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Algebraic notation (chess)

Index Algebraic notation (chess)

Algebraic notation (or AN) is a method for recording and describing the moves in a game of chess. [1]

47 relations: Apple Inc., Artificial intelligence, Bishop (chess), Blunder (chess), Castling, Check (chess), Checkmate, Chess, Chess notation, Chess piece, Chess problem, Chess symbols in Unicode, Chessboard, Colon (punctuation), Coordinate system, Correspondence chess, Dagger (typography), Descriptive notation, Discovered attack, Double check, Draw (chess), Ellipsis, En passant, Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings, Fairy chess piece, FIDE, Font, ICCF numeric notation, Jacob Köbel, King (chess), Knight (chess), Loanword, Miscellaneous Symbols, Nightrider (chess), Philipp Stamma, Portable Game Notation, Promotion (chess), Queen (chess), Rook (chess), Russia, Ruy Lopez, Soviet Union, Tim Krabbé, Time control, Unicode, United States Chess Federation, Universal Chess Interface.

Apple Inc.

Apple Inc. is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Cupertino, California, that designs, develops, and sells consumer electronics, computer software, and online services.

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Artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI, also machine intelligence, MI) is intelligence demonstrated by machines, in contrast to the natural intelligence (NI) displayed by humans and other animals.

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Bishop (chess)

A bishop (♗,♝) is a piece in the board game of chess.

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Blunder (chess)

In chess, a blunder is a very bad move.

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Castling

Castling is a move in the game of chess involving a player's king and either of the player's original rooks.

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Check (chess)

A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.

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Checkmate

Checkmate (often shortened to mate) is a game position in chess and other chess-like games in which a player's king is in check (threatened with) and there is no way to remove the threat.

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Chess

Chess is a two-player strategy board game played on a chessboard, a checkered gameboard with 64 squares arranged in an 8×8 grid.

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Chess notation

Chess notations are various systems that have developed to record either the moves made in a game of chess or the position of pieces on a chessboard.

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Chess piece

A chess piece, or chessman, is any of the six different movable objects used on a chessboard to play the game of chess.

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Chess problem

A chess problem, also called a chess composition, is a puzzle set by somebody using chess pieces on a chess board, that presents the solver with a particular task to be achieved.

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Chess symbols in Unicode

Chess symbols are part of Unicode.

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Chessboard

A chessboard is the type of checkerboard used in the board game chess, consisting of 64 squares (eight rows and eight columns).

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Colon (punctuation)

The colon is a punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots centered on the same vertical line.

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Coordinate system

In geometry, a coordinate system is a system which uses one or more numbers, or coordinates, to uniquely determine the position of the points or other geometric elements on a manifold such as Euclidean space.

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Correspondence chess

Correspondence chess is chess or variant chess played by various forms of long-distance correspondence, often through a correspondence chess server, a public internet chess forum, email, or the postal system.

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Dagger (typography)

A dagger, obelisk, or obelus is a typographical symbol usually used to indicate a footnote if an asterisk has already been used.

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Descriptive notation

Descriptive notation is a notation for recording chess games, and at one time was the most popular notation in English- and Spanish-speaking countries.

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Discovered attack

In chess, a discovered attack is an attack revealed when one piece moves out of the way of another.

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Double check

In chess, a double check is a check delivered by two pieces simultaneously.

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Draw (chess)

In chess, a draw is the result of a game ending in a tie.

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Ellipsis

An ellipsis (plural ellipses; from the ἔλλειψις, élleipsis, 'omission' or 'falling short') is a series of dots (typically three, such as "…") that usually indicates an intentional omission of a word, sentence, or whole section from a text without altering its original meaning.

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En passant

En passant (in passing) is a move in chess.

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Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings

The Encyclopedia of Chess Openings is a classification system for the opening moves in chess.

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Fairy chess piece

A fairy chess piece, variant chess piece, unorthodox chess piece, or heterodox chess piece is a chess piece not used in conventional chess but incorporated into certain chess variants and some chess problems.

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FIDE

The Fédération Internationale des Échecs or World Chess Federation is an international organization that connects the various national chess federations around the world and acts as the governing body of international chess competition.

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Font

In metal typesetting, a font was a particular size, weight and style of a typeface.

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ICCF numeric notation

ICCF numeric notation is the official chess game notation for all International Correspondence Chess Federation games.

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Jacob Köbel

Jacob Köbel (1462-1533) was a printer and publisher in Oppenheim.

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King (chess)

In chess, the king (♔,♚) is the most important piece.

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Knight (chess)

The knight (♘ ♞) is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).

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Loanword

A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation.

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Miscellaneous Symbols

Miscellaneous Symbols is a Unicode block (U+2600–U+26FF) containing glyphs representing concepts from a variety of categories: astrological, astronomical, chess, dice, musical notation, political symbols, recycling, religious symbols, trigrams, warning signs, and weather, among others.

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Nightrider (chess)

A nightrider (also known as a knightmare or unicorn, though the latter sometimes also means the bishop+nightrider compound) is a fairy chess piece that can move any number of steps as a knight in the same direction.

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Philipp Stamma

Philipp Stamma (c. 1705 – c. 1755), a native of Aleppo, Ottoman Syria, later resident of England and France, was a chess master and a pioneer of modern chess.

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Portable Game Notation

Portable Game Notation (PGN) is a plain text computer-processible format for recording chess games (both the moves and related data), supported by many chess programs.

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Promotion (chess)

Promotion is a chess rule that requires a pawn that reaches its eighth to be immediately replaced by the player's choice of a queen, knight, rook, or bishop of the same.

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Queen (chess)

The queen (♕,♛) is the most powerful piece in the game of chess, able to move any number of squares vertically, horizontally or diagonally.

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Rook (chess)

A rook (♖,♜) is a piece in the strategy board game of chess.

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Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

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Ruy Lopez

The Ruy Lopez, also called the Spanish Opening or Spanish Game, is a chess opening characterised by the moves: The Ruy Lopez is named after 16th-century Spanish bishop Ruy López de Segura.

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Soviet Union

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991.

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Tim Krabbé

Tim Krabbé (born 13 April 1943) is a Dutch journalist and novelist.

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Time control

A time control is a mechanism in the tournament play of almost all two-player board games so that each round of the match can finish in a timely way and the tournament can proceed.

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Unicode

Unicode is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems.

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United States Chess Federation

The United States Chess Federation (also known as US Chess or USCF) is the governing body for chess competition in the United States and represents the U.S. in FIDE, the World Chess Federation.

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Universal Chess Interface

A Universal Chess Interface (UCI) is an open communication protocol that enables chess engines to communicate with user interfaces.

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Redirects here:

AN (chess), Algebraic Chess Notation, Algebraic chess notation, Chess algebraic notation, ChessAN, Figurine Algebraic Notation, International notational, Standard algebraic notation, Standard chess notation.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algebraic_notation_(chess)

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