Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

De Officiis

+ Save concept

De Officiis (On Duties or On Obligations) is a treatise by Marcus Tullius Cicero divided into three books, in which Cicero expounds his conception of the best way to live, behave, and observe moral obligations. [1]

58 relations: Adamo Rossi, Aelius Donatus, Ambrose, Anecdote, Assassination of Julius Caesar, Athens, Augustine of Hippo, Biblioteca Augusta, Christian Garve, Christianity, Church Fathers, Cicero, Cicero Minor, De jure belli ac pacis, Deity, Erasmus, Frederick the Great, Gutenberg Bible, Honour, Hugo Grotius, Illuminated manuscript, Jerome, John Locke, John Marshall (historian), Julius Caesar, LacusCurtius, Library of Congress, Loeb Classical Library, Middle Ages, Moral authority, Movable type, Natural law, Nicomachean Ethics, Non nobis solum, Panaetius, Peripatetic school, Perseus Project, Perugia, Petrarch, Philip Melanchthon, Plato, Platonic Academy, Printing press, Priscian, Robert Sanderson (theologian), Roman Republic, Samuel von Pufendorf, Satire, Satires (Juvenal), Seneca the Younger, ..., Stoicism, Summum bonum, The Book of the Governor, The Latin Library, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Elyot, Voltaire, Westminster School. Expand index (8 more) »

Adamo Rossi

Adamo Rossi (March 5, 1821 in Petrignano – February 22, 1891 in Perugia) was an Italian clergyman, revolutionary patriot, scholar and librarian.

New!!: De Officiis and Adamo Rossi · See more »

Aelius Donatus

Aelius Donatus (fl. mid-fourth century AD) was a Roman grammarian and teacher of rhetoric.

New!!: De Officiis and Aelius Donatus · See more »

Ambrose

Aurelius Ambrosius (– 397), better known in English as Ambrose, was a bishop of Milan who became one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century.

New!!: De Officiis and Ambrose · See more »

Anecdote

An anecdote is a brief, revealing account of an individual person or an incident.

New!!: De Officiis and Anecdote · See more »

Assassination of Julius Caesar

The assassination of Julius Caesar was the result of a conspiracy by many Roman senators led by Gaius Cassius Longinus, Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, and Marcus Junius Brutus.

New!!: De Officiis and Assassination of Julius Caesar · See more »

Athens

Athens (Αθήνα, Athína; Ἀθῆναι, Athênai) is the capital and largest city of Greece.

New!!: De Officiis and Athens · See more »

Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

New!!: De Officiis and Augustine of Hippo · See more »

Biblioteca Augusta

The Biblioteca Augusta (est. 1582) is a public library in Perugia, Italy, founded by.

New!!: De Officiis and Biblioteca Augusta · See more »

Christian Garve

Christian Garve (7 January 1742 – 1 December 1798) was one of the best-known philosophers of the late Enlightenment along with Immanuel Kant and Moses Mendelssohn.

New!!: De Officiis and Christian Garve · See more »

Christianity

ChristianityFrom Ancient Greek Χριστός Khristós (Latinized as Christus), translating Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning "the anointed one", with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas.

New!!: De Officiis and Christianity · See more »

Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

New!!: De Officiis and Christmas · See more »

Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

New!!: De Officiis and Christmas and holiday season · See more »

Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

New!!: De Officiis and Christmas Eve · See more »

Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

New!!: De Officiis and Christmas traditions · See more »

Church Fathers

The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers.

New!!: De Officiis and Church Fathers · See more »

Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

New!!: De Officiis and Cicero · See more »

Cicero Minor

Marcus Tullius Cicero Minor (Minor Latin for ‘the younger’), or Cicero the Younger, was born in 65 BC.

New!!: De Officiis and Cicero Minor · See more »

De jure belli ac pacis

De iure belli ac pacis (On the Law of War and Peace) is a 1625 book in Latin, written by Hugo Grotius and published in Paris, on the legal status of war.

New!!: De Officiis and De jure belli ac pacis · See more »

Deity

A deity is a supernatural being considered divine or sacred.

New!!: De Officiis and Deity · See more »

Erasmus

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (28 October 1466Gleason, John B. "The Birth Dates of John Colet and Erasmus of Rotterdam: Fresh Documentary Evidence," Renaissance Quarterly, The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the Renaissance Society of America, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Spring, 1979), pp. 73–76; – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus or Erasmus of Rotterdam,Erasmus was his baptismal name, given after St. Erasmus of Formiae.

New!!: De Officiis and Erasmus · See more »

Frederick the Great

Frederick II (Friedrich; 24 January 171217 August 1786) was King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786, the longest reign of any Hohenzollern king.

New!!: De Officiis and Frederick the Great · See more »

Gutenberg Bible

The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible, the Mazarin Bible or the B42) was the first major book printed using mass-produced movable metal type in Europe.

New!!: De Officiis and Gutenberg Bible · See more »

Honour

Honour (or honor in American English, note) is the idea of a bond between an individual and a society, as a quality of a person that is both of social teaching and of personal ethos, that manifests itself as a code of conduct, and has various elements such as valor, chivalry, honesty, and compassion.

New!!: De Officiis and Honour · See more »

Hugo Grotius

Hugo Grotius (10 April 1583 – 28 August 1645), also known as Huig de Groot or Hugo de Groot, was a Dutch jurist.

New!!: De Officiis and Hugo Grotius · See more »

Illuminated manuscript

An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript in which the text is supplemented with such decoration as initials, borders (marginalia) and miniature illustrations.

New!!: De Officiis and Illuminated manuscript · See more »

Jerome

Jerome (Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus; Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian.

New!!: De Officiis and Jerome · See more »

John Locke

John Locke (29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".

New!!: De Officiis and John Locke · See more »

John Marshall (historian)

John Marshall is a British historian, who is also the Chairman of the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University.

New!!: De Officiis and John Marshall (historian) · See more »

Julius Caesar

Gaius Julius Caesar (12 or 13 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC), known by his cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and military general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

New!!: De Officiis and Julius Caesar · See more »

LacusCurtius

LacusCurtius is a website specializing in ancient Rome, currently hosted on a server at the University of Chicago.

New!!: De Officiis and LacusCurtius · See more »

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States.

New!!: De Officiis and Library of Congress · See more »

Loeb Classical Library

The Loeb Classical Library (LCL; named after James Loeb) is a series of books, today published by Harvard University Press, which presents important works of ancient Greek and Latin literature in a way designed to make the text accessible to the broadest possible audience, by presenting the original Greek or Latin text on each left-hand page, and a fairly literal translation on the facing page.

New!!: De Officiis and Loeb Classical Library · See more »

Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

New!!: De Officiis and Middle Ages · See more »

Moral authority

Moral authority is authority premised on principles, or fundamental truths, which are independent of written, or positive, laws.

New!!: De Officiis and Moral authority · See more »

Movable type

Movable type (US English; moveable type in British English) is the system and technology of printing and typography that uses movable components to reproduce the elements of a document (usually individual letters or punctuation) usually on the medium of paper.

New!!: De Officiis and Movable type · See more »

Natural law

Natural law (ius naturale, lex naturalis) is a philosophy asserting that certain rights are inherent by virtue of human nature, endowed by nature—traditionally by God or a transcendent source—and that these can be understood universally through human reason.

New!!: De Officiis and Natural law · See more »

New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

New!!: De Officiis and New Year · See more »

New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

New!!: De Officiis and New Year's Day · See more »

New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

New!!: De Officiis and New Year's Eve · See more »

Nicomachean Ethics

The Nicomachean Ethics (Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια) is the name normally given to Aristotle's best-known work on ethics.

New!!: De Officiis and Nicomachean Ethics · See more »

Non nobis solum

Non nobis solum (not for ourselves alone) is a Latin motto.

New!!: De Officiis and Non nobis solum · See more »

Panaetius

Panaetius (Παναίτιος, Panaitios; c. 185 – c. 110/109 BC) of Rhodes was a Stoic philosopher.

New!!: De Officiis and Panaetius · See more »

Peripatetic school

The Peripatetic school was a school of philosophy in Ancient Greece.

New!!: De Officiis and Peripatetic school · See more »

Perseus Project

The Perseus Project (version 4 also known as "Perseus Hopper") is a digital library project of Tufts University, which is located in Medford and Somerville, near Boston, in the U.S. state of Massachusetts.

New!!: De Officiis and Perseus Project · See more »

Perugia

Perugia (Perusia) is the capital city of both the region of Umbria in central Italy, crossed by the river Tiber, and of the province of Perugia.

New!!: De Officiis and Perugia · See more »

Petrarch

Francesco Petrarca (July 20, 1304 – July 18/19, 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch, was a scholar and poet of Renaissance Italy who was one of the earliest humanists.

New!!: De Officiis and Petrarch · See more »

Philip Melanchthon

Philip Melanchthon (born Philipp Schwartzerdt; 16 February 1497 – 19 April 1560) was a German Lutheran reformer, collaborator with Martin Luther, the first systematic theologian of the Protestant Reformation, intellectual leader of the Lutheran Reformation, and an influential designer of educational systems.

New!!: De Officiis and Philip Melanchthon · See more »

Plato

Plato (Πλάτων Plátōn, in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

New!!: De Officiis and Plato · See more »

Platonic Academy

The Academy (Ancient Greek: Ἀκαδημία) was founded by Plato (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) in ca.

New!!: De Officiis and Platonic Academy · See more »

Printing press

A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink.

New!!: De Officiis and Printing press · See more »

Priscian

Priscianus Caesariensis, commonly known as Priscian, was a Latin grammarian and the author of the Institutes of Grammar which was the standard textbook for the study of Latin during the Middle Ages.

New!!: De Officiis and Priscian · See more »

Robert Sanderson (theologian)

Robert Sanderson (19 September 1587 – 29 January 1663) was an English theologian and casuist.

New!!: De Officiis and Robert Sanderson (theologian) · See more »

Roman Republic

The Roman Republic (Res publica Romana) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire.

New!!: De Officiis and Roman Republic · See more »

Samuel von Pufendorf

Freiherr Samuel von Pufendorf (8 January 1632 – 13 October 1694) was a German jurist, political philosopher, economist and historian.

New!!: De Officiis and Samuel von Pufendorf · See more »

Satire

Satire is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.

New!!: De Officiis and Satire · See more »

Satires (Juvenal)

The Satires are a collection of satirical poems by the Latin author Juvenal written in the early 2nd centuries AD.

New!!: De Officiis and Satires (Juvenal) · See more »

Seneca the Younger

Seneca the Younger AD65), fully Lucius Annaeus Seneca and also known simply as Seneca, was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and—in one work—satirist of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

New!!: De Officiis and Seneca the Younger · See more »

Stoicism

Stoicism is a school of Hellenistic philosophy founded by Zeno of Citium in Athens in the early 3rd century BC.

New!!: De Officiis and Stoicism · See more »

Summum bonum

Summum bonum is a Latin expression meaning "the highest good", which was introduced by the Roman philosopher Cicero, to correspond to the Idea of the Good in ancient Greek philosophy.

New!!: De Officiis and Summum bonum · See more »

The Book of the Governor

The Boke named the Governour, sometimes referred to in modern English as The Book of the Governor, is a book written by Thomas Elyot and published in 1531.

New!!: De Officiis and The Book of the Governor · See more »

The Latin Library

The Latin Library is a website that collects public domain Latin texts.

New!!: De Officiis and The Latin Library · See more »

Thomas Aquinas

Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 – 7 March 1274) was an Italian Dominican friar, Catholic priest, and Doctor of the Church.

New!!: De Officiis and Thomas Aquinas · See more »

Thomas Elyot

Sir Thomas Elyot (c. 1490 – 26 March 1546) was an English diplomat and scholar.

New!!: De Officiis and Thomas Elyot · See more »

Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on Christianity as a whole, especially the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state.

New!!: De Officiis and Voltaire · See more »

Westminster School

Westminster School is an independent day and boarding school in London, England, located within the precincts of Westminster Abbey.

New!!: De Officiis and Westminster School · See more »

2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

New!!: De Officiis and 2018 · See more »

2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

New!!: De Officiis and 2019 · See more »

Redirects here:

Cicero de Officiis, De Oficiis, De officiis, De oficiis, N Duties, On Duties, On Obligations.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Officiis

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »