

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Mount John University Observatory

University of Canterbury Mount John Observatory (UCMJO), previously known as Mt John University Observatory (MJUO),is New Zealand's premier astronomical research observatory.

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Natural satellite

A natural satellite or moon is, in the most common usage, an astronomical body that orbits a planet or minor planet (or sometimes another small Solar System body).

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Nova

A nova (plural novae or novas) or classical nova (CN, plural CNe) is a transient astronomical event that causes the sudden appearance of a bright, apparently "new" star, that slowly fades over several weeks or many months.

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Occultation

An occultation is an event that occurs when one object is hidden by another object that passes between it and the observer.

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Orbital eccentricity

The orbital eccentricity of an astronomical object is a parameter that determines the amount by which its orbit around another body deviates from a perfect circle.

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PA-99-N2

PA-99-N2 is a microlensing event detected in the direction of the Andromeda Galaxy in 1999.

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Periodic function

In mathematics, a periodic function is a function that repeats its values in regular intervals or periods.

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Planetary science

Planetary science or, more rarely, planetology, is the scientific study of planets (including Earth), moons, and planetary systems (in particular those of the Solar System) and the processes that form them.

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Rotating ellipsoidal variable

Rotating ellipsoidal variables are a class of variable star.

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Rotation period

In astronomy, the rotation period of a celestial object is the time that it takes to complete one revolution around its axis of rotation relative to the background stars.

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Semiregular variable star

Semiregular variable stars are giants or supergiants of intermediate and late spectral type showing considerable periodicity in their light changes, accompanied or sometimes interrupted by various irregularities.

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Solar System

The Solar SystemCapitalization of the name varies.

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Starspot

Starspots are stellar phenomena.

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Supernova

A supernova (plural: supernovae or supernovas, abbreviations: SN and SNe) is a transient astronomical event that occurs during the last stellar evolutionary stages of a star's life, either a massive star or a white dwarf, whose destruction is marked by one final, titanic explosion.

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Telescope

A telescope is an optical instrument that aids in the observation of remote objects by collecting electromagnetic radiation (such as visible light).

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Titan (moon)

Titan is the largest moon of Saturn.

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Type II supernova

A Type II supernova (plural: supernovae or supernovas) results from the rapid collapse and violent explosion of a massive star.

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Video

Video is an electronic medium for the recording, copying, playback, broadcasting, and display of moving visual media.

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VizieR

The VizieR Catalogue Service is an astronomical catalog service provided by Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg.

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Redirects here:

Asteroid Lightcurve Database, Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB), Asteroid light curve, Asteroid light curves, LCDB quality code, Light curves, Light-curve, Lightcurve, Lightcurve inversion.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_curve

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