Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Orthodoxy

Index Orthodoxy

Orthodoxy (from Greek ὀρθοδοξία orthodoxía "right opinion") is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion. [1]

79 relations: Ancient Egyptian religion, Ancient Greek, Animism, Anomoeanism, Arianism, Arius, Athanasius of Alexandria, Augustine of Hippo, Biblical Mount Sinai, Buddhism, Catholic Church, Chalcedonian Christianity, Chalcedonian Definition, Christianity, Christology, Council of Chalcedon, Council of Ephesus, Creed, Deviationism, Doctrine, Dogma, Early Christianity, East–West Schism, Eastern Catholic Churches, Eastern Christianity, Eastern Orthodox Church, Ecumenical council, Eusebius of Nicomedia, Eustathius of Antioch, First seven ecumenical councils, Four Marks of the Church, G. K. Chesterton, Gautama Buddha, Halakha, Haredi Judaism, Heresy, Heresy in Christianity, Heterodoxy, Hinduism, History of Oriental Orthodoxy, History of the Eastern Orthodox Church, Homoousion, Judaism, Kemetism, Lutheran orthodoxy, Modern Orthodox Judaism, Modernity, Monotheism, Neo-orthodoxy, Nicene Christianity, ..., Non-Chalcedonianism, Nontrinitarianism, Oral Torah, Oriental Orthodoxy, Orthodox Judaism, Orthodoxy (book), Orthopraxy, Paleo-orthodoxy, Patristics, Pāli Canon, Pejorative, Polytheism, Proto-orthodox Christianity, Radical orthodoxy, Revelation, Rule of Faith, Sanātanī, Schism, Secularization, Sunni Islam, Syncretism, Talmud, Theology, Theravada, Torah, Trinity, Vinaya, Visuddhimagga, Western Christianity. Expand index (29 more) »

Ancient Egyptian religion

Ancient Egyptian religion was a complex system of polytheistic beliefs and rituals which were an integral part of ancient Egyptian society.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Ancient Egyptian religion · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Ancient Greek · See more »

Animism

Animism (from Latin anima, "breath, spirit, life") is the religious belief that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Animism · See more »

Anomoeanism

In 4th century Christianity, the Anomoeans, also spelled "Anomeans" and known also as Heterousians, Aëtians, or Eunomians, were a sect that upheld an extreme form of Arianism, that Jesus Christ was not of the same nature (consubstantial) as God the Father nor was of like nature (homoiousian), as maintained by the semi-Arians.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Anomoeanism · See more »

Arianism

Arianism is a nontrinitarian Christological doctrine which asserts the belief that Jesus Christ is the Son of God who was begotten by God the Father at a point in time, a creature distinct from the Father and is therefore subordinate to him, but the Son is also God (i.e. God the Son).

New!!: Orthodoxy and Arianism · See more »

Arius

Arius (Ἄρειος, 250 or 256–336) was a Christian presbyter and ascetic of Berber origin, and priest in Baucalis in Alexandria, Egypt.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Arius · See more »

Athanasius of Alexandria

Athanasius of Alexandria (Ἀθανάσιος Ἀλεξανδρείας; ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ ⲁⲑⲁⲛⲁⲥⲓⲟⲩ ⲡⲓⲁⲡⲟⲥⲧⲟⲗⲓⲕⲟⲥ or Ⲡⲁⲡⲁ ⲁⲑⲁⲛⲁⲥⲓⲟⲩ ⲁ̅; c. 296–298 – 2 May 373), also called Athanasius the Great, Athanasius the Confessor or, primarily in the Coptic Orthodox Church, Athanasius the Apostolic, was the 20th bishop of Alexandria (as Athanasius I).

New!!: Orthodoxy and Athanasius of Alexandria · See more »

Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Augustine of Hippo · See more »

Biblical Mount Sinai

According to the Book of Exodus, Mount Sinai (Hebrew: הר סיני, Har Sinai) is the mountain at which the Ten Commandments were given to Moses by God.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Biblical Mount Sinai · See more »

Buddhism

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Buddhism · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Catholic Church · See more »

Chalcedonian Christianity

Chalcedonian Christianity is the Christian denominations adhering to christological definitions and ecclesiological resolutions of the Council of Chalcedon, the Fourth Ecumenical Council held in 451.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Chalcedonian Christianity · See more »

Chalcedonian Definition

The Chalcedonian Definition (also called the Chalcedonian Creed) was adopted at the Council of Chalcedon in AD 451.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Chalcedonian Definition · See more »

Christianity

ChristianityFrom Ancient Greek Χριστός Khristós (Latinized as Christus), translating Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning "the anointed one", with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Christianity · See more »

Christology

Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Christology · See more »

Council of Chalcedon

The Council of Chalcedon was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Council of Chalcedon · See more »

Council of Ephesus

The Council of Ephesus was a council of Christian bishops convened in Ephesus (near present-day Selçuk in Turkey) in AD 431 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius II.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Council of Ephesus · See more »

Creed

A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Creed · See more »

Deviationism

In political ideology, a deviationist is a person who expresses a deviation: an abnormality or departure.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Deviationism · See more »

Doctrine

Doctrine (from doctrina, meaning "teaching", "instruction" or "doctrine") is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or in a belief system.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Doctrine · See more »

Dogma

The term dogma is used in pejorative and non-pejorative senses.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Dogma · See more »

Early Christianity

Early Christianity, defined as the period of Christianity preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325, typically divides historically into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period (from the Apostolic Age until Nicea).

New!!: Orthodoxy and Early Christianity · See more »

East–West Schism

The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism and the Schism of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox churches, which has lasted since the 11th century.

New!!: Orthodoxy and East–West Schism · See more »

Eastern Catholic Churches

The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Eastern Catholic Churches · See more »

Eastern Christianity

Eastern Christianity consists of four main church families: the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Eastern Catholic churches (that are in communion with Rome but still maintain Eastern liturgies), and the denominations descended from the Church of the East.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Eastern Christianity · See more »

Eastern Orthodox Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, also known as the Orthodox Church, or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Ecumenical council

An ecumenical council (or oecumenical council; also general council) is a conference of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice in which those entitled to vote are convoked from the whole world (oikoumene) and which secures the approbation of the whole Church.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Ecumenical council · See more »

Eusebius of Nicomedia

Eusebius of Nicomedia (died 341) was the man who baptised Constantine the Great.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Eusebius of Nicomedia · See more »

Eustathius of Antioch

Eustathius of Antioch, sometimes surnamed the Great, was a Christian bishop and archbishop of Antioch in the 4th century.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Eustathius of Antioch · See more »

First seven ecumenical councils

In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, include the following: the First Council of Nicaea in 325, the First Council of Constantinople in 381, the Council of Ephesus in 431, the Council of Chalcedon in 451, the Second Council of Constantinople in 553, the Third Council of Constantinople from 680–681 and finally, the Second Council of Nicaea in 787.

New!!: Orthodoxy and First seven ecumenical councils · See more »

Four Marks of the Church

The Four Marks of the Church, also known as the Attributes of the Church, is a term describing four distinctive adjectives — "One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic" — of traditional Christian ecclesiology as expressed in the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed completed at the First Council of Constantinople in AD 381: " in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church." This ecumenical creed is today recited in the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church (both Latin and Eastern Rites), the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Church of the East, the Moravian Church, the Lutheran Churches, the Methodist Churches, the Anglican Communion, the Reformed Churches, and other Christian denominations.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Four Marks of the Church · See more »

G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936), was an English writer, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic.

New!!: Orthodoxy and G. K. Chesterton · See more »

Gautama Buddha

Gautama Buddha (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama, Shakyamuni Buddha, or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Gautama Buddha · See more »

Halakha

Halakha (הֲלָכָה,; also transliterated as halacha, halakhah, halachah or halocho) is the collective body of Jewish religious laws derived from the Written and Oral Torah.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Halakha · See more »

Haredi Judaism

Haredi Judaism (חֲרֵדִי,; also spelled Charedi, plural Haredim or Charedim) is a broad spectrum of groups within Orthodox Judaism, all characterized by a rejection of modern secular culture.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Haredi Judaism · See more »

Heresy

Heresy is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Heresy · See more »

Heresy in Christianity

When heresy is used today with reference to Christianity, it denotes the formal denial or doubt of a core doctrine of the Christian faithJ.D Douglas (ed).

New!!: Orthodoxy and Heresy in Christianity · See more »

Heterodoxy

Heterodoxy in a religious sense means "any opinions or doctrines at variance with an official or orthodox position".

New!!: Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy · See more »

Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or a way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Hinduism · See more »

History of Oriental Orthodoxy

Oriental Orthodoxy is the communion of Eastern Christian Churches that recognize only three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus.

New!!: Orthodoxy and History of Oriental Orthodoxy · See more »

History of the Eastern Orthodox Church

The history of the Eastern Orthodox Church is traced back to Jesus Christ and the Apostles.

New!!: Orthodoxy and History of the Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Homoousion

Homoousion (from, homós, "same" and, ousía, "being") is a Christian theological doctrine pertaining to the Trinitarian understanding of God.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Homoousion · See more »

Judaism

Judaism (originally from Hebrew, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is the religion of the Jewish people.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Judaism · See more »

Kemetism

Kemetism (also Kemeticism; both from the Egyptian kmt or Kemet, the native name of Ancient Egypt), also sometimes referred to as Neterism (from nTr (Coptic noute) "deity"), or Egyptian Neopaganism, is the contemporary revival of Ancient Egyptian religion and related expressions of religion in classical and late antiquity, emerging during the 1970s.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Kemetism · See more »

Lutheran orthodoxy

Lutheran orthodoxy was an era in the history of Lutheranism, which began in 1580 from the writing of the Book of Concord and ended at the Age of Enlightenment.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Lutheran orthodoxy · See more »

Modern Orthodox Judaism

Modern Orthodox Judaism (also Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize Jewish values and the observance of Jewish law, with the secular, modern world.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Modern Orthodox Judaism · See more »

Modernity

Modernity, a topic in the humanities and social sciences, is both a historical period (the modern era), as well as the ensemble of particular socio-cultural norms, attitudes and practices that arose in the wake of Renaissance, in the "Age of Reason" of 17th-century thought and the 18th-century "Enlightenment".

New!!: Orthodoxy and Modernity · See more »

Monotheism

Monotheism has been defined as the belief in the existence of only one god that created the world, is all-powerful and intervenes in the world.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Monotheism · See more »

Neo-orthodoxy

Neo-orthodoxy, in Christianity, also known as theology of crisis and dialectical theology, was a theological movement developed in the aftermath of the First World War.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Neo-orthodoxy · See more »

Nicene Christianity

Nicene Christianity refers to Christian doctrinal traditions that adhere to the Nicene Creed, which was originally formulated at the First Council of Nicaea in 325 AD and finished at the First Council of Constantinople in AD 381.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Nicene Christianity · See more »

Non-Chalcedonianism

Non-Chalcedonianism is a religious doctrine of those Christian churches that do not accept the Confession of Chalcedon as defined at the ecumenical Council of Chalcedon in 451.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Non-Chalcedonianism · See more »

Nontrinitarianism

Nontrinitarianism is a form of Christianity that rejects the mainstream Christian doctrine of the Trinity—the teaching that God is three distinct hypostases or persons who are coeternal, coequal, and indivisibly united in one being, or essence (from the Greek ousia).

New!!: Orthodoxy and Nontrinitarianism · See more »

Oral Torah

According to Rabbinic Judaism, the Oral Torah or Oral Law (lit. "Torah that is on the mouth") represents those laws, statutes, and legal interpretations that were not recorded in the Five Books of Moses, the "Written Torah" (lit. "Torah that is in writing"), but nonetheless are regarded by Orthodox Jews as prescriptive and co-given.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Oral Torah · See more »

Oriental Orthodoxy

Oriental Orthodoxy is the fourth largest communion of Christian churches, with about 76 million members worldwide.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy · See more »

Orthodox Judaism

Orthodox Judaism is a collective term for the traditionalist branches of Judaism, which seek to maximally maintain the received Jewish beliefs and observances and which coalesced in opposition to the various challenges of modernity and secularization.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Orthodox Judaism · See more »

Orthodoxy (book)

Orthodoxy (1908) is a book by G. K. Chesterton that has become a classic of Christian apologetics.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Orthodoxy (book) · See more »

Orthopraxy

In the study of religion, orthopraxy is correct conduct, both ethical and liturgical, as opposed to faith or grace etc.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Orthopraxy · See more »

Paleo-orthodoxy

Paleo-orthodoxy (from Ancient Greek παλαιός "ancient" and Koine Greek ὀρθοδοξία "correct belief") is a Protestant Christian theological movement of the late 20th and early 21st centuries which focuses on the consensual understanding of the faith among the Ecumenical councils and Church Fathers.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Paleo-orthodoxy · See more »

Patristics

Patristics or patrology is the study of the early Christian writers who are designated Church Fathers.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Patristics · See more »

Pāli Canon

The Pāli Canon is the standard collection of scriptures in the Theravada Buddhist tradition, as preserved in the Pāli language.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Pāli Canon · See more »

Pejorative

A pejorative (also called a derogatory term, a slur, a term of abuse, or a term of disparagement) is a word or grammatical form expressing a negative connotation or a low opinion of someone or something, showing a lack of respect for someone or something.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Pejorative · See more »

Polytheism

Polytheism (from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Polytheism · See more »

Proto-orthodox Christianity

The term "proto-orthodox Christianity", coined by New Testament scholar Bart D. Ehrman, describes the Early Christian movement which was the precursor of Christian orthodoxy.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Proto-orthodox Christianity · See more »

Radical orthodoxy

Radical orthodoxy is a Christian theological and philosophical school of thought which makes use of postmodern philosophy to reject the paradigm of modernity.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Radical orthodoxy · See more »

Revelation

In religion and theology, revelation is the revealing or disclosing of some form of truth or knowledge through communication with a deity or other supernatural entity or entities.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Revelation · See more »

Rule of Faith

The rule of faith (regula fidei) is the name given to the ultimate authority or standard in religious belief.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Rule of Faith · See more »

Sanātanī

Indians often use the term Sanātanī with reference either.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Sanātanī · See more »

Schism

A schism (pronounced, or, less commonly) is a division between people, usually belonging to an organization, movement, or religious denomination.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Schism · See more »

Secularization

Secularization (or secularisation) is the transformation of a society from close identification and affiliation with religious values and institutions toward nonreligious values and secular institutions.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Secularization · See more »

Sunni Islam

Sunni Islam is the largest denomination of Islam.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Sunni Islam · See more »

Syncretism

Syncretism is the combining of different beliefs, while blending practices of various schools of thought.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Syncretism · See more »

Talmud

The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד talmūd "instruction, learning", from a root LMD "teach, study") is the central text of Rabbinic Judaism and the primary source of Jewish religious law and theology.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Talmud · See more »

Theology

Theology is the critical study of the nature of the divine.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Theology · See more »

Theravada

Theravāda (Pali, literally "school of the elder monks") is a branch of Buddhism that uses the Buddha's teaching preserved in the Pāli Canon as its doctrinal core.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Theravada · See more »

Torah

Torah (תּוֹרָה, "Instruction", "Teaching" or "Law") has a range of meanings.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Torah · See more »

Trinity

The Christian doctrine of the Trinity (from Greek τριάς and τριάδα, from "threefold") holds that God is one but three coeternal consubstantial persons or hypostases—the Father, the Son (Jesus Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God in three Divine Persons".

New!!: Orthodoxy and Trinity · See more »

Vinaya

The Vinaya (Pali and Sanskrit, literally meaning "leading out", "education", "discipline") is the regulatory framework for the sangha or monastic community of Buddhism based on the canonical texts called the Vinaya Pitaka.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Vinaya · See more »

Visuddhimagga

The Visuddhimagga (Pali; English: The Path of Purification), is the 'great treatise' on Theravada Buddhist doctrine written by Buddhaghosa approximately in the 5th Century in Sri Lanka.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Visuddhimagga · See more »

Western Christianity

Western Christianity is the type of Christianity which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.

New!!: Orthodoxy and Western Christianity · See more »

Redirects here:

Orthadoxy, Orthodox Christian, Orthodox Christianity, Orthodox Faith, Orthodox faith, Orthodoxies.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthodoxy

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »