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Tuu languages

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The Tuu languages, or Taa–ǃKwi (Taa–ǃUi, ǃUi–Taa, Kwi) languages, are a language family consisting of two language clusters spoken in Botswana and South Africa. [1]

24 relations: Australia, Bilabial clicks, Botswana, Consonant, ǀXam language, ǁXegwi language, ǂ’Amkoe language, ǃGãǃne language, Damin, Endangered language, Gǀui dialect, Khoisan languages, Kx'a languages, Language contact, Language family, List of national mottos, Lower Nossob language, Nǁng language, South Africa, Sprachbund, Taa language, Tone (linguistics), Vaal–Orange language, Vowel.

Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands.

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Bilabial clicks

The labial or bilabial clicks are a family of click consonants that sound something like a smack of the lips.

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Botswana

Botswana, officially the Republic of Botswana (Lefatshe la Botswana), is a landlocked country located in Southern Africa.

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Consonant

In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract.

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ǀXam language

ǀXam (/Kham) (English pronunciation), or ǀXam Kaǃkʼe, is an extinct Khoisan language of South Africa, part of the ǃUi branch of the Tuu languages.

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ǁXegwi language

ǁXegwi, also known as Batwa, is an extinct ǃKwi language spoken at Lake Chrissie in South Africa, near the Swazi border.

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ǂ’Amkoe language

ǂ’Amkoe, formerly called by the dialectal name ǂHoan (ǂHȍã, ǂHûân, ǂHua, ǂHû, or in native orthography ǂHȍȁn), is a severely endangered Kx'a language of Botswana.

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ǃGãǃne language

ǃGãǃne (!Gã!nge) is an extinct language of the ǃKwi family, once spoken near Tsolo and in Umtata District in South Africa, south of Lesotho.

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Damin

Damin (Demiin in the practical orthography of Lardil) was a ceremonial language register used by the advanced initiated men of the aboriginal Lardil (Leerdil in the practical orthography) and the Yangkaal peoples of Australia.

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Endangered language

An endangered language, or moribund language, is a language that is at risk of falling out of use as its speakers die out or shift to speaking another language.

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Gǀui dialect

Gǀui or Gǀwi (pronounced in English, and also spelled ǀGwi, Dcui, Gcwi, or Cgui) is a Khoe dialect of Botswana with 2,500 speakers (2004 Cook).

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Khoisan languages

The Khoisan languages (also Khoesan or Khoesaan) are a group of African languages originally classified together by Joseph Greenberg.

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Kx'a languages

The Kx'a languages, also called Ju–ǂHoan, are a family established in 2010 linking the ǂ’Amkoe (ǂHoan) language with the ǃKung (Juu) dialect cluster, a relationship that had been suspected for a decade.

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Language contact

Language contact occurs when speakers of two or more languages or varieties interact and influence each other.

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Language family

A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family.

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List of national mottos

This page lists state and national mottos for the world's nations.

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Lower Nossob language

Lower Nossob an extinct Khoisan language once spoken along the Nossob River on the border of South Africa and Botswana, near Namibia.

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Nǁng language

Nǁng or Nǁŋǃke, commonly known by its primary dialect Nǀuu (Nǀhuki), is a moribund Tuu (Khoisan) language once spoken in South Africa.

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South Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa.

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Sprachbund

A sprachbund ("federation of languages") – also known as a linguistic area, area of linguistic convergence, diffusion area or language crossroads – is a group of languages that have common features resulting from geographical proximity and language contact.

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Taa language

Taa, also known as ǃXóõ (ǃKhong, ǃXoon – pronounced), is a Tuu language notable for its large number of phonemes, perhaps the largest in the world.

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Tone (linguistics)

Tone is the use of pitch in language to distinguish lexical or grammatical meaning – that is, to distinguish or to inflect words.

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Vaal–Orange language

Vaal–Orange, also known as Seroa, is an extinct ǃKwi language of South Africa and Lesotho.

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Vowel

A vowel is one of the two principal classes of speech sound, the other being a consonant.

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Redirects here:

!Kwi, !Kwi language, !Kwi languages, !Ui languages, Kwi languages, Proto-Tuu, Southern Khoisan languages, Southern South African Khoisan languages, Taa-!Kwi languages, Tuu language, ǃKwi languages.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuu_languages

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