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Library of Congress

Index Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. [1]

180 relations: Abraham Lincoln, Academic library, Ainsworth Rand Spofford, American Civil War, American Library Association, American literature, American Memory, Americana, App Store (iOS), Archer Milton Huntington, Archibald MacLeish, Art Deco, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Bay Psalm Book, Betts Stradivarius, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Billy Joel, Boston Public Library, Braille, British Library, Burning of Washington, Burt Bacharach, Cairo, Capitol Hill, Carla Hayden, Carole King, Cecil Hobbs, Charles Coffin Jewett, Claiborne Pell, Cold War, Compact disc, Congressional Record, Congressional Research Service, Conservation and restoration of books, manuscripts, documents and ephemera, Copyright, Copyright registration, Culpeper, Virginia, Daniel J. Boorstin, Daniel W. Voorhees, Daniel Webster, David Rubenstein, David Woodley Packard, Digital Public Library of America, Documents Expediting Project, Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, Ezra Winter, Federal government of the United States, Federal Research Division, Federal Reserve System, ..., Feleky Collection, Fellows in American Letters of the Library of Congress, Fort Knox, Founding Fathers of the United States, Francis Bacon, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Gershwin Prize, Google Books, Government Accountability Office, Great Depression, Gutenberg Bible, Hal David, Hal Varian, Harry S. Truman, Harvard Library, Hebrew language, Herbert Putnam, Himalayas, Honorarium, House of Romanov, Incunable, Independence Avenue (Washington, D.C.), Interlibrary loan, Internet Archive, James H. Billington, James Madison, James Pearce, John Adams, John D. Rockefeller, John Gould Stephenson, John Russell Young, John Silva Meehan, Joseph Henry, Justin Smith Morrill, K–12, LaserDisc, Laura Bush, Law Library of Congress, Lawrence Quincy Mumford, Legal deposit, Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970, Librarian of Congress, Library of Congress Classification, Library of Congress Control Number, Library of Congress Country Studies, Library of Congress Living Legend, Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Libretto, List of concert halls, List of largest libraries, Luther H. Evans, Magna Carta, Manuscript, Map, MARC standards, Mass deacidification, Megasthenes, Melvil Dewey, Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard, Metadata Object Description Schema, Microform, Minerva Initiative, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, National Book Festival, National Diet Library, National Digital Library Program, National Film Registry, National library, National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, National Recording Registry, New York City, New York State Library, North America, Packard Humanities Institute, Paul McCartney, Paul Simon, Petabyte, Peter Force, Peter Lyman, Philadelphia, Primary source, Progressive Era, Public domain, Ross A. Collins, Saint Blaise Abbey, Black Forest, Search/Retrieve via URL, Search/Retrieve Web Service, Sheet music, Sir George Cockburn, 10th Baronet, Smithsonian Contributions and Studies Series, Smithsonian Institution, Snapshots of the Past, Sound recording and reproduction, Stevie Wonder, Terabyte, Text file, The Christian Science Monitor, The Federalist Papers, The Journal of Asian Studies, The New York Times, Theodore Roosevelt, THOMAS, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson Building, Title 17 of the United States Code, Totalitarianism, Twitter, United Nations Conference on International Organization, United States, United States Air Force, United States Capitol, United States Congress, United States Congress Joint Committee on the Library, United States Constitution, United States Copyright Office, United States Declaration of Independence, United States Department of State, United States Department of the Interior, United States Poet Laureate, United States Senate Library, Vatican Library, Vellum, Virginia, Visual impairment, Waldseemüller map, War of 1812, Washington, D.C., Willie Nelson, Z39.50. Expand index (130 more) »

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

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Academic library

An academic library is a library that is attached to a higher education institution which serves two complementary purposes to support the school's curriculum, and to support the research of the university faculty and students.

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Ainsworth Rand Spofford

Ainsworth Rand Spofford (September 12, 1825 – August 11, 1908) was an American journalist and the sixth Librarian of Congress.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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American Library Association

The American Library Association (ALA) is a nonprofit organization based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally.

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American literature

American literature is literature written or produced in the United States and its preceding colonies (for specific discussions of poetry and theater, see Poetry of the United States and Theater in the United States).

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American Memory

American Memory is an Internet-based archive for public domain image resources, as well as audio, video, and archived Web content.

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Americana

Americana are artifacts, or a collection of artifacts, related to the history, geography, folklore and cultural heritage of the United States.

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App Store (iOS)

The App Store is a digital distribution platform, developed and maintained by Apple Inc., for mobile apps on its iOS operating system.

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Archer Milton Huntington

Archer Milton Huntington (March 10, 1870 – December 11, 1955) was the son of Arabella (née Duval) Huntington and the stepson of railroad magnate and industrialist Collis P. Huntington.

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Archibald MacLeish

Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet and writer who was associated with the modernist school of poetry.

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Art Deco

Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I. Art Deco influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners.

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Battle of Chancellorsville

The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War (1861–1865), and the principal engagement of the Chancellorsville Campaign.

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Battle of Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg (with an sound) was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

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Bay Psalm Book

The Bay Psalm Book was the first book printed in British North America.

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Betts Stradivarius

The Betts Stradivarius is an antique violin made in 1704 by the Italian luthier Antonio Stradivari of Cremona.

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Bibliothèque nationale de France

The (BnF, English: National Library of France) is the national library of France, located in Paris.

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Billy Joel

William Martin Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer and pianist.

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Boston Public Library

The Boston Public Library is a municipal public library system in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, founded in 1848.

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Braille

Braille is a tactile writing system used by people who are visually impaired.

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British Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and the largest national library in the world by number of items catalogued.

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Burning of Washington

The Burning of Washington was a British invasion of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, during the War of 1812.

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Burt Bacharach

Burt Freeman Bacharach (born May 12, 1928) is an American composer, songwriter, record producer, pianist, and singer who has composed hundreds of popular hit songs from the late 1950s through the 1980s, many in collaboration with popular lyricist Hal David.

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Cairo

Cairo (القاهرة) is the capital of Egypt.

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Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill, in addition to being a metonym for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C., stretching easterly in front of the United States Capitol along wide avenues.

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Carla Hayden

Carla Diane Hayden (born August 10, 1952) is an American librarian and the 14th Librarian of Congress.

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Carole King

Carole King (born Carol Joan Klein, February 9, 1942) is an American composer and singer-songwriter.

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Cecil Hobbs

Cecil Hobbs (April 22, 1907 – December 8, 1991) was an American scholar of Southeast Asian history, best known for being the head of the Southern Asia Section of the Orientalia (now Asian) Division of the Library of Congress.

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Charles Coffin Jewett

Charles Coffin Jewett (August 12, 1816 – January 9, 1868) was an American librarian, in 1848 becoming the Librarian and Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution before being appointed Superintendent of the Boston Public Library in 1858.

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Claiborne Pell

Claiborne de Borda Pell (November 22, 1918 – January 1, 2009) was an American politician and writer who served as a U.S. Senator from Rhode Island for six terms from 1961 to 1997.

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Cold War

The Cold War was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc (the Soviet Union and its satellite states) and powers in the Western Bloc (the United States, its NATO allies and others).

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Compact disc

Compact disc (CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips and Sony and released in 1982.

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Congressional Record

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress, published by the United States Government Publishing Office and issued when Congress is in session.

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Congressional Research Service

The Congressional Research Service (CRS), known as Congress's think tank, is a public policy research arm of the United States Congress.

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Conservation and restoration of books, manuscripts, documents and ephemera

The conservation and restoration of books, manuscripts, documents and ephemera is an activity dedicated to the preservation and protection of items of historical and personal value made primarily from paper, parchment, and leather.

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Copyright

Copyright is a legal right, existing globally in many countries, that basically grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights to determine and decide whether, and under what conditions, this original work may be used by others.

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Copyright registration

The purpose of copyright registration is to place on record a verifiable account of the date and content of the work in question, so that in the event of a legal claim, or case of infringement or plagiarism, the copyright owner can produce a copy of the work from an official government source.

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Culpeper, Virginia

Culpeper (formerly Culpeper Courthouse, earlier Fairfax) is the only incorporated town in Culpeper County, Virginia, United States.

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Daniel J. Boorstin

Daniel Joseph Boorstin (October 1, 1914 – February 28, 2004) was an American historian at the University of Chicago who wrote on many topics in American and world history.

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Daniel W. Voorhees

Daniel Wolsey Voorhees (September 26, 1827April 10, 1897) was an American lawyer and politician who served as a United States Senator from Indiana from 1877 to 1897.

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Daniel Webster

Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782October 24, 1852) was an American politician who represented New Hampshire (1813–1817) and Massachusetts (1823–1827) in the United States House of Representatives; served as a Senator from Massachusetts (1827–1841, 1845–1850); and was the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison (1841), John Tyler (1841–1843), and Millard Fillmore (1850–1852).

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David Rubenstein

David Mark Rubenstein (born August 11, 1949) is an American financier and philanthropist best known as the co-founder and co-executive chairman of The Carlyle Group, January 2014 a global private equity investment company based in Washington, D.C. He also currently serves as chairman of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, chairman of the Smithsonian Institution, and President of the Economic Club of Washington, D.C. According to the Forbes ranking of the wealthiest people in America, Rubenstein has a net worth of $2.9 billion.

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David Woodley Packard

David Woodley Packard, Ph.D. (born 1940) is a former professor and noted philanthropist; he is the son of Hewlett-Packard co-founder David Packard.

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Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is a US project aimed at providing public access to digital holdings in order to create a large-scale public digital library.

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Documents Expediting Project

DOCEX, the common name for Documents Expediting Project, was a program begun in 1946 by the Library of Congress (LoC) to distribute duplicate copies of government publications they received from federal government agencies.

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Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge

Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge aka Liz Coolidge (30 October 1864 – 4 November 1953), born Elizabeth Penn Sprague, was an American pianist and patron of music, especially of chamber music.

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Ezra Winter

Ezra Augustus Winter (March 10, 1886 – April 6, 1949) was a prominent American muralist.

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Federal government of the United States

The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government) is the national government of the United States, a constitutional republic in North America, composed of 50 states, one district, Washington, D.C. (the nation's capital), and several territories.

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Federal Research Division

The Federal Research Division (FRD) is the research and analysis unit of the United States Library of Congress.

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Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve System (also known as the Federal Reserve or simply the Fed) is the central banking system of the United States of America.

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Feleky Collection

The Feleky Collection, acquired by the Library of Congress in 1953, consisted of more than 10,000 books and 15,000 periodical issues, including biographical files, newspaper clippings, questionnaires and other materials on approximately 920 Hungarian Americans, plus photographs, prints, music scores, maps, broadsides and posters, recordings, and manuscripts.

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Fellows in American Letters of the Library of Congress

The Fellows in American Letters of the Library of Congress are awarded by the Library of Congress.

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Fort Knox

Fort Knox is a United States Army post in Kentucky, south of Louisville and north of Elizabethtown.

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Founding Fathers of the United States

The Founding Fathers of the United States led the American Revolution against the Kingdom of Great Britain.

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Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, (22 January 15619 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, and author.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

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Gershwin Prize

The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song is an award given to a composer or performer for their lifetime contributions to popular music.

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Google Books

Google Books (previously known as Google Book Search and Google Print and by its codename Project Ocean) is a service from Google Inc. that searches the full text of books and magazines that Google has scanned, converted to text using optical character recognition (OCR), and stored in its digital database.

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Government Accountability Office

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is a legislative branch government agency that provides auditing, evaluation, and investigative services for the United States Congress.

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Great Depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States.

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Gutenberg Bible

The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible, the Mazarin Bible or the B42) was the first major book printed using mass-produced movable metal type in Europe.

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Hal David

Harold Lane "Hal" David (May 25, 1921 – September 1, 2012) was an American lyricist.

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Hal Varian

Hal Ronald Varian (born March 18, 1947 in Wooster, Ohio) is an economist specializing in microeconomics and information economics.

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Harry S. Truman

Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953), taking office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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Harvard Library

The Harvard Library system comprises about 76 libraries, with more than 18 million volumes.

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Hebrew language

No description.

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Herbert Putnam

George Herbert Putnam (September 20, 1861 – August 14, 1955) was an American librarian.

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Himalayas

The Himalayas, or Himalaya, form a mountain range in Asia separating the plains of the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau.

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Honorarium

An honorarium is an ex gratia payment (i.e., a payment made, without the giver recognizing themself as having any liability or legal obligation, to a person for his or her services in a volunteer capacity or for services for which fees are not traditionally required).

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House of Romanov

The House of Romanov (. Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. also Romanoff; Рома́новы, Románovy) was the second dynasty to rule Russia, after the House of Rurik, reigning from 1613 until the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II on March 15, 1917, as a result of the February Revolution.

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Incunable

An incunable, or sometimes incunabulum (plural incunables or incunabula, respectively), is a book, pamphlet, or broadside printed in Europe before the year 1501.

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Independence Avenue (Washington, D.C.)

Independence Avenue is a major east-west street in the southwest and southeast quadrants of the city of Washington, D.C., in the United States, running just south of the United States Capitol.

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Interlibrary loan

Interlibrary loan (abbreviated ILL, and sometimes called interloan, interlending, document delivery, or document supply) is a service whereby a patron of one library can borrow books, DVDs, music, etc.

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Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a San Francisco–based nonprofit digital library with the stated mission of "universal access to all knowledge." It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, software applications/games, music, movies/videos, moving images, and nearly three million public-domain books.

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James H. Billington

James Hadley Billington (born June 1, 1929), the Librarian of Congress Emeritus, is a leading American academic and author who taught history at Harvard and Princeton before serving for 42 years as CEO of four federal cultural institutions.

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James Madison

James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

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James Pearce

James Alfred Pearce (December 14, 1805December 20, 1862) was an American politician.

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John Adams

John Adams (October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the first Vice President (1789–1797) and second President of the United States (1797–1801).

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John D. Rockefeller

John Davison Rockefeller Sr. (July 8, 1839 – May 23, 1937) was an American oil industry business magnate, industrialist, and philanthropist.

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John Gould Stephenson

John Gould Stephenson (March 1, 1828 – November 11, 1883) was an American physician and soldier.

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John Russell Young

John Russell Young (November 20, 1840 – January 17, 1899) was an American journalist, author, diplomat, and the seventh Librarian of the United States Congress from 1897 to 1899.

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John Silva Meehan

John Silva Meehan (6 February 1790 – 24 April 1863) was an American printer and publisher.

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Joseph Henry

Joseph Henry (December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was an American scientist who served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.

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Justin Smith Morrill

Justin Smith Morrill (April 14, 1810December 28, 1898) was a Representative (1855–1867) and a Senator (1867–1898) from Vermont, most widely remembered today for the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act that established federal funding for establishing many of the United States' public colleges and universities.

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K–12

K–12 (spoken as "k twelve", "k through twelve", or "k to twelve"), for kindergarten to 12th grade, indicates the sum of primary and secondary education in several nations, including India, the United States, Canada, Ecuador, South Korea, Turkey, Philippines, Egypt, Australia, Afghanistan, and Iran for publicly supported school grades prior to college.

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LaserDisc

LaserDisc (abbreviated as LD) is a home video format and the first commercial optical disc storage medium, initially licensed, sold and marketed as MCA DiscoVision in the United States in 1978.

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Laura Bush

Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is an American educator and the wife of the 43rd President of the United States, George W. Bush, serving as the First Lady of the United States from 2001 to 2009.

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Law Library of Congress

The Law Library of Congress is the law library of the United States Congress.

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Lawrence Quincy Mumford

Lawrence Quincy Mumford (11 December 1903 – 15 August 1982) was an American librarian.

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Legal deposit

Legal deposit is a legal requirement that a person or group submit copies of their publications to a repository, usually a library.

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Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970

The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 was an act of the United States Congress to "improve the operation of the legislative branch of the Federal Government, and for other purposes." The act focused mainly on the rules that governed congressional committee procedures, decreasing the power of the chair and empowering minority members, and on making House and Senate processes more transparent.

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Librarian of Congress

The Librarian of Congress is the head of the Library of Congress, appointed by the President of the United States with the advice and consent of the United States Senate, for a term of ten years.

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Library of Congress Classification

The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress.

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Library of Congress Control Number

The Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress in the United States.

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Library of Congress Country Studies

The Country Studies are works published by the Federal Research Division of the United States Library of Congress, freely available for use by researchers.

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Library of Congress Living Legend

A Library of Congress Living Legend is someone recognized by the Library of Congress for his or her creative contributions to American life.

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Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction

Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction (formerly the Library of Congress Creative Achievement Award for Fiction and Library of Congress Lifetime Achievement Award for the Writing of Fiction) is an annual book award presented by the Librarian of Congress each year at the National Book Festival.

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Library of Congress Subject Headings

The Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) comprise a thesaurus (in the information science sense, a controlled vocabulary) of subject headings, maintained by the United States Library of Congress, for use in bibliographic records.

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Libretto

A libretto is the text used in, or intended for, an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, oratorio, cantata or musical.

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List of concert halls

A concert hall is a cultural building with a stage that serves as a performance venue and an auditorium filled with seats.

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List of largest libraries

This sortable list of largest libraries includes libraries that, as measured in 2008 or subsequently, store 15 million or more items.

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Luther H. Evans

Luther Harris Evans (13 October 1902 – 23 December 1981) was an American political scientist who served as the tenth Librarian of Congress and third Director-General of UNESCO.

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Magna Carta

Magna Carta Libertatum (Medieval Latin for "the Great Charter of the Liberties"), commonly called Magna Carta (also Magna Charta; "Great Charter"), is a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.

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Manuscript

A manuscript (abbreviated MS for singular and MSS for plural) was, traditionally, any document written by hand -- or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten -- as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way.

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Map

A map is a symbolic depiction emphasizing relationships between elements of some space, such as objects, regions, or themes.

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MARC standards

MARC ('''MA'''chine-'''R'''eadable '''C'''ataloging) standards are a set of digital formats for the description of items catalogued by libraries, such as books.

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Mass deacidification

Mass deacidification is a term used in Library and Information Science for one possible measure against the degradation of paper in old books (the so-called "slow fires").

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Megasthenes

Megasthenes (Μεγασθένης, c. 350 – c. 290 BC) was an ancient Greek historian, diplomat and Indian ethnographer and explorer in the Hellenistic period.

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Melvil Dewey

Melville Louis Kossuth "Melvil" Dewey (December 10, 1851 – December 26, 1931) was an American librarian and educator, inventor of the Dewey Decimal system of library classification, and a founder of the Lake Placid Club.

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Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard

The Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) is a metadata standard for encoding descriptive, administrative, and structural metadata regarding objects within a digital library, expressed using the XML schema language of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

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Metadata Object Description Schema

The Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) is an XML-based bibliographic description schema developed by the United States Library of Congress' Network Development and Standards Office.

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Microform

Microforms are scaled-down reproductions of documents, typically either films or paper, made for the purposes of transmission, storage, reading, and printing.

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Minerva Initiative

The Minerva Initiative is a research program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) that provides grants to sustain university-based, social science studies on areas of strategic importance to U.S. national security policy.

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National Audio-Visual Conservation Center

The National Audiovisual Conservation Center, also known as the Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation, is the Library of Congress's audiovisual archive located inside Mount Pony in Culpeper, Virginia.

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National Book Festival

The National Book Festival is a public book event in the United States organized and sponsored by the Library of Congress.

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National Diet Library

The is the national library of Japan and among the largest libraries in the world.

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National Digital Library Program

The Library of Congress National Digital Library Program (NDLP) is assembling a digital library of reproductions of primary source materials to support the study of the history and culture of the United States.

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National Film Registry

The National Film Registry (NFR) is the United States National Film Preservation Board's (NFPB) selection of films deserving of preservation.

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National library

A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a country to serve as the preeminent repository of information for that country.

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National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) is a free library program of braille and audio materials circulated to eligible borrowers in the United States by postage-free mail.

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National Recording Registry

The National Recording Registry is a list of sound recordings that "are culturally, historically, or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States." The registry was established by the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, which created the National Recording Preservation Board, whose members are appointed by the Librarian of Congress.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York State Library

The New York State Library was established in 1818 to serve the government of the state.

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North America

North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.

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Packard Humanities Institute

The Packard Humanities Institute (PHI) is a non-profit foundation, established in 1987, and located in Los Altos, California, which funds projects in a wide range of conservation concerns in the fields of archaeology, music, film preservation, and historic conservation, plus Greek epigraphy, with an aim to create tools for basic research in the Humanities.

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Paul McCartney

Sir James Paul McCartney (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and composer.

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Paul Simon

Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and actor.

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Petabyte

The petabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information.

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Peter Force

Peter Force (November 26, 1790 – January 23, 1868) was the twelfth Mayor of Washington D.C., 19th-century American politician, newspaper editor, archivist, and historian.

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Peter Lyman

George Peter Lyman (September 13, 1940 in San Francisco – July 2, 2007 in Berkeley, California) was an American professor of information science who taught at the University of California, Berkeley School of Information, and was well known in U.S. academia for his research on online information and his leadership in remaking university library systems for the digital era.

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Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

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Primary source

In the study of history as an academic discipline, a primary source (also called original source or evidence) is an artifact, document, diary, manuscript, autobiography, recording, or any other source of information that was created at the time under study.

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Progressive Era

The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States that spanned from the 1890s to the 1920s.

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Public domain

The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply.

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Ross A. Collins

Ross Alexander Collins (April 25, 1880 – July 14, 1968) was a U.S. Representative from Mississippi.

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Saint Blaise Abbey, Black Forest

Saint Blaise Abbey (Kloster Sankt Blasien) was a Benedictine monastery in the village of St. Blasien in the Black Forest in Baden-Württemberg, Germany.

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Search/Retrieve via URL

Search/Retrieve via URL (SRU) is a standard search protocol for Internet search queries, utilizing Contextual Query Language (CQL), a standard query syntax for representing queries. Samplecode of a complete answer for this SRU Query-URL: http://philosophy-science-humanities-controversies.com/XML/sru.php?version.

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Search/Retrieve Web Service

Search/Retrieve Web service (SRW) is a web service for search and retrieval.

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Sheet music

Sheet music is a handwritten or printed form of music notation that uses modern musical symbols to indicate the pitches (melodies), rhythms or chords of a song or instrumental musical piece.

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Sir George Cockburn, 10th Baronet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Cockburn, 10th Baronet (22 April 1772 – 19 August 1853) was a Royal Navy officer.

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Smithsonian Contributions and Studies Series

The Smithsonian Contributions and Studies Series is a collection of serial periodical publications produced by the Smithsonian Institution, detailing advances in various scientific and societal fields to which the Smithsonian Institution has made contributions.

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Smithsonian Institution

The Smithsonian Institution, established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.

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Snapshots of the Past

Snapshots of the Past is an archive and blog founded in May 2001 by Jim Lantos.

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Sound recording and reproduction

Sound recording and reproduction is an electrical, mechanical, electronic, or digital inscription and re-creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice, singing, instrumental music, or sound effects.

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Stevie Wonder

Stevland Hardaway Morris (né Judkins; born May 13, 1950), known by his stage name Stevie Wonder, is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist.

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Terabyte

The terabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information.

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Text file

A text file (sometimes spelled "textfile"; an old alternative name is "flatfile") is a kind of computer file that is structured as a sequence of lines of electronic text.

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The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is a nonprofit news organization that publishes daily articles in electronic format as well as a weekly print edition.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

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The Journal of Asian Studies

The Journal of Asian Studies is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Association for Asian Studies, covering Asian studies, ranging from history, the arts, social sciences, to philosophy of East, South, and Southeast Asia.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman and writer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

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THOMAS

THOMAS was the first online database of United States Congress legislative information.

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Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (April 13, [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

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Thomas Jefferson Building

The oldest of the three United States Library of Congress buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building was built between 1890 and 1897.

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Title 17 of the United States Code

Title 17 of the United States Code is the United States Code that outlines United States copyright law.

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Totalitarianism

Benito Mussolini Totalitarianism is a political concept where the state recognizes no limits to its authority and strives to control every aspect of public and private life wherever feasible.

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Twitter

Twitter is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets".

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United Nations Conference on International Organization

The United Nations Conference on International Organization (UNCIO), commonly known as the San Francisco Conference, was a convention of delegates from 50 Allied nations that took place from 25 April 1945 to 26 June 1945 in San Francisco, California.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Air Force

The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial and space warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces.

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United States Capitol

The United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building, is the home of the United States Congress, and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

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United States Congress Joint Committee on the Library

The Joint Committee on the Library is a joint committee of the United States Congress devoted to the affairs and administration of the Library of Congress, which is the library of the federal legislature.

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United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

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United States Copyright Office

The United States Copyright Office, a part of the Library of Congress, is the official U.S. government body that maintains records of copyright registration in the United States, including a Copyright Catalog.

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United States Declaration of Independence

The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776.

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United States Department of State

The United States Department of State (DOS), often referred to as the State Department, is the United States federal executive department that advises the President and represents the country in international affairs and foreign policy issues.

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United States Department of the Interior

The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is the United States federal executive department of the U.S. government responsible for the management and conservation of most federal lands and natural resources, and the administration of programs relating to Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, territorial affairs, and insular areas of the United States.

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United States Poet Laureate

The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress—commonly referred to as the United States Poet Laureate—serves as the official poet of the United States.

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United States Senate Library

The United States Senate Library is the library of the United States Senate.

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Vatican Library

The Vatican Apostolic Library (Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City.

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Vellum

Vellum is prepared animal skin or "membrane" used as a material for writing on.

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Virginia

Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

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Visual impairment

Visual impairment, also known as vision impairment or vision loss, is a decreased ability to see to a degree that causes problems not fixable by usual means, such as glasses.

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Waldseemüller map

The Waldseemüller map or Universalis Cosmographia ("Universal Cosmography") is a printed wall map of the world by German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller, originally published in April 1507.

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War of 1812

The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States, the United Kingdom, and their respective allies from June 1812 to February 1815.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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Willie Nelson

Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 29, 1933) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, author, poet, actor, and activist.

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Z39.50

Z39.50 is an international standard client–server, application layer communications protocol for searching and retrieving information from a database over a TCP/IP computer network.

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Redirects here:

Congress Library, Congressional Library, LIBRARY of CONGRESS, Library Of Congress, Library of Congress Magazine, Library of congress, Library of the Congress of the United States, Loc.gov, National Jukebox, National Library of the United States, The Library of Congress, The library of congress, U.S. Library of Congress, US Library of Congress, United States Library of Congress.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Congress

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