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Chicago Tribune

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The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by the Tribune Publishing Company. [1]

208 relations: Abolitionism in the United States, Abraham Lincoln, Air Zimbabwe, Alfred Cowles, Sr., Alicia Patterson, American Civil War, Amy Dickinson, Ann Marie Lipinski, AOL, Arch Ward, Architectural design competition, Ask Ann Landers, Associated Press, At the Movies (1982–90 TV series), At the Movies (U.S. TV series), Autopilot, Barack Obama, Baseball, Battle of Shiloh, Baz Luhrmann, Bill Foster (politician), Blair Kamin, Bob Greene, Bob Sirott, Boston Bruins, Boston Marathon bombing, Broadsheet, Cablevision, Call sign, Canada, Carey Orr, Catholic Church, Century of Progress, Charles Madigan, Chiang Kai-shek, Chicago, Chicago Blackhawks, Chicago Cubs, Chicago Democrat, Chicago metropolitan area, Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune Silver Basketball, Chicago Tribune Silver Football, Clarence Page, Claudia Cassidy, Cleveland, Comic book, Cook County Board of Commissioners, Cornelia Grumman, CSS Acadia, ..., Daily News (New York), Dave Kehr, David Haugh, Dean Baquet, Democratic Party (United States), Dewey Defeats Truman, Dick Locher, Disney–ABC Domestic Television, Don King (boxing promoter), Edwin Cowles, Emerge (magazine), English language, Eric Zorn, Evan Osnos, Evanston, Illinois, Flag of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Free Soil Party, Freedom of information laws by country, Galena, Illinois, Gene Siskel, George Ryan, George W. Bush, Gothic architecture, Gothic Revival architecture, Great Chicago Fire, Great Lakes region, Greenland, Harry S. Truman, HIV/AIDS, Horace Greeley, Hugh Keough, Iceland, Illinois, Illinois Newspaper Project, Jack Fuller, Jack Mabley, James Kelly (journalist), James Warren (journalist), Jay Mariotti, Jeff MacNelly, Jerome Holtzman, John Brown's Body, John D. McCormick, John Kass, John M. Crewdson, John Mead Howells, John Wentworth (Illinois), Joseph McCarthy, Joseph Medill, Joseph Medill Patterson, Julia Keller, Julia Ward Howe, Know Nothing, Labrador, Leukemia, Levi Boone, Little Orphan Annie, Los Angeles Times, Magnificent Mile, Major League Baseball All-Star Game, Mary Schmich, Mayor of Chicago, Melissa Bean, Melissa Harris-Perry, Michael Holley, Michael Phillips (critic), Michigan Avenue (Chicago), Mike Downey, Mike Royko, Moon Mullins, National Enquirer, Nativism (politics), New Deal, Newcity, Newsday, Nixon White House tapes, North Utica, Illinois, Ohio University, Old Right (United States), Outlit, Pam Zekman, Paul Gapp, Paul Salopek, Pearl Harbor, Pete Souza, Phil Crane, Phil Rosenthal, Progressive Party (United States, 1912), Pulitzer Prize, Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing, Raymond Hood, RedEye, Republican Party (United States), Richard J. Daley, Richard Nixon, Rick Kogan, Ring Lardner, Robert Maxwell, Robert R. McCormick, Rod Blagojevich, Roger Ebert, Sam Roe, Sam Smith (sportswriter), Sam Zell, Sikorsky Aircraft, Skip Bayless, Spelling, Spirit (comics), Steve Daley (journalist), Steve Neal (historian), Sun-Sentinel, Tabloid (newspaper format), Temperance movement in the United States, The Baltimore Sun, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, The Boston Globe, The Front Page, The Jerry Springer Show, The New York Times, The Plain Dealer, The Wall Street Journal, The Walt Disney Company, Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas E. Dewey, Todd Stroger, Toni Preckwinkle, Tony Rezko, Treaty of Versailles, Tribune Entertainment, Tribune Media, Tribune Publishing, Tribune Tower, Ungava Bay, Union Station (St. Louis), United Press International, United States, United States Government Publishing Office, United States House of Representatives, United States non-interventionism, United States presidential election, 1948, United States Senate, Vernon Jarrett, Vulgarism, Wear Sunscreen, WFLD, WGN (AM), WGN-TV, Whig Party (United States), White House, William Armstrong (music critic), William Bross, William Howard Taft, William Lorimer (politician), William Weston Patton, WPIX, Xenophobia, 2013 Stanley Cup Finals. Expand index (158 more) »

Abolitionism in the United States was the movement of the American Civil War to end slavery, whether formal or informal, in the United States.

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Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

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Air Zimbabwe is the flag carrier airline of Zimbabwe, headquartered on the property of Harare International Airport, in Harare.

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Alfred Cowles, Sr. (1832–1889) was an American businessperson and newspaper publisher.

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Alicia Patterson (October 15, 1906 – July 2, 1963) was the founder and editor of Newsday, which became a respected and Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper.

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The American Civil War, widely known in the United States as simply the Civil War as well as other sectional names, was a civil war fought from 1861 to 1865 to determine the survival of the Union or independence for the Confederacy.

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Amy Dickinson (born November 6, 1959) is an American newspaper columnist who writes the syndicated advice column Ask Amy.

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Ann Marie Lipinski (born January 1956) is a journalist and the curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.

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AOL Inc. (previously known as America Online, written as AOL and styled as Aol.) is an American multinational mass media corporation based in New York City that develops, grows, and invests in brands and web sites.

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Arch Ward (December 27, 1896 – July 9, 1955) was the sports editor for the Chicago Tribune and personal friend of the owner, Robert R. McCormick.

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An architectural design competition is a type of competition in which an organization that intends on constructing a new building invites architects to submit design proposals.

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Ann Landers was a pen name created by Chicago Sun-Times advice columnist Ruth Crowley in 1943 and taken over by Esther Pauline "Eppie" Lederer in 1955.

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The Associated Press (AP) is an American multinational nonprofit news agency headquartered in New York City.

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At the Movies is a movie review television program that aired from 1982 to 1990.

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At the Movies (originally Siskel & Ebert & the Movies, and later At the Movies with Ebert and Roeper) was a movie review television program produced by Disney-ABC Domestic Television in which two film critics share their opinions of newly released films.

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An autopilot is a system used to control the trajectory of a vehicle without constant 'hands-on' control by a human operator being required.

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Barack Hussein Obama II (born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States, and the first African American to hold the office.

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Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of nine players each who take turns batting and fielding.

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The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, fought April 6–7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee.

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Mark Anthony "Baz" Luhrmann (born 17 September 1962) is an Australian film director, screenwriter and producer best known for The Red Curtain Trilogy, comprising his romantic comedy film Strictly Ballroom (1992), the romantic drama Romeo + Juliet (1996), and the pastiche-jukebox musical Moulin Rouge! (2001).

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George William "Bill" Foster (born October 7, 1955) is an American physicist, businessman and U.S. Representative for, winning the seat in 2012.

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Blair Kamin is the Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic of the Chicago Tribune, a post he has held since 1992.

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Robert Bernard Greene, Jr. (born March 10, 1947) is an American journalist.

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Robert "Bob" Sirott (born August 9, 1949) is an American broadcaster.

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The Boston Bruins are an American professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts.

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The Boston Marathon bombing was a terrorist attack, followed by subsequent related shootings, that occurred when two pressure cooker bombs exploded during the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.

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The broadsheet is the largest of newspaper formats and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically). The term derives from types of popular prints usually just of a single sheet, sold on the streets and containing various types of material, from ballads to political satire.

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Cablevision Systems Corporation is an American cable television company with systems serving areas surrounding New York City.

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In broadcasting and radio communications, a call sign (also known as a call name or call letters—and historically as a call signal—or abbreviated as a call) is a unique designation for a transmitting station.

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Canada is a country, consisting of ten provinces and three territories, in the northern part of the continent of North America.

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Carey Cassius Orr (January 17, 1890 Ada, Ohio – May 16, 1967) was an American editorial cartoonist.

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The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is, the largest Christian church, with more than 1.25 billion members worldwide.

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A Century of Progress International Exposition was a World's Fair held in Chicago, as The Chicago World's Fair, from 1933 to 1934 to celebrate the city's centennial.

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Charles M. Madigan (born August 23, 1949) is an American educator who has been an editor, journalist and columnist in Chicago, Illinois.

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Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was a Chinese political and military leader who served as the leader of the Republic of China between 1928 and 1975.

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Chicago is the third most populous city in the United States.

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The Chicago Blackhawks (spelled as Black Hawks before 1986, and known colloquially as the Hawks) are a professional ice hockey team based in Chicago, Illinois.

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The Chicago Cubs are an American professional baseball franchise located on the North Side of Chicago, Illinois.

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The Chicago Democrat was the first newspaper in Chicago, Illinois.

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The Chicago metropolitan area, or Chicagoland, is the metropolitan area associated with the city of Chicago, Illinois, and its suburbs.

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The Chicago Sun-Times is a daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois.

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The Chicago Tribune Silver Basketball was an award that was presented annually by the Chicago Tribune to the Most Valuable Player of the Big Ten Conference for both men's and women's basketball in the United States through 2007.

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The Chicago Tribune Silver Football is awarded by the Chicago Tribune to the college football player determined to be the best player from the Big Ten Conference.

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Clarence Page (born June 2, 1947) is an American journalist, syndicated columnist, and senior member of The Chicago Tribune editorial board.

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Claudia Cassidy (1899–1996), born in Shawneetown, Illinois, was a music, dance, and drama critic in Chicago.

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Cleveland is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Cuyahoga County, the most populous county in the state.

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A comic book or comicbook, also called comic magazine or simply comic, is a publication that consists of comics art in the form of sequential juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes.

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The Cook County Board of Commissioners is a legislative body made up of 17 commissioners who are elected by district for four year terms.

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Cornelia Grumman, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, was the Executive Director of the First Five Years Fund (FFYF - http://ffyf.org/) from 2008-2012.

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CSS Acadia is a former hydrographic surveying and oceanographic research ship of the Hydrographic Survey of Canada and its successor the Canadian Hydrographic Service.

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The Daily News is an American newspaper based in New York City.

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Dave Kehr (b. c. 1950) is an American film critic.

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David Haugh (born May 22, 1968) is a sports columnist with the Chicago Tribune.

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Dean P. Baquet (born September 21, 1956 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and the executive editor of The New York Times.

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The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party to its right.

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"Dewey Defeats Truman" was an incorrect banner headline on the front page of the Chicago Daily Tribune on November 3, 1948, the day after incumbent United States President Harry S. Truman won an upset victory over Republican challenger and Governor of New York Thomas E. Dewey in the 1948 presidential election.

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Richard Earl "Dick" Locher (born June 4, 1929) is an American syndicated cartoonist.

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Disney–ABC Domestic Television, also operating as ABC Syndication (formerly known as Buena Vista Television and also known as Disney Domestic Television and Disney|ABC Home Entertainment and Television Distribution), is the in-home sales and content distribution firm of the Disney–ABC Television Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company.

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Donald "Don" King (born August 20, 1931) is an American boxing promoter whose career highlights include promoting "The Rumble in the Jungle" and the "Thrilla in Manila".

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Edwin Cowles (1825–1890), born in Austinburg, was the publisher of The Cleveland Leader, Vice-President of the 1884 Republican National Convention, postmaster of Cleveland, April 4, 1861 - July 11, 1865, and elder brother of Alfred Cowles, Sr., also a newspaper publisher.

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Emerge was a monthly news magazine that was published from 1989 to 2000.

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English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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Eric Zorn (born January 6, 1958) is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune.

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Evan Lionel Richard Osnos (born December 24, 1976) is an American journalist and author.

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Evanston is a suburban city in Cook County, Illinois, United States, north of downtown Chicago, bordered by Chicago to the south, Skokie to the west, and Wilmette to the north, with a population of 74,486 as of 2010.

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The flag of the United States of America, often referred to as the American flag, is the national flag of the United States.

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt (his own pronunciation, or) (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), commonly known by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States.

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The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections.

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Freedom of Information laws (FOI laws) allow access by the general public to data held by national governments.

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Galena is the largest city in and the county seat of Jo Daviess County, Illinois, with a population of 3,429 at the 2010 census.

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Eugene Kal "Gene" Siskel (January 26, 1946February 20, 1999) was an American film critic and journalist for the Chicago Tribune.

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George Homer Ryan, Sr. (born February 24, 1934) was the 39th Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003.

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George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and businessman who served as the 43rd President of the United States from 2001 to 2009, and the 46th Governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000.

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Gothic architecture is a style of architecture that flourished during the high and late medieval period.

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Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic, Neo-Gothic or Jigsaw Gothic, and when used for school, college, and university buildings as Collegiate Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England.

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The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday, October 8, to early Tuesday, October 10, 1871.

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The Great Lakes region of North America is a bi-national Canadian-American region that includes portions of the eight U.S. states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as well as the Canadian province of Ontario.

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Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat; Grønland) is an autonomous country within the Kingdom of Denmark, located between the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

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Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884December 26, 1972) was the 33rd President of the United States (1945–53).

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Human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a spectrum of conditions caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

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Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was editor of the New-York Tribune, among the great newspapers of its time.

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Hugh E. Keough (January 24, 1864 - June 9, 1912) was a Chicago sportswriter who worked as a journalist for thirty-one years,Hugh E. Keough Dead, New York Times, June 10, 1912, pg.

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Iceland is a Nordic island country between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean.

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Illinois is a state in the Midwestern United States.

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The Illinois Newspaper Project (INP) began as part of the United States Newspaper Program (USNP), a cooperative effort between the states and the federal government designed to catalog and preserve on microfilm the nation's historic newspaper heritage.

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Jack William Fuller (born October 12, 1946)Biography at the is an American journalist who spent nearly forty years working in newspapers.

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Jack Mabley (October 26, 1915 – January 6, 2006) was an American newspaper reporter and columnist.

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James Kelly (1809–1895) was a founder of Chicago Tribune, serving as business manager among other roles when the first daily issue of the paper came out July 10, 1847, according to the recollection of a partner some 50 years later in the Tribune.

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James C. Warren (born January 4, 1953 in New York City) is an American journalist, currently the Washington Bureau chief for the New York Daily News.

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Jay Mariotti (born June 22, 1959) is an American sports commentator and writer.

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Jeffrey Kenneth "Jeff" MacNelly (September 17, 1947 – June 8, 2000) was a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist and the creator of the popular comic strip Shoe.

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Jerome Holtzman (July 12, 1926 – July 19, 2008) was an American sportswriter known for his writings on baseball who served as the official historian for Major League Baseball from 1999 until his death.

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"John Brown's Body" (originally known as "John Brown's Song") is a United States marching song about the abolitionist John Brown.

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John McCormick (born 1969) is a Bloomberg News reporter based in Chicago who covers national politics and government.

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John Kass is a Chicago Tribune columnist.

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John M. Crewdson (born December 15, 1945) won a Pulitzer Prize for The New York Times, where he worked for 12 years.

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John Mead Howells, FAIA (August 14, 1868 – September 22, 1959), was an American architect.

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John Wentworth (nicknamed "Long John") (March 5, 1815 – October 16, 1888) was the editor of the Chicago Democrat, publisher of an extensive Wentworth family genealogy, a two-term mayor of Chicago, and a six-term member of the United States House of Representatives, both before and after his service as mayor.

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Joseph Raymond "Joe" McCarthy (November 14, 1908May 2, 1957) was an American politician who served as a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin from 1947 until his death in 1957.

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Joseph Medill (April 6, 1823March 16, 1899) was an American newspaper editor, publisher, and politician.

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Joseph Medill Patterson (January 6, 1879 – May 26, 1946) was an American journalist and publisher, grandson of publisher Joseph Medill, founder of the Chicago Tribune and a mayor of Chicago, Illinois.

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Julia Keller is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American writer.

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Julia Ward Howe (May 27, 1819 – October 17, 1910) was a prominent American abolitionist, social activist, poet, and the author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic".

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The Native American Party, renamed in 1855 as American Party, and commonly named Know Nothing movement, was an American political party that operated on a national basis during the mid-1850s.

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Labrador is the distinct northerly region of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Leukemia (American English) or leukaemia (British English) is a group of cancers that usually begin in the bone marrow and result in high numbers of abnormal white blood cells.

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Levi Day Boone (December 6, 1808 – January 24, 1882) served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois (1855–1856) for the American Party (Know-Nothings).

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Little Orphan Annie was a daily American comic strip created by Harold Gray (1894–1968) and syndicated by the Tribune Media Services.

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The Los Angeles Times, commonly referred to as the Times, is a paid daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California, since 1881.

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The Magnificent Mile, sometimes referred to as The Mag Mile, is an upscale section of Chicago's Michigan Avenue, running from the Chicago River to Oak Street in the Near North Side.

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The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also known as the "Midsummer Classic", is an annual professional baseball game sanctioned by Major League Baseball (MLB) contested between players from the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), currently selected by fans for starting fielders, by managers for pitchers, and by managers and players for reserves.

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Mary Theresa Schmich (born November 29, 1953) is an American journalist who has been a columnist for the Chicago Tribune from 1992, winning the Pulitzer Prize in 2012.

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The Mayor of Chicago is the chief executive of Chicago, Illinois, the third-largest city in the United States.

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Melissa Luburich Bean (born January 22, 1962) is an American politician who was the U.S. Representative for from 2005 to 2011.

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Melissa Victoria Harris-Perry (born October 2, 1973; formerly known as Melissa Victoria Harris-Lacewell) is an American writer, professor, television host, and political commentator with a focus on African-American politics.

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Michael S. Holley (born February 26, 1970) is an American television and radio sports commentator, sports reporter and author.

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Michael Phillips (born 1961) is a film critic for the Chicago Tribune newspaper.

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Michigan Avenue is a major north-south street in Chicago which runs at 100 east on the Chicago grid.

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Mike Downey (born August 9, 1951 in Chicago Heights, Illinois, and raised in the nearby village of Steger, Illinois) is a retired American newspaper columnist.

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Michael "Mike" Royko (September 19, 1932 – April 29, 1997) was a Chicago newspaper columnist, winner of the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

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Moon Mullins, created by cartoonist Frank Willard (1893–1958), was a popular American comic strip which had a long run as both a daily and Sunday feature from June 19, 1923 to June 2, 1991.

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The National Enquirer (also commonly known as the Enquirer) is an American supermarket tabloid now published by American Media Inc (AMI).

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Nativism is the political position of preserving status for certain established inhabitants of a nation as compared to claims of newcomers or immigrants.

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The New Deal was a series of domestic programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938, and a few that came later.

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Newcity is an independent, free weekly newspaper in Chicago that specializes in music, stage, film and art and is notable for launching the careers of numerous cartoonists and writers and art critics.

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Newsday is an American daily newspaper that primarily serves Nassau and Suffolk counties and the New York City borough of Queens on Long Island, although it is sold throughout the New York metropolitan area.

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The Nixon White House tapes are audio recordings of the communications of U.S. President Richard Nixon and various Nixon administration officials and White House staff, ordered by the President for personal records.

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North Utica, often known as Utica, is a village in Utica Township, LaSalle County, Illinois.

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Ohio University is a major U.S. public research university located primarily on a campus in Athens, Ohio, United States.

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The Old Right is a branch of American conservatism that started in a Republican split over Tariffs in 1910 and was most active from then through 1948, by which point they had become 'Conservatives' (around 1936).

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Outlit is an online pay-per-view journalism and digital media virtual marketplace founded in 2014 in Arlington, Virginia.

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Pam Zekman (Born October 22, 1944 in Chicago) has been an investigative reporter at WBBM-TV in Chicago since 1981.

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Paul Gapp (1928 – July 30, 1992) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune.

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Paul Salopek (born February 9, 1962 in Barstow, California) is an American journalist and writer of Croatian descent.

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Pearl Harbor is a lagoon harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, west of Honolulu.

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Peter J. Souza (born December 31, 1954) is an American photojournalist, the current Chief Official White House photographer for President Barack Obama and the director of the White House Photography Office.

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Philip Miller "Phil" Crane (November 3, 1930 – November 8, 2014) was an American politician.

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Phil Rosenthal (born July 14, 1963) is a lead business columnist for the Chicago Tribune.

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The Progressive Party of 1912 was an American political party.

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The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States.

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The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing is one of the fourteen American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Journalism.

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Raymond Mathewson Hood (March 29, 1881 – August 14, 1934) was an American architect who worked in the Art Deco style.

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The RedEye is a daily publication put out by the Chicago Tribune geared toward 18 to 34-year-olds.

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The Republican Party, commonly referred to as GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

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Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was an American politician who was the Mayor of Chicago for 21 years (1955–1976) and chairman of the Cook County Democratic Central Committee for 23 years, holding both positions until his death in office in 1976.

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Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974 when he became the only U.S. president to resign the office.

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Rick Kogan (born September 13, 1951) is a Chicago newspaperman, a Chicago radio personality and a noted author.

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Ringgold Wilmer Lardner (March 6, 1885 – September 25, 1933) was an American sports columnist and short story writer best known for his satirical writings about sports, marriage, and theatre drama.

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Ian Robert Maxwell, MC (10 June 1923 – 5 November 1991) was a Czechoslovakian-born British media proprietor and Member of Parliament (MP).

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Robert Rutherford "Colonel" McCormick (July 30, 1880 – April 1, 1955) was a member of the McCormick family of Chicago who became owner and publisher of the Chicago Tribune newspaper.

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Rod Blagojevich (born December 10, 1956) is a former American politician who served as the 40th Governor of Illinois from 2003 to 2009.

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Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942 – April 4, 2013) was an American film critic and historian, journalist, screenwriter and author.

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Sam Roe is a Chicago Tribune journalist who was part of a team of reporters that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting for an examination of hazardous toys and other children's products.

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Sam Smith (born on January 24, 1948, in Brooklyn, New York) is an NBA writer for the Chicago Bulls website bulls.com.

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Samuel "Sam" Zell (born September 27, 1941)Johnson, by Ben E. Dec 31, 2009 is an American business magnate.

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The Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation is an American aircraft manufacturer based in Stratford, Connecticut.

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Skip Bayless (born December 4, 1951) is an American sports columnist, author, and television personality who is best known as a commentator on the ESPN2 show, First Take, with Stephen A. Smith.

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Spelling is the writing of a word or words with the necessary letters and diacritics present in an accepted standard order.

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The Spirit is a fictional masked crimefighter created by cartoonist Will Eisner.

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Steve Daley (1948 – October 2, 2011) was a newspaper journalist, best known for his work as political correspondent for the Chicago Tribune between 1988 and 1996.

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Steve Neal (b. 1949 Coos Bay, Oregon; d. February 18, 2004 Hinsdale, Illinois) was an American journalist and historian, noted for political columns and coverage of American electoral history.

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The Sun-Sentinel, owned by Tribune Publishing, is the main daily newspaper of Broward County, Florida, but circulates all throughout the three counties that comprise South Florida.

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A tabloid is a newspaper with compact page size smaller than broadsheet, although there is no standard for the precise dimensions of the tabloid newspaper format.

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The Temperance movement in the United States was a movement to curb the consumption of alcohol and had a large influence on American politics and society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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The Baltimore Sun is the largest general-circulation daily newspaper based in the American state of Maryland and provides coverage of local and regional news, events, issues, people, and industries.

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"The Battle Hymn of the Republic", also known as "Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory" outside of the United States, is a song by American writer Julia Ward Howe using the music from the song "John Brown's Body".

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The Boston Globe is an American daily newspaper based in Boston, Massachusetts.

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The Front Page is a hit Broadway comedy about tabloid newspaper reporters on the police beat, written by former Chicago reporters Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur which was first produced in 1928.

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The Jerry Springer Show, also known as Jerry Springer, or just Springer, is an American syndicated tabloid talk show hosted by Jerry Springer, a former politician.

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The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company.

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The Plain Dealer is the major daily newspaper of Cleveland, Ohio, United States.

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The Wall Street Journal is a business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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The Walt Disney Company, commonly known as Disney, is an American diversified multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate headquartered at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California.

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Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919), often referred to as Teddy or TR, was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States, from 1901 to 1909.

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Thomas Edmund Dewey (March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the 47th Governor of New York (1943–1954). In 1944 he was the Republican candidate for President, but lost to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the closest of Roosevelt's four presidential elections. In 1948, he was again the Republican candidate for President, but lost to the incumbent President, Harry S. Truman, in one of the greatest upsets in presidential election history. Dewey led the progressive/moderate faction of the Republican Party, in which he fought conservative Ohio Senator Robert A. Taft. Dewey was an advocate for the professional and business community of the Northeastern United States, which would later be called the "Eastern Establishment." This group supported most of the New Deal social-welfare reforms enacted during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and it consisted of internationalists who were in favor of the United Nations and the Cold War fight against communism and the Soviet Union. In addition, he played a large part in the election of Dwight D. Eisenhower as President in 1952. Dewey's successor as leader of the progressive Republicans was Nelson Rockefeller, who became governor of New York in 1959. The New York State Thruway is named in Dewey's honor.

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Todd H. Stroger (born January 14, 1963) is the former president of the Cook County, Illinois Board and a former alderman for the 8th Ward in Chicago.

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Toni Preckwinkle (née Reed; March 17, 1947) is the current Cook County Board President and a former alderman in the Chicago City Council representing Chicago's 4th ward in Cook County, Illinois, United States.

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Antoin "Tony" Rezko (born 1955) is an American businessman.

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The Treaty of Versailles (Traité de Versailles) was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers.

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Tribune Entertainment was a television production and syndication company that was owned by the Tribune Broadcasting division of the Tribune Company.

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The Tribune Media Company, also known as Tribune Media and formerly known as the Tribune Company, is an American multimedia corporation that is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

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Tribune Publishing Company is an American newspaper and print media publishing company based in Chicago, Illinois.

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The Tribune Tower is a neo-Gothic building located at 435 North Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois, USA.

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Ungava Bay (French: baie d'Ungava, Inuktitut (syllabics/Roman) ᐅᖓᕙ ᑲᖏᖅᓗᒃ/ungava kangiqluk) is a large bay in northeastern Canada separating Nunavik (far northern Quebec) from Baffin Island.

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St.

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United Press International (UPI) is an international news agency, whose newswires, photo, news film and audio services provided news material to thousands of newspapers, magazines and radio and television stations for most of the 20th century.

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The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major territories and various possessions.

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The United States Government Publishing Office (GPO) is an agency of the legislative branch of the United States federal government.

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The House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the United States Congress (a bicameral legislature).

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Non-interventionism, the diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations in order to avoid being drawn into wars not related to direct territorial self-defense, has had a long history of popularity in the government and among the people of the United States at various periods in time.

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The United States presidential election of 1948 was the 41st quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 2, 1948.

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The United States Senate is a legislative chamber in the bicameral legislature of the United States, and together with the U.S. House of Representatives makes up the U.S. Congress.

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Vernon Jarrett (June 19, 1918 – May 23, 2004) was an African-American journalist who worked in newspaper, television and radio and was an influential commentator on race relations, politics, and African-American history.

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In the study of language and literary style, a vulgarism is an expression or usage considered non-standard or characteristic of uneducated speech or writing.

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"Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young", commonly known by the title "Wear Sunscreen", is an essay written as a hypothetical commencement speech by columnnist Mary Schmich, originally published in June 1997 in the Chicago Tribune.

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WFLD, virtual channel 32 (UHF digital channel 31), is a Fox owned-and-operated television station located in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

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WGN, 720 AM, is a radio station in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

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WGN-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 19), is a CW-affiliated television station located in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

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The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States of America.

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The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

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William Armstrong (1858 – May 18, 1942) was an American music critic, lecturer, and writer.

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William J. Bross (November 4, 1813 – January 27, 1890) was an American politician and publisher originally from the New Jersey–New York–Pennsylvania tri-state area.

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William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American jurist and statesman who served as both the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and later the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930).

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William Lorimer (April 27, 1861September 13, 1934) was a U.S. Representative from the State of Illinois.

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Rev.

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WPIX, channel 11, is a television station located in New York City.

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Xenophobia is the dislike of that which is perceived to be foreign or strange.

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The 2013 Stanley Cup Final, commonly known as the 2013 Stanley Cup Finals, was the championship series of the National Hockey League (NHL) season, and the conclusion of the 2013 Stanley Cup playoffs.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Tribune

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