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Book of Documents

Index Book of Documents

The Book of Documents (Shujing, earlier Shu-king) or Classic of History, also known as the Shangshu ("Esteemed Documents"), is one of the Five Classics of ancient Chinese literature. [1]

81 relations: Analects, Anyang, Bamboo and wooden slips, Battle of Muye, Book of Han, Books of Kings, Burning of books and burying of scholars, Chen Mengjia, Chinese bronze inscriptions, Chinese literature, Chinese Text Project, Chu (state), Clerical script, Confucius, Duke Mu of Qin, Duke of Zhou, Duke Wen of Jin, Emperor Shun, Emperor Wu of Han, Emperor Yao, Four Books and Five Classics, Fu Sheng (scholar), Gao Yao (minister), Guodian Chu Slips, Han dynasty, He zun, Huangfu Mi, Hubei, Jin dynasty (265–420), Jingmen, Kaicheng Stone Classics, King Cheng of Zhou, King Kang of Zhou, Kong Anguo, Liu Xiang (scholar), Liu Xin, Luoyang, Mandate of Heaven, Mei Ze, Mencius, Mencius (book), Mozi, National Central Library, Old Chinese, Old Testament, Old Texts, Oracle bone, Oracle bone script, Pan Geng, Qin dynasty, ..., Qin Shi Huang, Qing dynasty, Qufu, Records of the Grand Historian, Rites of Zhou, Sacred Books of the East, Seal script, Shang dynasty, Shangdi, Song dynasty, Spring and Autumn period, Su Shi, T'oung Pao, Tang dynasty, Tang of Shang, The Cambridge History of China, Tsinghua Bamboo Slips, Tsinghua University, Warring States period, Wu Cheng (philosopher), Wu Ding, Xia dynasty, Xiping Stone Classics, Xun Kuang, Yan Ruoqu, Yi Yin, Yi Zhou Shu, Yu Gong, Yu the Great, Zhou dynasty, Zuo zhuan. Expand index (31 more) »

Analects

The Analects (Old Chinese: *run ŋ(r)aʔ), also known as the Analects of Confucius, is a collection of sayings and ideas attributed to the Chinese philosopher Confucius and his contemporaries, traditionally believed to have been compiled and written by Confucius's followers.

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Anyang

Anyang is a prefecture-level city in Henan province, China.

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Bamboo and wooden slips

Bamboo and wooden slips were the main media and writing medium for documents in China before the widespread introduction of paper during the first two centuries AD.

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Battle of Muye

The Battle of Muye or Mu was a battle fought in ancient China between the Zhou dynasty and Shang dynasty.

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Book of Han

The Book of Han or History of the Former Han is a history of China finished in 111, covering the Western, or Former Han dynasty from the first emperor in 206 BCE to the fall of Wang Mang in 23 CE.

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Books of Kings

The two Books of Kings, originally a single book, are the eleventh and twelfth books of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament.

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Burning of books and burying of scholars

The burning of books and burying of scholars refers to the supposed burning of texts in 213 BCE and live burial of 460 Confucian scholars in 212 BCE by the First Emperor of the Qin dynasty of ancient China.

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Chen Mengjia

Chen Mengjia (or Ch'en Meng-chia; 20 April 1911, Nanjing – 3 September 1966, Beijing) was a Chinese scholar, poet and archaeologist.

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Chinese bronze inscriptions

Chinese bronze inscriptions, also commonly referred to as Bronze script or Bronzeware script, are writing in a variety of Chinese scripts on Chinese ritual bronzes such as zhōng bells and dǐng tripodal cauldrons from the Shang dynasty to the Zhou dynasty and even later.

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Chinese literature

The history of Chinese literature extends thousands of years, from the earliest recorded dynastic court archives to the mature vernacular fiction novels that arose during the Ming Dynasty to entertain the masses of literate Chinese.

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Chinese Text Project

The Chinese Text Project (CTP) is a digital library project that assembles collections of early Chinese texts.

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Chu (state)

Chu (Old Chinese: *s-r̥aʔ) was a hegemonic, Zhou dynasty era state.

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Clerical script

The clerical script (Japanese: 隷書体, reishotai; Vietnamese: lệ thư), also formerly chancery script, is an archaic style of Chinese calligraphy which evolved from the Warring States period to the Qin dynasty, was dominant in the Han dynasty, and remained in use through the Wei-Jin periods.

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Confucius

Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history.

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Duke Mu of Qin

Duke Mu of Qin (died 621), born Renhao, was a duke of Qin (659–621) in the western reaches of the Zhou Kingdom during the Spring and Autumn Period of Chinese history.

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Duke of Zhou

Dan, Duke Wen of Zhou (11th Century BC), commonly known as the Duke of Zhou, was a member of the royal family of the Zhou dynasty who played a major role in consolidating the kingdom established by his elder brother King Wu.

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Duke Wen of Jin

Duke Wen of Jin (697–628BC), born Chong'er, was a scion of the royal house of Jin during the Spring and Autumn Period of Chinese history.

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Emperor Shun

Shun, also known as Emperor Shun and Chonghua, was a legendary leader of ancient China, regarded by some sources as one of the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors.

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Emperor Wu of Han

Emperor Wu of Han (30 July 157BC29 March 87BC), born Liu Che, courtesy name Tong, was the seventh emperor of the Han dynasty of China, ruling from 141–87 BC.

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Emperor Yao

Emperor Yao (traditionally c. 2356 – 2255 BC) was a legendary Chinese ruler, according to various sources, one of the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors.

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Four Books and Five Classics

The Four Books and Five Classics are the authoritative books of Confucianism in China written before 300 BC.

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Fu Sheng (scholar)

Fu Sheng (268–178 BC), also known as Master Fu (伏生), was a Confucian scholar of the Qin and Western Han dynasties of ancient China.

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Gao Yao (minister)

Gao Yao was the Minister for Law of Emperor Shun in prehistorical China according to tradition.

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Guodian Chu Slips

The Guodian Chu Slips were unearthed in 1993 in Tomb no.

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Han dynasty

The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China (206 BC–220 AD), preceded by the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and succeeded by the Three Kingdoms period (220–280 AD). Spanning over four centuries, the Han period is considered a golden age in Chinese history. To this day, China's majority ethnic group refers to themselves as the "Han Chinese" and the Chinese script is referred to as "Han characters". It was founded by the rebel leader Liu Bang, known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu of Han, and briefly interrupted by the Xin dynasty (9–23 AD) of the former regent Wang Mang. This interregnum separates the Han dynasty into two periods: the Western Han or Former Han (206 BC–9 AD) and the Eastern Han or Later Han (25–220 AD). The emperor was at the pinnacle of Han society. He presided over the Han government but shared power with both the nobility and appointed ministers who came largely from the scholarly gentry class. The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government using an innovation inherited from the Qin known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following the Rebellion of the Seven States. From the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BC) onward, the Chinese court officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics, synthesized with the cosmology of later scholars such as Dong Zhongshu. This policy endured until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 AD. The Han dynasty saw an age of economic prosperity and witnessed a significant growth of the money economy first established during the Zhou dynasty (c. 1050–256 BC). The coinage issued by the central government mint in 119 BC remained the standard coinage of China until the Tang dynasty (618–907 AD). The period saw a number of limited institutional innovations. To finance its military campaigns and the settlement of newly conquered frontier territories, the Han government nationalized the private salt and iron industries in 117 BC, but these government monopolies were repealed during the Eastern Han dynasty. Science and technology during the Han period saw significant advances, including the process of papermaking, the nautical steering ship rudder, the use of negative numbers in mathematics, the raised-relief map, the hydraulic-powered armillary sphere for astronomy, and a seismometer for measuring earthquakes employing an inverted pendulum. The Xiongnu, a nomadic steppe confederation, defeated the Han in 200 BC and forced the Han to submit as a de facto inferior partner, but continued their raids on the Han borders. Emperor Wu launched several military campaigns against them. The ultimate Han victory in these wars eventually forced the Xiongnu to accept vassal status as Han tributaries. These campaigns expanded Han sovereignty into the Tarim Basin of Central Asia, divided the Xiongnu into two separate confederations, and helped establish the vast trade network known as the Silk Road, which reached as far as the Mediterranean world. The territories north of Han's borders were quickly overrun by the nomadic Xianbei confederation. Emperor Wu also launched successful military expeditions in the south, annexing Nanyue in 111 BC and Dian in 109 BC, and in the Korean Peninsula where the Xuantu and Lelang Commanderies were established in 108 BC. After 92 AD, the palace eunuchs increasingly involved themselves in court politics, engaging in violent power struggles between the various consort clans of the empresses and empresses dowager, causing the Han's ultimate downfall. Imperial authority was also seriously challenged by large Daoist religious societies which instigated the Yellow Turban Rebellion and the Five Pecks of Rice Rebellion. Following the death of Emperor Ling (r. 168–189 AD), the palace eunuchs suffered wholesale massacre by military officers, allowing members of the aristocracy and military governors to become warlords and divide the empire. When Cao Pi, King of Wei, usurped the throne from Emperor Xian, the Han dynasty would eventually collapse and ceased to exist.

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He zun

The He zun is an ancient Chinese ritual bronze vessel of the zun shape.

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Huangfu Mi

Huangfu Mi (215–282) was a Chinese scholar and physician who lived through the late Eastern Han dynasty, Three Kingdoms period and early Western Jin dynasty.

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Hubei

Hubei is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the Central China region.

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Jin dynasty (265–420)

The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire (sometimes distinguished as the or) was a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated from 266 to 420.

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Jingmen

Jingmen is a prefecture-level city in central Hubei province, People's Republic of China.

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Kaicheng Stone Classics

The Kaicheng Stone Classics (開成石經) or Tang Stone Classics are a group of twelve early Chinese classic works carved on the orders of Emperor Wenzong of the Tang dynasty in 833–837 (Kaicheng era) as a reference document for scholars.

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King Cheng of Zhou

King Cheng of Zhou or King Ch'eng of Chou was the second king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty.

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King Kang of Zhou

King Kang of Zhou or King K’ang of Chou was the third sovereign of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty and son of the King Cheng of Zhou.

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Kong Anguo

Kong Anguo (ca. 156 – ca. 74 BC), courtesy name Ziguo (子國), was a Confucian scholar and government official of the Western Han dynasty of ancient China.

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Liu Xiang (scholar)

Liu Xiang (77–6BCE), born Liu Gengsheng and bearing the courtesy name Zizheng, was a Chinese politician, historian, and writer of the Western Han Dynasty.

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Liu Xin

Liu Xin (c. 50 BCE – 23 CE), courtesy name Zijun, was a Chinese astronomer, historian, librarian and politician during the Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 9 CE) and Xin Dynasty (9 – 23 CE).

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Luoyang

Luoyang, formerly romanized as Loyang, is a city located in the confluence area of Luo River and Yellow River in the west of Henan province.

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Mandate of Heaven

The Mandate of Heaven or Tian Ming is a Chinese political and religious doctrine used since ancient times to justify the rule of the King or Emperor of China.

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Mei Ze

Mei Ze (fl. 4th century), also known as Mei Yi (梅頤), was a Confucian scholar and government official of the Eastern Jin Dynasty of ancient China.

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Mencius

Mencius or Mengzi (372–289 BC or 385–303 or 302BC) was a Chinese philosopher who has often been described as the "second Sage", that is after only Confucius himself.

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Mencius (book)

The Mencius (Old Chinese: *mˤraŋ-s tsəʔ) is a collection of anecdotes and conversations of the Confucian thinker and philosopher Mencius on topics in moral and political philosophy, often between Mencius and the rulers of the various Warring States.

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Mozi

Mozi (Latinized as Micius; c. 470 – c. 391 BC), original name Mo Di (墨翟), was a Chinese philosopher during the Hundred Schools of Thought period (early Warring States period).

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National Central Library

The National Central Library (NCL) is the national library of Taiwan, Republic of China, which it is located at No.

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Old Chinese

Old Chinese, also called Archaic Chinese in older works, is the oldest attested stage of Chinese, and the ancestor of all modern varieties of Chinese.

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Old Testament

The Old Testament (abbreviated OT) is the first part of Christian Bibles, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible (or Tanakh), a collection of ancient religious writings by the Israelites believed by most Christians and religious Jews to be the sacred Word of God.

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Old Texts

In Chinese philology, the Old Texts refer to some versions of the Five Classics discovered during the Han Dynasty, written in archaic characters and supposedly produced before the burning of the books, as opposed to the Modern Texts or New Texts (今文經) in the new orthography.

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Oracle bone

Oracle bones are pieces of ox scapula or turtle plastron, which were used for pyromancy – a form of divination – in ancient China, mainly during the late Shang dynasty.

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Oracle bone script

Oracle bone script was the form of Chinese characters used on oracle bonesanimal bones or turtle plastrons used in pyromantic divinationin the late 2nd millennium BCE, and is the earliest known form of Chinese writing.

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Pan Geng

Pán Gēng, given name Xun, was a Shang dynasty King of China.

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Qin dynasty

The Qin dynasty was the first dynasty of Imperial China, lasting from 221 to 206 BC.

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Qin Shi Huang

Qin Shi Huang (18 February 25910 September 210) was the founder of the Qin dynasty and was the first emperor of a unified China.

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Qing dynasty

The Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing, was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912.

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Qufu

Qufu is a city in southwestern Shandong Province, China.

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Records of the Grand Historian

The Records of the Grand Historian, also known by its Chinese name Shiji, is a monumental history of ancient China and the world finished around 94 BC by the Han dynasty official Sima Qian after having been started by his father, Sima Tan, Grand Astrologer to the imperial court.

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Rites of Zhou

The Rites of Zhou, originally known as "Officers of Zhou" is actually a work on bureaucracy and organizational theory.

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Sacred Books of the East

The Sacred Books of the East is a monumental 50-volume set of English translations of Asian religious writings, edited by Max Müller and published by the Oxford University Press between 1879 and 1910.

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Seal script

Seal script is an ancient style of writing Chinese characters that was common throughout the latter half of the 1st millennium BC.

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Shang dynasty

The Shang dynasty or Yin dynasty, according to traditional historiography, ruled in the Yellow River valley in the second millennium BC, succeeding the Xia dynasty and followed by the Zhou dynasty.

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Shangdi

Shangdi, also written simply, "Emperor", is the Chinese term for "Supreme Deity" or "Highest Deity" in the theology of the classical texts, especially deriving from Shang theology and finding an equivalent in the later Tian ("Heaven" or "Great Whole") of Zhou theology.

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Song dynasty

The Song dynasty (960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279.

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Spring and Autumn period

The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC (or according to some authorities until 403 BC) which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou Period.

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Su Shi

Su Shi (8January103724August1101), also known as Su Dongpo, was a Chinese writer, poet, painter, calligrapher, pharmacologist, gastronome, and a statesman of the Song dynasty.

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T'oung Pao

T’oung Pao, founded in 1890, is a Dutch journal and the oldest international journal of sinology.

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Tang dynasty

The Tang dynasty or the Tang Empire was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period.

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Tang of Shang

Tang (– 1646 BC) or Cheng Tang (成湯), recorded on oracle bones as Da Yi (大乙), was the first king of the Shang dynasty in Chinese history.

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The Cambridge History of China

The Cambridge History of China is an ongoing series of books published by Cambridge University Press (CUP) covering the history of China from the founding of the Qin dynasty in 221 BC to 1982.

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Tsinghua Bamboo Slips

The Tsinghua Bamboo Slips are a collection of Chinese texts dating to the Warring States period and written in ink on strips of bamboo, that were acquired in 2008 by Tsinghua University, China.

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Tsinghua University

Tsinghua University (abbreviated THU;; also romanized as Qinghua) is a major research university in Beijing, China and a member of the elite C9 League of Chinese universities.

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Warring States period

The Warring States period was an era in ancient Chinese history of warfare, as well as bureaucratic and military reforms and consolidation, following the Spring and Autumn period and concluding with the Qin wars of conquest that saw the annexation of all other contender states, which ultimately led to the Qin state's victory in 221 BC as the first unified Chinese empire known as the Qin dynasty.

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Wu Cheng (philosopher)

Wú Chéng or Wu Ch'eng (1249 – 1333), courtesy names Yòuqīng and Bóqīng, studio names Yīwúshānrén and Caolu Xiansheng (草廬先生; lit. "Mr. Grass Hut"), was a scholar, educator, and poet who lived in the late Song dynasty and Yuan dynasty.

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Wu Ding

Wu Ding was a king of the Shang dynasty in ancient China, whose reign lasted from approximately 1250–1192 BC.

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Xia dynasty

The Xia dynasty is the legendary, possibly apocryphal first dynasty in traditional Chinese history.

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Xiping Stone Classics

The Xiping Stone Classics are a collection of Han dynasty stone carved books on various Confucian classics.

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Xun Kuang

Xun Kuang (c. 310c. 235 BC, alt. c. 314c. 217 BC), also widely known as Xunzi ("Master Xun"), was a Chinese Confucian philosopher who lived during the Warring States period and contributed to the Hundred Schools of Thought.

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Yan Ruoqu

Yan Ruoqu (November 11, 1636 – July 9, 1704) was an influential Chinese scholar of the early Qing Dynasty.

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Yi Yin

Yi Yin (born Yī Zhì (伊挚), also known as A Heng (阿衡)), was a minister of the early Shang dynasty, and one of the honoured officials of the era.

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Yi Zhou Shu

The Yi Zhou Shu is a compendium of Chinese historical documents about the Western Zhou period (1046–771 BCE).

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Yu Gong

The Yu Gong or Tribute of Yu is a chapter of the Book of Xia (夏書/夏书) section of the Book of Documents, one of the Five Classics of ancient Chinese literature.

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Yu the Great

Yu the Great (c. 2200 – 2100 BC) was a legendary ruler in ancient China famed for his introduction of flood control, inaugurating dynastic rule in China by establishing the Xia Dynasty, and for his upright moral character.

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Zhou dynasty

The Zhou dynasty or the Zhou Kingdom was a Chinese dynasty that followed the Shang dynasty and preceded the Qin dynasty.

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Zuo zhuan

The Zuo zhuan, generally translated The Zuo Tradition or The Commentary of Zuo, is an ancient Chinese narrative history that is traditionally regarded as a commentary on the ancient Chinese chronicle ''Spring and Autumn Annals'' (''Chunqiu'' 春秋).

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Redirects here:

Book of Historical Documents, Book of History, Book of documents, Book of history, Book of shu-king, Classic of History, Classic of documents, Classic of history, Esteemed Documents, History Classic, Shang Shu, Shang shu, ShangShu, Shangshu, Shoo King, Shoo-king, Shou King, Shu Ching, Shu Jing, Shu King, Shu ching, Shu jing, ShuJing, Shujing, Shàngshū, Shūjīng, The Book Of History, The Book of Documents, The Book of Historical Documents, Venerated documents.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Documents

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